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$2.95 • FEBRUARY 8, 2018 70TH YEAR. NO. 3

PERIODICALS - TIME-SENSITIVE DATED MATERIALS

Love is in the air P. 21 A dose of FAA revenue reality P. 10 Rare air racer found in barn P. 6 Living Legends of Aviation P. 22


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

February 8, 2018


February 8, 2018

www.GeneralAviationNews.com — facebook.com/ganews

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The TOC EDITORIAL Janice Wood, Editor Janice@GeneralAviationNews.com

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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Jamie Beckett • Theron Burton William E. Dubois • Joni M. Fisher Dan Johnson • Frederick Johnsen Jeffrey Madison • Paul McBride • Amelia T. Reiheld • Tom Snow Ben Visser • Bill Walker ADVERTISING Ben Sclair, Publisher Ben@GeneralAviationNews.com PRODUCTION & WEB DEVELOPMENT Russell Kasselman Russell@GeneralAviationNews.com BUSINESS OFFICE & SUBSCRIPTIONS Kathleen Elsner-Madsen Kathleen@GeneralAviationNews.com CONTACT Phone: 800-426-8538 || 253-471-9888 Fax: 800-426-8538 Internet: www.generalaviationnews.com Social: twitter.com/genavnews facebook.com/ganews General Aviation News accepts unsolicited editorial manuscripts and photos but is not responsible for return unless submissions are accompanied by a stamped, selfaddressed envelope. READER INFORMATION General Aviation News makes its subscription list available to other companies for their products and services. To be excluded from such offers, send a copy of your mailing label to General Aviation News, Attn: Mail Preference Service, PO Box 39099, Lakewood WA 98496. General Aviation News – a publication of Flyer Media, Inc. – endeavors to accept only reliable advertisements, but shall not be responsible for advertisements nor are the views expressed in those advertisements necessarily those of General Aviation News. The right to decline or discontinue any ad without explanation is reserved. General Aviation News (ISSN 1536 8513) is published semimonthly by Flyer Media, Inc., 5409 100th St. SW #39099, Lakewood, WA 98496-0099. Periodicals Postage Paid at Lakewood, Washington, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to General Aviation News, 5409 100th St. SW #39099, Lakewood, WA 98496-0099. Publications mail agreement number 40648085. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to P.O. Box 1051, Fort Erie, ON L2A 6C7. Courier delivery: 5409 100th St SW #39099, Lakewood, WA 98496.

General Aviation News • 70th Year, No. 3 • February 8, 2018 • © 2018 Flyer Media, Inc. • All Rights Reserved.

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Photo by Dan Johnson

The U.S. Sport Aviation Expo kicks off the flying season.

News 4....... Remember summer? 6....... Art Chester air racer found in barn 8....... Triple A for aircraft owners launches 8....... Museum unveiled at KAPA 9....... More than 1 million drones registered 9....... New Jersey bans drunk drone flying 12..... Aviation boarding school takes off 12..... STEM on the Fly 18..... The magic of making dreams come true 21..... Love is in the air — and on the water 22..... The Living Legends of Aviation

Columnists 10..... TOUCH & GO: A dose of FAA revenue reality 11..... POLITICS FOR PILOTS: Something’s happening 14..... ASK PAUL: Why is my new engine running so hot? 16..... OF WINGS & THINGS: Refining the art of biplane fighters 24..... SPLOG: Let the flying season begin

Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery of first issue. Canada - add $10 additional postage per year. The subscription rate is $85 per year for countries outside of Canada and Mexico. All payments in U.S. dollars.

Photo by Blythe Asagi/Living Legends of Aviation

Gen. Jack Dailey, the retiring Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum director, with fellow Living Legend David Greschke at the Living Legends of Aviation event.

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On Final 26..... Accident Reports 28..... New Products 32..... Calendar of Events 37..... Aviation Classifieds

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NOTICE: The next issue will be mailed Feb. 22, 2018.

One of Ageless Aviation Dreams Foundation’s Stear­mans takes flight, offering free rides to veterans and senior citizens. Photo by Mike Collins, reprinted with permission from AOPA.


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

February 8, 2018

Remember summer?

Photo by Mike Kincaid

As most of the country continues in a deep freeze, it’s refreshing to remember that it will eventually end and we can look forward to sunny, warm days. To help with that, we are featuring frequent contributor Mike Kincaid’s picture, which he named “Summer day on Lake Pend Oreille.” He explains the photograph was taken during “a seaplane adventure to the secluded beach on the 1,150-foot-deep North Idaho Lake. Taking in the rays are Sasha Gordon and Gail Hartigan of Salt Lake City.”

A D V E R T I S E R Aero Ski Mfg Co Inc............................................ 38 Aerotech Publications......................................... 16 Aircraft Door Seals.............................................. 12 Aircraft Propeller Service..................................... 34 Aircraft Specialties Services................................... 2 Aircraft Spruce & Specialty.................................. 40 Airforms............................................................. 37 Airpac................................................................ 38 Airplane Things................................................... 29 Alaska Airmen’s Association................................ 35 Alpha Aviation, Inc.............................................. 31 AOPA Membership Publications, Inc..................... 15 Aviation Insurance Resources.............................. 32 Aviation Insurance Resources.............................. 38 Aviation Supplies & Academics (ASA)..................... 5 Avionics Shop, Inc.............................................. 29 Cannon Avionics, Inc........................................... 34 Cardinal Aviation................................................. 32 Cee Bailey’s Aircraft Plastics................................ 29 Clay Lacey Aviation............................................. 34 Corvallis Aero Service.......................................... 32

I N D E X

Cubs, Floats and Fun.......................................... 38 Desser Tire & Rubber Co..................................... 32 Eagle Fuel Cells.................................................. 31 Electroair........................................................... 16 Fallon Airmotive.................................................. 29 Fast Aviation...................................................... 38 Genuine Aircraft Hardware, Inc............................. 29 Gibson Aviation.................................................... 8 Great Lakes Aero Products.................................. 38 Hooker Custom Harness...................................... 38 Hydraulics International....................................... 17 Idaho Aviation Expo............................................. 17 Kitfox Aircraft...................................................... 31 KS Avionics........................................................ 31 MH Oxygen Systems............................................. 6 Micro Aerodynamics............................................ 14 Niagara Air Parts................................................... 8 Northwest Aviation Conference............................ 33 Northwest Aviation Services................................. 29 Northwest Propeller Service................................. 38 P2 Aviation Technology, Inc.................................... 6

Pacific Coast Avionics.......................................... 31 Para-Phernalia ................................................... 38 Petersen Aviation................................................ 37 Rainbow Flying Service........................................ 37 Rapidset Buildings.............................................. 12 R & M Steel......................................................... 5 Schweiss Doors.................................................... 6 Schweiss Doors.................................................. 39 Sky Ox Limited................................................... 37 Sporty’s Pilot Shop............................................... 9 SUN ’n FUN Fly-In............................................... 13 Tempest Plus..................................................... 14 Univair Aircraft Corporation.................................... 7 Univair Aircraft Corporation.................................. 38 Val Avionics, Ltd................................................. 32 Vantage Plane Plastics........................................ 34 Willow Run Airport................................................ 9 WINGsReality LLC............................................... 38 Wings West Governors........................................ 38 Winter Haven Municipal Airport.............................. 6 Zephyr Aircraft Engines........................................ 37


February 8, 2018

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Briefing Garmin has expanded its pilot training opportunities for 2018, adding classes throughout the United States on the GTN 650/750 touchscreen navigator series, the G500/G600 glass flight display systems, and all Garmin Integrated Flight Decks. FlyGarmin.com

For the first time ever, a U.S. Air Force Heritage Flight performed a fly-over at the start of a Super Bowl (similar to the one pictured). An F-16 Fighting Falcon, two A-10 Thunderbolt IIs, and a P-51 Mustang flew in formation over U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis Feb. 4. AirForceHeritageFlight.org

A new $5,000 scholarship for pilot training at Sporty’s Academy for a woman has been introduced by Natalie Kelley, founder of Fly Girl. Applications must be received by April 15, 2018. SportysAcademy.com/FlyGirl

Jetscape Services has expanded its FBO at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport (FLL) in Florida. JetscapeFBO.com The Experimental Aircraft Association’s IMC Clubs and VMC Clubs reached a milestone, as more than 200 clubs now exist throughout the country. EAA.org Troy Techau, a Ph.D. candidate at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, is seeking input from pilots about Electronic Flight Bags. If you fill out his survey, you’ll be entered for a chance to win a $100 Amazon gift card. The survey is anonymous, and should take about 15 to 20 minutes to complete. SurveyMonkey.com/r/efb4

Cascade Warbirds is offering scholarships for private pilot ground school with introductory flights, valued at $1,125. The scholarships are open to students 16 to 21. Eight scholarships will be awarded. Deadline to apply is Feb. 28, 2018. CascadeWarbirds.org/Scholarship

Photo by Frederick A. Johnsen

Heritage Flights are held at a variety of events, including the 2017 Planes of Fame air show.

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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

February 8, 2018

Photos by The Spirit of Flight

The Spirit of Flight museum plans to restore the Art Chester design to static condition to help tell the story of early air racing.

A vintage photo of the Swee’ Pea.

Art Chester air racer found in barn ERIE, Colorado — The Spirit of Flight museum added a piece of air racing history to its growing collection with the delivery of a 1947 Art Chester design known as the Swee’ Pea. The museum plans to restore the plane to static condition to help tell the story of early air racing. “We were contacted in August 2017 by the Peterson family of Walnut Grove, California, and they said they had the remains of a plane called Swee’ Pea (later named Sky Baby), which had been stored in a barn near Los Angeles since the 1950s,” said Gordon Page, president of the Spirit

MH

The MH XCP System

of Flight Center. “It took us a while to figure out what they actually had, but concluded it might be an Art Chester racer based on photos.” The Swee’ Pea was the third design from Chester, who worked on the design of the North American P-51 Mustang during World War II. The Swee’ Pea shared a similar short, mid-wing taildragger configuration with other midget air racers of the 1940s. The aircraft was unique in that it used a V-tail configuration and a single cooling air intake through a large hole in the cen-

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ter of the spinner. The fuselage is welded tube steel with wood and fabric covering, and the wings are plywood covered. Swee’ Pea could fly 180 mph using a Continental C-85 engine. The Swee’ Pea was introduced at the 1947 National Air Races and the V-tail performed poorly at takeoff speed, so it was replaced by a conventional tail for the 1948 Miami races. The top speed was reduced with a conventional tail, so the Vtail was re-installed. Art Chester sold the Swee’ Pea to his mechanic, Lynn Kauffold, shortly after the Miami races. It was later sold to Nancy Peterson’s brother, John D. Hardman, who put it in storage in 1957 with hopes of restoring it. It was never touched after it went into storage. “Time certainly took a toll on the Swee’ Pea while it was in storage,” said Page. “The fabric on the fuselage is mostly gone, but you can still see the #7 that was painted on the wing for racing.” The Spirit of Flight museum is seeking support to help restore the plane, and it hopes to take the completed project to EAA AirVenture and other airshows.

Museum officials note it will take a lot to restore Swee’ Pea back to static condition. “But the V-tail midget air racer has now emerged from a half century of storage and will be on display at the Spirit of Flight museum to tell the Art Chester story,” they add. SpiritOfFlight.com


February 8, 2018

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Piper Wings, Frames, Cowls and More Univair is Celebrating Our 72nd Year Providing the Parts You Need!

Piper Sealed Lift Struts

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Complies with AD 2015-08-04. End repetitive inspection of your struts and forks! Univair’s lift struts are oiled, sealed, and include the new 5⁄8-inch heavy duty lift strut fork.

New

Old

J-3 Front.......................................................... U85547-002 .............$589.40 J-3 Rear ........................................................... U85548-002 .............$589.40 J-4 Front.......................................................... U85549-002 .............$589.40 J-4 Rear ........................................................... U85550-002 .............$589.40 J-5 Front.......................................................... U85552-002 .............$526.38 J-5 Rear ........................................................... U85553-002 .............$526.38 PA-11 Front ..................................................... U85554-002 .............$629.50 PA-11 Rear ...................................................... U85555-002 .............$575.21 PA-12/14 Front................................................ U85552-002 .............$526.38 PA-12/14 Rear ................................................. U85553-002 .............$526.38 PA-15/17 Front................................................ U85556-002 .............$637.49 PA-15/17 Rear ................................................. U85557-002 .............$637.49 PA-16 Front ..................................................... U85558-002 .............$575.21 PA-16 Rear ...................................................... U85559-002 .............$526.38 PA-18 Front ..................................................... U89497-002 .............$526.38 PA-18 Rear ...................................................... U89498-002 .............$526.38 PA-18 Front Strut – Heavy Duty ...................... U89497-102 .............$658.24 PA-18 Rear Strut – Heavy Duty ....................... U89498-102 .............$620.85 PA-20/22 Front................................................ U85560-002 .............$526.38 PA-20/22 Rear ................................................. U85559-002 .............$526.38 PA-25 235-260hp Pawnee Strut .......................L64038-002 ......... $3,626.30 PA-25 150hp Pawnee Strut ............................. U61046-000 ......... $3,899.73

J-3 Frame Assembly 1 ...................................... R24096-000 ....... $14,379.82 J-3, PA-11 Long Repair Section 1 ................. SA00002DE-01 ......... $4,160.09 J-3, PA-11 Short Repair Section 1 ................ SA00002DE-02 ......... $3,106.02 J-3 Top Deck Super Structure Assembly 2 ......... U24096-002 ......... $1,736.71 J-3, PA-11 Top Cabin Assembly 2...................... U10561-005 ......... $1,292.09 PA-11 Frame Assembly 1 ................................. R10560-000 ....... $15,334.79 PA-12 Frame Assembly 2 ................................. U24066-000 ....... $18,151.39 PA-12 Top Deck Assembly 2.............................. U24066-003 ......... $2,055.82 PA-18 Frame Assembly with Belly Tabs 1 .......... J12446-007 ....... $15,866.82 PA-18 Frame Assembly with Doors 1 ................ J12446-006 ....... $14,378.84 PA-18 Long Repair Section 1 ..................STC-SA4077NM-01 ......... $4,628.39 PA-18 Short Repair Section 2 .................STC-SA4077NM-02 ......... $2,739.34 PA-18 Top Deck Section 2 ..................................... U752-978 ......... $1,756.02 PA-18 Tail Section Kit 2 .....................................U12183-TSK ......... $1,411.83 PA-18 Fuselage Bulkhead (front door post to firewall) 2........................... U751-376 ......... $1,111.65 PA-18 Top Deck Super Structure 2 ........................ U752-979 .............$698.19

