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$2.95 • AUGUST 9, 2018 70TH YEAR. NO. 15

PERIODICALS - TIME-SENSITIVE DATED MATERIALS

Get a flying start A pilot’s kindness to others The impossible became practical Never too late to share a lesson


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

August 9, 2018


August 9, 2018

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The TOC EDITORIAL Janice Wood, Editor Janice@GeneralAviationNews.com

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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Jamie Beckett • Theron Burton William E. Dubois • Joni M. Fisher Dan Johnson • Frederick Johnsen Jeffrey Madison • Paul McBride Amelia T. Reiheld • Tom Snow Ben Visser • Bill Walker ADVERTISING Ben Sclair, Publisher Ben@GeneralAviationNews.com PRODUCTION & WEB DEVELOPMENT Russell Kasselman Russell@GeneralAviationNews.com BUSINESS OFFICE & SUBSCRIPTIONS Kathleen Elsner-Madsen Kathleen@GeneralAviationNews.com CONTACT Phone: 800-426-8538 || 253-471-9888 Fax: 253-471-9888 Internet: www.generalaviationnews.com Social: twitter.com/genavnews facebook.com/ganews General Aviation News accepts unsolicited editorial manuscripts and photos but is not responsible for return unless submissions are accompanied by a stamped, selfaddressed envelope. READER INFORMATION General Aviation News makes its subscription list available to other companies for their products and services. To be excluded from such offers, send a copy of your mailing label to General Aviation News, Attn: Mail Preference Service, PO Box 39099, Lakewood WA 98496. General Aviation News – a publication of Flyer Media, Inc. – endeavors to accept only reliable advertisements, but shall not be responsible for advertisements nor are the views expressed in those advertisements necessarily those of General Aviation News. The right to decline or discontinue any ad without explanation is reserved. General Aviation News (ISSN 1536 8513) is published semimonthly by Flyer Media, Inc., 5409 100th St. SW #39099, Lakewood, WA 98496-0099. Periodicals Postage Paid at Lakewood, Washington, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to General Aviation News, 5409 100th St. SW #39099, Lakewood, WA 98496-0099. Publications mail agreement number 40648085. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to P.O. Box 1051, Fort Erie, ON L2A 6C7. Courier delivery: 5409 100th St SW #39099, Lakewood, WA 98496.

General Aviation News • 70th Year, No. 15 • August 9, 2018 • © 2018 Flyer Media, Inc. • All Rights Reserved.

Put GAN in your hand! 1 year $29.95 | 2 years $49.95 Name Address City

Photo by Albert Dyer

A Corsair pilot shows his kindness to strangers during a stop on the way to EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2018.

News 6..... Forecast calls for 790,000 pilots in 20 years 6..... New administration building in works at KDED 8..... Focused Flight Review program launches 9..... New features unveiled for flying car 12... BlackFly electric ultralight unveiled 12... Get a flying start 13... Bückers to gather at Swiss event 14... OSH 2018: As close to perfect as can get 15... NH aircraft fees more equitable 16... Second generation Young Eagle honored 17... Legislation to revitalize aviation introduced 18... From the big show to the future of fly-ins 19... A Corsair pilot’s kindness to strangers 22... Why should pilots learn about drones? 22... FAA warns against drone registration schemes 23... Missing World War II B-24 discovered

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Photo Courtesy Don Lee

Don Lee shares his advice for those who want to be an Alaskan bush pilot.

Columnists

COVER SHOT

10... TOUCH & GO: Never too late to share a lesson learned 11... POLITICS FOR PILOTS: Because the impossible became practical 15... ASK PAUL: Why am I not getting enough power? 24... OF WINGS & THINGS: The Lighter-Than-Air Army 26... PILOT PERSPECTIVES: Bush pilot Don Lee

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NOTICE: The next issue will be mailed Aug. 23, 2018.

Photographer Albert Dyer captures the essence of EAA AirVenture 2018: The campground with planes flying overhead. See coverage of this year’s show throughout this issue.


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

August 9, 2018

Leading Image On final

Photo by Chad Christopher

Chad Christopher sent in this photograph, noting the plane is arriving for the Great Alaska Airmen Aviation Gathering, held in May in Anchorage. “This is final before the gravel strip next to Ted Stevens International Airport,” he says. “The Chugach Mountains are incredibly picturesque in the background.”

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August 9, 2018

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Briefing Sonex Aircraft’s SubSonex Personal Jet (pictured) has been approved to race at the Reno Air Races in September. SonexAircraft.com, AirRace.org

facility in Denver at Centennial Airport (KAPA). Cutter Denver-Centennial is a Pilatus Authorized Sales & Service Center serving Southern California, Texas, Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico. CutterAviation.com

South St. Paul Municipal AirportRichard E. Fleming Field (KSGS) is now selling Swift Fuels unleaded UL94 aviation gasoline for its piston aircraft customers, making it the first airport in Minnesota to sell the unleaded avgas. SwiftFuels.com

Aircraft parts purchased and maintenance activities conducted in Virginia are now exempt from sales and use tax. TheVABA.org, NBAA.org

Wipaire has delivered its 100th set of Wipline 8750 floats to be used on a Mission Aviation Fellowship (MAF) Cessna Caravan, which will be sent to Papua, Indonesia. Wipaire.com, MAF.org

Photo by Curtis Noble

RAJAY Turbo Products has approved two new service centers in North America: Clifton Aero in Clifton, Texas, and Brant Aero in Brantford, Ontario. Rajay.aero

it is “an entry-level Lancair for the pilot who wants maximum performance with a minimum investment of build time and budget.” Price: $200,000. Lancair.com

Lancair debuted a prototype two-seat aircraft called the Barracuda at EAA AirVenture 2018. Company officials say

The National Aviation Heritage Invitational (NAHI) returns to the Reno Air Races this year, with a static display

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of vintage aircraft. At next year’s races, NAHI will have a vintage aircraft competition, including judging in multiple categories and the People’s Choice Award, which is sponsored by Air & Space Smithsonian Magazine. AirRace.org, HeritageTrophy.org Cutter Aviation has opened a new

Alsim will begin producing its simulator products in the United States starting in mid-2019. The French company’s new facility is expected to be based in the eastern U.S. Alsim.com The latest Pilot’s Guide to Avionics is now available from the Aircraft Electronics Association. Association officials are handing out the free guides at airshows, or you can request a free copy at AEA­ PilotsGuide.net while supplies last. Find expanded versions of these news briefs on www.gan.aero

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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

August 9, 2018

Forecast calls for 790,000 pilots in 20 years Boeing released its 2018 Pilot & Technician Outlook at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2018, projecting demand for 790,000 pilots over the next 20 years. This represents double the current workforce and the most significant demand in the outlook’s nine-year history. The demand is being driven by an anticipated doubling of the global commercial airplane fleet as well as record-high air travel demand and a tightening labor supply. This year’s outlook also includes data from the business aviation and civil helicopter sectors for the first time. “Despite strong global air traffic

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growth, the aviation industry continues to face a pilot labor supply challenge, raising concern about the existence of a global pilot shortage in the near term,” said Keith Cooper, vice president of training and professional services, Boeing Global Services. “An emphasis on developing the next generation of pilots is key to help mitigate this. With a network of training campuses and relationships with flight schools around the globe, Boeing partners with customers, governments and educational institutions to help ensure the mar-

ket is ready to meet this significant pilot demand.” Boeing offers the Pilot Development Program — an accelerated training program that guides future pilots from abinitio training through type rating as a first officer — to help operators meet their growing pilot needs. Despite the commercial pilot demand forecast holding nearly steady, maintenance technician demand decreased slightly from 648,000 to 622,000, primarily due to longer maintenance intervals

for new aircraft, Boeing officials said. The business aviation and civil helicopter sectors will demand an additional 155,000 pilots and 132,000 technicians. Demand for commercial cabin crew increased slightly from 839,000 to 858,000, due to changes in fleet mix, regulatory requirements, denser seat configurations and multi-cabin configurations that offer more personalized service. In addition, 32,000 new cabin crew will be required to support business aviation. Boeing.com

New administration building in works at KDED Now under construction at DeLand Municipal Airport-Sidney H. Taylor Field (KDED) in Florida is a new airport administration building. The 6,000-square-foot building will house the airport manager’s office, a 76seat meeting room, a kitchenette, a pilot lounge, and a 24-hour accessible locker room. Located near the flight line, the project also includes a connecting expansion of the airport apron. The new building is set to open in Oct­ ober, just in time for the third annual De-

Land Sport Aviation Showcase, which is slated for Nov. 1-3. Construction has also started on the DeLand Sport Aviation Village, airport officials report. A bid was recently awarded to WLW Construction to begin putting the infrastructure in for Phases 1a and 1b immediately. Equipment is on-site and work has started, airport officials said. The first DeLand Sport Aviation Village tenant, Straight and Level Technologies, will build a 10,000-square-foot hangar to

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manufacture the WingBug and house its current company, AeroAdventure. More than 20 other businesses are on the waiting list for the commercial hangars, according airport officials. Many of the companies are currently located overseas or in the Northern U.S. and wish to relocate for the year-round temperate climate of Central Florida, officials add. Officials report that more than 100 exhibitors have already signed on for the upcoming DeLand Sport Aviation Showcase. Exhibitors will be showcasing all kinds of sport aircraft, ultralights, trikes, rotorcraft, powered parachutes and paragliders, engines, avionics, and more. DeLandAirport.com, SportAviationShowcase.com

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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

August 9, 2018

Focused Flight Review program launches

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The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) Air Safety Institute (ASI) has launched its Focused Flight Review program, providing pilots a more individualized opportunity to sharpen skills, proficiency, and knowledge through carefully designed flight scenarios. Taking a flight review every 24 months is a requirement for most pilots, and for many, it is the only opportunity to hone skills or zero in on piloting areas needing some brush-up. But many know from experience that despite their best intentions, setting up a flight review that satisfies regulatory requirements and also includes ground and flight activities tailored to those training goals isn’t always practical. That obstacle has now been removed with the new Focused Flight Review, a series of ready-to-use scenarios complete with preflight study materials and flight profiles that focus on a variety of familiar operational areas, according to AOPA officials. Built into each scenario are ways to improve fundamental stick-and-rudder skills, decision making, understanding of aircraft operating envelopes, technologies, aircraft performance capabilities, and loss-of-control avoidance. “Focused Flight Review is a comprehensive flight review program, designed by an Air Safety Institute-led consortium of influential instructors, pilot clubs, and government agencies,” said Air Safety Institute Executive Director Richard McSpadden. “The profiles and preflight preparation materials were created to deal

with historical problem areas and help make us all better pilots.” The flight profiles and preflight study resources offered in the Focused Flight Review, which are downloadable as PDF files, include Positive Aircraft Control; Weather and CFIT (controlled flight into terrain); Fuel, Engine, and Other Systems; Instrument Proficiency; Takeoffs, Landings, and Go-Arounds; and Mountain and Backcountry Flying. “Don’t just wait for your next flight review, try this any time,” McSpadden said. “It’s easy to select the flight profile that focuses on your needs from the Focused Flight Review website. Before your flight date, share the profile with your CFI, and review the preflight materials. Then fly your Focused Flight Review.” You can share how it went by clicking the feedback tab on the Focused Flight Review home page to give the Air Safety Institute ideas for fine-tuning the program. “Feedback is critical to the program’s success. We encourage pilots and flight instructors to let us know how we can make improvements to ensure the program remains relevant and insightful,” McSpadden said. Pilots can use the Focused Flight Review website to find a flight school or additional flight review resources, AOPA officials add. Pilots also can receive credit under the FAA Wings program, as well as accomplish an instrument proficiency check along with the Focused Flight Review. AOPA.org

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The $425.00 Overhaul Price is for most Cylinders. Price includes Disassembly, Cleaning, Inspection. Valve Guides and Seats, Studs, Bushings and fittings will be replaced as necessary in order to bring the Cylinder to Airworthy 8130 Status. The cylinders must be crack free and the bore in specification in order to meet this price. Larger Lycoming cylinders will be overhauled at a higher price due to cost of valve guides and seats. We also offer off the shelf exchange cylinders. Call for pricing.


August 9, 2018

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Photos courtesy Terrafugia

New features unveiled for flying car Terrafugia has unveiled new features in the Transition production vehicle, a twoseat auto and aircraft, including updates to the interior, safety systems, motor, and flight instrumentation. The latest features and systems will be incorporated and verified in the next test vehicles, according to company officials. The first production vehicles will come to market in 2019, officials add. “Developing this new technology has allowed us to test several different mechanisms and generate process improvements along the way,” said Terrafugia CEO Chris Jaran. “We are at the critical point where we can implement the best design features based on years of flight and drive testing. This will improve function, safety and aesthetics for the optimal flying and driving experience.” Improvements include: • Hybrid-Electric Motor: The Transition will now drive in hybrid mode, using a combination of an internal combustion engine and a LiFePO4 (Lithium iron phosphate chemistry) battery. • Boost: The throttle incorporates a boost feature for a brief burst of extra power while flying. • Interior: The interior is remodeled with upgraded seats, an intuitive user interface experience, and increased luggage capacity. • Safety: Updated safety systems include improved seat belts, airbags, and increased visibility with three rearview cameras in drive mode. • Partners: Terrafugia is partnering with state-of-the-art suppliers for avionics and parachutes. Dynon is providWhat’s the buzz? “The desire to fly is an idea handed down to us by our ancestors who looked enviously on the birds soaring freely through space on the infinite highway of the air.” Wilbur Wright

ing the EFIS (Electrical Flight Information Systems) and BRS is providing a full frame parachute system. As an automotive vehicle and a lightsport aircraft, the Transition is built for

both aviation and automotive safety to comply with FAA and National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) standards, company officials explain. The new features will enable

the Transition to meet all the necessary requirements while optimizing the flight experience for both pilot and passenger, company officials add. Terrafugia.com


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

August 9, 2018

Never too late to share a lesson learned Ben Sclair Touch & Go

Flying is one of those skills where a good amount of knowledge can still be learned from the experience of others. A flavor of hangar flying, if you will. Downsizing from a 3,000-square-foot condo into a 700-square-foot apartment requires a good amount of consolidation and clean up. And that’s exactly what we’ve been working on during my Mom’s recent move from her condo home of more than 25 years. Among the copious amounts of paper­ work I found a letter addressed to my sister Robyn Sclair from Leslie L. Megyeri. The postmark on the envelope is July 19, 2007. I don’t recall ever seeing the following story published and hope you enjoy it. “On a bright, Saturday morning, not too long ago, my wife Kathy and I drove to our hangar at the Frederick Airport (FDK), located directly across from the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association’s legal counsel, John Yodice’s hangar. Since we were pressed for time, we decided just to make several takeoffs and landings in our Mooney Ovation 2000. During my pre-flight, I noticed that I had about two hours of fuel in my tanks, but since we were not going anywhere, I thought that was adequate for our practice flight. The run-up was uneventful, and we taxied to Runway 5. We took off and rotated at about 65 knots. As I gained altitude, I retracted the landing gear and the flaps and shortly turned to the right crosswind Ben Sclair is Publisher. He can be reached at ben@generalaviationnews.com.

pattern. We proceeded right downwind at about 1,300 MSL. Halfway downwind, I put the electric gear handle in the down position. We heard the usual small grinding sound as the gear lowered, but we did not feel the usual minor tremor which would indicate that the gear was locked. I looked at my instrument panel and, sure enough, the green light was not on. Kathy said, “We don’t have the landing gear locked. Do not land — let’s go out and determine what’s wrong.” By this time, we were over the stone quarry, which is where we normally turn base. I told Kathy to call CTAF on the radio as we were going to do a fly over the field to see if anyone on the ground would look at our landing gear and determine visually if it was properly extended. Someone must have heard this transmission on CTAF because we saw a couple people running toward Runway 5. A helicopter pilot hovering near the runway confirmed that the gear was not properly extended downward. I flew over the runway one more time to confirm that it was not safe to land. We flew a short distance away from FDK to give me some time to get the gear down. I asked Kathy to fly the plane so I could hand crank the landing gear down. She was a great help to me when she took the controls so I could manually pull the cable without any difficulty. It took almost 14 pulls to ensure that the gear was fully in the down position. Unfortunately, the green light still did not come on to indicate that the landing gear was locked.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR LET’S GET INAPPROPRIATE

Re: Jamie Beckett’s column, “Let’s get inappropriate” in the June 21 issue: I read with interest about your initial try to get into flying. Sad how you were summarily brushed off. And the bad news, although no fault of yours, was that you had no frame of perspective to fight off the rejection and follow your interest. When I was 6 years old in 1948, my father took me to the Brockton, Massachusetts, airport (closed since 1955). There I saw my first airplane, a J-3 Cub. I was

standing on the floor in the back of a 1936 Chrysler with the famous rear “suicide” doors as it was parked in the lot next to the airplane ramp. My view was toward the right rear quarter of that tied-down Cub where I could clearly see the ribs in the wings and longerons in the fuselage. It was a sight I will never forget. My interest grew and 14 years later I took my first flying lesson at the Hyannis Airport on Cape Cod. How about $21 an hour dual for a Piper Tri-Pacer? My circumstance of rejection was very

Photo courtesy Leslie L. Megyeri

Leslie L. Megyeri with his beloved Mooney. I again flew low over Runway 5 and requested a visual observation of the wheels. The helicopter pilot responded this time that the wheels appeared to be down but he was not sure. I decided to land and made touchdown as gentle as possible. The landing was successful although I felt that the wheels were not reacting to the landing as I expected or as I was used to. Nonetheless, everything seemed OK, and we taxied to the ramp. When we got out of the plane, there were a number of people present who knew of our predicament. One of them, Phil Boyer, AOPA president at the time, happened to be at the airport. He loves flying as much as we do, so it is not unusual to spot him on the field. Normally, when I get out of my Mooney, I turn the propeller horizontal. I don’t want to give away my age, but early on, this became a habit because wooden propellers were always to be positioned horizontally so that the sap in them would not flow to the lowest point to unbalance the prop. Fortunately, I remembered my early

training that day because shortly thereafter, the nose wheel on the Mooney collapsed and the nose of the plane hit the tarmac with a loud thud. Fortunately, damage to the plane was minimal, but if there had been a prop hit (prop not being horizontal), the engine would have to be taken out and inspected. Phil Boyer witnessed this incident and asked me how it happened that the prop was in the horizontal position. I told him it was a habit of mine to always place it that way. He said, “Write an article about your habit. It could prove helpful to others as well.” So I submit to you our experience in order that you as a pilot might save yourself some money should your plane’s nose wheel for any reason collapse or when towing your plane, some action would inadvertently tip the nose of the plane downward. It is an inexpensive way to reduce the probability of a propeller strike on the ground. We recently had our Mooney’s repairs completed, so we look forward to more takeoffs and landings, gear permitting.”