All items above are shipped via truck freight, except PA-15/17, -16, -20/-22

Additional crating charges apply

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Cowls

FAA/PMA

J-3 Fuselage Cowl............................................ U23993-000 .............$813.21 J-3 Fuselage Cowl/Stainless Steel Firewall .... U23993-000S .............$778.83 PA-11, PA-18 Nose Cowl, Screw Type ............... U10802-000 ......... $1,371.71 PA-11, PA-18 Nose Cowl, Lion Type.................. U10802-005 ......... $1,090.26 PA-11 Fuselage Cowl Assembly ..................... U10789-000S .............$958.77 PA-18 Fuselage Cowl Assembly ....................... U10789-002 ......... $1,287.76 PA-18 Fuselage Cowl Assembly ....................... U12381-000 ......... $1,324.96 PA-18 135-150hp Fuselage Cowl Assembly ..... U12381-002 ......... $1,262.77 PA-18 150hp Fuselage Cowl .......................... U14849-000S ......... $1,227.86 PA-18 Fuselage Cowl, S/N 8020 Up.................. U14849-002 ......... $1,299.79 PA-18 150hp Fuselage Cowl Assembly ............ U14849-000 ......... $1,232.49 Additional crating charges apply

Engine Mounts

J-3 (Continental) ............................................. U71163-000 .............$863.97 J-5 ................................................................... U00032-016 ......... $1,155.68 PA-11 (C-90) ................................................... U10576-000 .............$811.62 PA-12, PA-14 ................................................... U10070-000 .............$940.17 PA-15, PA-17 ....................................................L11824-000 .............$648.99 PA-16, PA-20 (Lycoming 115-125hp) .............. U11786-000 ......... $1,280.09 PA-18 (C-90) ................................................... U12209-000 .............$874.34 PA-18 (Lycoming 150hp)................................. U12351-015 .............$711.54 PA-20 (125-135hp), PA-25 (150hp) ................ U11786-013 ......... $1,280.09 PA-22 (Lycoming, 150-160hp, SN 3387 and up) and Colt (108hp) ......................................... U11786-015 ......... $1,347.45 More mounts available on website

Unassembled Parts Kit

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J-3

Left ..................................... -15556-000UK............... $5,367.44 Right ................................... -15556-001UK............... $5,389.90

Left............................................................................... U15556-000 ....... $8,218.97 Right ............................................................................ U15556-001 ....... $8,218.97

PA-11

Left ..................................... -10625-000UK............... $5,682.21 Right ................................... -10625-001UK............... $5,682.21

Left............................................................................-10625-000UR ....... $7,944.09 Right .........................................................................-10625-001UR ....... $7,944.09

PA-18 95hp

Left ..................................... -10625-004UK............... $5,682.21 Left ..................................... -10625-006UK............... $5,682.21 Right ................................... -10625-003UK............... $5,682.21 Right ................................... -10625-005UK............... $5,682.21

Left, serial numbers 1 to 468 without tank bay .........-10625-004UR ....... $6,776.36 Left, serial numbers 469 and up with tank bay..........-10625-006UR ....... $6,754.33 Right, serial numbers 1 to 468 without tank bay .......-10625-003UR ....... $6,754.33 Right, serial numbers 469 and up with tank bay .......-10625-005UR ....... $6,776.36

PA-18 135hp

Left ..................................... -12778-008UK............... $7,715.65 Right ................................... -12778-003UK............... $7,536.96

Left............................................................................-12778-008UR ..... $10,479.22 Right .........................................................................-12778-003UR ..... $10,479.22

PA-18 150hp

Left ..................................... -14394-000UK............... $7,760.03 Right ................................... -14394-001UK............... $7,760.03

Left............................................................................... U14394-000 ..... $10,688.80 Right ............................................................................ U14394-001 ..... $10,339.67

Wings for Piper PA-12, 14, 15, 16, 20, and 22 aircraft available on our website. Wing assemblies are sold uncovered. Wings and kits do not include ailerons, flaps, gas tanks or tank covers. Crating charges apply.

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FAA/PMA

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ALL MERCHANDISE IS SOLD F.O.B., AURORA, CO • PRICE AND AVAILABILITY SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE • 1-08-18


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

February 8, 2018

Triple A for aircraft owners launches Insurance company Global Aerospace has launched a new Aircraft Breakdown Assistance program available to its U.S. aircraft policyholders at no additional cost. Savvy Aviation, a professional maintenance management, consulting and breakdown assistance company for owner-flown general aviation airplanes, supports the program for Global Aerospace. A mechanical problem with an aircraft while away from home can be an owner’s worst nightmare, Global Aerospace officials note. The Aircraft Breakdown Assistance program provides policyholders with 24/7 access to a dedicated toll-free assistance hotline and experienced Savvy Airframe and Powerplant and Inspection Authorization (A&P/IA) technicians.

Savvy technicians will troubleshoot mechanical problems and help owners determine whether an aircraft is safe to fly home. If repairs are needed, they will help find a local, trustworthy maintenance provider and work with them to get pilots safely, and quickly, back in the air, officials explained. “For the very first time, light aircraft owners can link their insurance protection with the peace of mind of breakdown assistance,” said Rick Underwood, senior vice president and Aeroinsure manager at Global Aerospace. “This combination adds tremendous value, at no additional cost, for our light aircraft policyholders.” “Savvy’s extraordinary team of veteran A&P/IAs have been coming to the rescue of stranded GA owner-pilots for de-

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FAA accepted as “direct replacement” for original copper cooler on PA-18 / 19 / 20 / 22 4lbs lighter and 50% more cooling

gratitude heartwarming. We’re thrilled to be able to extend this valuable service to Global Aerospace policyholders.” The Aircraft Breakdown Assistance program is available at no additional cost to Global Aerospace policyholders if their policy begins or renews on or after Jan. 1, 2018. To activate your exclusive Aircraft Breakdown Assistance membership, visit SavvyAviation.com. Global-Aero.com, SavvyAviation.com

Museum unveiled at KAPA DENVER — After more than a decade of planning and fundraising, Wings Over the Rockies has unveiled its entertainment and education campus, Exploration of Flight. The sister facility to Wings Over the Rockies Air & Space Museum in Denver’s Lowry neighborhood, Exploration of Flight is a 15-acre campus located on the south side of Centennial Airport (KAPA) in An artist’s Englewood, Colorado. Slated for completion in summer 2018, phase one of Wings’ Exploration of Flight campus is the Boeing Blue Sky Aviation Gallery, which will be filled with interactive exhibits and activities, including simulators, a tour of Centennial Airport, and more. “This facility will be unique to the

Photo by Exploration of Flight

rendering of the museum entrance. nation,” said Wings Over the Rockies President & CEO John Barry. “Our Air & Space Museum in Lowry will concentrate on the past while the Exploration of Flight Campus at Centennial Airport will focus on the present and future. One organization, two locations.” ExplorationOfFlight.org

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February 8, 2018

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More than 1 million drones registered Work continues on ways to safely integrate unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) into the National Airspace System, as the U.S. Department of Transportation revealed in January that more than 1 million drones have been registered with the FAA. That figure includes 878,000 recreational operators, who are each assigned a single identification number for all UAS they fly, as well as 122,000 individuallyregistered drones flown by public and commercial entities. “Without question, UAS are here to stay, and their numbers will only increase in coming years,” said Heidi Williams, director of air traffic services and infrastructure for the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA). “That makes it imperative for all stakeholders to work together to ensure the safety of UAS operations. The registration requirement is an important step toward educating first-time drone operators of their responsibilities in that process.” First implemented in December 2015, but later suspended due to court action,

New Jersey bans drunk drone flying On his last day in office, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie signed a law making it illegal to fly a drone after too many drinks, according to a report from Reuters. The new law prohibits flying a drone with a blood alcohol content of 0.08% or higher, the same as for driving a vehicle on the ground. Violators face up to six months in jail, a $1,000 fine, or both. The new law also prohibits flying a drone near a prison or in pursuit of wildlife.

Historic Willow Run Airport

the drone registration requirement for recreational small UAS weighing less than 55 pounds was reinstated in December 2017 as part of the National Defense Authorization Act. The Drone Sightings Working Group of the Unmanned Aircraft Safety Team met late last year to analyze more than 3,400 UAS sighting reports submitted to the FAA between August 2015 and March 2017. “The current sighting-report methodology makes it difficult to sort out actionable data,” said Sarah Wolf, NBAA’s senior manager for security and facilitation. “There’s definitely some useful information to be found, but the group determined that additional steps must be taken to improve submission standards. For example,

A MavicPro drone in flight. the group found that many reports came from sightings of birds or balloons, not UAS.” Separately, the UAS Identification and Tracking Aviation Rulemaking Commit-

tee recently submitted its report to the FAA regarding available technologies to identify and track UAS in flight, NBAA officials reported. FAA.gov

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10

General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

February 8, 2018

A dose of FAA revenue reality Ben Sclair

AATF FY 2016 Excise Tax Revenues $406

Touch & Go

$476

(in millions of dollars)

$177 $25 $15

Transportation of persons Use of International Air Facilities Transportation of property

$3,396 I was recently poking around the FAA website when I came across the Airport and Airway Trust Fund Fact Sheet for fiscal year 2016. It was like re-reading a section of the FARs after too many years. The trust fund was created in 1970 to fund aviation programs with aviationrelated excise taxes on passengers, cargo, and fuel. Do you know what percentage of FAA’s annual funding is provided by the trust fund? • 71.53% in 2013; • 80.10% in 2014; • 92.77% in 2015; • 87.79% in 2016. The remainder of the FAA budget comes from the government’s general fund. But when I slowed down enough to really look at the charts and graphs in the fact sheet, I was stunned. Revenue from “Transportation of persons,” “Use of International Air FaciliBen Sclair is Publisher. He can be reached at ben@generalaviationnews.com.

ties,” and “Transportation of Property” together totaled $13.782 billion or 95.66% of all excise tax revenue. When I added the revenue from “Aviation Fuel Commercial,” the excise that revenue derived from commercial operations totals $14.188 bill or 98.48%. That means 1.52% or $217 million of fiscal year 2016 excise tax revenue came from non-commercial general aviation. Don’t misunderstand my tone. General aviation plays a vital role in the economy. And for many VFR only pilots, we produce very little impact on the system. We also pay our own way. We don’t have customers we can pass the fuel tax bill on to. The leaders of the commercial segment of aviation would do well to remember who is really paying the excise tax bill. This second chart shows that aviation fuel (commercial and non-commercial lumped together) hardly moves. Meanwhile, revenue (both domestic and international) from airline passengers continues to be clearly visible and since 2010 enjoys a positive rate. Now I know what a fly on the back of an elephant feels like.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR DRONES AND SAFETY

Re: “Most drone reports don’t pose safety risk” in the Jan. 25 issue: Since when is a small percentage of dead bodies something we should accept? It only takes one to cause a tragedy. There are, or will be, literally millions of these things flown by many unqualified people who don’t know the rules and don’t care about them. The professionals flying these things are not much of a risk, but toy drones flown by children, or by adults who may be irresponsible or ignorant of the rules, are a major threat. Sooner or later, they will bring down a manned aircraft. It is just a matter of time. FAA rules that restrict drones to 400’ or less and 5 miles from airports are intended to provide separation between manned aircraft and drones, but this is wishful thinking. The rules are routinely violated by uneducated or irresponsible drone pilots. Even when the rules are adhered to, they do not provide separation from heli­ copters and seaplanes, which legally fly lower than 400’ away from airports on a routine basis.

Two things are needed: 1. Licensing of drone operators, requiring knowledge of the safety rules and passing a test in order to be licensed. 2. Anti-collision equipment on the drones so that they automatically land or retreat when in the presence of manned aircraft. This would be simple to accomplish because nearly all manned aircraft send out a signal that can be received by the drones. The cost would be minimal when spread out over the huge numbers of drones manufactured. But since the government and the FAA have their heads in the sand, and the media are complicit, we will not get these safety improvements. Instead we will get dead bodies sooner or later. It is only a matter of time. MARC RODSTEIN via GeneralAviationNews.com FORMATION FLYING Re: “The fun of formation flying” in the Jan. 25 issue: Wonderful article. It really reflects the spirit and mystic of flying the Mooney Caravan. I did it last year for

Aviation Fuel Commercial Aviation Fuel Other than Gas Non-commercial Aviation Gasoline Liquid Fuel used in a Fractional Ownership Flight

$9,910 Total excise tax revenues $14,406

AATF Tax Revenue FY 2000-2016 (millions) $16,000 $14,000 $12,000 $10,000 $8,000 $6,000 $4,000 $2,000 $0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

Domestic transportation of persons

Domestic air cargo

Aviation Fuel

Total AATF Tax Revenues

International Passengers

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the first time. Not an easy challenge, even for an experienced pilot. But if you do it once, you always want to come back. OSCAR AVALLE via GeneralAviationNews.com

AMY HOOVER

Re: “Pilot Perspectives: Amy Hoover,” in the Jan. 25 issue: Amy and I flew a backcountry refresher course last summer and with nearly 50 years of flying I put Amy in the top 2% of all the instructors I’ve had the privilege to know. She planted the Idaho backcountry seed for me and I’ve now shared that experience with dozens of friends. Great article! BOB VOSBURGH via GeneralAviationNews.com I’ve been fortunate to spend not just one but two three-day backcountry ses-

sions with Amy over three years period. Every day I could see big strides in my flying ability, confidence, and knowledge in flying into high altitude short dirt strips. What’s even more important: My wife has always been a nervous flyer. Amy spent two days with her in a pinch hitter course in my C-180, and when we flew out of McCall, Idaho, to go home I could see a huge difference in her comfort level. Thank you Amy! JOHN DUNLAP via GeneralAviationNews.com

APPRECIATING THE 1%

Re: Jamie Beckett’s column in the Jan. 25 issue, “In appreciation of the 1%,” When I got my private pilot certificate on my 17th birthday in 1972, the population was about 205 million (aaahhhhh so easy LETTERS | See Page 11


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Something’s happening Jamie Beckett Politics for Pilots