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similar to yours. I remember proudly displaying my logbook with the entry of my first flying lesson to my father and another similarly aged family member only to be greeted with “Ah...whaddya wasting your time on that for? You’re just wasting your money....you’re not going to do anything with that.” When I heard that and experienced such rejection from those “old school folks”— from those who you would think would support your effort to enlighten yourself — I made up my mind that very day to

never say another thing to them about my flying. And I never did. The other man who rejected me in later years had a grandson who asked me about flying. I went out of my way to find information, books, training manuals, etc., to guide him along his way and satisfy his curiosity. I never heard one word from the young fellow. Funny how things work out like that. Fast forward some 56 years and 20,000 LETTERS | See Page 11


August 9, 2018

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Because the impossible became practical Jamie Beckett Politics for Pilots

To the average general aviation enthusiast, there is nothing all that remarkable about jumping into a single-engine aircraft and pointing it over the horizon for a trip from here to there and back again. Maybe it’s a day trip. A simple out-andback. Or maybe it’s a bit more ambitious. A trip of a hundred miles is enjoyable, but not exactly earth-shattering. Extend that cross-country by twice as many miles, or 10 times as many, and it merely becomes a series of hops that add up to the full distance. Incremental awesomeness. That’s what we’ve got here. In an annual pilgrimage that has become almost a right-of-passage for some, thousands of pilots and passengers have climbed into small, single-engine aircraft for a trip to Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Wittman Field is their destination. Be it just over the county line, or a couple time zones away, folks from all over the map made plans, executed them beautifully, and put a few lines in their logbooks that will become cherished memories. Jamie Beckett is the AOPA Ambassador in Florida. A dedicated aviation advocate, you can reach him at: Jamie@GeneralAviationNews.com

LETTERS | From Page 10 hours later and here I am. Mr. Lucky for sure. Flight instruction, air taxi, corporate, military and airline flying, floats, gliders, helicopters, turboprops, jets, J-3 Cub, DC-10, Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award. I also own a beautiful 1977 V35B Bonanza. All this with a high school education. You could say I lived my dream. FRANK PELAGGI Bethlehem, Pa.

SO WHAT?

Re: “New evidence shows JFK soloed in 10 days,” in the June 21 issue: And I soloed in seven days, so what? GRANT CHRISTENSEN via email

THANKS

Back in January, I read Tom Snow’s article on his experience at the seaplane base at Lake Como, Italy. We were recently in the Lake Como region for a music festival and based on Snow’s descriptions, supplemented our time there with a

That’s all well and good. It’s even noble on some level. But the fact that it’s even possible seems to have been lost somewhere along the line. What was once impossible has become almost routine for us. Is it just me, or is that almost too good to be true? As recently as 100 years ago the idea of safely traveling hundreds or even thousands of miles in an aircraft was just… well, it was unheard of. When the U.S. Postal Service introduced Air Mail service a century ago, traveling from Washington D.C. to New York City required an intermediate stop in Philadelphia. And the first pilot to attempt that journey didn’t make it. He got lost and crashed in Maryland, barely 25 miles from his starting point. That surprised no one. Of course the pilot got lost and the airplane crashed. That’s what pilots and airplanes do, or so went the thinking of the day. In fact, during the first nine years of airmail service, 35 of the Post Office’s pilots died on the job. That wasn’t an auspicious start. Still to this day, that’s why aviation is often thought of as being dangerous. Because it was, once. It’s not dangerous any longer. Flight is much better understood. Maintenance practices are greatly improved. Structures are better built and more thoroughly seaplane ride with the folks at Aero Club Como. It was a wonderful experience and I’m thankful to you for publishing Snow’s article. A.D. DONALD Dallas, Texas

AVIATION DNA

I really enjoyed reading the article “Born with aviation DNA” in the July 19 issue. I got my private in the early 1980s, bought an old M20A to build some time, then life got in the way. Kids, bad economy, etc. Sold my Mooney and flew very little after that. Now that I can afford to fly, I can’t pass the physical! Woe is me…Lol! Now I fly through these articles and YouTube. Thanks for all the articles! Keeps an old man happy! LARRY LONG via GeneralAviationNews.com

THE COST OF GA INSURANCE

Re: “Why general aviation liability insurance is so high” in the July 19 issue: One of the biggest obstacles to the

tested. Engines are far more reliable. Navigational tools extend well beyond a wristwatch and a map. Pilots are trained far more effectively than those early pioneers were. Aviation is not just safer than ever, it’s actually transcended the impossible to become not just possible, but practical. Yes, practical. Viable, useful, largely predictable, and remarkably accident free. It’s even reasonably cost-effective, naysayers grumbling aside. In 1918 a Curtiss Jenny could be bought for $5,465. That sounds cheap when viewed from a century in the future. But in 1918 the average household income was $1,518. That’s household income, not the salary of the head of household. Today you can pick up a good four-seater that will cruise at 100 knots or better for the price of a moderately priced sportscar. Yep, an airplane that’s faster and more reliable than the Jenny ever dreamed of being. One that will last for decades, or longer. An airplane that will carry you and your friends or family where ever you want to go. And they’re available to you pretty much where ever you are in the great expanse of North America. Thousands and thousands of us have picked up on that reality and bought airplanes of our own. Thousands more belong to flying clubs, or rent from the local FBO or flight school. And many of us have saddled up in that airplane, flown into the distance, and descended on Wisconsin for a week in July to revel in the spectacle of aeronautics. It’s heady stuff, I tell ya. In 1918 my paternal grandfather turned 20 years old. A colorful southern gentle-

man if ever there was one, he grew up in a world without electricity, indoor plumbing, or paved roads. He became aware of aviation early in life, however. As a resident of Pinellas County, Florida, he knew of Tony Janus and the flying boat that carried passengers, crossing Tampa Bay for a price, and cutting hours off the travel time between St. Petersburg and Tampa. He knew about aviation, but he wasn’t rushing to be a part of it. I wonder what he would think today if I were to invite him to jump aboard the Cessna 182 my flying club owns. The idea of launching off from an airport that lies just across the lake from my house, flying anywhere we want to go at speeds his younger self would have considered unimaginable. Tampa to Key West in two hours? Miami to Jacksonville in less than three? West Palm Beach to Washington D.C. in one day? Yes. That’s all possible, and more. I was home the week of the big show, more than a thousand miles from AirVenture. But I celebrated the joys of aviation right along with all those folks in Wisconsin. I did it by visiting my local airport. I did a few turns in the pattern to work on my currency and prepare for a planned flight into a short runway at a beautifully picturesque destination. I applied a new decal to the club airplane and took a fledgling aviation enthusiast on their first flight in a Cessna 152. I may not have been in Oshkosh, and you may not have been there either. But we can sure be proud of the aeronautical activities we get to involve ourselves in every day, all year, where ever we are.

defense in an aviation-related court case is that most, if not all, jurors, including the judge, have no knowledge of aviation. They don’t know what makes an aircraft fly, or how an engine or aircraft systems work, let alone what required maintenance is. So what enables these people to hear an aviation case? Everything is preloaded in favor of the prosecution! HENRY K. COOPER via GeneralAviationNews.com

sometimes. The answer in this author’s opinion is to essentially make the company immune from suit. So a person injured as a result of a company’s negligence will have no recourse against the company? What if the person can no longer work? What if they were the sole income for a family? So now they go on disability, who pays for that? We the taxpayers do. When people cannot seek redress for another’s negligence it is society that pays. People who push this BS narrative about lawsuit reform neglect to mention who ultimately pays. The answer is the taxpayer. This is the kind of article I would expect from a person who views the world in absolutes. JOHN via GeneralAviationNews.com

So general aviation insurance rates are high because of lawyers? How original. As an attorney, aircraft owner, and a lifetime pilot, it amuses me that the same garbage keeps getting shoveled over and over without any regards to the truth. Yet another poorly written unoriginal antilawyer article that puts forth a factual scenario that has no application to the author’s conclusion. The scenario cited by the author admits negligence on the part of the company, and seems to suggest that the injured person is somehow at fault because they should have known that things happen

ONE OF A KIND

Re: “The one and only CallAir Cadet” in the July 19 issue: WOW! Congratulations. What a beautiful airplane and one of a kind. That is awesome. MICHAEL A CROGNALE via GeneralAviationNews.com


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

August 9, 2018

BlackFly electric ultralight unveiled OPENER has unveiled the BlackFly, an ultralight all-electric fixed-wing vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft. “BlackFly is a single-seat Personal Aerial Vehicle (PAV) designed and built for a new world of three-dimensional transportation,” company officials said. “BlackFly is simple to master and requires no formal licensing in the USA or special skills to operate safely.” Though BlackFly has full amphibious capabilities, it is primarily designed to operate from small grassy areas and travel distances of up to 25 miles at a speed of 62 mph, officials add. “OPENER is re-energizing the art of flight with a safe and affordable flying vehicle that can free its operators from the

everyday restrictions of ground transportation,” said Marcus Leng, CEO. “Safety has been our primary driving goal in the development of this new technology. Even though not required by FAA regulations, BlackFly operators will be required to successfully complete the FAA Private Pilot written examination and also complete company-mandated vehicle familiarization and operator training.” Eight propulsion systems, spread across two wings, provide for multiple-failure security, according to company officials. “Years of continuous testing, combined with 1,000+ flights and 10,000+ miles flown, form the bedrock of OPENER’s development program,” officials add. Opener.aero

Photo by Tom Snow

Opener’s BlackFly on display at EAA AirVenture 2018.

Get a flying start

FLYING HIGHER UNDER NEW FAA RULE One of the many ways AOPA works hard to protect the freedom to fly is by advocating for regulations that will ease the financial burden on students and certified pilots. A recent update by the FAA is a major victory for GA and will have a huge impact on how we fly. Last month, the FAA published a final rule that will allow for broader use of technology to reduce the cost of flight training and maintaining proficiency without compromising safety. Since the beginning, AOPA has sought and supported these regulatory changes that are expected to save the general aviation community more than $113 million in the next five years. The new rule includes many changes, mostly to Part 61 of the Federal Aviation Regulations. The overhaul will take effect in two phases, starting on July 27, and all changes are set to be implemented by Dec. 24. The updates will reduce costs for pilots by leveraging advances in avionics, aircraft equipment, flight simulators, and aviation training devices. The most significant savings will come from allowing the nation’s more than 300,000 instrumentrated pilots to use advanced aviation training devices to satisfy flight requirements and enjoy six months of currency rather than two. AOPA knows the cost of flying matters to our members, and we’re going to keep advocating for changes like this that make a real difference. Other efforts and initiatives like BasicMed and You Can Fly are just some of the other ways AOPA is working to keep prices lower for pilots and make aviation accessible for everyone. For a complete update on the changes, please visit www.aopa.org/advocacy.

Mark R. Baker President & CEO, AOPA

*For more information on the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and the issues that affect your flying go to www.aopa.org today.

EAA AVIATION CENTER, OSHKOSH, Wisconsin — The Experimental Aircraft Association’s new Flying Start program is a new tool for EAA chapters to use to offer a local pathway for interested adults into the world of flight. The program consists of an EAA-prepared presentation and video that provides information about learning to fly, with topics ranging from what is involved in flight training and which certificate would be best to pursue, to how much it will cost in both time and money. The hosting chapter can customize this experience with information about their local chapter and flight training options. “EAA chapters throughout the country supply a natural support system for those adults pursuing their dreams of flight,” said Rick Larsen, EAA’s vice president of communities and member programs. “The Flying Start program gives those local chapters the tools to welcome and encourage those who are eager to discover aviation, but may not know how to take the next step.” Flying Start participants will also have direct access to EAA’s Eagle Flights program through the hosting chapter, allowing them to experience aviation for themselves with a free introductory flight and informal mentorship from an EAA volunteer pilot. The Flying Start program benefits are twofold: An organized pathway for adults to learn more about learning to fly and a way for EAA chapters to engage their current members and recruit new enthusiasts. Chapters that are interested in hosting a Flying Start event can see the program requirements, register, and receive the materials needed to help plan, promote, and host a successful Flying Start event at EAA.org/FlyingStart.


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Photo by Ian Lienhard

Photo by Rudolf Stämpfli

Bückers to gather at Swiss event More than 100 pilots have already registered for the International Bücker Meeting in Thun, Switzerland, slated for Aug. 31 to Sept. 2. According to organizers, 51 Bücker aircraft are expected at the meeting, a record-setting number for a modern-day fly-in. “As far as we know, probably only in the production workshops there were so many Bücker together,” says Andy Wegier, manager of the organizing committee of the International Bücker Meeting.

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Organized by Air-Thun, Bücker types expected at the event include Jungmann, Jungmeister, Bestmann, and Student. Airplanes with a history related to Thun also will be on display. “Two of our special guests of the Bücker Meeting will be the two last Dewoitine D26, which were constructed in Thun and still fly today,” Wegier said. A highlight of the weekend will be the baptism of one of the Dewoitine with the name “Stadt Thun,” meaning City of Thun, on Aug. 31.

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The oldest airplane expected to be at the event is a TravelAir E-400, built in 1927, flying from Bern Belp. The Bücker Jungmann was the first airplane of the Bücker Aeroplane Construction in Berlin-Johannistal. The Swedish constructor Anders Andersson was responsible for the first Bücker, whose first flight took place on April 27, 1934. The Bücker 131 Jungmann was not only built for many German aviation schools, but the German air force. Another eight

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European countries flew this model. In Switzerland, Dornier in Altenrhein built 100 planes under license, while in Japan, 1,237 were built for the army and the navy. The most famous of the airplanes today are the Bücker 131 Jungmann and Bücker 133 Jungmeister biplanes, which were developed in the early 1930s and were held to be “the best airplane of the world” for a long time. All in all, 3,300 of these two types of machines were built.