Over the course of my life I’ve had three major obsessions. In chronological order they are motorcycles, guitars, and airplanes. My dad was an avid motorcyclist, owning a Harley Davidson 125cc machine when he was but a young lad in St. Petersburg, Florida, in the late 1940s. By the time I was born, he owned an Ariel Square Four, exactly the sort of thing a young fighter pilot would want to tool around with on the Arizona highways. When his sons got to be old enough (10 and 11 years old), he bought us a dilapidated Ducati 160cc bike to share. Thankfully, my brother had no interest in motorcycling, so there was no sharing involved. I rode that raggedy thing down dirt roads with great gusto. I’m convinced it was my early exposure to motorcycles that gave me such a great affection for them. I’ve owned many over the course of my life, have ridden them on long adventures up and down the East coast of America, and generally found great satisfaction and joy in the endeavor. All because I was allowed — even encouraged — to ride. As for educational pursuits, I was somewhat less engaged early on. My student record was consistently disappointing — a fact not helped at all by my pursuit of the guitar as a possible career. By the time I got to high school my hair was long, my focus was on six-strings and a bigger amplifier, and virtually every adult I knew was sure I was headed in the wrong direction. One day a recruiter from the U.S. Navy came to my school. I pleaded with my geo­metry teacher to let me out of class so I could sit in on his talk. Her response was classic: “Why should I let you out of class,” she chided me. “You’re never going to be a pilot.” Ten years later I proved her wrong. Yet the resistance I found when trying to pursue a dream, or even to take a whack at finding a dream to follow, left an indelible mark on my psyche. Of my three children, my son’s academic career mirrored my own. My daughters went the other way. They were stellar. One graduated high school with honors. The other was valedictorian of her class. That’s big stuff. Jamie Beckett is the AOPA Ambassador in Florida. A dedicated aviation advocate, you can reach him at: Jamie@GeneralAviationNews.com

Yet upon leaving school they both found the same thing — their 12 years of school had prepared them to do absolutely nothing in the larger world outside the school building. Eventually all three found their own version of success on their own. I’m tremendously proud of each of them. I share all this to get to a point that’s wildly unpopular, but undeniably true: Our nation’s school systems are often failing their students. We’re not preparing them to find success or to even be competitive in the world they’re headed into. Rather, we’re driving them to diligently pursue grades of no particular value in courses of limited worth. This is a problem. Thankfully, there is a significant shift underway. Perhaps due to people like Mike Rowe, the champion of the blue collar worker who touts the value of handson work, actual skills, and the ability to build, repair, or operate machinery that make our way of life possible. There are others in this game, too. And, although they’re in the minority, they’re making real headway. It gives me great satisfaction to know my beloved aviation is making serious advances into high school curriculums across the country. Slowly, but it’s happening and it’s making a difference. In my own corner of the world is the Central Florida Aerospace Academy. Initially funded by James Ray, a man of real vision and drive, this high school has done nothing but exhibit excellence from the day it opened. With a scholarship in place to assist in covering the cost of flight training, students at CFAA can walk in on Day One with a realistic expectation of learning to fly, or to become an aircraft mechanic, or an engineer, or an avionics tech. These are all courses of study that lead to real jobs. To a life where the students can contribute to society and earn a decent living in the process. And it works. CFAA’s first graduates are flying for airlines, acting as administrators in aeronautical pursuits, and generally lighting the path for those behind them to follow. The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) held its first High School STEM Symposium at the CFAA, gathering educators and administrators from around the country. Professionals who, like me — and very possibly you — understand that a good education should impart knowledge and skills that can be directly applied in the job market.

High school graduation is a time of joy, but many graduates find that school does not prepare them for real life.

A rider on a Harley-Davidson travelling through Monument Valley, Arizona. The 2017 Symposium was held in Fort Worth, Texas, and attracted an even larger audience. Currently, 29 high schools in the U.S. are testing a STEM curriculum developed by AOPA. With three specific tracks, students and teachers can focus on studies that will actually prepare them to be pilots, to work with drones, or get into aerospace engineering. The curriculum is free to use and includes everything a teacher needs to teach the material, including lesson plans, PowerPoint presentations, student assessments, student activities, teachers notes, and such. That’s no small potatoes, y’all. This movement is growing. And with a free curriculum available to any school system

that asks for it, the program is bound to keep growing over the coming years. Something’s happening. Something good. Something productive. I’m hoping that one day when a sketchy looking teenager walks up to his or her geometry teacher and says, “Can I get out of class today so I can see my guidance counselor about getting into the aerospace program?” The answer will be something like, “Sure, go check it out. I’ll see you tomorrow.” Maybe that’s wishful thinking, but there’s precedence for taking the high road and giving a kid the chance to at least try. They may not look like much at 16, but that kid just might surprise you in the long run by turning out pretty darned well.

LETTERS | From Page 10

years, I can attest to what the article points out. In my time providing a place for regular folks to experience the challenges of learning to fly, I have met many people from all walks of life, and I can honestly say that anyone obtaining the ability to fly an airplane are exceptional people. They should consider obtaining their license quite an accomplishment, and be proud of being a member of that 1%. DENNIS BAMPTON via GeneralAviationNews.com

to find parking). The big news was that we were about to hit the 1 million pilot mark. Now 45 years later, there are 123 million more people and 400,000 less pilots. RICHARD NEWMAN via GeneralAviationNews.com As the owner of St. Charles Flying Service in the St. Louis area for the past 44


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

February 8, 2018

Aviation boarding school takes off PORTLAND, Oregon — Windells Academy, an action sports boarding school, and Hillsboro Aero Academy (HAA), a helicopter and airplane pilot training school, have partnered to create the nation’s first high school boarding program where students can earn their professional pilot certifications while at the same time working toward their high school diploma. The new program will kick off with the Aviation Discovery Program, a sevenweek course providing students with an introduction to multiple areas of aviation, starting June 18, 2018. The full program is set to begin in September 2018. Enrollment in the program, which is open to students 14 to 18, began in January. “Our students are driven and talented

athletes with Olympic and X-Games prospects, but now we are able to offer our students the opportunity to train for a career in a blossoming industry,” said Kevin English, president of Windells Academy. “The beauty of this program is that we will be able to train high school students to become airplane and helicopter pilots, preparing them for a career that has tremendous growth prospects well into the future.” “We are truly pleased to be working with Windells on this project,” added Jon Hay, CEO of Hillsboro Aero Academy. “The synergies are phenomenal — both organizations have a very clear focus on offering a personalized approach to coaching and training for every student.” FlyHAA.com, WindellsAcademy.com

Photo by Hillsboro Aero Academy

A student learns how to preflight an aircraft.

STEM on the Fly

Photo courtesy Texas Instruments

Alex Livingston, a 15-year-old student at Tech Valley High School in Albany, New York, wants to be an airline pilot.

DALLAS — A high school sophomore has won Texas Instruments’ (TI) #GenSTEM contest and a starring role in the latest edition of STEM Behind Cool Careers, a series of calculator activities and videos that introduce middle and high school students to unexpected STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) careers. The national contest, hosted by former professional football player turned fulltime mathematician John Urschel, asked students and teachers from across the country to submit photos showing how STEM inspires them. Urschel selected the winning photo from Alex Livingston, a 15-year-old student at Tech Valley High School in Albany, New York, and a volunteer with the Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program. Living­ ston is one of the youngest members of his local flying club to solo a glider and has already logged nearly 25 hours of flight time. As part of his prize for winning the contest, the aspiring commercial pilot traveled to Dallas where he visited with

mathematicians and scientists at Texas Instruments, got a behind-the-scenes tour of McKinney National Airport, and sat in the cockpit of a flight simulator at Southwest Airlines’ training facilities. “My trip to Dallas was an amazing way to see the different sides of flying and opened my eyes to the many career options that exist in the field of aviation,” said Livingston. “It also helped me to connect what I need to learn in math and science class today to be successful in an aviation career in the future.” While in Dallas, Livingston met with Southwest Airlines Captain Adam Schindall, who helped TI create the new aviation lesson, “STEM on the Fly.” The free activity puts students at the controls of an intercontinental airliner as they cruise through the math and science that explain how wings work. It is designed for the TI-Nspire CX and TI-84 Plus CE graphing calculators and shows students how a solid understanding of STEM subjects is vital for almost any career, and especially aviation. TI.com


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

February 8, 2018

Why is my new engine running so hot? Paul McBride Ask Paul

Q

I fly a Cessna 182S. It has a Lycoming IO-540-AB1A5 and 3 blade prop. Sea level OAT is 90°F or so year round. It had a single probe analog CHT display connected to cylinder #1, which always remained around 320°F. I then installed a digital engine monitor, which showed the rest of the cylinders easily getting into the 400° range. So I started flying lean of peak with GAMI injectors and cowl flaps fully open all the time and got the CHTs into the 360° range. The original engine reached its 19th birthday and some 1,900 hours, so I decided to replace it with a factory rebuilt. Paul McBride, an expert on engines, retired after almost 40 years with Lycoming. Send your questions to: AskPaul@GeneralAviationNews.com.

The test data sheet from Lycoming shows all temperatures completely normal at the factory. I just flew the first two hours with the new engine, and it’s running much hotter than the old engine, particularly cylinder #2. In order to keep the temp at 400° or below, I have to keep cowl flaps full open and keep the mixture around 19 gallons per hour. At 19 gph, CHT1 reads 303, CHT2 reads 402, other CHTs around 375. At 18 gph CHT1 reads 311, CHT2 reads 408, other CHTs around 384. At 17 gph CHT1 reads 316, CHT2 reads 412, other CHTs around 390. I’ve read all the Lycoming literature I could find, which boils down to: Baffles, mag timing, induction leaks, exhaust leaks, and obstructed injectors. All of these look good, so I sent Savvy Aviation the EDM download, but they didn’t find anything really wrong.

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The Lycoming 540 engine. I then called Lycoming and they told me to check baffling again and to play with mixture and power and continue break in, avoiding continuous flight above 435° CHT. A friend who is an A&P as well as a mechanical engineer recommended I reduce the spark advance from 23°, which is specified, closer to 20°. Would you have any recommendations for me? Should I continue breaking in?

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Should I lean further as long as CHTs stay below 435°? Should I try reducing the spark advance? Henry Stec

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Henry, I first want to point out the fact that any engine recently rebuilt or overhauled will typically show higher cylinder head temperatures ASK PAUL | See Page 15

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Upgrades continue at KBCT BOCA RATON, Florida — Major safety enhancements have been completed at the Boca Raton Airport (KBCT) with the completion of the new Engineered Materials Arresting System (EMAS) installation and airfield electrical upgrades. While the EMAS arrestor bed installation for the departure end of Runway 5 was finished in July 2016, the construction of the arrestor bed at the departure end of Runway 23 was completed this fall, according to airport officials. EMAS is a bed of cellular material customized for the Boca Raton Airport and designed to crush under the weight of an aircraft, allowing the aircraft to stop and passengers and pilots to exit safely, airport officials explain.

The project also included the installation of LED runway end identifier lights and the relocation of threshold light assemblies, as well as the installation of a touchscreen Airfield Lighting Control and Monitoring System (ALCMS) in the Air Traffic Control Tower cab and the airfield electrical vault. The airport also is set to begin Phase II of the rehabilitation of the air traffic control tower this year. Last year the airport authority completed several renovations to the tower aimed at extending the useful life of the facility and creating an enhanced work environment for controllers, according to officials. Renovations included updates to criti-

cal systems, such as the roof, HVAC, bathroom plumbing, cab plumbing and fire line valves. The second phase of the tower’s rehabilitation will include replacing the windows, replacing millwork and fixtures in the cab, and repairs to the millwork and fixtures in the training and break room, airport officials noted. According to airport officials, 80% of funding for Phase II will be provided by a grant from the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT). The remaining 20% will be paid by the Boca Raton Airport Authority’s 2018 Capital Improvement budget, which is comprised of revenue generated through land leases and fuel flow fees.

Phase II is projected to cost $280,000, with $224,000 coming from the FDOT grant and the remaining $56,000 coming from the Capital Improvement budget, airport officials report. “Since the Tower began operations in 2000, it has played a vital part in the airport’s role as a premier general aviation facility,” said Boca Raton Airport Authority Executive Director Clara Bennett. “Phase II will ensure that it remains a cornerstone of our operations.” This final phase of improvement is expected to be completed in the fall. Next up for the airport is an upgraded Noise Monitoring and Flight Tracking System, airport officials note. BocaAirport.com

ASK PAUL | From Page 14 as a result of the tighter tolerances compared to your previous engine with 1,900 hours. The most important thing I can tell you is all of the temperatures you provided are well within the specific limits for your engine. I would not alter the specific engine timing under any circumstances! One thing to remember is that the airframe manufacturer decides which is typically the hottest cylinder following their cooling climb tests during the certification process. Cessna has chosen the #1 cylinder for a single probe system location because its tests confirmed that was the hottest running cylinder in this specific installation. If this engine were installed in a different aircraft with a different cowling design, the hottest cylinder may turn out to be #5. My suggestion for you would be to continue to break the engine in as recommended in the Cessna Pilots Operators Manual or the Lycoming Service Instruction 1427C. I agree with the Lycoming recommendations and wouldn’t recommend additional leaning. Remember: The two least expensive things you can put in your engine are gas and oil. Also, running with the cowl flaps open causes drag, which in turn means consuming more fuel, so continue to keep the cylinder head temperatures below that 435° point and keep the cowl flaps closed if possible. If I were to do anything else in your situation, it would be to really take a close look at the engine baffling again. I feel you may be able to make some improvements in that area. We know that engine baffling lives in a very hostile environment, so in many cases where an engine is replaced, it makes sense to replace a good part, if not all, of the baffling so that it fits much better than some of the high time baffles that have taken a set over time and may not seal as they did when new.

BasicMed is Here to Stay Since BasicMed took effect on May 1, more than 26,000 pilots are now qualified to fly under the new alternative to third class medical certification. This new process is the most significant shift in third class medical reform since the early 1960s. In just its first seven months, BasicMed has achieved some major milestones. Already expanded across borders, pilots can now fly under the new FAA medical approval in the Bahamas. And we are continuing to work with leadership across the globe to recognize BasicMed or similar medical alternatives in their countries. In addition, the Civil Air Patrol also began accepting BasicMed last summer.

Photography courtesy of Chris Rose

At AOPA headquarters, our aviation and medical certification specialists in the Pilot Information Center continue to field hundreds of calls from members each week interested in learning more about BasicMed and its benefits. If you have questions regarding BasicMed, you can reach the AOPA Pilot Information Center at 888-462-3976, Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Eastern. As time goes on and more doctors and AMEs familiarize themselves with the BasicMed exam, we believe the numbers will continue to skyrocket. If you’ve had a positive experience with the BasicMed process and have a doctor you’d like to recommend to AOPA and other pilots, please send us their information through www.aopa.org/submit-doctors. AOPA will be following up with each doctor for their approval to share their information when the Pilot Information Center receives a request to connect a pilot with a BasicMed friendly doctor.

Mark R. Baker President & CEO, AOPA

*For more information on the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association and the issues that affect your flying go to www.aopa.org today.


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

February 8, 2018

Refining the art of biplane fighters Frederick A. Johnsen Of Wings & Things

The decade of the 1920s was a transitional time for American military aircraft design and construction. Early fighters of the era, though better than the machines of the recently concluded Great War, were hardly revolutionary. They began employing welded steel tube fuselages, a design advancement proven in combat with Fokker fighters flown by German airmen. The Aircraft Year Book for 1928, reflecting back on 1927, observed: “…the tendency toward the use of metals noted in 1926 was even more marked in 1927. The use of wood fuselage construction has practically disappeared.” The postwar pursuits initially relied on liquid-cooled engines, even as military planners looked ahead to enhanced simplicity and reliability that could be gained from emerging air-cooled radial powerplants. Boeing sold a number of biplane fighter designs to the Navy in the 1920s incorporating air-cooled engines, welded steel fuselages, and the use of some corrugated aluminum flight control structures. This was in keeping with the Boeing team’s knack for melding traditional and new technologies as the company hammered out a strong design rationale by the end of the first decade of its existence. Boeing was not alone in its evolution of Fred Johnsen is a product of the historical aviation scene in the Pacific Northwest that has fostered everything from museums to historical publishing. An author, historian, curator and photographer, you can reach him at Fred@GeneralAviationNews.com.

fighter design in the 1920s. Curtiss was a strong rival, likewise bridging the divide between air-cooled and liquid-cooled engines in its offerings to the American military. What followed from Boeing in 1928 began as a privately funded design venture that sought to improve on the performance of those earlier biplanes with lighter weight. Called Model 83, this new biplane initially used a hybrid fuselage construction with welded steel tubing in the forward fuselage and bolted square aluminum tube construction from the cockpit aft. Boeing employed square aluminum tube in the design of its Model 80 tri­motor airliner and in later projects, including the B-17 wing structure. The Boeing Model 83 was called the P-12 by the Air Corps and the F4B by the Navy. It was an early instance of serendipitous commonality — the biplane had been designed to meet a Navy need, but the Air Corps subsequently found it viable for that service’s requirements as well. P-12s and F4Bs went through a series of model letters. Both services’ examples started out as quite traditional biplanes with fabric-covered fuselages. But with the introduction of the Army’s P-12E and the Navy’s F4B-3, the fuselage was an aluminum-clad semi-monocoque design that foretold the future of fighters. Throughout development of the P-12 and F4B series, differing Boeing model numbers were applied, from Model 83 to 89, 99, 100, 101, 102, 218, 222, 223, 227, 234, 235, 251, 256, and 267. The handful of Model 100s were civilian test beds, demonstrators, and personal aircraft. One, flown by the Boeing com-

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A vintage Boeing P-12 photo depicts aircraft serial number 29-354. This serial was copied for the restoration of the similar Boeing Model 100 now in the Museum of Flight in Seattle. In this photo, the P-12 has streamlined fairings behind each cylinder in an attempt to reduce drag; in actuality, the P-12 gained speed after these fairings were removed.

Photo by Frederick A. Johnsen

Lew Wallick makes the first restoration flight in Model 100 at Boeing Field on Sept. 19, 1977. pany and registered NC874H, was fitted with a Boeing ring cowl similar to the pioneering British Townend Ring. The cowling reduced drag on this Model 100’s higher compression and supercharged variant of the Pratt and Whitney Wasp engine, and claims of speeds in excess

of 200 miles per hour were made for this demonstrator in a January 1930 story in “Aviation” magazine. Production P-12s never breached 200 miles an hour. This Model 100 was later sold to the Mitsui Co. in Japan. Historian Peter M. Bowers described


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17

Photo by USMC via Barrett Tillman

This Army P-12E shows the somewhat enlarged fin and rudder common to the Navy’s F4B-3 version. The Navy’s F4B-4 would make the vertical fin even bigger. This enhanced spin recovery.

Photo by USMC photo via Barrett Tillman

Boeing F4B-3 of U.S. Marine Corps in 1933. F4B, as did countries like Thailand and Brazil. The various models of P-12 and F4B evolved different landing gear struts, aileron shapes, fuel tank locations, and, most radically, the aluminum fuselage of the F4B-3, P-12E, and later models. The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) used a Navy F4B-2 BIPLANES | See Page 23

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An F4B-4 at Brown Field, Quantico, Virginia, on April 13, 1934. The aircraft is serial 9037 from squadron VF-10M.

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the P-12 as a fairly safe bet; not too radical to gain acceptance, and with triedand-true refinements over earlier biplanes to give it a performance edge. Bowers said the P-12 had the good fortune of arriving on the scene when its improvements were valid for the military, just before biplane fighters lost the edge to monoplanes. The U.S. Army Air Corps, Navy, and Marines flew variants of the P-12 and

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February 8, 2018

The magic of making dreams come true By JANICE WOOD Back in 2011, Darryl Fisher took a flight that changed his life — and the lives of thousands of veterans and senior citizens. On a cross-country trip in a Stearman with his father, Darryl suggested offering rides to veterans at each stop. His dad enthusiastically said yes. The first stop: Oxford, Mississippi. The first flight was given to Hugh Newton, a World War II veteran. As Darryl approached the airport, he saw a bus from the senior citizen facility where Hugh lived. “There were 20 or 30 people milling about and when I land, they start clapping,” Darryl recalls. The local newspaper was on hand, as well as Hugh’s family. “After the flight, his wife came up to me and she was just beaming,” he says. “And I’ll never forget she says, ‘You have no idea what you’ve just done for Hugh.’ And I was speechless.” “Dad and I go back to the hotel that night and we’re just looking at each other saying, ‘that was just magic,’” he continues. And that’s how Ageless Aviation Dreams began. The non-profit organization travels the country, offering free rides to veterans in three Stearmans. The group is now raising funds to buy another two Stearmans, which will greatly increase the number of rides its six pilots can offer veterans and other senior citizens.

From low to high

Ageless Aviation Dreams was created at a time when Darryl was at a low point professionally. A professional in the senior living industry, he was hit hard by the 2008 recession. A few years later after guiding a senior living facility through bankruptcy, he sold it to another company. He soon learned that the new company was not continuing one of his pet projects, Ageless Dreams, which was created to give residents a chance to fulfill their lifelong dreams. “Just because somebody gets older doesn’t mean they don’t have dreams and desires,” he says. “I mean, those don’t die at a certain age. So, I challenged each of our leaders in our communities to find a resident who wanted to do something — either something they had done before or something that they’ve always wanted to do — and make it happen. Help them live. Help them fulfill their dreams.” When his company was sold, Ageless Dreams “kind of died,” he relates. “The company that bought it didn’t do anything with it and that really hurt me. I can deal with the professional setbacks, but that program was so rich. I handed it to them and they didn’t do anything with it. It was such a lost opportunity.”

Photos Courtesy Ageless Aviation Dreams

Darryl Fisher prepares for takeoff with one of the thousands of senior citizens flown by the foundation since 2011. So that was on his mind when his dad asked him to travel from Oregon to Mississippi to pick up a Stearman that has just undergone restoration.

Steeped in Stearmans

It’s not a stretch to say the Fishers are a family steeped in Stearmans and aviation. “My grandparents were both pilots,” he reports. “As a matter of fact, I still have the trophy that William Piper gave my grandmother in 1958 to congratulate her on getting her pilot’s license.” “My grandfather started flying back in the late 1930s and I eventually bought the Stearman he used to own in the 1940s and had it restored.” When he sold the business, Darryl was in the process of rebuilding another Stearman, while the restoration of his dad’s Stearman was almost complete. That’s when the fateful call from his dad came. While planning the trip, Darryl knew the trip back to Oregon would take about 20 stops. “And I thought, how cool would it be to stop at some of the communities that I used to work with and give one or two of their residents a flight,” he says. His dad was all in, Darryl says, even af-

Pilot Mike Winterboer and one of his many passengers. ter he pointed out that this would increase his expenses for the trip. “He said, ‘don’t worry about it, it’ll be worth it,’” Darryl recalls. After the first stop in Mississippi, the duo headed to Jasper, Alabama, where they gave Lloyd Latham, another World War II veteran, a ride. “His entire family came out,” Darryl remembers. “And, again, it was just mind-blowing.”

On the trip back to Oregon, Darryl gave 25 flights to veterans across the country. “Every night I’d call my wife and dad would call my mom and we’d tell them about that day’s flight,” he says. “It’s like you’re just living this dream.”

From a dream to reality

When he returned home, his wife told him they needed to find a way to keep


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Photo by Mike Collins

One of the Ageless Aviation Dreams Foundation’s Stearmans in flight. offering the flights. With her legal background, she offered to complete all the paperwork to create a non-profit foundation, while he was tasked with raising money and giving the flights. The first year, the Ageless Aviation Dreams Foundation gave 50 flights. In 2016, the foundation’s pilots gave 786 flights. “On Nov. 10, 2017, I gave our 3,000th flight,” he reports. But even as he celebrates that milestone, his mind returns to Lloyd Latham back in Jasper, Alabama. “I didn’t fully appreciate the ripple effect and the profoundness of the flights until about a year later. I got a call from the administrator at the senior facility and she said, ‘Hey, I just wanted to tell you that Lloyd passed.’ It kind of surprised me because he was in his late 80s, but was in really great shape.” It also surprised him when he learned that at Lloyd’s funeral, the only photo on his casket was one that was taken during his Ageless Aviation Dreams flight. “To this day it brings tears to my eyes,” he says. “We take it for granted that we get to do things, particularly with aviation. I’ve learned, over the years, that when you are dealing with a group of individuals in their late 80s and older, that they are losing things in their life. Not much is working for them. They don’t think they’ll ever fly again in anything.” “Then we show up with a Stearman and it becomes an experience,” he continues. “It’s not a flight — it’s an experience. We spend 45 minutes with the flight and listening to their stories and taking photos

and getting family pictures and making a big deal out of it.” “In many, many cases it’s their last big deal,” he says. “They get to go out on top.”

Seeing the magic

But in other cases, it isn’t their last big deal, but something that changes their lives forever. “The flights truly change people sometimes,” says Tim Newton, a retired Air Force pilot who flies for the foundation. He tells the story of one veteran who lives at the Army Residence Community in Texas, which houses up to 800 retired officers from all branches of the military. “He has Alzheimer’s and had not spoken in years,” he recalls. “We took him up and when we landed — well, he hasn’t shut up since. He’s telling stories. He’s having full conversations, and he had not spoken in a long, long, long time.” There was another Army veteran in Wyoming, a man in his late 90s who was dying and on hospice care. “His family signed him up for the flight,” Tim says. “He didn’t want to fly. He didn’t want anything to do with it.” Still his family persevered, bringing him out to the airport, along with four generations of the family, including a new great-great-grandson. “They wheel him out in a wheelchair. He’s on oxygen. He’s not talking much. He’s not moving. He’s worried. They said, ‘He can barely stand up. I don’t know if we can get him in the airplane or not.’” Undaunted, Tim wheeled him out to the airplane. Before helping the vet into the

Photo Courtesy Ageless Aviation Dreams

Darryl Fisher and other crew members help a veteran into the Stearman.


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Photos Courtesy Ageless Aviation Dreams

One of the foundation’s Stearmans comes in for a landing. Stearman, Tim turned to the family to let them know what to expect. “All of a sudden, all of their eyes got really, really big. I turn around, and the guy had taken his oxygen off, stood up, and was halfway up the wing climbing in the airplane. We took him out flying and got a letter from his family later. He wasn’t on hospice anymore. He was doing fine.” “It doesn’t happen all the time, but every now and then it does, and it rewires their brain. It changes them somehow,” he continues. “I think what it is, in a lot of cases, they’ve been told, ‘You can’t do this because you’re old,’ and they’ve basically been put away to die, and they believe it. They believe they have nothing else left to live for. We take them out and they realize, ‘Wait a minute. I don’t have to die. There’s still a lot I can do.’ It re-energizes them, and it’s just fantastic. It really is amazing when you see it.” And even if the magic doesn’t happen, it’s still a great experience for everybody — the vets, their families, and the pilots. Especially the pilots.

Paid in satisfaction

“We get paid in satisfaction,” Darryl says. “The joy that I’ve received in seeing them enjoy their flights and being able to give so richly to people who deserve it so much has just been so amazing.” “We always tell the veterans we fly that we get more enjoyment out of it than they do, and I’m an honest believer that that’s true,” Tim adds. “It’s just special. You just can’t not love doing it. I enjoy the flying. I enjoy talking to the veterans and hearing their stories and interacting with them and laughing.” “It’s just fantastic getting to know them,” he continues. “Many of them still email and write us and keep in touch. We see them again when we come back, and for those that don’t live much longer, which, unfortunately, a lot of them don’t, it’s really special to give to them and their family an experience that they can remember forever. It’s a special time where, quite honestly, this is the first time in a long time that the families have gotten together, and it’s the last time that they will get together as a big family. It’s just really, really special.”