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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

August 9, 2018

OSH 2018: As close to perfect as can get With the wrap-up of EAA AirVenture 2018 July 30, EAA officials are calling the event a huge success. “A ‘perfect’ event may be unattainable, but AirVenture 2018 came about as close as one could imagine,” said Experimental Aircraft Association Chairman Jack Pelton. “The combination of outstanding programs, aircraft variety, a robust economy, and good weather combined to complement the efforts of our staff and 5,000 volunteers throughout the grounds. The week was upbeat, exciting, and filled with many ‘Only at Oshkosh’ moments.” EAA officials report that attendance was approximately 601,000, nearly 2% above 2017’s record total. “EAA members and aviation enthusiasts attended in large numbers, even without the presence of a military jet team as we had in 2017,” Pelton said. “Our efforts to create unique attractions and aviation highlights across the grounds were incredibly successful. Attendance on opening day was the best in our history, as the vast majority of our guests came to Osh­kosh early and stayed throughout the week.” More than 10,000 aircraft arrived at Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh and other airports in east-central Wiscon-

sin. At Wittman alone, there were 19,588 aircraft operations in the 11day period from July 20-30, which is an average of approximately 134 takeoffs/landings per hour. Jack Pelton As for showplanes, there were 2,979 — the second straight year over 2,900, EAA officials noted. Of the total, 1,160 were homebuilt aircraft (a 5% increase), 1,094 vintage airplanes, 377 warbirds (7% increase), 185 ultralights and light-sport aircraft, 75 seaplanes, 22 rotorcraft, 52 aerobatic aircraft, and 14 hot air balloons. Other figures of note: Camping: More than 12,300 sites in aircraft and drive-in camping accounted for an estimated 40,000 visitors. Commercial exhibitors: 867. Forums, Workshops, and Presentations: A total of 1,500 sessions attended by more than 75,000 people. EAA Aircraft Flights: 2,800 people flew aboard EAA’s Ford Tri-Motor, while 3,032 people flew aboard EAA’s Bell 47

helicopters and 680 flew aboard EAA’s B-17 “Aluminum Overcast.” Social Media, Internet and Mobile: More than 12 million people were reached by EAA’s social media channels during AirVenture, including 5.5 million via Facebook videos; EAA’s website had more than 1.7 million page views; EAA video clips during the event were viewed 2.2 million times; and EAA’s 2,400 photo uploads were viewed more than 12.4 million times. Additionally, EAA web streams were accessed nearly 800,000 times by viewers in more than 200 countries, who watched more than 170,000 hours of activities from the AirVenture grounds. The AirVenture app was downloaded and used by nearly 50,000 attendees. Guests registered at International Visitors Tent: A record 2,714 visitors registered from 87 nations, also a record total. (Actual counts may be higher since international visitor registration is voluntary.) Top countries represented by registered visitors: Canada (538 visitors), Australia (386), and South Africa (277). Media: 976 media representatives were on-site, from six continents. Economic impact: $170 million for the five counties in the Oshkosh region (Winnebago, Outagamie, Fond du Lac,

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Calumet, and Brown). This is based on a 2017 University of Wisconsin Oshkosh economic impact study, according to EAA officials.

What’s ahead for 2019?

Next year’s Oshkosh is slated for July 22-28, 2019. “We are celebrating our 50th consecutive year in Oshkosh during 2019, so we’ll be looking back on a half-century of unforgettable highlights at Wittman Regional Airport, and planning activities that involve EAA’s hometown and its unique place in aviation history,” Pelton said. “While 2018 is barely in the record books, we’re talking to many groups and individuals with intriguing new ideas for aircraft, innovations, exhibits, and events. We’re already planning for 2019 and looking forward to announcing features and attractions very soon.” EAA.org What’s the buzz? “Aviation is proof that given, the will, we have the capacity to achieve the impossible.” Eddie Rickenbacker

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Why am I not getting enough power? Paul McBride Ask Paul

Q

I have a mid-time O-235-N2C. I recently pulled the engine from service due to low power reports from our renters. Initial troubleshooting revealed two cylinders with low compressions. One was 55 and the other was 62. Decided to do a top overhaul. Put it all together, including an over-

hauled carb, and I still cannot get more than 2200 static on the ground. All compressions are 77 or better on the overhauled cylinders. I also performed the Lycoming valve lifter clearance procedure recommended after cylinder replacement. The engine is installed in a 2004 AMD Alarus and the TCDS indicates 2550 min

and 2750 max static. I also noticed the oil temperature was higher than usual. I would appreciate any ideas or troubleshooting steps you can recommend! John Sidorek

A

John, let me begin by telling you I really don’t think you have any issues here. If the TCDS for the AMD Alarus indicates a minimum of 2250 static RPM on the ground, my bet is you’re right in the ballpark with what you’re seeing on your tachometer. This startling fact may not come as a surprise to you, but one of the most common situations is for an aircraft tachometer to provide an erroneous reading and, typically, they read low.

Paul McBride, an expert on engines, retired after almost 40 years with Lycoming. Send your questions to: AskPaul@GeneralAviationNews.com.

NH aircraft fees more equitable Aircraft registration fees in New Hampshire are now more equitable for all aircraft types, thanks to legislation recently signed by Gov. Chris Sununu. House Bill 124 also addresses the discrepancy that existed between registration fees in New Hampshire and those in neighboring Massachusetts, which led many aircraft owners to base their aircraft at Massachusetts airports. “Previously, New Hampshire aircraft registration fees were based on the age and price of the aircraft, meaning that newer business aircraft could pay upwards of $300,000 in first-year registration fees, compared to a flat $300 fee in Massachusetts,” said Brittany Davies, regional representative for the Northeast for the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA). “We have been working for a long time to try and get a fix to this issue, which is definitely a win-win in that it is revenue neutral to the state, with the revenue much more equally spread out over all aircraft types,” said NBAA member Lee Rohde, president and CEO of Essex Aviation Group. “The legislation is a big fix to what was a real problem for New Hampshire to attract aircraft to base in this state.” To make the new legislation revenue neutral, fees for smaller, older aircraft will increase. For example, aircraft weighing from 3,001 pounds to 8,000 pounds will see their fees increase from the current $128 to $250. Additional revenue can be expected from fuel taxes, new businesses relocating, and more, officials noted.

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My suggestion is that you check the calibration of your tachometer or locate a local maintenance facility that has a VueThru or other instrument to calibrate your tachometer. I do have one question for you though and that is what RPM does the engine turn in straight and level flight? How does this compare to what you read prior to doing the top overhaul? Oh, and did you ever happen to check the static RPM prior to doing the top overhaul? Just had to ask this! I haven’t provided very much information for you here, but I feel it may give you something to compare and find out exactly whether your engine is, in fact, producing less power than you think.


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

August 9, 2018

Second generation Young Eagle honored OSHKOSH, Wisconsin — A passion for aviation runs deep for Joe Coraggio, this year’s recipient of the Phillips 66 Aviation Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) Young Eagles Leadership Award. The award, which is presented each year at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh, recognizes outstanding Young Eagles volunteers who have supported the future of aviation by going above and beyond the basic Young Eagles flight. Joe, a second generation Young Eagle, has been active in the Young Eagles program for more than 20 years. His love of aviation began well before he could fly an airplane — or even drive a car — and he credits the Young Eagles program for much of the success in his aviation career. “I am humbled to receive this award,” said Coraggio. “I know some of the past recipients, and they’re incredible pilots that have given back in such a big way. I’m blown away to now be among their ranks.” For more than 25 years, Phillips 66 Aviation has sponsored the EAA Young Eagles, an organization whose sole mission is to introduce kids to the world of aviation by providing them their first ride in an airplane for free. More than 2 million children have flown through the EAA Young Eagles program with the help of EAA’s network of volunteer pilots and ground volunteers, like Joe. “Joe was chosen to receive the award not only because of his Young Eagle volunteer efforts, but because of the impact he’s helping make in the aviation community — both on the ground and in the air,” said Eric McMurphy, director of sales, general aviation, U.S. for Phillips 66 Aviation. “We’re delighted to honor him.”

Navigating on the Ground

Since earning his pilot’s license 17 years ago, Joe has flown more than 80 Young Eagles flights, but his involvement with the organization began long before he could fly, as a ground volunteer.

Photo Courtesy Joe Coraggio

Joe Coraggio flying.

Photo by David K. Witty

Eric Whyte and Joe Corragio. Today, he spends a lot of time mentoring aspiring aviation professionals. Whether it’s teaching them, helping them earn scholarships, or guiding them through airline career options, Joe helps kids pursue their love of aviation. He’s

currently working with three young mentees. Joe is also vice chairman of the AirVenture Cup, a cross-country air race held for more than 20 years the weekend before AirVenture begins. During the race festiv-

ities, Young Eagles flights are available. According to Joe, one of the key benefits of participating in and leading the AirVenture Cup is to be able to support the Young Eagles program, raising awareness of it among the hundreds of pilots who participate in the Cup. Joe is the epitome of a Young Eagles success story, according to Phillips 66 Aviation officials. After being introduced to the world of aviation at the age of 12, he quickly discovered the Young Eagles program and was connected with family friend Eric Whyte, who received the EAA Young Eagles Leadership Award last year. Eric gave Joe his first official Young Eagles ride in 1995, and after attending an aviation day camp at Capitol Drive Airport in Brookfield, Joe’s hometown, he’s been hooked. The local EAA chapters took Joe under their wing and encouraged his passion for flying. On his 16th birthday, Joe completed his first solo flight before heading to the DMV to get his driver’s license. And on his 17th birthday, he earned his pilot’s license. Joe now lives in Phoenix, Arizona, and works as a pilot for a major airline. One of his greatest accomplishments is the aircraft he took nearly eight years to build, his Long-EZ, he notes. Next to the rear seat of the plane is a sign that proudly states, “3rd Generation Young Eagles Fly Here.” “This award — and the program itself — is a testament to all of the Young Eagles pilots out there because this program changes lives and changes the course of lives,” said Coraggio. “The program and the volunteer pilots make aviation accessible to everybody who has a dream and love of flying. The only prerequisites are the interest, hard work and determination. When I learned that, it was a license to set goals and dream big. Now I want to make sure others know that, too.” Young Eagles.org, Phillips66Aviation.com


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Legislation to revitalize aviation introduced By TOM SNOW Senator James Inhofe (R-Okla.), acknowledged by many as general aviation’s best friend in government, returned to EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2018 for his 40th consecutive year after a busy week in Washington, where he introduced legislation to revitalize aviation. The new bill, S.3270, named the Securing and Revitalizing Aviation Act of 2018 (SARA), is a follow on to Inhofe’s Pilot’s Bill of Rights 1 and 2, passed in 2012 and 2016. That James Inhofe legislation led to significant improvements in legal due process for FAA violations and reforms to the Third Class Medical called BasicMed. “I’ve taken advantage of BasicMed along with thousands of others,” confirmed Inhofe, 83, who is the only active commercial pilot in the Senate. A Certified Flight Instructor (CFI), Inhofe owns a Cessna 340, an RV-8, and a Grumman Tiger. He has amassed over 11,000 hours. Many of the changes to general aviation proposed by Inhofe come from personal experience, plus input from pilot town hall forums such as the one held Saturday, July 28, at AirVenture. “I recently had trouble finding a Desig-

nated Pilot Examiner (DPE) when I needed a check ride to renew my CFI before it ran out,“ he said. “The new legislation will change the rule limiting DPEs to only two check rides per day and also remove geographical boundaries.” To help eliminate the looming pilot shortage, the SARA Act would enable schools across the country to benefit from grants that would bring ground school education into classrooms and expose students to a career in aviation, both in the cockpit and as aircraft maintenance professionals. The SARA Act also supports Inhofe’s existing legislation to modernize FAAapproved curriculum for aircraft maintenance. Inhofe noted that the FAA’s curriculum wastes time teaching maintenance professionals about decades-old technology instead of equipping them to repair the modern aircraft being used today. Other proposed changes include protection for volunteer pilots and permanently eliminating FAA charges for the extra controllers required for air shows such as AirVenture. As senior member of the U. S. Senate Armed Services Committee and primary sponsor of the defense authorization bill, Inhofe said he is passionate about improving the military aircraft fleet and addressing the shortage of military pilots. Currently, the Air Force is short about 1,500 pilots. Inhofe also looks forward to the passage of this year’s FAA reauthorization because he worked diligently to ensure it contains resources and provisions to ben-

Photo courtesy James Inhofe

Sen. James Inhofe with his RV-8. efit the general aviation community. His reforms include allowing airports greater flexibility to expand investments in infrastructure. He’s also led efforts to encourage public-private partnerships to support local, small airports. When asked about the status of ATC privatization, which continues to rear its

head, Inhofe emphatically stated “that’s dead and gone.” “Since I flew around the world, I know what it’s like to fly in countries other than the United States,” he said. “We have the best system now and I have a favorite saying: “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Inhofe.Senate.gov

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August 9, 2018

From the big show to the future of fly-ins Dan Johnson Splog

EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2018 is now history. As most readers know, Oshkosh is a massive event, by many measures the largest gathering of true aviation believers in the known universe. However, being big isn’t everything. Indeed, some recreational flying enthusiasts will soon begin a trek to Mt. Vernon, Illinois, for the Midwest LSA Expo, a far smaller event that has proven adept at linking willing buyers with ready sellers.

Half A World Away, Aviation Is Just Getting Started

Let me tell you about a specific brand fly-in for the CTLS produced in China. While small compared to big American events, this was a healthy start. If aviation is to grow in the Asia-Pacific, I think events like that hosted by manufacturer AeroJones are key. More of them are needed but here was a worthy start. In May 2018, AeroJones Aviation hosted a first-time event at its training facility in the south of Taiwan, called Pingtong Saijiain Airport. AeroJones Aviation is the manufacturer of the sophisticated light aircraft called CTLS. The aircraft factory is located in Xiamen, China. “As promised, AeroJones Aviation conducted CT Club, the first flying club reunion in Taiwan on May 19, 2018,” said company spokesperson Jenny Chang. China and other countries have very well developed airline and military aviation, but flying for fun is a relatively new activity. The first-time function was well attended. “Around 40 participants came for the whole day event,” reported Chang. “The group included CTLS pilots, CTLS owners, and those who have intentions to become pilots.” AeroJones Aviation operates a flying field, flight school, and maintenance center in the south of Taiwan. The operation is described by foreign visitors as a prototype for what may become many such facilities across China as that nation prepares to build hundreds of brand-new airports. The new airports will allow Chinese citizens to see and experience light aviaDan Johnson, president of the Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, is an expert on LSA. For more on Sport Pilot/LSA, go to ByDanJohnson.com.

tion. Few Chinese people have ever seen aircraft such as AeroJones’ CTLS and almost none have flown in one. Events like the one AeroJones hosted may be critically important to introduce literally billions of people in the AsianPacific region to the idea of flying for fun. “We were pleased with this first event and the number of people who came to help launch this new idea,” observed Hsieh Chi-Tai, General Aviation Development Vice President for AeroJones. “Even CT owners that could not fly their aircraft to Pingtong still showed their enthusiasm of flying.” He added he believes this type of activity will grow as AeroJones Aviation is able to replicate its flight school and pilots club across China in the years ahead. AeroJones acquired the rights to manufacture the German CTLS aircraft design in late 2016. The company has since secured approval from the government to build and sell these LSA. China is predicted to become a major market for LightSport Aircraft.

In addition to China and Taiwan, AeroJones Aviation is able to ship fully manufactured CTLS aircraft to other Asia-Pacific countries, including Australia, New Zealand, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Japan, Korea, and Thailand. Many aviation experts believe China could see rapid growth for aircraft of this type given plans from the central Chinese government to build hundreds of new airports during the next few years. The Air Sports Federation of China (ASFC) is also planning hundreds of “flying camps” where citizens can learn more

about and experience aviation. ASFC personnel attended Oshkosh 2018 and met with groups to learn more about how to pursue their plans. The Xiamen, China, base of AeroJones Aviation includes a manufacturing facility with full fabrication capability. More than 50 highly-trained workers build nearly every part of the airplane in Xiamen. As China may nurture entry level aviation, AeroJones appears destined to be a part of it. EAA.org, MidwestLSAExpo.com, AeroJonesAviation.com

Photos courtesy AeroJones Aviation

Scenes from the CT Club, the first flying club reunion in Taiwan on May 19.