It’s not just the pilots and passengers who get enjoyment from the flights. That joy is felt by the volunteers on the ground, as well as the foundation’s sponsors. Sports Clips, the nation’s largest provider of men’s and boys’ hair cuts, is the foundation’s biggest sponsor. The company is led by Gordon Logan, a retired Air Force C-130 pilot. At many events, Sports Clips employees volunteer on the ground, Gordon notes, adding he’s been to several events himself. “Our team members, our stylists, managers, and franchisees go out to the airport to help. They just can’t say enough about how much it means to them,” he reports. “It’s something that’s great for the veterans, but I think it’s good for everybody who’s involved. It’s just a good program that makes a big difference in people’s lives who, quite frankly, don’t have much left.” “It is just such a rewarding emotional experience,” he continues. “Seeing the lights in their eyes and the smiles on their faces makes it a really great experience. It’s a lot like Honor Flights. We sponsor those as well. You can’t go on one of those flights and be around those veterans and see how much that means to them without it having a major impact on you.” It’s interesting to note that the foundation did not go in search of a sponsor. It was Sports Clips that sought Ageless Aviation Dreams out. “Darryl had a plane in Fresno giving rides to senior veterans in assisted living homes,” Gordon recounts. “One of our franchisees was out there at the airport helping and he was so impressed with it he called me and told me all about it, and I got excited about it.” That led Gordon to calling Darryl, asking how he could help. Darryl mentioned the foundation didn’t have a sponsor yet and Gordon, without hesitation, offered to become a sponsor. In 2014 alone, the foundation was able to offer an additional 400 flights because of Sports Clips’ sponsorship. Another important sponsor is Signature Flight Support, which runs a network of FBOs across the country. “They hangar us anywhere in the country for free,” Tim notes. “They have been unbelievable supporters.”

Photo by Courtesy Ageless Aviation Dreams

Darryl Fisher and passenger Marjorie Carlson prepare for her flight.

Darryl Fisher preps a veteran for his flight.

Photo by Sports Clips

Sports Clips’ Gordon Logan “We couldn’t do what we do without our donors and our sponsors,” he adds. “All they want is for us to do good. They want us to fulfill our mission.”

A time of growth

The mission is about to grow, as the foundation is actively fundraising to add two more Stearmans to its fleet. One will be based in Texas and the other in Wisconsin, adding to the planes that are now based in Blountsville, Florida, San Antonio, Texas, and Phoenix. The foundation has raised about $100,000 towards buying the new air-

Darryl Fisher gets a kiss from one of his passengers. planes and is now shopping, according to Tim. “We’re looking for the right one, because if you’ve seen our airplanes, you know that they are showpieces. They’re gorgeous and they’re pristine,” he says. They are hoping that somewhere there’s a Stearman owner who is willing to give the foundation a good price or even donate an airplane — or a portion of it — for a tax break. “The right person is out there and the right airplane is out there,” he says. “We DREAMS | See Page 21


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Love is in the air — and on the water By JANICE WOOD As Valentine’s Day approaches, men around the globe are preparing to ask the most important question of their lives: Will you marry me? And many who want to make the proposal unforgettable turn to the skies — and the seas. Seaplane tour operations around the country report an uptick in proposal flights around this time of year, including the folks at Miami Seaplane Tours in Key Biscayne, Florida. The good new is love is definitely in the air, according to pilot Tony Anderson. “About 95% of the women say yes,” he reports. “But I can always tell if she’s hesitating because all of a sudden it becomes very quiet.” At that point, he says he cuts the flight short to get the seaplane back on the ground. “They’ve got more work to do,” he notes. While many of the men propose in the plane, others plan elaborate events, Anderson reports. One man from London spent three months preparing his proposal. “He just kept making it more and more elaborate,” he remembers. “In the end we ended up flying them to one of the smaller islands, telling her they were going swimming.” But once the seaplane pulled up on the beach, it was revealed that there were several chefs on the island preparing a sevencourse meal. Then the chef’s assistant brings out a table and chairs, along with flowers and champagne. “And while they are eating and drinking their champagne a little plane goes by with a banner that says ‘Jolene, will you marry me?’ Of course the answer was yes.” Some men forgo the romantic route and aim for something a little more adrenaline filled. DREAMS | From Page 20 just haven’t connected with them yet.” Once the new airplanes join the fleet, Tim estimates each of them will allow the foundation to offer an additional 300 flights every season.

Want to help make dreams come true?

All of the Ageless Aviation Dreams pilots are volunteers. There are six, including Darryl, with the expectation of adding two more this year. As the foundation begins its hunt for more pilots, officials are looking for people with four attributes. “The first one is you’ve got to believe our mission. You’ve got to understand what we’re doing and why,” Darryl be-

Photo by Miami Seaplane Tours

A romantic getaway often includes more than just the seaplane flight.

It’s not uncommon for the man to be very nervous before the flight. “We always try to take attention away from that,” he says. That includes the preflight briefing where the pilots tell the passengers about the seat belts and how to put on the life vest, he reports. “I get them distracted. That’s the name of the game, engaging your guests, making them have a really memorable experience,” he says. “That’s why it wins.” The company is offering a Valentine’s Day special, not just for proposals, but for all couples. Along with the flight, there’s dinner, a bouquet of a dozen roses, and more. “We’re trying to make it appealing to guys as a one-stop shop for the holiday,” he says.

Anderson recalls one couple from about seven years ago. The woman was a bit nervous about flying in a small aircraft, especially over the water. “Some ladies have a heightened fear about it and sometimes we feed on that,” Anderson says. “So we actually simulated an engine failure. If that doesn’t get her heart pumping, nothing will, right?” Once he got the seaplane down on the beach, he told the couple he was going to check “under the hood” to see what was going on with the engine. This was the cue for the man to jump out of the plane first. “As I help her out of the plane, he’s on his knees with the wedding band, asking ‘will you marry me?’ She was very slow to get what was actually happening, but when she did it was real fun. It was an unforgettable moment.” He admits some people are not up for something “that dramatic,” but luckily this woman took it all in stride, posting the whole story on her Facebook page. Making each proposal unique to each couple is important, Anderson says. “We have several variations on the

theme,” he notes. “We work with our clients to get something within their budget, and also something that is specific to the people involved.” Many times when the couple show up for their flight, the woman has an inkling something big is in the works. “Women are very intuitive,” he says. “They know their man well enough to know when he’s up to something.” For the most part they are good sports and go along with the whole “surprise,” he reports. Many women, however, have no clue. A lot of them think it’s just their man finally picking up on the hint that a seaplane tour is something she’d like to do. “A lot of the women tell us ‘do you know how many times we’ve seen you flying while we’re having lunch or dinner and I tell him ‘we really have to try that,’” he reports. So the women are happy their boyfriends finally listened and did something they wanted. “And the guys think, ‘Well even if she says ‘no,’ well, hell I got a good ride out of it,” Anderson says with a laugh.

Now hiring

gins. “Then you have to have a love of seniors and people.” “Then the obvious one is that you’ve got be able to fly the airplane. Ironically, that’s the easiest one,” he says. “There’s a lot of people who would love to fly the Stearman.” While pilots are volunteers, the foundation covers all travel expenses. And that leads to the fourth attribute: You have to have the mindset of a barnstormer. “We’re traveling from city to city,” he says. “We don’t know what’s going on with weather. We don’t know what’s going on with mechanical issues or what kind of accommodations we’re going to have. On the long days you’ll fly eight or nine flights and then you’ve got to do a two-hour ferry to another town. It’s a fair

amount of adventure.” The insurance company requires pilots have 100 hours tailwheel time and 25 hours Stearman time. But the foundation is looking for more experienced Stearman pilots. “We will not pay for people’s training. That’s kind of a test, if you will, if people will commit and invest in their own training, then that means they are serious about it,” he explains. The foundation isn’t just looking for pilots. It also needs mechanics to help maintain the airplanes, as well as people to help with public affairs, or others to help with the website and Facebook page. “There’s endless amount of things that people can volunteer to do, and you don’t have to be a pilot to do a lot of it,” Tim says.

Like any aviation endeavor, money keeps the planes aloft. That means fundraising is constant. “We are a grassroots foundation,” Darryl says. “Our ability to serve and give back is 100% dependent on donors and we’re in the airplane business. It’s expensive.” A typical flight costs about $250, with Darryl noting it would be a lot more if the crew were paid. He adds that he doesn’t draw a salary from the foundation. “Being all volunteer, that means all the money is going to the people,” he says. “And that’s unusual. It’s easy to donate to the foundation. Go to AgelessAviationDreams.org and you’ll see the donate link right at the top of the page. All donations are tax-deductible. AgelessAviationDreams.org

Business is good at the company, so much so that it is looking for more pilots to fly its fleet of Cessna 172s and a deHavilland Beaver. “Ideally we are looking for someone with 1,000 hours total time,” he says, noting they could help with the seaplane rating. Anderson also said they’d be willing to consider a pilot with 500 hours. “We can use him in the flight school area as we teach him what we do,” he says. Interested pilots should realize that being a seaplane pilot is a very physical job, so they must be fit and like to be outdoors doing something different every day, he adds. Ultimately, however, they are looking for someone who is able to constantly improvise, as well as make good decisions. “It is incumbent on our pilots to be able to make good decisions,” he says. “There’s no controller and there’s always a new environment. They could be dealing with a sunken vessel or debris from Hurricane Irma.” MiamiSeaplane.com


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February 8, 2018

The Living Legends of Aviation By HAYMAN TAM Early January marks two things for me: Putting away the Christmas tree and preparing for one of my favorite photography events — the Living Legends of Aviation Awards. This is a black-tie gala in which the Legends of Aviation honor those who have made significant contributions to aviation. Held every January, many consider this the most prestigious and important recognition event of aviation. The “Living Legends of Aviation” is a select group of people from around the world, now numbering 97 men and women of extraordinary accomplishment and renown in the aviation arena. Among the defining criteria used in identifying “Living Legends” are aviation entrepreneurs, innovators, industry leaders, record breakers, astronauts, pilots who have become celebrities, and celebrities who have become pilots. As the initial group of Legends evolved, these extraordinary people of aviation nominate others to join them, and the list has gradually grown. As Legends take their final flight west, new inductees are selected by their fellow Legends to replace them. 2018 marked the 15th awards event, held at the Beverly Hilton hotel in Beverly Hills in the very same ballroom as the Golden Globes. The event is organized as a fundraiser and my wife (and second photographer) and I have been very fortunate to be regular members of the event’s photography team for nine years now. Immersed in the celebrity environment here, it is always interesting to learn of another celebrity who is a pilot. In prior years, actor/pilots attending included Tom Cruise, Morgan Freeman, and Kurt Russell. This year, famed musician Kenny G was in attendance. Who knew he is an avid pilot and owns a Beaver floatplane? Prior to the main award events, there is a private, informal gathering of Legends held the evening before to allow the Legends to have some quality time together and re-connect. This event is traditionally hosted by Clay Lacy, Bruce McCaw, and Joe Clark and held in one of Clay’s spacious hangars at Van Nuys Airport (VNY). Set with enticing tables of food, surrounded by classic aircraft, it was a cozy intimate event punctuated by the presence of numerous aviation heroes. The awards event is a fantastic opportunity to see and even meet aviation heavyweights. It has also been very educational, learning from the biographical videos and acceptance speeches how these folks built their lives around aviation, often starting as childhood dreams. Emcee duties were split between airshow star Sean Tucker and renowned airshow announcer Danny Clisham, aided by the host, John Travolta.

Photo by Hayman Tam/Living Legends of Aviation

The newest Living Legends of Aviation pose for a group photo with the host John Travolta. Special remarks made during the program included a memorial tribute to former Living Legend Gene Cernan, the last man to walk on the moon, and an impassioned speech from Harrison Ford on House Bill 2997, which seeks to privatize air traffic services in this country. Living Legends of Aviation Inductees for 2018 are: H. Ross Perot, Jr., best known in aviation circles for undertaking the first helicopter flight around the world in 1982, he also led the 14-year effort to build the USAF Memorial in Washington D.C.; Dr. Ulf Merbold, a German astronaut with the European Space Agency who flew on two Space Shuttle missions and one mission to the Mir space station; Felix Baumgartner, an Austrian skydiver, daredevil and BASE jumper best known for his 2012 jump from over 127,000’, exceeding Mach 1 during freefall; Bruno Gantenbrink, a German glider pilot and multiple world champion, as well as a safety advocate for the sport; Danny Clisham, a renowned airshow announcer marking over 50 years of the craft, who is also a retired American Airlines pilot with more than 30,000 hours flight time; and Mark Baker, president and CEO of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, who is also a fixed and rotary wing pilot. Among the many award honorees at this year’s event were ForeFlight co-founders Tyson Weihs and Jason Miller, who were given the Eren Ozmen Entrepreneur of the Year Award. Other award winners included Senator Jim Inhofe, (R-Oklahoma) and Gen. Jack Dailey, retired director of the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum. To supplement the fundraising are a va-

Photo by Hayman Tam/Living Legends of Aviation

ForeFlight co-founders Tyson Weihs and Jason Miller accept the Eren Ozmen Entrepreneur of the Year Award.

Photo by Blythe Asagi/Living Legends of Aviation

Kermit Weeks, owner of one of the largest aircraft collections in the world, poses with artists Michelle Rouch and Mimi Stuart.


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Photo by Hayman Tam/Living Legends of Aviation

One can only imagine the flying stories being exchanged by Burt Rutan, Harrison Ford, and Buzz Aldrin at the pre-event.

Photo by Hayman Tam/Living Legends of Aviation

Exterior features of the Beverly Hilton sported special décor for the Awards event.

riety of silent auction items, ranging from signed aircraft models to large artwork from artists such as Mimi Stuart and Michelle Rouch. Through the course of the evening, many of these items accumulate numer-

ous signatures from the Living Legends in attendance. The Legends of Aviation Awards event raises funds for the Kiddie Hawk Air Academy, a non-profit organization that introduces children to aviation. Kiddie

Hawk follows the students as they progress, making scholarships available as they begin actual flight training. Living-Legends-of-Aviation.myshopify. com,Kiddie-Hawk-Air-Academy. myshopify.com

Photo by NACA

During spin testing, this Boeing F4B-2 flown by NACA differed from the standard in having an experimental “T” tail. BIPLANE | From Page 17 in the first half of the 1930s for a series of explorations on the efficacy of tail configuration changes as an aid to spin recovery. At one point in the flight research program, the F4B-2 had a T-tail, with its horizontal tail surfaces nearly in line with the biplane’s upper wing, and just over three feet higher than normal position. This NACA F4B-2 was an early adopter of a spin parachute for emergency recovery, using a design that improved upon

a rudimentary and not satisfactory spin chute the Navy had tried earlier. The T-tail configuration aided spin recovery, according to a NACA report: “The ease with which recoveries could be made was decidedly improved by raising the stabilizer and elevator, especially when the stabilizer and elevator were raised to the top of the fin and rudder. Of all the conditions tested, only the one with the stabilizer and elevator at the top of the fin gave satisfactory recoveries with the controls held neutral.”

Photo by Air Corps via Gen. Stephen McElroy collection

An Army P-12E tucks in tight with the camera plane, showing off its bright markings. The larger vertical fin and rudder of the F4B-4 proved helpful in spin recovery. Serving well into the 1930s, some P12s and F4B-4s were available for use by the Navy as early-day full-size target drones between 1940 and 1942. The P-12 and F4B operated in an era of bright and often geometric markings.

Even in black-and-white, the accompanying photos bespeak a bold era of pre-war fliers. Note: Aviation photographer and historian Jim Morrow died Jan. 20, 2018. He was 92. Jim was an important component of the historical aviation community in Puget Sound for decades.


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February 8, 2018

Let the flying season begin Dan Johnson Splog

The 14th running of the U.S. Sport Aviation Expo vigorously launched the 2018 season of airshows. The show ran Jan. 24-27, 2018, at Sebring Regional Airport (KSEF). The central Florida airport — directly adjacent to the famous Sebring Raceway — hosts the annual event and lucked out with an opening day of gorgeous weather of clear blue skies and modest breezes in the high 70s. More than 100 vendors exhibited and plenty of shiny new aircraft were available to examine. Throughout the four-day event, I observed good foot traffic. Every morning the parking lot was on its way to a good fill by 8:30 a.m. These sector-specific shows rarely seem crowded compared to the big shows, but that’s actually a great thing if you want to talk to an aircraft designer or take a demo flight. At times numerous aircraft were surrounded by visitors and, overall, Sebring looked healthy. Many vendors reported sales right from the start of Sebring 2018. Perhaps these buyers had already decided to act and just wanted one more look or to ask one more question. Non-airframe equipment vendors also reported a solid response to Mike Willingham, the airport director and man in charge of the event.

He added a dealer in the east, while he handles sales in the west from his California base. From what I could see, interest is growing for this handsome 80%-scale 182 lookalike done in composite. Many visitors looked over the fourstroke HKS-powered Merlin Chip Erwin brought on behalf of his Aeromarine-LSA company based in the Tampa area. The bargain-priced aircraft clearly fills a need even while being a single seater. Day two of the year’s first show was a bit cooler and windier, but still a fine day as evidenced by crowds that were as good or better than the first day, not even counting a large contingent of ROTC candidates visiting the event. Zenith continued to garner lots of attention for its supersized SuperDuty CH-750 variant. Larger wings (6’ more span) and tail feathers are mated to a common 750 fuselage, with construction time reduced through higher tech. SuperDuty is powered by an Aero Sport Power IO-375 producing 205 horsepower. The show example was a three seater that grosses at 1,900 pounds. An 1,100 pounds empty weight results in an 800-pound useful load. This is the model with the distinctive

Unpanel instrument system that works like a swivel-mounted flat screen TV in your living room (but better because it’s in your airplane). Aeroprakt USA displayed an A22LS model that has been selling well. This is a Ukraine design featuring expanses of clear plastic that deliver massive visibility. The show model had tundra tires with rather unique “footwear” as its tricycle gear used surfaces closer to fenders than wheel pants. They won’t provide any drag reduction, but will help keep mud or debris splatter off the wings and fuselage.

All Photos by Dan Johnson

The Merlin PSA.

First impressions

We saw a rare sighting of an Icon A5 on display, with another on a lake doing demo flights. The California company has, in recent years, limited its airshow appearances to a splashy big tent at Osh­ kosh. It was good to see the team from the factory’s flight school and operation in Tampa, Florida, make a showing. Scott Severen of US Sport Planes made his first appearance as the new man handling sales nationally for Jabiru, focused on the company’s J230-D and J170-D models. Scott has played many roles in aviation and he’s a veteran choice to take over from Pete Krotje and his Shelbyville, Tennessee, team as Pete slides gracefully into a well-deserved retirement. Aeropilot USA boss Deon Lombard reported a solid first year with six deliveries of the L600 and several more in the works. Dan Johnson, president of the Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, is an expert on LSA. For more on Sport Pilot/LSA, go to ByDanJohnson.com.

The exhibited A-22 also had sliding windows useful for aerial photography. AutoGyro USA is now a regular at airshows as the clear European market leader showed its line of models, including the very handsome Cavalon done in a brilliant blue. This model is rare in gyroplanes by offering two-place side-by-side seating. Despite the full enclosure, visibility is broad thanks to wide swaths of artfully curved clear plastic. John Williams of Titan Aircraft reported that after making more than 800 of his Tornado light kits in various configura-

Scott Severen is taking over all sales of Jabiru in North America.


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Photo by Dan Johnson

The Icon A5 was on display and in the water at Sebring 2018. tions, his Ohio company is now focused on the T-51 Mustang replica. Starting with a 100-hp Rotax 912, the T-51 has evolved up to a 400-hp Corvette engine that produces 4,000 fpm climb rates, yet manages to burn only 10-12 gallons an hour at cruise. Around 200 have been sold and more than 100 are flying. Indoor displays benefitted from those seeking to get out of the wind for a time. At Duc Hélices propellers, we learned about the company’s super-easy prop pitch adjustment allowing the owner to fine tune the blades for specific performance. Using a special allen wrench in a single motion, changes can be made to all three blades in half-degree increments as desired. The French company plans a U.S. facility in the next year to better serve a growing customer base in America. Beringer debuted a new wheel for aircraft doing bush duty using big Alaska tires. As always the hardware is gorgeous from this best-in-class French company supported by a U.S. operation. A special brake unit augments the split hub wheel, which allows fitting of the tire without jamming a tire iron against the wheel edge. Airframe builders keen on the new wheel include Just Aircraft, CubCrafters, Rans, American Legend, and more. Although a somewhat unpredictable time of year, weather at Sebring was good this year, although fairly windy on a couple of the days. However, plenty of flying still occurred and the gyroplanes in particular appeared to have no problem with the conditions. Even the Ford Trimotor — one of two flying examples remaining, according to the local EAA chapter — flew steadily, ceasing operations only on one afternoon.

A strong year ahead

If the rest of the year goes like U.S. Sport Aviation Expo 2018, I predict a strong year for LSA and light kit aircraft sales. Vendors were smiling by the end of the show and a good many customers are now anticipating a shiny new aircraft in their hangars. Based on my unscientific survey of vendors, I would estimate at least 15 air-

craft sales and possibly several more, as I did not pose the question to every vendor. Of course, airshow promises don’t always materialize, but regardless of the precise number, it was amply clear that Sebring — and similar focused-venue shows that confine themselves to LSA, light kits, and ultralight — still offer their magic in putting customers and sellers together. Several vendors told airport executive Mike Willingham about having “pages” of solid leads. Even non-LSA exhibitors such as Cirrus reported they found good prospects at the show. While vendors form these observations, the fact is that buyers are still flocking to the many great choices in this segment of affordable aviation.

Photo by Dan Johnson

Auto Gyro USA’s Cavalon.

BasicMed and More

By another view, the push by the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) and the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) for BasicMed appears to have hardly affected Light-Sport Aircraft interest. In fact, BasicMed may be helping. While new opportunities now exist for older pilots to keep flying their older GA airplanes, BasicMed comes with enough hoops to jump through that some are electing to continue using their driver’s license paired with their existing pilot certificate to fly Light-Sport Aircraft. Putting a finer point on it, I believe the reaction of many pilots at events such as Sebring’s Expo demonstrates that brandnew, affordable, high-tech, roomy, and well-performing LSA hold genuine appeal. Sebring is the granddaddy of these LSA, light kit, and ultralight shows. It has spawned similar events like the Midwest LSA Expo and the DeLand Showcase. It also has inspired shows like Copperstate and Arlington to keep a focus on more affordable, recreational aircraft. Such sector-specific events are no challenge to the majors such as SUN ’n FUN (starting in only two months) and AirVenture Oshkosh, but they have definitely won a place in the airshow circuit. The number of exhibitors at Sebring,

LSA leader Tecnam has a large facility at KSEF.

Aeropilot USA’s L600 appears to be enjoying a warm reception. the volume of attendees and the seriousness of these pilots about buying, plus the range of aircraft options — in both types and cost — is but one part of the success story that is Light-Sport and experimental

amateur built aircraft. By most measures, Sebring #14 was declared a success by a majority of attendees and vendors interviewed. Let the season of flying begin!


26

General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

February 8, 2018

Accident Reports These February 2016 accident reports are provided by the National Transportation Safety Board. Published as an educational tool, they are intended to help pilots learn from the misfortunes of others.

Cessna 175 hits fence

During approach to the airport in Gold Beach, Oregon, the Cessna 175 encountered a wind gust and the landing gear hit the top of the airport’s perimeter fence. The plane flipped over and slid to a stop, sustaining substantial damage to both wings, the rudder, and vertical stabilizer. According to the airport facility directory, the fence was more than 200’ from the approach end of the runway, which was 3,237’ in length. Probable cause: The pilot’s failure to maintain an approach angle of descent to avoid obstacles, resulting in the airplane hitting the airport perimeter fence.

RV-7 lands on airpark road

The pilot was landing the RV-7 at a residential airpark in Tavernier, Florida, for the first time. Immediately following the accident, a state trooper interviewed the pilot, who said he thought the side road was the runway. The airplane hit three mailboxes, a basketball hoop, phone lines, and a car, then came to rest inverted. In a later statement, the pilot reported that, during landing, he noticed a car off the side of the runway on a parallel access road. He was concerned with the proximity of the car to his intended landing area, so he executed a go-around. With dusk approaching, he decided to make an “abbreviated” traffic pattern and “circle back around” to land on the runway. He applied full power, began the turn, and reported that the engine “backfired.” The airplane did not climb normally, and as he turned the airplane, it was unable to gain sufficient altitude for him to maintain sight of the runway. Probable cause: The pilot’s misidentification of a parallel road for the runway.

152 pilot hits snow berm

The pilot reported that on his second landing he felt a “small” impact just before touchdown, and then the Cessna 152 pitched down and skidded to a stop at the airport in Shirley, N.Y. After the plane came to a stop, he observed smoke coming from the lower left side of the cowling just forward of the firewall. The airplane was destroyed in the post-impact fire. The pilot observed evidence of where the airplane’s nose wheel hit a snow berm on the approach to the runway. He estimated that the snow berm was about 5’ high and about 20’ wide. The airport manager reported that about

4” of snow accumulated on the ground prior to the accident, but that almost all of the snow had been plowed from the runway. He further reported that the 152’s nose gear hit a snow berm that was about 10’ off the end of the runway, and about 28’ high. Probable cause: The pilot’s failure to maintain adequate terrain clearance while landing, which resulted in a collision with a snow berm, nose gear collapse, and post-impact fire.

proaches. The rapid turn and descent at low altitude away from the lighted airport at night, over dark water, with no visible horizon, was consistent with the pilot experiencing spatial disorientation and a loss of control. Probable cause: The non-instrumentrated pilot’s decision to turn the plane away from the airport at low altitude, over water, with no visible horizon, in night conditions, which resulted in spatial disorientation and a loss of airplane control.

Piper hits birds

Distracted pilot lands on airport taxiway

During night visual meteorological conditions, the pilot hit multiple birds at an altitude of about 300’ to 400’ above ground on final approach to the airport in Newport, Rhode Island. He continued the approach and landed the Piper PA-31 without further incident. A post-accident examination revealed substantial damage to the right wing. Probable cause: An inadvertent collision with birds during final approach.

Spatial disorientation fatal

The private pilot was flying along the shoreline of the Gulf of Mexico in dark night conditions, with a tailwind, on an extended left base leg for landing at the airport in Destin, Florida. Witnesses reported he announced a goaround on the airport’s common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF). Radar track data depicted the Piper PA-28 crossing the approach end of the runway, then turning upwind on the far side of the runway. The plane continued in a left circuit around the airport, and its altitude varied between 500’ and 700’. Radar then depicted a left turn in a location consistent with a left base turn for a second attempt at landing. However, the plane stopped its turn early and flew through the final approach course a second time as it tracked parallel to the coast. Instead of completing another left circuit around the airport, the plane turned right, away from the airport and out over open, dark water with no visible horizon. The last radar targets showed the airplane over the water in a descending right turn toward the airport, with the last target at 175’ above the water, and 128 knots groundspeed. A witness, who was monitoring the CTAF as he approached the airport in his own airplane, reported he heard the Piper pilot announce his positions as he circumnavigated the airport. The pilot’s last radio call announced he would be “circling somewhere.” There were no further communications from him. The tailwind encountered on the base leg of the traffic pattern likely contributed to the pilot flying through the final approach course on two consecutive ap-

The pilot, who was conducting a crosscountry flight in a Beech 95, entered the pattern at the airport in Casey, Illinois, on the crosswind leg and set the mixture and power for landing and extended the flaps. He reported the right engine “sputtered” while the plane was abeam the runway threshold. He immediately checked the power levers and pushed the mixture controls to full. As he turned onto the base leg of the traffic pattern, the right engine lost power. He reported that, during the turn to the final leg of the traffic pattern, the left engine also sputtered, and then experienced a total loss of power. He extended the flaps to the final setting, lowered the landing gear, and pushed the airplane’s nose over to “make the runway.” He said he “flared, then bounced, floated and bounced again.” The airplane ran off the paved surface, flew over a ditch, and touched down in a plowed field where all three landing gear collapsed. Post-accident examination revealed that the plane touched down on the 1,400’ parallel taxiway, rather than the runway, and continued off the taxiway, where it came to rest. During recovery of the airplane, 25 gallons of fuel was drained from each of the main fuel tanks. The engines were run on a test stand at the manufacturer’s facility. Both exhibited normal operation through all power settings. No other system anomalies were found with the airplane. It is likely the pilot, distracted by the reported loss of power on both engines, mistook the parallel taxiway for the runway. On touching down, he quickly ran out of hard surface and pulled the airplane back into the air. He subsequently touched down beyond the perimeter road into soft ground, collapsing the landing gear and resulting in the damage to the airplane’s forward fuselage and right wing. Probable cause: The pilot’s inadvertent landing on a taxiway after a reported loss of engine power in both engines, which resulted in an overrun of the paved surface. The reason for the loss of engine

power could not be determined because a post-accident test run of the engines did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

Dragging landing site goes awry for pilot

The pilot was on a personal crosscountry flight to a remote, off-airport site in Sleetmute, Alaska, in a tailwheelequipped Cessna 180. He said that before landing he intended to fly a low pass over the snow-covered site to determine the condition of the snowpack, a maneuver commonly known as dragging the landing site. He said that as the main landing gear wheels touched down atop the frozen layer of crusty snow, the wheels broke through, and the plane nosed over, sustaining substantial damage to the left wing and vertical stabilizer. Probable cause: The pilot’s decision to make contact with an unsuitable landing surface, resulting in a nose over.