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A Corsair pilot’s kindness to strangers By ALBERT DYER It was 48 hours until opening day. Thousands of pilots were amped up as they made their way to the big show: EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2018. However, a low pressure system spinning just east of Oshkosh was generating bands of rain, gusty winds, and low levels of visibility for the VFR traffic converging to their initial arrival points according to the Oshkosh 2018 NOTAM. Airports within 100 miles of Oshkosh were finding their parking ramps bursting with aircraft of all types seeking shelter and pilots waiting for the announcement that Oshkosh Tower was once again open to receive traffic. DeKalb Taylor Municipal Airport (KDKB) is a popular airport a little more than 100 miles south of Oshkosh. It’s a good place to make that last fuel stop, get a hot dog and a bag of chips, and check the weather. And so it was for a Corsair that flew in, folding its wings just before coming to a stop on the parking ramp. After a few minutes securing the cockpit, this big, tall fella with a bit of a southPhoto by Albert Dyer ern drawl climbed onto the wing walk. He was greeted by a half dozen or so people A young aviation enthusiast gets the chance to sit in the cockpit of a Corsair, thanks to the pilot’s generosity. who came out to get a closer look at such into the seat. A quick glance at his watch, a rare aircraft. but he said nothing. After instructing the line guy to put in More time passed as he watched the 100 gallons of fuel, he looked at all of us reactionary smiles and last minute photos and said if we wanted to climb up and get being taken. He made no urgent pleas of in the seat to go ahead, giving a quick tuhaving to leave. He let everyone take their torial on the gymnastics required. time and enjoy the moment that he knew I heard someone say in disbelief, “reall too well. ally?” I was moved by his kindness to strang“That’s what owning an airplane like ers. This big, tall fella really was very this is about — sharing,” he said in an appreciative to be in indebted tone. “Share a position to share his where you can,” he Corsair. added as he headed As pilots know, for some food and to when we are concheck weather. “That’s what owning cerned with closing The line quickly an airplane like this weather at our destinalengthened as more and more people came is about — sharing.” tion, delays of any type Photo by Albert Dyer are not welcome. out to the Corsair to Corsair pilot Frank Kimmel As he flew away I spend a few minutes Frank Kimmel after he flew his Corsair at Oshkosh. wondered if he would seeing the view from a I wanted to ask him about Saturday at be able to make Oshpilot’s seat. DeKalb. After his part of the show was kosh. I, too, was waitAfter about 30 minover and he had the Corsair secured, I ing for the gap between weather bands to utes of relaxing, chatting over a few hot went up to him and asked him if he was widen so I could make it to Wittman Redogs and one more weather update, the able to make it to Oshkosh when he left gional Airport (KOSH) before the airport pilot said the weather had cleared enough DeKalb. closed for the night. for him to make it to Oshkosh, so it was “No, I had to divert to Madison until the I left about 45 minutes after him. I time to leave. next band of clear weather passed over had to turn back and sit the weather out When he got to the Corsair he told Oshkosh,” he reported. at Dodge County Airport (KUNU) in Juevery­one it was time for him to go before So now I knew. This big, tall southern neau, about 25 miles south of Oshkosh. the weather closed in on Oshkosh again. fella put that small group of aviation enTo my surprise, the mass arrivals of CessThat announcement created a small panic thusiasts above his own desires, giving nas and Beechcraft were also there waitbecause two people had not had a chance them a memory that will be cherished a ing out the weather. to climb up and into the seat. His name is Frank Kimmel of Greenlifetime. It would not surprise me if there A few days later I saw the Corsair fly The pilot said to go ahead and he began wood, Mississippi. He gave me a memois a white Stetson hat sitting in his car during one of the daily airshows. I made his preflight inspection. With the preflight rable experience, and I didn’t even get to when he arrives home. my way to Warbird parking and waited completed, I noted him standing there, sit in his Corsair — yet. Oh yeah, who is this pilot? for him to land. watching the last person ascend up and


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AirVenture Oshkosh 2018

August 9, 2018

Photo by Albert Dyer

Photo by Megan Vande Voort

Photo by Albert Dyer

Photo by Megan Vande Voort

Photo by Albert Dyer

Photo by Megan Vande Voort

Photo by Albert Dyer


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Photo by Megan Vande Voort

Photo by Albert Dyer

Photo by Albert Dyer

Photo by Albert Dyer

Photo by Albert Dyer

Photo by Albert Dyer

Photo by Albert Dyer

Photo by Albert Dyer


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

August 9, 2018

Why should pilots learn about drones? By TERRY JARRELL Not too many years ago the idea of small unmanned flying machines seemed like something from sci-fi movies or toys for the kids to play with. This could not be further from today’s reality. Drones, or Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), have been taking on more and more important roles and are now regarded as fully-fledged aircraft performing legitimate and crucial operations in the National Airspace. Along with these new abilities and capabilities comes the need to understand how drones fit into today’s world of aviation and how new and existing pilots can benefit from understanding the direction drones are leading in many areas. Who uses these things anyway? As previously mentioned, professional UAS systems are absolutely not toys. Many common uses revolve around aerial photography and videography for industries such as real estate, insurance and roof inspections, advertising, and TV and film production. Others are deployed with growing frequency in life saving areas of search and rescue, disaster response, and other critical situations. You may be wondering, “why not use conventional aircraft and pilots…?” That certainly is an option, but when you factor in things such as per-mission flight cost, speed of deployment, and safety factors, it becomes very difficult to not go with the UAS option. The smaller aircraft size and incredible real-time optics, thermal sensing cameras, and onboard technology gives remote operators the ability to navigate dangerous or restrictive elements where you simply would not risk a pilot or larger aircraft. In many cases, a drone can be deployed

Terry Jarrell is a FAA Part 107 Remote Pilot and owner of Black Dog Drone Operations in Florida. He has been involved in leading edge technologies for over 15 years as an Apple expert and nationally recognized writer and instructor. You can contact him at terry@blackdogdroneops.com.

Photo by Kelly Managhan@Black Dog Drone Ops

Terry flying his drone. in just a few minutes in remote and harsh areas that would simply not be possible or impractical to consider with conventional aircraft.

Why would I want to know how to fly a drone?

It is easy to come away feeling like unmanned aerial systems are replacing actual pilots, but there is actually another way to look at this. Despite all the advanced technology, autonomous flight software and sophistication of a UAS, there still needs to be a Remote Pilot in Command (RPIC). Having a solid understanding and experience flying these systems will only add to your abilities, particularly as this budding industry continues to expand into areas no one has even thought of yet. Adding “stick time” can further hone your flying abilities and open new doors

professionally or even simply for recreational flying.

Do I need certification?

The simple answer is yes. To fly professionally, that is. The FAA has established 14 CFR Part 107 to allow for civil operation in the National Airspace System. For new, previously unlicensed operators, the process is essentially being able to learn the required materials regarding airspace, weather, aeromedical factors, sectionals, rules and regulations, and other elements regarding flight operations. Then, you have to successfully pass the aeronautical knowledge test at an FAA approved testing center and screening. For existing pilots holding a 14 CFR Part 61, the process is a bit easier. You can take the online course, Part 107 small Unmanned Aircraft Systems

(sUAS) ALC-451 on the FAA FAASTeam website. Then, complete FAA Form 8710-13 online or by paper. More details can be found on the FAA website or by contacting your local FSDO.

A new perspective

If you do have an interest in adding drones to your flying skills or as a new pilot just venturing into this new world, it is an exciting time for sure. We are seeing more guidance and formalization from the FAA, as well as many other professional entities, and the future looks bright for our new aircraft. Whether you choose to fly for recreational fun or to expand your professional capabilities and options, it is a wonderful time to explore UAS flying! FAASafety.gov

FAA warns against drone registration schemes The FAA is warning drone owners — especially hobbyists — about people offering to “help” register their drones with the agency. The FAA Drone Zone is all you need — and it costs only $5, agency officials say. There are a number of entities that offer to help drone owners file an application for a registration number. Some attempt to mimic the look of the FAA’s website with similar graphic design and even the

FAA logo, or suggest they are somehow “approved” by the agency. They aren’t — and you could be wasting your money, FAA officials say. “The FAA neither regulates these entities nor will speculate on their legitimacy,” officials said in a prepared release. “However, we have recently received reports of vendors charging exorbitant fees up to $150 for this service. The actual FAA registration fee is $5. For that

charge, hobbyists receive one identification number for all the drones they own. All others pay the registration fee for each drone they intend to operate.” You should only register your unmanned aircraft at the FAA Drone Zone, officials say. “It’s the only way to make sure your drone is legally registered and that you’ve gotten your money’s worth,” they add. FAADroneZone.FAA.gov

Photo by Kelly Managhan@Black Dog Drone Ops


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Missing World War II B-24 discovered A B-24 D-1 bomber associated with 11 American servicemen missing in action from World War II was recently found in Hansa Bay off Papua New Guinea by Project Recover, a team of marine scientists, archaeologists, and volunteers who have combined efforts to locate aircraft associated with MIAs from World War II. The crew of “Heaven Can Wait” was part of the 320th squadron of the “Jolly Rogers” 90th Bombardment Group and was on a mission to bomb Japanese antiaircraft batteries around Hansa Bay on March 11, 1944, when their B-24 was shot down by enemy fire, causing it to crash into the ocean. Project Recover set its sights on finding “Heaven Can Wait” after being presented with four years of research on circumstances of the crash, compiled by family members of one of the B-24 crew members seeking closure for their lost relative. Data included historical eyewitness narratives from official military reports, mission documents, and diary entries from crew members on other aircraft in formation with the B-24 during its flight. In October 2017, a team from Project Recover set out to perform an archaeological survey of Hansa Bay believed to be the final resting place of five U.S. aircraft with 24 MIA lost during fierce combat. Based on the historical data, “Heaven Can Wait” was believed to be offshore the north end of the Bay, according to officials with Project Recover. After 11 days on the water, and a search that covered nearly 27 square kilometers of the sea floor involving scanning sonars, high definition imagers, advanced diving, and unmanned aerial and underwater robotic technologies, Project Recover located the debris field of the B-24 bomber in 213’ of water. The details of the crash site have been formally communicated to the U.S. government for their review to potentially set into motion a process for recovering and identifying the remains of up to 11 crew members missing for over 70 years. “Unique to this mission was the contact by an extended family group associated with ‘Heaven Can Wait’ while our historians were independently researching the loss of their loved one prior to our departure to Papua New Guinea,” said Eric Terrill, co-founder of Project Recover. “The results from our efforts in Hansa Bay have stirred a mix of lasting emotions within our team and drives home the need to recognize the sacrifices that service members and their families make in protecting our freedoms.” “This is an important step toward our ultimate goal of identifying and returning home the crew of ‘Heaven Can Wait’ who bravely served our country during the battle at Hansa Bay,” said Dan Friedkin, team member of Project Recover. “Our search efforts for the more than 72,000

Photos courtesy Project Recover

A videographer captures images of the lost B-24 on the ocean floor.

missing American service members from World War II will continue as we seek to bring closure to the families impacted by their loss.” Project Recover’s team of scientists, historians, archaeologists, engineers, and divers conduct research and surveys to discover new crash sites, document wreckage, and correlate wrecks to known MIA cases. That documentation can then be used by the U.S. Department of Defense’s Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency to evaluate that site for the possible recovery of remains. The mission to Papua New Guinea occurred during Project Recover’s second year of formal operations and was made possible by a substantial financial commitment from Friedkin in 2016. Friedkin’s continued support is helping sustain ongoing missions, while enabling the organization to innovate its technology and broaden its search and discovery efforts to focus areas around the world. In the last five months there have been three repatriation ceremonies for World

War II service members who were recovered and identified as a result of Project Recover’s search and discovery efforts: Albert (“Bud”) Rybarczyk, Navy Reserve Aviation Radioman 2/c and Ora H. Sharninghouse Jr., Navy Reserve Aviation Ordnanceman 2/c of the U.S. Navy, USS Intrepid, Air Group 18 whose TBM Avenger went down in the Republic of Palau, and Navy Reserve Lt. William Q. Punnell whose F6F Hellcat was shot down in the Republic of Palau. To this day, there are still more than 72,000 U.S. service members unaccounted for from World War II, leaving families

with unanswered questions about their loved ones. Project Recover intends on launching more underwater missions later this year in various locations within the Pacific and European Theaters. Established in 2012 with initial support from the Office of Naval Research and formalized in 2016 with private funding, Project Recover is a partnership among researchers at the University of Delaware’s College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment, Scripps Institution of Oceano­ graphy at the University of California San Diego, and The BentProp Project. ProjectRecover.org


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

August 9, 2018

The Lighter-Than-Air Army Frederick A. Johnsen Of Wings & Things

If the U.S. Navy and Goodyear gained icon status as operators of blimps in the United States, the U.S. Army was a big player in the interwar years. U.S. Army lighter-than-air aircraft can be traced to reconnaissance balloons used during the Civil War by Thaddeus Lowe in support of the Union Army. In 1921 the U.S. Army operated the semi-rigid Italian-built airship Roma, the largest semi-rigid design in the world at the time, with a length of 410’. Buoyed by hydrogen, the Roma came to grief near its base at Langley Field, Virginia, in 1922 when the nose collapsed during high-speed flying, and the ensuing hydrogen fire gave the U.S. military the resolve to fill all of their future airships with nonflammable helium instead. Ever protective of their own mission priorities, the U.S. Army and U.S. Navy agreed in that decade that the Army would pursue non-rigid or semi-rigid designs for coastal and inland patrol duties, while the U.S. Navy embarked upon its large rigid dirigible program for scouting at sea. The Army airship program thereafter blossomed during the Roaring Twenties. In the Depression of the 1930s, Army funding for airships declined until Army Air Corps Chief General Oscar Westover decided to end the Army’s airship program in 1936. Some of the last activity carried into 1939. During the hey day of Army airship operations, sometimes several contractors would build designs created by the Air Service. At other times, the Army bought available existing machines. The airships’ identities were linked to the car or gondola, which carried a serial number. The fabric balloon or envelope was not numbered, and was replaceable as needed. Produced in smaller numbers than production line aircraft, the Army’s lighter-than-air vehicles tended to be more individualized pieces of equipment. Early captive spherical observation balloons became less stable in wind. In the late 19th Century, German designers tamed this problem with elongated gas envelopes and stabilizing fins. Progress led to elongated powered freeFred Johnsen is a product of the historical aviation scene in the Pacific Northwest that has fostered everything from museums to historical publishing. An author, historian, curator and photographer, you can reach him at Fred@GeneralAviationNews.com.

flying lighter-than-air craft. The early use of hydrogen gas, with its potential for fire, is cited as a reason hydrogen-filled airships had their cars suspended away from the undersurface of the envelope for safety. When helium became the Army’s gas of choice, gondolas could be mounted close to the envelope. The first free-flying powered airship for the U.S. Army was the so-called SC-1, for Signal Corps No. 1, built in 1908 by Thomas Baldwin. It featured a long open trusswork structure for the crew of two, a single 20-horsepower Curtiss engine, and guiding vanes. Variations on the tethered observation balloon shapes of World War I led to the Army’s use of the United States Motorized Balloon, or USMB, by late 1922. This elongated balloon could either be used tethered or as a free-flying powered vehicle. In 1923, the USMB (also sometimes called the MB-1 or OA-1) was loaned to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which used the airship, fitted with an insecticide hopper, to combat a gypsy moth infestation in New Hampshire. A French design, the ZDUS-1 (later RN-1), was received from a U.S. Navy order of 1918. It was unique for its day in having a cannon in the bow of the car and a defensive machine gun emplacement atop the envelope.

Photo by Air Service photo via 1FW/HO

This Goodyear Pony Blimp served as a training airship for the Army Balloon and Airship School at Scott Field, Illinois, in 1923.

Photo by Air Service via 1FW/HO

The U.S. Army operated a balloon school at Lee Hall, Virginia, during World War I.

Photo by Air Service via 1FW/HO

Ventral fin vertical striping was used on a number of Army blimps. This variant features a long fuselage-like car suspended beneath the envelope — standard practice for hydrogen-filled blimps.


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Photo by Air Service via 1FW/HO

The car for this blimp looks very much like the converted fuselage of a biplane trainer. Army blimps were a highly individualized lot. Photo by Air Service via 1FW/HO

The U.S. Army’s semi-rigid Roma at Langley Field, circa 1921.

Photo by Air Service via 1FW/HO

Photo by 116th Observation Squadron via John E. Dean

Army handlers prepared the Roma for its first flight in the U.S. at Langley Field in November 1921.

It took a lot of hydrogen to keep Army observation balloons and older blimps aloft, as seen in this photo from Fort Lewis, Washington, in 1937. The Army’s brief foray into semi-rigid airships began with the ill-fated Roma. In 1923, another semi-rigid LTA, the RS-1, was ordered from Goodyear. Most Army machines were variations on non-rigid blimp designs. The U.S. Army received the Goodyear TC-13 in 1933. At the time, it was the world’s largest non-rigid airship. The TC13 and TC-14 used five-fin tail surfaces instead of the traditional four. By 1934, the modified Army TE-3 airship had an eight-fin tail array. Not surprisingly, Army airships of the early 1920s used some of the most prevalent American aircraft powerplants of the era, the OX-5, Liberty, and HallScott engines. Foreign-supplied designs sometimes used European powerplants,

and later developments included radial engines. Army blimps experimented with tasks as diverse as picking up mail from a moving train to serving as a carrier vehicle for aircraft — a concept later evolved by the Navy in its huge dirigibles. While the Army’s observation needs were met by fixed-wing aircraft by the time of World War II, the U.S. Navy expanded its use of blimps during World War II for patrol missions. The Army used an exhaustingly varied set of nomenclature schemes to designate its airships over the years. A detailed listing of designations and specifications can be found in “United States Military Aircraft Since 1908” by Peter M. Bowers and Gordon Swanborough.