Crankshaft failure brings down Cessna 210

The pilot reported that, 10 miles from the destination airport, the passengers heard a loud “clank” and smoke entered the Cessna 210’s cockpit. Shortly after, the engine experienced a total loss of power and the propeller stopped turning. The pilot selected a field near Bryan, Texas, as a forced landing site, but the plane hit trees and terrain at the edge of the field. The pilot and passengers were able to extricate themselves through the right side passenger window. A post-accident engine examination revealed a catastrophic failure of the engine crankshaft between the No. 2 main bearing journal and the No. 2 connecting rod journal. The damage displayed on the No. 2 bearing was consistent with the bearing having shifted and spun. Several of the bearing supports displayed fretting near the through-bolt holes. An accurate measurement of the pre-accident through-bolt torques could not be determined due to the loads subjected upon the crankcase when the crankshaft failed. Review of maintenance records indicated that the through bolts were properly torqued during the remanufacturing process nearly 1,000 flight hours before the accident and that there was no record of major work performed on the engine since that time. However, the wear signatures displayed on the bearing supports indicated that the crankcase halves were shifting in a manner consistent with improper torque of the through bolts. Probable cause: A failure of the crankshaft due to improper torque of the crankcase through bolts.


February 8, 2018

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Accident Reports Distracted pilot hits tree

During a cross-country flight at night, the pilot was attempting to deviate due to deteriorating weather. He failed to maintain terrain clearance and the Piper PA-34 hit the top of a tree. He subsequently landed at the airport in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, about 23 miles away from where the tree was hit. Examination of the airplane by an FAA inspector revealed damage to the wings and windshield. Probable cause: The pilot’s failure to maintain altitude in cruise flight due to his diverted attention, which resulted in controlled flight into terrain.

Partial loss of engine power leads to forced landing

The pilot reported the Cessna 150 had seven gallons of fuel and that he had planned a short flight to a nearby airport to purchase more fuel. During initial climb, about 750’ above ground level, the engine experienced a partial loss of power. He applied carburetor heat, but the engine rpm remained at about 1,700, and he was unable to maintain the airplane’s altitude. He turned the plane back toward the airport in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, but realized it was not going to reach the runway. He attempted to land in a field ahead of the runway, but the plane hit trees in the field. The airplane’s left wing fuel tank cap was found on the runway; it likely became separated during the takeoff roll. About two gallons of fuel was drained from each wing fuel tank after the accident, and more fuel may have leaked out after the accident due to the airplane’s position, therefore, it is unlikely that fuel leaked out during the brief flight. The engine was subsequently successfully test run on the airframe. Review of a carburetor icing chart revealed that the atmospheric conditions at the time of the accident were outside of the icing envelope. The reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined. Probable cause: A partial loss of engine power during initial climb for undetermined reasons.

Fatigue crack leads to Cessna 140 ground loop

The private pilot was landing the Cessna 140 on a dry, hard-surfaced runway in Independence, Oregon. He said the approach and touchdown were normal. Just after touchdown, he felt “something similar to a bump,” and the airplane started to drift to the left. He thought the plane possibly had a flat tire and tried to compensate with rudder input, but it continued drifting to the left, left the runway, and ground looped, re-

sulting in substantial damage to the right wing and fuselage. An on-scene examination revealed that the left main landing gear axle had fractured, resulting in the separation of the wheel assembly. A detailed examination revealed that the axle was fractured near the inboard end, just outboard of the axle attachment flange. Portions of the fracture surface at the upper and lower sides of the axle had relatively smooth features oriented perpendicular to the outer surface, consistent with fatigue. The fatigue cracks initiated at a fillet corner at a change in the axle’s outer diameter. The manufacturer specified inspection intervals to check for cracks and corrosion of the main landing gear axle, however the airplane’s maintenance logs were not located, and the airplane’s maintenance history could not be determined. Probable cause: The failure of the left main landing gear wheel axle due to a fatigue crack.

First solo ends badly

The student pilot was performing his third stop and go landing during his first solo flight. He reported that during the landing flare he heard the stall warning horn, and he bounced the landing while traveling at a ground speed of approximately 45 knots. The student pilot remarked he was not able to control the Cessna 172’s lateral direction during the landing roll and the plane left the right side of the runway at the airport in Newport News, Virginia, subsequently hitting a drainage culvert. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing and the fire wall. Probable cause: The student pilot’s failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll, resulting in a runway excursion and impact with terrain.

Maule bent when passenger pushes rudder pedal

According to the airline transport pilot, during the takeoff roll at the airport in Anchorage, Alaska, the Maule M-4 briefly exited the runway after the passenger inadvertently pushed the left rudder pedal. While correcting for the runway excursion, the right main landing gear hit a taxiway sign. The pilot and passenger reported they did not observe any damage from their cockpit seats, and continued the takeoff roll and departure. After reaching their destination, during the touchdown roll, the pilot noticed the right main landing gear tire deflated and affirmed that “the right wheel dug in and threw up debris that damaged the right elevator.” However, photographs taken at the de-

parture airport depict a taxiway sign with blue paint and metallic particle transfer on the sign, which appears to be the same blue color as the accident airplane. The photographs also show damage to the sign consistent with the damage to the airplane’s elevator. There were impact impressions on the taxiway sign’s black metal frame that were consistent with the damage sustained to the right side of the airplane’s elevator. The pilot reported that he used duct tape to make repairs to the airplane, took off and landed at their final destination airport without further incident. Probable cause: The inadvertent rudder input by the passenger, resulting in a runway excursion during takeoff and collision with a taxiway sign.

ter he entered the left turn moving away from the sun line, it is likely that the rising terrain suddenly came into view, and he increased the airplane’s bank angle to avoid the terrain and exceeded the wing’s critical angle-of-attack, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall. The altitude the airplane was operating at was too low to allow for a recovery. Probable cause: The pilot’s failure to maintain adequate airspeed while maneuvering at low altitude in hilly terrain, which resulted in the airplane’s wing exceeding its critical angle-of-attack and a subsequent aerodynamic stall. Contributing to the accident were the pilot’s inability to recognize the rising terrain due to the sun glare and the operation of the airplane in excess of its gross weight.

Observation flight ends fatally

Dragging landing gear turns out to be bad decision

The Flight Design CTLS, which was owned and operated by the local county sheriff’s department, was on a low-altitude observation flight near Springville, California. According to GPS data recovered from the airplane, about one minute before the accident, the plane was flying westbound (heading 242°) over a highway, about 500’ above ground level (agl), and at a groundspeed of 52 knots. The GPS data and witness observations indicated that the airplane entered a left turn. According to the witnesses, the wings then dipped left and right, and the plane descended to the ground. The witnesses heard the engine operating in a steady tone until ground impact. A postcrash fire ensued, which destroyed the airplane. Both souls aboard the plane died. The airplane’s estimated weight at the time of the accident was about 152 pounds over the maximum gross weight. Because of the higher gross weight, the airplane’s stall speed in a 30° banked turn was 3 knots higher than it would have been at the maximum gross weight. This resulted in a stall speed of about 48 knots calibrated airspeed, which was near the airplane’s recorded groundspeed of 52 knots. The sun position at the time of the accident was on a bearing of 241° and was 13° above the horizon, indicating that the pilot was looking directly into the sun before the left turn began. Another pilot who flew in the vicinity shortly after the accident reported that when flying westbound over the highway, he was looking straight into the sun, there was a lot of haze, and he could not distinguish the tops of the hills to the left of the highway from the sky. It is likely the accident pilot was partially blinded by sun glare and did not see the hills rising above him on his left. Af-

The pilot was flying over a snowcovered dry lake bed near Park Valley, Utah, and decided to “drag” the left main landing gear to “better assess the surface condition.” When the Cessna 210’s tire touched down, he reported, “Drag rapidly increased and sucked the aircraft down.” He attempted to abort the landing by adding full power, but the plane sunk further into the snow, turned to the right, and nosed over. The fuselage and vertical stabilizer sustained substantial damage. Probable cause: The pilot’s decision to drag the left main landing gear on a snowcovered dry lake bed, which resulted in a loss of directional control and a nose over during an aborted landing.

Training flight ends before it begins

The flight instructor and student pilot were parked at the airport in San Diego with the Cessna 172’s engine running when the plane began to move forward and to the right. The instructor said that upon noticing the forward movement, he applied the brakes. He reported the right rudder/brake pedal was positioned further forward than the left pedal, and upon application of brakes, the right turn increased before the plane hit another occupied airplane parked on the ramp, resulting in substantial damage to both. The student pilot reported that he noticed the airplane’s movement and tried to alert the instructor, however the instructor appeared to be distracted. It is likely the plane’s nose wheel was initially displaced to the right, which resulted in the airplane’s right turn. Probable cause: The flight instructor’s failure to maintain awareness while parked on the ramp with the engine operating, which resulted in impact with another parked airplane.


28

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New Products

February 8, 2018

Online aviation sales course released

Cordless grease gun introduced

Aviation Business Consultants International has released a new online aviation sales course, designed for aviation industry professionals. “Much of the advice from traditional sales courses is not helpful for aviation industry professionals, and some of it can actually be harmful,” said President Paula Williams. “Aviation sales typically have long transaction cycles, large and complex transactions with multiple players, a limited number of well-insulated prospects for specific products and services, and a number of other challenges. It’s important that salespeople have skills and strategies to address those challenges.” The online aviation sales course is divided into three modules: Aviation Sales Basics, which offers an Aviation Sales Associate certificate; Aviation Sales Relationships, which offers an Aviation Sales Professional certificate; and Aviation Sales Systems, which offers an Aviation Sales Master certificate. All courses are offered online and can be completed as the student has available time. Each module includes a short video followed by an interactive activity, such as a quiz or task to be completed. At the end of each of the three modules, the student must complete a final task, such as a sales call or interview, interacting live with a faculty member via GoToMeeting. AviationSalesTraining.com

Snap-on has introduced its 2500 PSI Cordless Grease Gun Kit. According to company officials, the kit provides a turn-key solution for various aviation jobs in which lubricant pressure and application needs to be limited and closely monitored for the most favorable servicing results. The kit comes with a clear tube to ensure positive lubricant identification,

while reducing the risk of mixing incompatible or non-specified substances, company officials note. Other features include: Two-speed, high-torque 18V DC motor for consistent flow and pressure; 48” high pressure hose with spring guard and brass coupler; dual motor protection with self-resetting thermocouple; and more. SnapOn.com

FreeFlight paired with L3 NXT for ADS-B solution

West Star Aviation now offers paint protection

FreeFlight Systems reports its 1203C SBAS/GNSS sensor is approved for installation with L3’s NXT Mode S transponder series. Stevens Aviation recently received an Approved Model List (AML) Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) for ADS-B Out installations across a wide range of Part 25 aircraft after the company’s first successful install in a Citation 650. This pairing provides legacy aircraft a costeffective way to equip with ADS-B for the upcoming 2020 mandate, FreeFlight officials said. The 1203C pairs seamlessly with certified Mode S Extended Squitter transponders like the L3’s NXT series to provide a fully rule-compliant ADS-B Out system, FreeFlight officials explain. The 1203C can also serve as the approved position source for TAWS/FMS, RNP, and other NextGen applications, officials add. FreeflightSystems.com, StevensAviation.com, L3AviationProducts.com

West Star Aviation now offers Top Flight Supplies (TFS) Titanium Paint Protection in-house at its East Alton, Illinois, and Grand Junction, Colorado, facilities. The two-part process prolongs longevity of an aircraft paint job, according to company officials. The paint sealant bonds with the paint-

ed surface by fusing the paint pores and can even improve fuel efficiency by providing a slicker surface reducing overall drag, officials explain. Downtime varies from two to four days, depending on the size of the aircraft, company officials report. WestStarAviation.com

New prop receives nod as replacement for Cardinals Hartzell Propeller has received an STC for its two-blade aluminum scimitar propellers to replace the factory standard props for Cessna Cardinal 177B aircraft. Price is $10,800 for the new 76.5” diameter Scimitar propeller, composite spinner, and STC documentation. According to Hartzell officials, the new propeller offers increased performance in a number of areas: Acceleration is improved, reducing takeoff distance by approximately 5% and enhancing climb performance, while cruise speeds improve two to four knots. The new prop is compatible with the Powerflow Exhaust system and meets worldwide noise limits, company officials add. HartzellProp.com

ASA publishes The Droner’s Manual New from ASA is “The Droner’s Manual: A Guide to the Responsible Operation of Small Unmanned Aircraft,” by Kevin Jenkins. With his expertise as a unmanned aerial vehicle operator in government, industry, and hobby applications, Jenkins offers step-by-step guidance to build, program, test, and fly both multicopters and fixed-wing aircraft for a variety of purposes. The manual covers aircraft set up, flight controller fundamentals and fail-safe features, regulations for recreational and commercial use, the flight testing process, and flight operations. The more than 70 illustrations include detailed schematics and diagrams for the construction of systems, such as first-person view (FPV) and imaging payloads. The softcover, 176-page book sells for $19.95, while the eBook sells for $14.95. You can get both for $29.95. ASA2Fly.com


February 8, 2018

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February 8, 2018

New Products Bush pilot releases Wings of Her Dreams

AeroVue flight deck certified for King Airs BendixKing has received certification for the AeroVue integrated flight deck for King Air B200 aircraft. This is BendixKing’s first supplemental type certificate (STC) for an integrated flight deck and the first in a planned series of aircraft models, company officials report. BendixKing’s AeroVue includes three high-resolution 12” liquid crystal displays with Honeywell’s SmartView Synthetic Vision System software. The software enhances pilot safety and alertness, especially when flying and landing at night, in bad weather, or at unfamiliar airports, according to company officials. AeroVue includes a track-based flight

management system and heads-up display symbols on the primary display that make it easy to “point and fly” exactly where the pilot would like to go. AeroVue is compatible with the Aspen Avionics Connected Panel Wireless Gateway, allowing updates for navigational aids to happen wirelessly. The AeroVue system weighs 125 pounds less than currently-installed equipment, resulting in reduced fuel consumption, greater range, and more payload capacity, company officials said. AeroVue also brings owners into compliance with the FAA’s ADS-B mandate, officials add. BendixKing.com

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Advertising Spaces Now Available The official newspaper of the SUN ’n FUN Fly-In April 10-15, 2018 in Lakeland, Fla. Reserve your advertising spot by March 27, 2018 Call Ben Sclair at (800) 426-8538 or see GeneralAviationNews.com/advertise

Kitty Banner Seemann, once an Alaskan-based glacier and bush pilot renowned for piloting climbers, explorers, adventurers, and fisherman into the wilds and bush of Alaska in the 1970s and 1980s, recently released her new book, “Wings of Her Dreams.” The book is a reflection on her adventures in Alaska. Readers can experience her flights, landings and takeoffs on high altitude glaciers, transporting mountain climbers from around the world who came to Alaska seeking to ascend Denali (formerly known as Mt. McKinley), one of toughest mountains on earth. The story starts with Banner Seemann in her early 20s and carries through present day, depicting a life of adventures and journeys from Talkeetna to raising a family in the resort town of Vail, Colo., where she, her husband Bob, and sons Mick and Corey, all developed a similar love for aviation and “air” in all its forms as skiers, pilots, and adventurers. Written by aviation-author Ann Lewis Cooper, in conjunction with Kitty and Bob Seemann, a legendary ski coach, ski

goods representative, and pilot, the book is on sale at KittyBanner.com, your local book source, Amazon.com, or by calling Pogo Press at 800-846-7027. KittyBanner.com

Version 4.0 of Wx24 Pilot App launches A key feature of the new version 4.0 of Wx24 Pilot is the addition of cloud cover information provided by the National Digital Forecast Database (NDFD). Although NDFD is not an aviation specific weather product, it does provide pilots with a tool to access cloud information and the ability to make more informed judgments of weather conditions, company officials said.