Photo by 116th Observation Squadron via John E. Dean

On June 19, 1938, the Army still operated this blimp at Fort Lewis near Tacoma, Washington. It is probably a C-6 type.


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

August 9, 2018

Pilot Perspectives: Bush pilot Don Lee By DEREK ROBERTS Alaskan bush pilot — it’s a lifestyle that, at one time or another, almost all pilots dream about. The idea of being paid to practice “real” stick and rudder flying skills, in the world’s most visually spectacular and rugged country seems, for many, to be the ultimate in aviation. As the founder of Alaska Floats and Skis, in Talkeetna, Alaska, Don Lee not only helps pilots achieve that dream, he’s actually living it. After hitchhiking to the 49th state from his home in Minnesota — leaving one day after his high school graduation — Lee worked his way into buying his first airplane and launched a career that has since racked up more than 20,000 flying hours. Though occasional jobs have taken him from South America to the Middle East, Alaska is where he’s made his home since arriving in the mid 1970s — and it’s

where he stills revels in the unbelievable opportunities the state has to offer. “Flying is one thing, but the access to the wilderness is really where it’s at,” he says. “It’s cool to preflight my airplane, jump in, fly 30 miles and not see a road, a cabin, a light, then catch a fish right off the float on the first cast. It’s awesome.” It’s that type of adventurous lifestyle that Lee says leads dozens of pilots to contact him each year looking for advice. “They call me all the time and say ‘I want to be a bush pilot’ and I tell them it’s not a job, it’s a lifestyle,” he relates. This is a fun business, he encourages, “but this is a serious business.” Which is why students at his training outfit not only learn advanced flying skills, but also how to develop the right mental approach to off-airport success. “When I first came here a lot of the old bush pilots were still alive and I always thought they were tough guys and hard drinkers, but it was the exact opposite,”

he says. “Think about it — their airplane was how they were making their living. If they wrecked it, they’d be cutting firewood for the railroad.” “Where’s your rising air, which way is the wind blowing, where’s your avenue for escape?” he asks. “There are hundreds of things that good pilots need to be taught to think about.” Important too, is consideration for your cargo — especially if it’s a passenger. “If you go flying and land some place up in the mountains, is that person going to help you or are you going to have to immediately babysit them?” Don adds. “These are all things to consider.” And while those types of “soft skills” are important when working from the wa-

ter, the stakes are raised when the temperatures drop and operations shift to skis, high up in the mountains. On floats, Lee instructs, “it’s not going to be freezing and you can make a fire or you can swim to shore. But, the places we go in the winter time, we’re up at 7,000’or 8,000’. You can die just walking away from the airplane.” Ultimately though, whether it’s skis, floats or wheels, Lee says that those pilots that go on to success in remote environments “have a passion not only for flying, but for being out in the wilderness and for having the airplane be the conduit that allows them to access those places.” “Alaska — it’s the last frontier!” he says enthusiastically.

Don Lee.

What I fly

I have nine of these Piper Pacers now — five on floats and four on wheels.

Why I fly it

I think they’re underrated. You know they made 12,000 of them! They’re a great airplane. They have the O-320 Lycoming engine, which hasn’t had an AD note on it for 20 years. They’re very economical to work on and they make a great little float plane.

How I fly it

If I’m going to go someplace with my fishing rod, I’ll jump in one of my float Pacers and go out to a remote lake with a creek and fish for grayling for the afternoon. Go pick up some shed caribou horns and I can always take a friend or two if they are light. A hundred miles out, a hundred miles back — that’s what I’ll do.

Flying advice

Life is short, enjoy every minute of it! I tell new pilots, do you realize that for the $7,000 or $8,000 that you pay for a private license, you tap into this multi-trilliondollar industry. All of these airports and it’s free. How great is that! AlaskaFloats.com

Operating Costs (based on 100 hrs. per year) Fuel

9 GPH @ $6.18

$55.62

Annual

$1,500

$15

Insurance

$1,400 per year

$14

Engine Reserve

$18,000 @ 2,000 TBO

$9 Total $93.62

Photos Courtesy Don Lee


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Accident Reports These August 2016 accident reports are provided by the National Transportation Safety Board. Published as an educational tool, they are intended to help pilots learn from the misfortunes of others.

Rusty cylinders contribute to Republic RC3 crash

The pilot was conducting a local flight when the Republic RC3’s engine started to lose power. He attempted a forced landing to a field in Post Oak, Missouri, however, the airplane hit trees. The pilot was seriously injured in the crash. Examination of the engine noted that compression was low in all cylinders, and rust was present inside the cylinders. The airplane was not operated for about four years and had flown about two hours since being returned to service. The partial loss of engine power is consistent with a degradation in cylinder compression, and it is likely that rust formed in the engine during the time the airplane was not being used. Probable cause: A partial loss of engine power due to low cylinder compression. Contributing to the loss of engine power was rust formation in the cylinders due to inactivity.

Poor preflight results in fuel starvation

While on final during a practice instrument approach, the engine lost total power. An attempted engine restart and switching of the fuel tanks was unsuccessful. The flight instructor took control of the Beech V35B from the pilot receiving instruction, and executed a forced landing to a corn field near Sioux Falls, S.D. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings. The airplane was recovered from the field and about one cup of fuel was found in the right fuel tank, while the left wing fuel tank was about 3/4 full. The engine was functionally tested for about 10 minutes on the airframe with no anomalies noted. The pilot reported he did not check the wing fuel tanks during pre-flight and relied on the cockpit fuel gauges for fuel quantity. Probable cause: The pilot’s failure to adequately manage the available fuel supply, resulting in fuel starvation and a total loss of engine power.

Practice goes awry

The student pilot reported he was preparing for his private pilot check ride, and after about 90 minutes of flying, he approached the airport in Simsbury, Connecticut, and entered the traffic pattern for

Runway 21, a 2,205’ runway. He added that, while established on short final, he chose to perform a go-around because he was not “comfortable” with the approach. On the second landing attempt, the Beech C23 floated past the intended touchdown point before landing on the runway, and the student pilot was unable to stop the airplane before it went off the departure end. The plane hit a perimeter fence and an embankment, which resulted in the nose landing gear collapsing and substantial damage to the fuselage and left wing. The winds reported at an airport four miles east of the accident location were from 320° at 7 knots. Probable cause: The student pilot’s failure to attain the proper touchdown point, which resulted in a runway overrun.

and the controls functioned normally during that check. Examination of the airplane revealed that the elevator control operated normally after the accident, but further examination revealed that a plastic elbow fitting for the windshield defroster duct was loose and could be rotated into a position that obstructed full motion of the control yoke. Examination of the elbow revealed that it was not an approved part and appeared to be the type of plastic elbow found in home supply stores. The recent maintenance performed was not in the area where the plastic elbow was located. Probable cause: The incorrect maintenance of the airplane’s ventilation system, which resulted in an obstruction of the elevator control system.

Improperly rigged landing gear leads to crash

The pilot reported that during the landing approach to the grass runway in Lebanon, Indiana, he had ample time to observe the runway surface and the turf appeared smooth and even. He continued the approach and executed a soft field landing. While on the landing roll, he noticed a puddle of water ahead. He commanded full up elevator and attempted to “jump” the puddle, but the Cessna 140 had already slowed below flight speed. The main landing gear hit the standing water that was about 3” deep, and hidden by the grass. The airplane slowed abruptly and nosed over, resulting in substantial damage to the vertical tail and right wing strut. Probable cause: The unseen standing water on the runway that abruptly slowed the tailwheel-equipped airplane during landing, resulting in a nose-over.

The commercial pilot stated that, during the landing roll at the airport in Monett, Missouri, following a normal landing, the North American Navion began pulling to the right. The plane left the runway and traveled down an embankment and through a barbed wire fence. When the pilot inspected the plane, he noted that the right main landing gear (MLG) had collapsed. An examination of the landing gear found that the locking mechanism had been improperly rigged. Several weeks before the accident, the airplane’s right MLG was damaged in an incident and had been replaced with a serviceable unit. A review of maintenance records noted that a gear retraction test was conducted after the replacement and described as satisfactory. It is likely that during this maintenance, the landing gear was improperly rigged, which resulted in its collapse on the accident flight. Probable cause: Maintenance personnel’s failure to properly rig the right main landing gear locking mechanism, which resulted in a gear collapse during landing.

Aborted takeoff bends plane

The pilot reported that, during a maintenance test flight, when the Beech 58 reached rotation speed on takeoff, he applied elevator control to rotate. The elevator control could not be moved sufficiently aft for rotation and liftoff, and he aborted the takeoff at the airport in Wichita Falls, Texas. During the aborted takeoff, the plane travelled off the departure end of the runway and came to a stop on an airport access road. The airplane’s left main landing gear collapsed and the left wing was bent during the accident. The pilot reported he had performed a control system check prior to the flight

Attempt to jump puddle fails

Piper J-5A bent during emergency landing

The pilot was returning from a local flight when he intentionally ran the right fuel tank dry. After switching fuel tanks, he attempted to restart the Piper J-5A’s engine, but the attempt was unsuccessful. During an emergency landing on a narrow road near Sterling, Alaska, the right wing hit brush and trees, which resulted in substantial damage to both wings. Probable cause: The pilot’s improper fuel management, which led to fuel exhaustion and a subsequent forced landing on a road too narrow for the airplane.

CAP evaluation flight ends with bent 182

The flight instructor reported that during a Civil Air Patrol evaluation flight in Fallbrook, California, he decided to demonstrate a power off landing to the pilot being evaluated.

The flight instructor reported that when the Cessna 182 touched down within the first 400’ of the 2,160’ runway, the brakes were ineffective during the landing roll. A pilot witness who observed the landing from the left seat reported that he observed heavy braking, some swerving, a loss of control, and the airplane exited the left side of the runway near the departure end of the runway. During the runway excursion, the airplane nosed over and sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, empennage, and the right wing lift strut. In a Civil Air Patrol online system, the pilot witness reported that over the runway threshold the airspeed was 84 knots, the altitude was 20’, and the airplane touchdown zone was 1/2 to 2/3 down the runway, with 1,000’ of runway remaining. The local flight school provided video surveillance of the landing. The video showed the airplane still airborne while in the camera frame, which was about 700’ past the runway threshold. The plane subsequently moved out of camera view and was still airborne. The video did not show the airplane touch down on the runway. In a post-accident examination four days after the accident by the FAA, both brakes were found to be functional. In a post-accident inspection almost two weeks after the accident by the repair mechanic, it was revealed that the left brake was working, but the right brake was “full of air.” The mechanic reported that when the plane was upside down air can enter into the hydraulic system, so “all bets are off.” The mechanic further reported that there were no flat or bald spots on the tires. Probable cause: The flight instructor’s failure to go-around and the subsequent long landing and his failure to maintain directional control, which resulted in a runway excursion.

Distracted student hits hangar with 172’s wing

The solo student pilot reported that after he had landed at the airport in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, he taxied to get fuel. He was waved around behind two parked airplanes. After he passed the first airplane, the left wing of his Cessna 172 hit a hangar. The plane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and fuselage. The student pilot reported that this accident could have been prevented if he had remained focused “on the task of taxiing the airplane, rather than looking at the person/parking spot.” Probable cause: The student pilot’s distraction during taxi operations, which resulted in the airplane’s left wing hitting a hangar.


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Accident Reports Loose B-nut results in fuel starvation

The pilot reported that after takeoff, and about 150’ above the runway in Bruns­ wick, Georgia, the Cirrus SR20’s engine had a total loss of power. He also reported that a clear liquid sprayed from the upper cowling onto the windscreen. He aborted the takeoff, landed on the runway remaining, but was unable to stop prior to the end of the runway. The plane skidded off the runway and hit the airport perimeter fence, which resulted in substantial damage to both wings. During a post-accident examination, the cowling was removed, the electric fuel pump was actuated, and fuel was observed leaking from the fuel input line fitting at the fuel flow divider. After further examination, it was revealed that the torque strip had been disturbed and the fuel line B-nut was found to be loose. After the B-nut was tightened, no fuel leaks were observed. A review of the airplane’s engine maintenance log revealed that no recent maintenance had been performed involving the fuel pump, fuel flow divider, or associated fuel lines. Probable cause: The total loss of engine power during takeoff due to a loose B-nut on the fuel flow divider input fuel line fitting, which resulted in a fuel leak and fuel starvation.

C172 bent by prop wash

The flight instructor reported that while he and the student pilot were on a taxiway in Anchorage, Alaska, under air traffic control (ATC) instruction, the Cessna 172 encountered prop wash, originating from a larger, four-engine turbine-powered airplane performing a maintenance engines run-up. The run-up was performed in a location adjacent to the active taxiway that was authorized for parking as well as 80% engine power run-ups. The Cessna 172 was not on frequency when the larger turbine-powered airplane was given the clearance, and was not told by ATC at any time during their taxi of the larger turbine-powered airplane’s intentions. Subsequently, the 172 was blown approximately 80’ from its original location while taxiing behind the turbinepowered airplane, which resulted in substantial damage to the firewall. As a safety recommendation, the flight instructor stated that the incident could have been prevented with better communications between the tower controllers and the turbine-powered airplane’s ground personnel. Probable cause: The facility’s designation of the taxiway for use by maintenance personnel to conduct high thrust tests without appropriate safeguards in

place, which led to maintenance personnel conducting high-power, run-up thrust procedures across the active taxiway and resulted in the loss of directional control of a Cessna 172 on the taxiway when it encountered a sudden, unexpected blast of engine thrust.

Distracted pilot seriously injured in RV-6A crash

The pilot stated that, before takeoff, he waited with the engine running for about 10 minutes while other traffic departed. While waiting, he unlatched the canopy to allow air into the cockpit, however, he failed to re-secure the canopy before takeoff. Just after the RV-6A lifted off the runway, the canopy tilted up, and, while attempting to close it, the pilot said he “got distracted and neglected to fly the airplane.” The plane experienced an aerodynamic stall and hit terrain near Pekin, Illinois. The pilot was seriously injured in the crash. Probable cause: The pilot’s failure to latch the canopy before takeoff, and his subsequent distraction.

Piper hits branch on beach

The pilot reported that during landing on a coastal beach in Anchor Point, Alaska, the Piper PA-18’s left wing hit a driftwood tree branch that protruded from a higher berm. The airplane spun to the left, which resulted in substantial damage to the elevator and both ailerons. The pilot added he had seen the tree, but not the branch, on his initial flight over the landing area while looking for debris. Probable cause: The pilot’s failure to maintain clearance from obstacles while landing on a coastal beach.

Fuel exhaustion leads to 150’s forced landing

The pilot reported that while en-route to his destination airport, he saw a “small area of rain” ahead. He “circled around for a while” waiting for the weather to clear, but during the circling he “ran out of fuel” and the Cessna 150 lost power. He landed in a corn field near North Conway, N.H., and the plane nosed over. The firewall sustained substantial damage. Probable cause: The pilot’s improper fuel management, which resulted in fuel exhaustion, a total loss of engine power, a forced landing, and nose over.

Carb icing brings down Bellanca

The pilot and flight instructor were performing a recurrent training flight in the tailwheel-equipped Bellanca 7ECA. Both pilots reported that the takeoff roll and acceleration on the 1,900’ grass run-

way in Lino Lakes, Minnesota, seemed normal. As the plane approached the predetermined decision point, they decided to continue the takeoff. The plane became airborne near the end of the runway, and the wheels hit vegetation past the departure end. The airplane slowed, settled into a marshy area, and came to rest inverted. Review of the airplane’s performance data indicated that, under the conditions present at the time of the accident, the airplane’s ground run would be about 546’, and the distance to clear a 50’ obstacle would be about 1,192’. However, review of carburetor icing probability charts indicated the potential for moderate icing at cruise power and serious icing at descent power. The CFI reported that, during the takeoff roll, the carburetor heat was off. It is likely that carburetor ice accumulated during taxi and run-up before the takeoff, which resulted in a loss of engine power and reduced takeoff performance. Probable cause: A partial loss of engine power due to the formation of carburetor ice, which resulted in reduced climb capability and impact with vegetation and terrain during takeoff.

Distracted Piper pilot hits Cessna on the ground

The pilot of the parked Cessna 500 reported that he and his co-pilot had just reentered the airplane at the airport in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and were having a conversation when he felt the plane shake and heard a loud noise. He looked out of the right window and saw a Piper PA-34 with its propeller hitting the right wing. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing. The pilot of the other airplane reported that, after engine start and before taxi for takeoff, he was looking at his navigation communications and did not notice the airplane rolling forward. He further reported that he thought the hand brake was fully engaged. The Piper sustained minor damage. Probable cause: The pilot’s failure to ensure that the brake was fully engaged and his subsequent failure to notice that his airplane was rolling forward, which resulted in it hitting another airplane.

Unfamiliarity causes crash

After a one-hour local flight during which he familiarized himself with the Rans Coyote’s stall characteristics, the student pilot/owner of the experimental light-sport airplane returned to his home airport in London, Kentucky, to practice touch-and-go landings. The LSA bounced during the final landing attempt, and while recovering, he applied full power to the engine for a go-

around. The airplane then banked to the right due to the engine’s counter-clockwise rotation “p factor effect” and began heading toward a hangar located off the right side of the runway, he explained. Due to the airplane’s low altitude and airspeed, he chose to continue the right turn to avoid hitting the hangar, and once clear of it, tried to climb the plane to clear an approaching tree line. However, the right wing hit one of the trees. The plane then hit the ground, which resulted in substantial damage to the airframe and serious injuries to the pilot. The pilot attributed the loss of control during the go-around attempt to his unfamiliarity with the flight characteristics of the counter-clockwise rotation of the airplane’s two-stroke engine and his lack of flight experience in experimental LSAs. Probable cause: The student pilot’s improper recovery from a bounced landing and his subsequent failure to maintain clearance from trees during an attempted go-around.

Pilot’s failure to see and avoid bends airplane

While flying over a lake near Reno, Nevada, the pilot developed a severe headache and decided to land on a remote dirt area on the northwest side of the lake to rest. He overflew his intended landing site and did not see any obstructions to landing. However, close to touch down he noticed fence posts perpendicular to his landing path and applied full power to climb over them, but was unsuccessful. The Grumman American AA-5A hit the posts, which resulted in substantial damage to the wings. Probable cause: The pilot’s failure to see and avoid fence posts during landing, which resulted in substantial damage to the wings.

Failure to go-around contributes to crash

The pilot reported that about seven nm from the airport he mistook a road for the runway, which resulted in the Piper PA28 being above the normal approach path for landing. He reduced power to idle, applied full flaps, and entered a side slip, but the airplane did not touchdown until about 1/2 to 3/4 down the runway at the airport in Hamburg, N.Y. The plane overran the runway, the landing gear collapsed, and the right wing hit a guard rail on a road about 550’ beyond the runway threshold. The right wing sustained substantial damage. Probable cause: The pilot’s failure to perform a go-around, which resulted in a landing area overshoot, a runway overrun, a landing gear collapse, and a collision with a guard rail.


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Aspen Avionics unveils Evolution MAX

Redbird, Wipaire, Tropic Aero team up to modernize floatplane training A new partnership between Redbird Flight Simulations, Wipaire and Tropic Ocean Airways seeks to modernize floatplane training. Redbird has customized its immersive, full-motion CRV training device — which represents a Cessna 208 Grand Caravan — to include an amphibious float kit from Wipaire. Now, without setting foot in their aircraft, the pilots at Tropic Ocean Airways will be able to experience safely and accurately the flight characteristics and training events specific to their operations. The custom Redbird CRV is equipped with Wipaire’s Laser Gear Advisory System, which provides intelligent alerts when gear position and detected landing surface are mismatched. RedbirdFlight.com, Wipaire.com, FlyTropic.com

Aspen Avionics introduced its new line of Evolution MAX series flight displays at EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2018. The new series offers a bolder and brighter display, increased reliability, and multiple customer-requested functions, such as font and window enlargement and increased processing speeds, company officials said. The form factor, however, has not changed, officials added. The Evolution MAX series is comprised of the following displays: Evolution Pro 1000 MAX PFD ($9,995); Evolution MFD500 MAX MFD ($5,495); and Evolution MFD1000 MAX MFD ($8,995). All MAX displays can be configured for one, two, or three units. With the installation of a dual unit system comprised of the EFD1000 Pro MAX and the Evolution MFD1000 MAX, owners can eliminate vacuum system backup indicators, company officials said. Key features of the MAX series include GPS-aided AHRS in the event of pitot static failure; faster refresh rates with the latest generation processors; altitude intercept based on climb rate; and approved for more than 600 aircraft types The Evolution MAX series will be available starting in the fourth quarter of 2018. Upgrades of existing displays will start at an introductory price of $2,995. AspenAvionics.com

Electoair earns approval for turbo-charged Lycoming and Continental engines Electroair has earned installation approval from the FAA of its EIS-61000-5M Electronic Ignition Kit on aircraft powered by turbo-charged Lycoming engines. Engine series include the TIO-540, TIO-541, TIGO-540, and the non-turbo’d IO-580 and AEIO-580. Electroair has also been granted installation approval for the Continental O-300, GO-300, E-165, E-185 and E-225 series of engines. These engines are found on classic and legacy aircraft, which are often overlooked by many aircraft system modification companies, according to company officials. “This latest expansion to our six-cylinder STC rounds out our Approved Model List, making the Electroair electronic ignition system available to a tremendous number of different aircraft,” said Michael Kobylik, Electroair president. “Electroair electronic ignition systems are now FAA approved for well over 400 aircraft models.” Electroair.net

New autopilot option for Grumman AA-5 owners The STC Group has received a Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) for the installation of the nonTSO’d Trio Pro Pilot digital autopilot into all models of Grumman AA-5 aircraft, according to STC Group Founder and CEO Paul Odum. Frustration with trying to install a traditional after­ market autopilot in his 1975 Cessna 182P led to certifying Trio Avionics experimental autopilot for certified aircraft. “Trio’s Pro Pilot autopilot has a proven record of

Dynon adds to portable avionics line Dynon has introduced the D3, the latest edition of its Pocket Panel EFIS, and the DRX, a portable, dual-band ADS-B traffic and weather receiver. The D3 Pocket Panel lets pilots supplement their legacy instrumentation with a portable electronic attitude indicator. Featuring a new synthetic vision display, an intuitive touchscreen interface, and an even lower price point, the D3 is the most advanced portable safety device Dynon has ever made, according to company officials. The D3 features the same AHRS engine that Dynon uses in its panel-mounted products for experimental, light-sport, and type certificated aircraft. The D3 comes with a complete set of accessories, including home and airplane chargers, an optional external GPS antenna,

reliability in the Experimental and Warbird fleets. As such, it is an excellent off-the-shelf choice to retrofit into the legacy GA fleet based on its record of safety and reliability,” said Odum. The STC covers all variants of the Cessna 172, 175, 180, 182, 185, PA-28, and now the Grumman AA-5. STCs for the Cessna 190, 195, several Cessna 210 models, and Piper PA-32 are in development and expect to be STC’d this fall. TheSTCGroupLLC.com

and two mounting options. Both the cockpit mounting options require no tools, allowing the D3 to be deployed in any aircraft with no FAA approval. The D3’s list price is $995. The Dynon DRX is an ADS-B traffic and weather receiver that is small enough to fit in a pocket, but can also last all weekend on a single charge, according to Dynon officials. DRX supports connectivity with most mobile apps, including ForeFlight and FlyQ. The DRX allows pilots to see the entire traffic picture with dual band ADS-B reception. Pilots also benefit from in-cockpit ADS-B weather products, such as NEXRAD Radar, METARS, TAFs, and more. DRX additionally provides WAAS GPS position to mobile devices and has auto-dimming status lights for night flight. List price is $395. DynonAvionics.com


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Avidyne IFD550 and Lynx NGT-9000 packaged for savings

AirtextLT debuts at Oshkosh Send Solutions, the manufacturer of Airtext, a low-cost Iridium aviation text messaging product, unveiled AirtextLT on opening day of EAA AirVenture Osh­ kosh. The company first introduced Airtext, a small, lightweight, certified aircraft texting product. It then introduced Airtext+, a small lightweight, certified aircraft talk and text product. Now, the company has introduced an even smaller, lighter, and lower cost texting product that is portable, the AirtextLT. “Initially we were filling the need in corporate aviation for low-cost connectivity. Airtext works anywhere in the world at any altitude for 5 cents a message,” says David Gray, founder of Send Solutions. “Our customers then asked for a low-cost solution for voice calling so they could remove legacy products that were outdated but utilize the iridium antenna on the airplane. We introduced Airtext+ that allows phone calls for only $1.60 per minute. “With the approaching ADS-B mandate deadline at the end of 2019 we found that avionics facilities were limited in installation man-hours and could not fit Airtext installations into their schedule,” he continued. “By having a portable solution we have solved the temporary inconvenience of installation availability and still provide the low-cost connectivity to the customer. An added bonus is AirtextLT is ⅓ the size, ½ the weight, and is ½ the price of its certified big brother Airtext.” Price is $4,950. Data service is $300 a year, which includes the first 500 text messages. Additional messages are 5 cents per message. AirtextLT is a complete portable system that includes a 1.5” GPS-type antenna that is placed on the glareshield and DC or AC converter. If there is an existing Iridium antenna on the airplane that provides even better signal strength, AirtextLT can connect to that, company officials said. AirtextLT is available through Sporty’s, authorized avionics dealers, and from Send Solutions direct. Airtext.aero

Avidyne Corporation is offering an ADS-B Premium Package, which includes $2,500 cash back and a free ADS-B Traffic Advisory System (ATAS) upgrade for customers who purchase a new Avidyne IFD550 GPS/Flight Management System (FMS) along with a Lynx NGT-9000 ADS-B Transponder. In addition to the $2,500 cash back from Avidyne after installation, this promo includes a free upgrade to the aural alerting capability on the Lynx system. ATAS is the FAA-approved traffic advisory algorithm that announces range, bearing and relative altitude of intruder aircraft through the cockpit audio system. Avidyne’s IFD550 ($21,990) is a touchscreen navigator that provides SBAS/ LPV precision navigation and is designed to meet the accuracy and integrity requirements for ADS-B, as part of the FAA’s NextGen airspace initiative, company officials explain. The IFD550, a direct replacement for legacy systems, has an integrated Attitude Reference Sensor (ARS), and includes Synthetic Vision and integrated wireless connectivity, company officials add. The Lynx NGT-9000 ($6,170) is a turnkey solution for general aviation aircraft, providing enhanced situational awareness, ATAS ($667) traffic alerting below 500’, safety and ADS-B compliance, company officials said. The Lynx provides 1090MHz ADS-B Out and dual-band (1090MHz and 978MHZ) ADS-B In capability. Lynx interfaces with the Avidyne display for traffic, terrain, and graphical and textual weather, as well as moving maps depicting geopolitical boundaries. Up-to-the-minute Notices to Airmen (NOTAMs), Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFRs), and Winds and Temps Aloft data are also included, according to company officials. This offer is good on orders placed with Avidyne between now and Sept. 28, 2018. Avidyne.com, L-3Lynx.com

Sporty’s launches Stratus 3 Sporty’s has introduced Stratus 3, the latest generation of the weather receiver. The new model includes features such as subscription-free weather, dual band ADS-B traffic, GPS, and backup attitude information, plus additional app options, and a lower price. Stratus 3 has an introductory price of $699, which is $200 less than Stratus 2S, according to Sporty’s officials. New features include an automatic shutoff mode that senses the conclusion of a flight, saving battery life. Another new feature is smart WiFi, which allows pilots to use the iPad’s LTE connection while connected to Stratus 3, ideal for lastminute flight plan changes on the ground.

ASA’s 2019 Test Prep products now available ASA’s 2019 Test Prep and Test Guide books, Test Prep Bundles, and Prepware software are now available and shipping has begun. Materials are available for pilots, remote pilots, and aviation mechanics. The 2019 Test Prep and Test Guide books include five free online practice tests and the option for pilot applicants to receive their endorsement (test authorization). ASA officials noted that endorsements are only provided for eligible pilot exams, and are not issued for aviation maintenance tests. AMTs must get authorization from their school. Test Preps for pilots include the Testing Supplement with the same FAA legends, figures, and full-color charts issued at the testing center to help you become familiar with all available information before you take your official test. FAA test figures for Test Guides are included in the book near the questions to which they apply. 2019 Prepware Software can be installed to laptop and desktop computers (PC and Mac compatible) and includes a 24-month subscription to Prepware Online. Students can study for their exam using the installed program on a desktop or laptop computer, or log in to their Prepware Online account from any internet-connected computer, tablet or smartphone. Prepware is available in multiple formats including software (DVD-ROM or Download, compatible with PCs and Macs), Prep­ware Online (compatible with any internet-connected device, including iPads), Test Prep and Test Guide Bundles (book + software), Prepware School (for instructors and institutions), as well as apps for Apple iOS and Android operating systems. ASA also keeps up with changes in the FAA Knowledge Exams with a free email subscription service and updates, company officials added. ASA2Fly.com Pilots can now hide the Stratus WiFi network or make it password-protected, a critical feature for airline and military pilots, Sporty’s officials noted. Stratus 3 can also take advantage of some new features from the FAA and ForeFlight. It will receive five new ADS-B products when they start broadcasting later this year, including echo tops, lightning, icing and turbulence forecasts, Center Weather Advisories, and G-AIRMETs. ADS-B traffic is also better than ever, with a 3D display of nearby targets in ForeFlight’s updated synthetic vision view, added Sporty’s officials. Sportys.com/Stratus


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General Aviation News —  Buyer’s Guide Marketplace — 800.426.8538

August 9, 2018

Calendar of Events

POWERED BY

WEEK OF APRIL 1, 2013

Western United States

Aug. 12, 2018, Davis, CA. EAA Chapter 52 Pancake Breakfast/Antique Aircraft Display Day, 858-395-6718 Aug. 14, 2018, Los Gatos, CA. Los Gatos Hangar Flyers Weekly Coffee, 408-209-3067 Aug. 15, 2018, Lincoln, CA. EAA Chapter 1541 Membership Meeting Aug. 16, 2018, Mountain View, CA. Mountain View Hangar Flying Coffee Drinkers Aug. 16, 2018, Seattle, WA. IA AMT 145 Repair Station AC Owners And Operators Maintenance QA Seminar, 425-227-2247 Aug. 17, 2018, Concord, CA. Monthly MDPA Meeting & Dinner Aug. 18-19, 2018, Camarillo, CA. Wings Over Camarillo, 805-910-5905 Aug. 18, 2018, Redlands, CA. National Aviation Day Fly-In, 909-557-5292 Aug. 18, 2018, Richland, WA. Wings and Wheels 2018, 509-539-3533 Aug. 18, 2018, Susanville, CA. Susanville Air Fair, 530-249-3063 Aug. 18, 2018, Sacramento, CA. Hangar Flying, Coffee & Donuts at KSAC Hangar 27, 858-395-6718 Aug. 18, 2018, Klamath Falls, OR. Klamath Falls Annual EAA Fly-In, 901-497-4010 Aug. 18, 2018, Erie, CO. EAA Chapter 43 Young Eagles Rally, 303-744-8180 Aug. 18, 2018, Everett, WA. Challenge Air Fly Day — Kids With Special Needs — at Paine Field, 214-351-3353 Aug. 18, 2018, Compton, CA. EAA Chapter 96 General Meeting, 310-612-2751 Aug. 21, 2018, Los Gatos, CA. Los Gatos Hangar Flyers Weekly Coffee, 408-209-3067 Aug. 21, 2018, Fullerton, CA. FAPA Meeting/Seminar, 714-588-9346 Aug. 23-24, 2018, San Carlos, CA. GA SPARK, 650-946-1700 Aug. 23, 2018, Mountain View, CA. Mountain View Hangar Flying Coffee Drinkers Aug. 24-25, 2018, Madras, OR. The Airshow of the Cascades, 541-475-0155 Aug. 24-26, 2018, Republic, WA. 19th Annual Wings Over Republic Fly-In, 509-775-3939 Aug. 25, 2018, Albany, OR. EAA Grilled Burger Lunch, 541-730-3345 Aug. 25-26, 2018, McChord Field, WA. JBLM Airshow & Warrior Expo 2018 Aug. 25, 2018, Albuquerque, NM. 28th Land of Enchantment Fly-In Aug. 25, 2018, Vacaville, CA. Legends of Flight Fly-In and Pancake Breakfast, 425-442-0963 Aug. 25, 2018, Bremerton, WA. Bremerton Fly-In and Car Show, 360-710-3481 Aug. 25, 2018, Hermiston, OR. EAA Chapter 219 Last Saturday Breakfast, 541-969-8444 Aug. 25, 2018, Renton, WA. IFR Workshop, 425-336-7445 Aug. 28, 2018, Sacramento, CA. EAA Chapter 52 General Membership Meeting, 8583-956-718 Aug. 31-Sept. 03, 2018, Los Angeles, CA. LA Fleet Week, 310-732-3498 Sept. 01, 2018, Groveland, CA. EAA Chapter 1337 Meeting, 209-962-5061 Sept. 01, 2018, Hillsboro, OR. EAA Chapter 105 Pancake Breakfast Sept. 01, 2018, Placerville, CA. EAA Chapter 512 Pancake Breakfast, 9163376700

South Central United States

Aug. 14, 2018, Lubbock, TX. EAA Chapter 19 Meeting Aug. 16-17, 2018, Mexico, MO. Zenith Aircraft Hands-On Workshop, 573-581-9000 Aug. 18, 2018, Mountain View, AR. Third Saturday Breakfast, 870-269-3142 Aug. 18, 2018, Oklahoma City, OK. Okie Derby, 405-921-7763 Aug. 19, 2018, Fayetteville, AR. EAA Chapter 732 Regular Meeting, 479-986-4308 Aug. 20, 2018, Lee's Summit, MO. EAA Chapter 91 Monthly Meeting, 816-350-2289 Aug. 21, 2018, Webb City, MO. Avionics Seminar Featuring Reps From Garmin and Aspen Avionics, 417-623-3113 Aug. 23, 2018, Houston, TX. Wings and Wheels, 713-454-1940 Aug. 24-26, 2018, St. Joseph, MO. Sound of Speed Open House & Air Show, 816-236-3274 Aug. 25, 2018, North Little Rock, AR. Super Breakfast with EAA Chapter 165, 419-360-7414 Aug. 25, 2018, Marion, KS. Cookout & Campout, 620-381-1347 Sept. 01, 2018, Ponca City, OK. Ponca City Aviation Booster Club Fly-In Breakfast Sept. 01, 2018, Hot Springs, AR. Hot EAA Breakfast

North Central United States

Aug. 12, 2018, Offutt AFB, NE. Defenders of Freedom Air Show, 402-294-8800 Aug. 12, 2018, La Porte, IN. La Porte Aero Club Annual Pancake Breakfast, 219-363-7417 Aug. 12, 2018, Poplar Grove, IL. Fly-In DriveIn Breakfast and Young Eagles Rally Aug. 12, 2018, Waterford Township, MI. Oakland County International Airport Open House & Air Show, 248-666-3900 Aug. 12, 2018, Mason, MI. Young Eagles, 517-853-1418 Aug. 13, 2018, Frankenmuth, MI. Grassroots Aviators Aug. 13, 2018, Valparaiso, IN. Hands On EAA Chapter 104 Meeting, 219-308-8129 Aug. 13, 2018, Omaha, NE. EAA Chapter 80 Meeting Aug. 14-15, 2018, Neenah, WI. Young Eagle Rides, 920-427-6160 Aug. 14, 2018, Kearney, NE. EAA Chapter 1091 Monthly Meeting Aug. 14, 2018, Chicago/Romeoville, IL. EAA Chapter 15 Monthly Meeting, 630-330-5362 Aug. 16, 2018, Peoria, IL. Thursday Morning Coffee in EAA Chapter 563 Hangar, 309-696-1428 Aug. 16-19, 2018, Urbana, IL. Ford Tri-Motor Tour Stop Aug. 17-18, 2018, Bemidji, MN. Moberg Fly-in Aug. 17, 2018, Rochester, IN. Free Friday Fly-In Lunches, 574-551-7035 Aug. 18-19, 2018, Chicago, IL. 60th Annual City of Chicago Air & Water Show, 312-744-7431 Aug. 18-19, 2018, Terre Haute, IN. Terre Haute Air Show, 812-877-2524 Aug. 18, 2018, Grinnell, IA. Fly Iowa 2018, 515-360-5235 Aug. 18, 2018, Guttenberg, IA. Abel Island Flyin, Float-in, Potluck and BBQ, 319-480-0913 Aug. 18, 2018, Gladwin, MI. Sugar Springs Fly-In Pancake Breakfast Aug. 18, 2018, Mason, MI. Mason

Aviation Day, 517-333-4531 Aug. 18, 2018, Peoria, IL. EAA Chapter 563 Pancake Breakfast, 309-696-1428 Aug. 18, 2018, Omaha, NE. EAA Chapter 80 Young Eagles Rally Aug. 18, 2018, Crete, NE. Crete Hangar Breakfast Aug. 18, 2018, Eden Prairie, MN. Oops! In the Soup!, 952-210-8600 Aug. 18, 2018, Mandan, ND. EAA Chapter 1008 Monthly Meeting, 701-391-1394 Aug. 18, 2018, Peru, IN. Peru Municipal Airport Open House, 765-472-1990 Aug. 18, 2018, Westfield, IN. Westfield Airport Open House Aug. 19, 2018, Mankato, MN. EAA Chapter 642 Fly-In Breakfast, 507-380-8377 Aug. 19, 2018, Boyceville, WI. Pancake Breakfast By The Boyceville Airport Booster Club, 218-393-5264 Aug. 19, 2018, Preston, MN. Fillmore County Fly-in/Drive in, 507-951-1788 Aug. 19, 2018, Poplar Grove, IL. 46th Annual Pancake Breakfast Aug. 23, 2018, Peoria, IL. Thursday Morning Coffee in EAA Chapter 563 Hangar, 309-696-1428 Aug. 23, 2018, Traverse City, MI. EAA Chapter 234 IMC Club, 231-590-5341 Aug. 23, 2018, Chicago/Aurora, IL. EAA Chapter 579 Meeting Aug. 24-25, 2018, Mattoon, IL. Air Show '18 Mattoon, 217-234-7100 Aug. 24-26, 2018, Ottumwa, IA. Fly Ottumwa Airshow, 641-680-4083 Aug. 24, 2018, La Porte, IN. Friday Lunch on the Fly, 219-324-3393 Aug. 25-26, 2018, Ypsilanti, MI. Thunder over Michigan, 734-637-8880 Aug. 25, 2018, Richmond, IN. Richmond Aviation Day Aug. 25, 2018, Auburn, IN. VAA Chapter 37 Breakfast, 260-348-4776 Aug. 25, 2018, Luverne, MN. Luverne Fly-in Breakfast, 605-413-4028 Aug. 25, 2018, Holland, MI. Wings of Mercy Fly-In, 616-610-5857 Aug. 25, 2018, Minneapolis, MN. The Engine Failure Emergency: A Survival Guide, 952-210-8600 Aug. 25, 2018, Monee, IL. Meadow Creek Fly-in/Drive-in Open House, 312-446-2163 Aug. 25, 2018, Mentone, IN. Rotors Over Mentone, 574-328-2034 Aug. 26, 2018, Waterford, MI. OCIA Air Show and Open House, 888-350-0900 Aug. 26, 2018, Burlington, WI. Burlington Open House, 262-758-0894 Aug. 28, 2018, Richmond, IN. B-17 Tour Stop, 800-359-6217 Aug. 28, 2018, Eden Prairie, MN. EAA/ IMC Club 878, 612-272-4600 Aug. 30, 2018, Peoria, IL. Thursday Morning Coffee in EAA Chapter 563 Hangar, 309-696-1428

North Eastern United States

Aug. 12, 2018, College Park, MD. 100 Year Anniversary Of Airmail Celebration, 3018645844 Aug. 12, 2018, Dayton, OH. EAA Chapter 48 Hot Dog and Ice Cream Fly-in, 417-343-4968 Aug. 12, 2018, Stroudsburg, PA. Pegasus Airpark Grass Field Fly-In/

SocialFlight is the most comprehensive tool ever created for finding aviationrelated events! Aircraft Fly-in's, Airshows, Pancake Breakfasts, Conventions, FAA Safety Seminars... they're all here! With SocialFlight, you can also chat with other attendees and even upload & view photos of the events! Whether you love flying, watching airplanes, ultralights, balloons or anything else airborne, this is the place for you. Keep exploring to discover all the features that SocialFlight has to offer.

Now get out there and FLY! www.socialflight.com Drive-In, 570-643-6499 Aug. 12, 2018, Stow, MA. Crow Island Airpark Annual Summer Fly-In, 978-273-7460 Aug. 13, 2018, Carlisle, PA. Carlisle Flying Club Monthly Meeting, 717-830-8773 Aug. 14, 2018, Fitchburg, MA. Fitchburg Pilot's Association (FPA) Monthly Meeting Aug. 16-18, 2018, Bethel, PA. Golden Age Air Museum Radio Control Model Meet, 717-933-9566 Aug. 16, 2018, Stow, MA. Wings and Wheels at Minute Man, 508-517-5574 Aug. 17-18, 2018, Conneaut, OH. D-Day Conneaut WWII Reenactment, 440-823-6667 Aug. 18, 2018, Springfield, KY. Fly-In Breakfast Aug. 18, 2018, Delaware, OH. DLZ EAA Chapter 1600 Monthly Pancake Breakfast, 614-439-9587 Aug. 18, 2018, Newark, OH. EAA Chapter 402 Fly-In/Drive-In Pancake Breakfast, 740-323-6994 Aug. 18-19, 2018, Urbana, OH. MidEastern Regional Fly In, 937-652-4319 Aug. 18, 2018, Bayport, NY. Antique Airplane Club of Greater New York 55th Annual Fly-In, 631-245-0829 Aug. 18, 2018, Philipsburg, PA. MidState Airport Fly-In, 814-342-6296 Aug. 18, 2018, Limington, ME. EAA Chapter 141 Monthly Meeting, 207-318-4427 Aug. 18, 2018, Springfield, OH. EAA Chapter 9 Young Eagles, 301-639-0616 Aug. 18-19, 2018, Akron, OH. Props and Pistons Festival Aug. 18, 2018, Fremont, OH. Hangar One Hot Dog Cookout, 419-332-8037

For more events and to stay up-to-date, go to www.socialflight.com


August 9, 2018

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General Aviation News —  Buyer’s Guide Marketplace — 800.426.8538

August 9, 2018

For more events and to stay up-to-date, go to www.socialflight.com Aug. 18, 2018, Georgetown, OH. Flying Musicians Hangar Jam Aug. 19, 2018, Groton, CT. Groton-New London Airport Annual Open House & Walking Tour Aug. 19, 2018, Brockport, NY. Spencerport Rotary Pancake Breakfast, 585-391-6515 Aug. 19, 2018, Batavia, OH. EAA Chapter 174 Meeting, 937-515-7453 Aug. 19, 2018, Trumbull County, OH. EAA Chapter 5 Fly-in, Picnic & Ice Cream Social at Farm Strip in Gustavus, OH, 843-269-5597 Aug. 20, 2018, Pittstown, NJ. EAA Chapter 643 Monthly Meeting, 908 586-4875 Aug. 20, 2018, Rochester, NY. Artisan Flying Club, 585-615-5710 Aug. 21, 2018, Manassas, VA. Compassion Airlift Pilots' Meeting, 703-812-4733 Aug. 22, 2018, Atlantic City, NJ. Atlantic City Thunder over the Boardwalk, 603-465-0155 Aug. 23, 2018, Stow, MA. Wings and Wheels at Minute Man, 508-517-5574 Aug. 25-26, 2018, Livermore Falls, ME. 32nd Annual Bowman Field Fly-In, 207-897-5104 Aug. 25, 2018, Owls Head, ME. Pancake Breakfast, 203-530-6681 Aug. 25-26, 2018, New Philadelphia, OH. Fly in a DC-3 or a WWII B-25 Bomber, 330-340-2999 Aug. 25, 2018, Chesapeake, VA. EAA/CAF Pancake Breakfast/Fly-in, 757-617-6300 Aug. 25, 2018, Limington, ME. Hangar Flying EAA Chapter 141 Hangar Aug. 25, 2018, Chase City, VA. Chase City (CXE) Fly-In Breakfast, 434-372-5136 Aug. 25, 2018, Fremont, OH. Hangar One Hot Dog Cookout, 419-332-8037 Aug. 26, 2018, Lumberton, NJ. All You Can Eat Pancake Breakfast At The Patti Wagon Cafe (N14), 609-265-2233 Aug. 26, 2018, Cumberland, MD. EAA Chapter 426 Fly-In Breakfast, 301-268-2624 Aug. 30, 2018, Stow, MA. Wings and

Wheels at Minute Man, 508-517-5574 Aug. 31-Sept. 02, 2018, Cincinnati, OH. B-17 Tour Stop, 800-359-6217 Aug. 31, 2018, Ravenna, OH. RunwayFest Fly-In/Cruise-In/Run-In, 216-630-2258 Aug. 31, 2018, Cleveland, OH. Corks in the Concourse/Burke Lakefront Airport. Pre Airshow Wine Tasting Event, 216-623-1111 Sept. 01-03, 2018, Cleveland, OH. Cleveland National Air Show, 216-781-0747 Sept. 01, 2018, Suffolk, VA. Fly-In Breakfast Social, 757-925-1174 Sept. 01, 2018, Limington, ME. Hangar Flying EAA Chapter 141 Hangar Sept. 01, 2018, Fremont, OH. Hangar One Hot Dog Cookout, 419-332-8037 Sept. 01, 2018, Orono, ME. Becoming a Snowbird: Does the Cold Weather Have You Stuck in Your Hangar? Sept. 01, 2018, Lyndonville, VT. EAA Chapter 1576 Monthly Meeting, 802-626-3353 Sept. 01, 2018, Sunbury, PA. EAA Chapter 769 Fly-In Lunch Sept. 02, 2018, Elmira/Corning, NY. EAA 533 Fly-in Breakfast

South Eastern United States

Aug. 12, 2018, Naples, FL. Fly-In Breakfast/Young Eagles Rally Aug. 13, 2018, Rock Hill, SC. EAA Chapter 961 Monthly Meeting, 704-965-4998 Aug. 15, 2018, Stuart, FL. EAA Chapter 692 Monthly Meeting Aug. 17, 2018, Fort Myers, FL. Fly-In Fridays Hot Dog Social, 239-590-6600 Aug. 18, 2018, Huntsville, AL. EAA Chapter 190 Pancake Breakfast at Moontown Airport, 256-852-9781 Aug. 18, 2018, Dawson, GA. EAA Chapter 354 Country Breakfast, 229-435-1667 Aug. 18, 2018, Deland, FL. EAA Chapter 635 Fly-In Breakfast, 407-920-1305 Aug. 18, 2018, Lawrenceville, GA. EAA Chapter 690 Young Eagles Rally, 770-377-4739 Aug. 18, 2018, Sarasota/Braden, FL. EAA Chapter 180 Young Eagles and Free Pancake Breakfast, 941-356-0591 Aug. 18, 2018, Collegedale, TN. EAA Chapter 150 Monthly Meeting, 423-593-3043 Aug. 18, 2018, Newland, NC. EAA Chapter 1271 Meeting Aug. 19, 2018, Moncks Corner, SC. South Carolina Breakfast Club at KMKS, 803-446-0214 Aug. 20, 2018, Lebanon, TN. Lebanon Flying Club Monthly Meeting, 615-479-9991 Aug. 20, 2018, Orlando, FL. Monthly IMC Club/ WINGS Seminar at KSFB, 817-312-7464 Aug. 21, 2018, Savannah, GA. Savannah Aviation Association, 912-964-1022 Aug. 21, 2018, Venice, FL. EAA Chapter 1285 IMC Club starts 6:15 p.m., 801-918-9722 Aug. 21, 2018, Venice, FL. EAA Chapter 1285 Monthly Meeting-Aviation Entertainment, 801-918-9722 Aug. 24, 2018, Fort Myers, FL. Fly-In Fridays Hot Dog Social, 239-590-6600

Aug. 25, 2018, Shelbyville, TN. Shelbyville Fly-In Breakfast, 931-680-9652 Aug. 25, 2018, Dayton, TN. Dayton Tn. Fly-in breakfast, every fourth Saturday. Aug. 25, 2018, Warner Robins, GA. EAA Chapter 38 Breakfast & Meeting, 478-284-8269 Aug. 25, 2018, Rome, GA. Museum of Flight Pancake Fly In Breakfast 4th Saturday, 423.228.2359 Aug. 27, 2018, Lawrenceville, GA. Civil Air Patrol/Gwinnett Composite Squadron, 404-444-9852 Aug. 28, 2018, Chamblee, GA. Civil Air Patrol/ PDK Senior Squadron, 404.829.3732 Aug. 31, 2018, Fort Myers, FL. Fly-in Fridays Hot Dog Social, 2395906600 Sept. 01, 2018, Burgaw, NC. EAA 297 Chapter Meeting, 910-880-5669 Sept. 01, 2018, Winchester, TN. EAA 699 Fly-In Breakfast, 931 967-0143 Sept. 01, 2018, Titusville, FL. FlyIn and Pancake Breakfast Sept. 01, 2018, Lawrenceville, GA. 1st Saturday Aviation Program and Pancake Breakfast, 404-314-7573 Sept. 01, 2018, Rome, GA. EAA Saturday Morning Pancake Breakfast, (864) 316-5250 Sept. 01, 2018, Pensacola, FL. 82J Pancake Breakfast Fly-In, 8504534181 Sept. 01, 2018, Brooksville, FL. EAA Chapter 1298 Monthly Meeting, 813-758-4196 Sept. 02, 2018, Fort Myers, FL. Pancake Breakfast, 239-849-7984 Sept. 02, 2018, Ormond Beach, FL. 8th Annual Angel Flight Southeast Poker Run, (386) 248-1611

International

Aug. 12, 2018, Abbotsford, BC. Abbotsford International Airshow, 604-852-8511 Aug. 12, 2018, Lacombe, AB. Sunday Donuts and Coffee Aug. 12, 2018, Picton, ON. PEFC FlyIn Breakfast, 613-661-3278 Aug. 17-19, 2018, Edmonton, AB. Edmonton Airshow, 780-718-8454 Aug. 18, 2018, Killam, AB. Coffee, 780-384-2026 Aug. 18-19, 2018, Victoriaville, QC. Victoriaville Air Show Aug. 18, 2018, Old Warden, England. Shuttleworth Flying Proms Aug. 18, 2018, Lethbridge, AB. Lethbridge Sport Flyers Weekly Breakfast Aug. 19, 2018, Lacombe, AB. Sunday Donuts Coffee and Sometimes Home Made Baking Aug. 23-24, 2018, Clacton-onSea, UK. Clacton Air Show Aug. 24-26, 2018, De Cocksdorp, Netherlands. Texel Fly-In, 0031 (0)222 311 Aug. 25-26, 2018, Summerside, PE. Atlantic Canada International Air Show, 902-465-2725 Aug. 25-26, 2018, Dunsfold Park, UK. Dunsfold Wings & Wheels Aug. 25-26, 2018, Radom-Sadkow AB, Radom Air Show 2018

Aug. 25, 2018, Kazan, Russia. Red Bull Air Race Aug. 25-26, 2018, Dittinger, Switzerland. Dittinger Flugtage 2018 Aug. 25-26, 2018, Debert, NS. Air Show Atlantic Summerside Fly-Out, 855-465-2725 Aug. 25, 2018, Lethbridge, AB. Lethbridge Sport Flyers Weekly Breakfast Aug. 25, 2018, Rocky Mountain House, AB. Rocky Mountain House Breakfast Fly-In, 403-845-8702 Aug. 25, 2018, Uppsala, Uppsala County, Sweden. Swedish Air Force Aug. 25, 2018, Ottawa, ON. Carp Airport Third Annual Family Day, 613-839-5276 Aug. 25, 2018, Wetaskiwin, AB. Wetaskiwin (CEX3) Coffee, 780-370-3456 Aug. 25, 2018, Medicine Hat, AB. CYXH Medicine Hat Fly-In & Corn Roast, 403-952-7888 Aug. 26, 2018, Smiths Falls, ON. 33 Full Stop Fly-in Breakfast at CYSH, 613-283-1148 Aug. 26, 2018, Lacombe, AB. Sunday Donuts, Coffee and Sometimes Home Made Baking Aug. 29, 2018, Brantford, ON. Brantford Charity Air Show, 905-679-4183 Aug. 30-31, 2018, Bournemouth, UK. Bournemouth Air Festival Sept. 01, 2018, Toronto, ON. Canadian International Air Show, (416) 263-3650 Sept. 01, 2018, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic. Czech International Air Fest 2018 Sept. 01-02, 2018, Bournemouth, UK. Bournemouth Air Festival Sept. 01, 2018, Wershofen-Eifel, Germany. Flugplatzfest Wershofen Sept. 01, 2018, Pirmasens, Germany. Flugtag 2018 Pirmasens Sept. 01, 2018, Potrush, UK. Air Waves Portrush NI International Airshow Sept. 01, 2018, Slaic AB, Slovenia. Slovak International Air Fest 2018 Sept. 01, 2018, Lethbridge, AB. Lethbridge Sport Flyers Weekly Breakfast Sept. 01, 2018, Gatineau, QC. COPA Flight 169 Monthly Breakfast Meeting/ Dejeuner Mensuel, 819-360-0706 Sept. 01, 2018, Three Hills, AB. Coffee Break, 403-443-8434 Sept. 02-03, 2018, Toronto, ON. Canadian International Air Show, 416-263-3650 Sept. 02, 2018, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic. Czech International Air Fest 2018 Sept. 02, 2018, Old Warden, UK. Shuttleworth Heritage Day Sept. 02, 2018, Wershofen-Eifel, Germany. Flugplatzfest Wershofen Sept. 02, 2018, Pirmasens, Germany. Flugtag 2018 Pirmasens Sept. 02, 2018, Potrush, UK. Air Waves Portrush NI International Airshow Sept. 02, 2018, Notodden, Norway. Telemark Airshow 2018 Sept. 02, 2018, Slaic AB, Slovenia. Slovak International Air Fest 2018 Sept. 02, 2018, Lacombe, AB. Sunday Donuts, Coffee and Sometimes Home Made Baking

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1-360-435-0900 fax: 1-360-403-9304 cannonav@frontier.com

Rev201807

Garmin GTX-345


36

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August 9, 2018

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www.GeneralAviationNews.com —  Classified Pages — facebook.com/ganews 2550 - Ercoupe Parts

6950 - Engines

FREE 400-PG UNIVAIR CATALOG w/hundreds of FAAPMA’d parts. info@univair.com or www.univair.com Order toll-free 888-433-5433. Foreign orders pay postage.

1060 - Alon Aircoupe 1966 Alon A2 A-200, approx 2208-TTA&E, EdoAire A550 audio panel, Narco MkD, G/S, Garmin GNC250 com/gps, MORE. Photos, data. Int/Panel/10, Ext/9. $27K/offers, 651-338-2275.

PA-12 Super Cruiser, O-235, Ceconite, pants, Val/76 xpdr/enc. Owner since 1990, NDH, 26TT, hangared KGRD. $28,500, will trade, want Ercoupe, 864-992-5150. 3920 - Piper Parts TRI-PACER and Colt Parts for sale. Tri-Pacer and Colt Fuselages and wings available. Tri-Pacer Colt Projects. Rich Waldren 503-538-7575.

1966 Cessna 172G 4000.6-TT 295-TTSOH. David Clark Headsets. GX55 GPS ISL. Wheel Pants. Always hangared. Original Paint. Annual 3/14/18. Owned since 1998. $32,500. 307-321-2714.

FREE 400-PG UNIVAIR CATALOG w/hundreds of FAAPMA’d parts. info@univair.com or www.univair.com Order toll-free 888-433-5433. Foreign orders pay postage.

1974 172-M, 4400-TT, 2000-SFRM, KX-170B, KT76A, KMA24, RT328C, intercom, new Cleveland wheels and brakes, no corrosion. $29,900, 509-765-1606, 509-7502327.

1998 ZENITH 701, STOL Rotax 912UL, 210 TTAE. Last annual 9-17-17, Pegastol wing, BRS-5 chute, $17,900 offer. 928-337-5081, Concho AZ.

1100 - Cessna Centurion 1/3 partnership on very well equipped 1973 turbocharged Centurion, hangared at Harvey AP(S43). 680-SMOH, 200hrs new Scimitar prop. New paint, leather interior and panel with Century IV coupled autopilot, Garmin 750TN, Aspen EFIS, Garmin NavCom, 466ELT, new Garmin 345 xpdr, ADS-B In/Out. Many other mods incl Rosen visors. 4-point restraint, O2. First class cross country airplane. Asking price for 1/3 of LLC: $55,000, bwhilyer@gmail. com, 206-852-4295.

IO-360-A1P ZERO SMOH, 750 SNEW, 180hp Std Acc. Reduced to $22K, Outright. One Stop Aviation, CA 760721-1389

Custom Engine Overhaul 2-YEAR 500-HOUR WARRANTY

RV-4, factory engine O-320E2A. Located in Oregon, call for details, $50,000, 208-369-6348. 6800 - Airport Equipment

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1965 Cessna 150F, 3524.38TT. Repainted 2010 - no corrosion, new TKM radio-2010. Annual 06/12/18, $23,000. Call Bob, 712-754-3467. 2030 - Cessna Parts SELKIRK AVIATION Inc. has FAA approval on composite cowlings for all Cessna 180, 185 & years 1956-1961 Cessna 182 planes. Also interior panels, extended bag kits, glare shields & nose bowl for most C-170 to U206 models. www.selkirk-aviation.com or 208-664-9589. FREE 400-PG UNIVAIR CATALOG w/hundreds of FAAPMA’d parts. info@univair.com or www.univair.com Order toll-free 888-433-5433. Foreign orders pay postage. 2055 - Champion Parts FREE 400-PG UNIVAIR CATALOG w/hundreds of FAAPMA’d parts. info@univair.com or www.univair.com Order toll-free 888-433-5433. Foreign orders pay postage. 2155 - Citabria Parts

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7340 - Inspections Annual Inspections specializing in Piper Cherokee 140, 160, 180, 300. Cessna 150, 152, 172, 182. Aero Mechanical Service Inc, Cochran, Georgia 48A, 478-230-2706. 7350 - Instruction

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Phone: 308-832-2200 http://autofuelstc.com

RIVERSIDE MUNICIPAL AIRPORT, So. California, Exec T-hangar for rent or sale, perfect for single engine. $12,000 to buy, $350/month to rent. Call or email for exact dimensions. Available now. Michelle, Pacifica Commercial, 805-237-4040, michelle@pacificacre.com

Fuel Tanks To Go, LLC, Ocala, Florida manufacturers FAA-approved aluminum single and double wall units from 110,150,280,500-1000 gal equipped with FAA-certified components. Trailers capable of hauling dual fuels-both Jet A & 100LL. Factory rep available to provide written quote,and availability 24/7 via mobile access. www.fueltankstogo.com. Selected dealerships available. George Adams, 770 329-9898 phone or text.

6915 - Engine Parts

984 K Road • Minden, NE 68959

6955 - Engine Parts PARTING OUT Lyc & Cont engines, all parts, large & small! Cores & overhauled parts available. Jerry Meyers Aviation. meyersaviation@gmail.com 888-893-3301.

Aviation maintenance shop at Lake Hood, Anchorage, Alaska is looking for 2 well-experienced Mechanic/Craftsmen. Must have minimum 5yrs experience working on Cessna 180/185/206. Must have A&P and IA certificate. Email resume to Blkshpaviation@gmail.com

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TI O N

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AV

1957 Champion 7EC, 3218-TT, O-200 100hp engine, 418 SMOH, Icom 1C-A200 radio, KT76A xpdr, rebuilt 1996 w/ new wood including spares, wingtip strobes, wide back seat. Not light sport. $24,900. 509-765-1606, cell 509750-2327.

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August 9, 2018

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General Aviation News —  Classified Pages — 800.426.8538

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Aviation Abbreviations A/C .................................. Air Conditioning ADs ......................Airworthiness Directives ADF ................. Automatic Direction Finder AH ...................................Artificial Horizon A&P ........................Airframe & Powerplant AP .........................................Audio Panel A/P ............................................Autopilot CDI ...................Course Deviation Indicator CHT ................. Cylinder Heat Temperature Com .......................Communication Radio C/R ................................ Counter Rotating CT ........................ Carburetor Temperature DF ...................................Direction Finder DG ...................................Directional Gyro DME ..........Distance Measuring Equipment EFIS ................................Electronic Flight Instrument System EGT.................... Exhaust Gas Temperature 7400 - Insurance

ELT ............ Emergency Locator Transmitter FD ......................................Flight Director FWF .................................Firewall Forward GPS .................. Global Positioning System GS ...................................... Groundspeed G/S ........................................ Glide Slope GSP ...........................Ground Service Plug HF ................................... High Frequency hp.......................................... horsepower HSI ............... Horizontal Situation Indicator IFR ....................... Instrument Flight Rules ILS.................. Instrument Landing System LE ...........................................Left Engine LMB..........................Light Marker Beacon LOC ........................................... Localizer Loran............. Long Range Area Navigation LR..........................................Long Range LRT ...............................Long Range Tanks 8225 - Parts

MB ...................................Marker Beacon MDH .......................Major Damage History MP ...............................Manifold Pressure NDH ...........................No Damage History NM .................................... Nautical Miles Nav................................ Navigation Radio NavCom .................................Navigation/ CommunicationRadio OAT...................... Outside Air Temperature OH ............................................. Overhaul RB ..................................Rotating Beacon RDF ........................Radio Direction Finder RE ........................................Right Engine RG ................................. Retractable Gear RMI ....................Radio Magnetic Indicator RNAV ............................... Area Navigation SBs ................................Service Bulletins SCMOH .......Since Chrome Major Overhaul 8400 - Propellers

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SFRM .......... Since Factory Remanufacture SHS ..............................Since Hot Section SMOH......................Since Major Overhaul SOH.................................. Since Overhaul S/N ....................................Serial Number SPOH ....................... Since Prop Overhaul STOH .......................... Since Top Overhaul STOL........................Short Takeoff/Landing TBO ......................Time Between Overhaul TT ............................................ Total Time TTAE ................ Total Time Airframe/Engine TTAF ........................... Total Time Airframe TTSN .......................Total Time Since New XPDR .................................... Transponder VLF ............................ Very Low Frequency VOR ............................... VHF Omni Range

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9000 - Survival

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Factory Directory Sales

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8870 - Skis

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installation for:

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AIRCRAFT CORPORATION

For 72 years, Univair has been a leading supplier of quality parts and supplies for general aviation enthusiasts and “classic” aircraft owners. Remember, we’re as close as your phone, computer or mailbox!

TITLE SEARCHES: Same day reports if called before noon C.T., most searches. 800-666-1397 or 405-2328886. Visa/ MC. Aircraft Title Corp. Established 1957. 9650 - Arizona

Toll Free Sales: 1-888-433-5433 2500 Himalaya Road • Aurora, Colorado • 80011 Info Phone ................................... 303-375-8882 Fax ....................800-457-7811 or 303-375-8888 Email ........................................info@univair.com Website ...................................www.univair.com

PRIVATE RUNWAY on 45+ acres of beautiful Northern Arizona. Call Shelbi Haering 928-230-2918.

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August 9, 2018

www.GeneralAviationNews.com —  Classified Pages — facebook.com/ganews

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Ever feel like something’s just missing in your life? The Pulse of Aviation delivers a daily dose of aviation news every weekday free to your email inbox.

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Y T I L I UT

Alta Sierra Airpark Lot: One acre gently rolling oak treed lot plus hangar pad (for 2500sqft hangar). Grass Valley,Ca.$140,000, 530-410-4067. 9650 - Real Estate

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LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION! West Houston Airport: 10,000 sqft lots--you design your perfect hangar home. 4000’ runway, AWOS, full service amenities. Jet A/100LL fuel will be delivered to your hangar door. Full service Maintenance & Avionics Shops located on field. www.aerovillas.com to see what AeroVillas has to offer, woody@westhoustonairport.com 281-492-2130.

D E E P S

9650 - Washington PILOTS! Home and hangar, 2.6ac, county AP(KTDO) thru-the-fence, GPS approach, fuel, midway between SEA and PDX. $850K, 360-864-8076. Roche Harbor Skyways Lot 44 100’ frontage on Cessna Ave, taxiway, small trailer, power, water , Wi-Fi $200,000. 503-250-1206, kforsythe@pisi.ws

Trade up, Head out

THREE: 1/2 acre lots on M94 in Desert Air community in E. WA. Nice territorial views 67.5k each. 360-710-4375 Lots For Sale, mid-way between Seattle & Portland Oregon: Toledo WA(TDO). Lots are 135’x459’=1.42 acres. Elec, water, phone, high speed internet. Access to 5000X150’ runway w/vasi systems both ends, GPS approach. 95,000.00, 360-864-6370. Publishers Notice: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limited or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living w/parents or legal custodian, pregnant women & people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are avail on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free 800-669-9777. Toll-free for the hearing impaired: 800-927-9277.

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The August 9, 2018 edition of General Aviation News

Aug. 9, 2018  

The August 9, 2018 edition of General Aviation News