NDFD also fills in the gaps of weather information for hundreds of smaller airports without Terminal Airport Forecast (TAFs) within the US, officials note. Cloud conditions in Wx24 Pilot are represented by eight shades of blue and gray colors, with blue indicating clear sky and lighter to darker shades of gray representing the extent of cloud cover. wx24Pilot.com


February 8, 2018

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General Aviation News —  Buyer’s Guide Marketplace — 800.426.8538

February 8, 2018

Calendar of Events

POWERED BY

WEEK OF APRIL 1, 2013

Western United States

Feb. 09, 2018, Corning, CA. Safety Considerations for the LSRM, 530-567-5141 Feb. 10, 2018, Logan, UT. Leading Edge Aviation Monthly Breakfast, 435-760-0684 Feb. 10, 2018, Modesto, CA. CAF Monthly Breakfast. Open to the public. Feb. 10, 2018, Corona, CA. Corona Airport Open House and Historic Aircraft Display, 949-829-1582 Feb. 10, 2018, Renton, WA. VFR Workshop, 425-336-7445 Feb. 10, 2018, Carlsbad, CA. EAA Chapter 286 Meeting, 760-207-2770 Feb. 11, 2018, Fullerton, CA. Fullerton Airport Antique Airplane Display Feb. 13, 2018, Los Gatos, CA. Los Gatos Hangar Flyers Weekly Coffee, 408-209-3067 Feb. 13, 2018, Upland, CA. Private Pilot Ground School, 704-995-7675 Feb. 13, 2018, Tucson, AZ. CAP Squadron 104, 520-307-5775 Feb. 15, 2018, Upland, CA. Private Pilot Ground School, 704-995-7675 Feb. 15, 2018, Seattle, WA. IA AMT 145 Repair Station AC Owners And Operators Maintenance QA Seminar, 425-227-2247 Feb. 16, 2018, Concord, CA. Monthly MDPA Meeting & Dinner Feb. 17, 2018, Mesa, AZ. EAA Warbird Squadron 50 Fly-In Pancake Breakfast Feb. 17, 2018, Compton, CA. EAA Chapter 96 General Meeting, 310-612-2751 Feb. 17, 2018, Renton, WA. IFR Workshop, 425-336-7445

South Central United States Feb. 13, 2018, Olathe, KS. Civil Air Patrol Meeting, 913-927-1317

North Central United States

Feb. 08, 2018, Bemidji, MN. EAA Chapter 1397 Meeting, 218-368-3162 Feb. 08, 2018, Omaha, NE. Omaha IMC Club Monthly Meeting, 316-213-7093 Feb. 08, 2018, Chicago, IL. Fox Flying Club Membership Meeting Feb. 10, 2018, Eden Prairie, MN. How to Work With ATC and FSS as an VFR Pilot, 952-210-8600 Feb. 10, 2018, Buffalo, MN. EAA Chapter 878 Chili Feed, 763-670-6021 Feb. 10, 2018, Oshkosh, WI. EAA Skiplane Fly-In, 920-426-4800 Feb. 12, 2018, Grand Rapids, MN. Civil Air Patrol Grand Rapids Composite Squadron Feb. 12, 2018, Omaha, NE. EAA Chapter 80 Meeting Feb. 13, 2018, Kearney, NE. EAA Chapter 1091 Monthly Meeting Feb. 13, 2018, Elkhart, IN. Free Weekly Ground School, 574-312-5117 Feb. 14, 2018, Anderson, IN. EAA Chapter 226 Meeting, 765-208-0299 Feb. 14, 2018, Brighton, MI. EAA Chapter 384 Monthly Membership Meeting Feb. 15, 2018, Peoria, IL. Thursday Morning Coffee in EAA 563 Hangar, south end of airport, 309-696-1428 Feb. 15, 2018, Madison, WI. Private Pilot Ground School, 608-268-5024 Feb. 17, 2018, Crete, NE. EAA

Chapter 569 Fly-In Breakfast Feb. 17, 2018, Peoria, IL. EAA 563 Pancake Breakfast in EAA hangar at the south end of the airport, 309-696-1428

North Eastern United States

Feb. 08, 2018, Frederick, MD. Sugarloaf 99s Chapter Meeting, 301-471-9103 Feb. 08, 2018, Reading, PA. Reading Aero Club Monthly Meeting, 610-370-7101 Feb. 08, 2018, Wadsworth, OH. EAA Chapter 846 Monthly Meeting, 330-321-6274 Feb. 08, 2018, Manassas, VA. IMC Club Meeting EAA Chapter 186 Feb. 09, 2018, Trenton, NJ. EAA Chapter 176 Monthly Meeting Feb. 10, 2018, Honesdale, PA. EAA Chapter 283 Monthly Meeting Feb. 12, 2018, Carlisle, PA. Carlisle Flying Club Monthly Meeting, 717-830-8773 Feb. 12, 2018, Richmond, VA. IMC Club, 804-564-3233 Feb. 13, 2018, Fitchburg, MA. Fitchburg Pilot's Association (FPA) Monthly Meeting Feb. 13, 2018, Cincinnati, OH. Lunken EAA/IMC Club Meeting Feb. 14, 2018, Nashua, NH. EAA IMC Club Chapter Meeting, 978-873-0507 Feb. 17, 2018, Rockland, ME. Maine Aviation Forum, 207-323-0616 Feb. 17, 2018, Gordonsville, VA. EAA Chapter 1563 Monthly Meeting Feb. 18, 2018, Batavia, OH. EAA Chapter 174 Meeting, 937-515-7453

SocialFlight is the most comprehensive tool ever created for finding aviationrelated events! Aircraft Fly-in's, Airshows, Pancake Breakfasts, Conventions, FAA Safety Seminars... they're all here! With SocialFlight, you can also chat with other attendees and even upload & view photos of the events! Whether you love flying, watching airplanes, ultralights, balloons or anything else airborne, this is the place for you. Keep exploring to discover all the features that SocialFlight has to offer.

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Contact Matt Hunt, Avionics Manager 541-753-4466 • matt@corvallisaero.net For more events and towww.GeneralAviationNews.com stay up-to-date, go to www.socialflight.com


February 8, 2018

www.GeneralAviationNews.com —  Buyer’s Guide Marketplace — facebook.com/ganews

35th Annual

33

PUYALLUP, WA

FEBRUARY 24-25 FRI, FEB 23 | 8:00 AM – 15:00 PM

NW AVIATION CAREER FORUM

Jobs, education, military transition, training & networking for students, new, career & mlitary pilots. Airline Meet and Greets for career pilots. Pre-registered attendees: $35/45

SAT/SUN, FEB 24/25

SAT 9:00 AM – 17:30 PM | SUN 10:00 AM – 16:00 PM

35TH NORTHWEST CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW

122,000 sf aircraft and displays, 400+ vendor booths & 75+ presentations. Tickets at the door $5/ Kids FREE; parking FREE. Display booths: 360-427-5599.

SAT, FEB 24 | 8:00 AM – 17:30 PM

REFRESHER CLINIC IA MAINTENANCE

FAA maintenance renewal seminars includes conference admission, Seminars, certificate & lunch. Register online: $35

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Learn what’s changed since you last took the controls and brush up on your VFR knowledge.

PROUDLY PRESENTED BY THE

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THANK YOU TO OUR 2018 EVENT SPONSOR S

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866-922-7469 | washington-aviation.org


34

General Aviation News —  Buyer’s Guide Marketplace — 800.426.8538

February 8, 2018

For more events and to stay up-to-date, go to www.socialflight.com South Eastern United States

Feb. 10, 2018, Guntersville, AL. EAA Chapter 683 Second Saturday Breakfast, 256-486-5121 Feb. 10, 2018, Lakeland, FL. EAA Chapter 454 Fly-In/Pancake Breakfast Feb. 10, 2018, Titusville, FL. Valiant Air Command Warbird Museum Flyin Breakfast, 321-268-1941 Feb. 10, 2018, Columbia, SC. EAA 242 Young Eagles Rally, 803-309-3130 Feb. 10, 2018, Madisonville, TN. Airport Breakfast Feb. 10, 2018, Woodruff, SC. Chilly Chili Fly-In & Lunch at Triple Tree, 864-525-8938

Feb. 17, 2018, Cleveland, TN. CAP Pancake Breakfast, 727-798-4013 Feb. 17, 2018, Huntsville, AL. EAA Chapter 190 Pancake Breakfast at Moontown Airport, 256-852-9781 Feb. 17, 2018, Dawson, GA. EAA Chapter 354 Country Breakfast, 229-435-1667 Feb. 17, 2018, Apex, NC. EAA Chapter 1114 Breakfast Meeting, 919-649-0447 Feb. 17, 2018, Valkaria, FL. Pancake Breakfast Feb. 17, 2018, Orlando, FL. Monthly Telecom for Florida Aviation Network Crew & Invited Guest, 407-719-6335 Feb. 17, 2018, Sarasota/Braden, FL. EAA Chapter 180 Young Eagles, Free Pancake Breakfast, 941-356-0591

Feb. 10, 2018, Green Cove Springs, FL. EAA Chapter 1379 Meeting Feb. 10, 2018, Williston, FL. Williston Airport Extravaganza Day, 352-528-4900 Feb. 10, 2018, Greeneville, TN. EAA Chapter 1355 Monthly Meeting , 423-588-8908 Feb. 10, 2018, Ocala, FL. Fourth Annual Burnyzz Car Show, 352-307-1968 Feb. 12, 2018, Lawrenceville, GA. Civil Air Patrol Meeting/Gwinnett Composite Squadron, 404-444-9852 Feb. 13, 2018, Chamblee, GA. Civil Air Patrol/ PDK Senior Squadron, 404-829-3732 Feb. 16-19, 2018, Marathon, FL. Americas Air Rally, -800-709-3209

Hey there Smart Birds! General Aviation News prints stories you can relate to ... No Gulfstreams or Learjets here. Like the old saying about business says “location, location, location” General Aviation News is about “flying, flying, flying” and more! We help you become a better pilot and tell stories about people and planes that will keep you reading until you can’t keep your eyes open anymore.

Why not put GAN in more pilot hands? Gift a subsciption now

Feb. 17, 2018, Collegedale, TN. EAA Chapter 150 Monthly Meeting, 423-593-3043 Feb. 17, 2018, Miami, FL. Young Eagles Rally, 305-607-4282 Feb. 17, 2018, Winterville, NC. EAA Chapter 1423 Meeting Feb. 17, 2018, Newland, NC. EAA Chapter 1271 Meeting Feb. 17, 2018, Columbus, GA. River City Aero Club Monthly Meeting Feb. 18, 2018, Greenville, SC. South Carolina Breakfast Club at KGMU, 803-446-0214

International

Feb. 17, 2018, Didsbury, AB. Monthly Fly In Coffee And Donuts, 403-701-1600

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February 8, 2018

www.GeneralAviationNews.com —  Buyer’s Guide Marketplace — facebook.com/ganews

35

ALASKA AIRMEN ASSOCIATION ALASKA AIRMEN

ANNUAL AIRPLANE RAFFLE!

A S S O C I A T I O N

Win a NEW Refurbished Airplane! + You can als become an o Airmen me mber

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ALASKA AIRMEN

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For information on our raffle:

www.alaskaairmen.org

Proceeds from this raffle enable the Association to further our mission, “to protect, preserve, and promote general aviation in Alaska!” The Alaska Airmen Association is a 501c3 non-profit organization. Raffle Terms and Conditions apply. See website for details.

Permit #1343 Federal ID 92-0074966


36

General Aviation News —  Buyer’s Guide Marketplace — 800.426.8538

February 8, 2018

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February 8, 2018 1050 - Aeronca

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6950 - Engines

VAN’S AIRCRAFT RV-14. Roomy, Fast, Aerobatic, Beautiful. The easiest to build RV yet! 49% Just Went Further. Visit www.vansaircraft.com for more info.

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2550 - Ercoupe Parts

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38

General Aviation News —  Classified Pages — 800.426.8538

7300 - Hangars

February 8, 2018

7400 - Insurance

RIVERSIDE MUNICIPAL AIRPORT, So. California, Exec T-hangar for rent or sale, perfect for single engine. $12,000 to buy, $350/month to rent. Call or email for exact dimensions. Available now. Michelle, Pacifica Commercial, 805-237-4040, michelle@pacificacre.com NW Indiana T-Hangars available at LaPorte Municipal Airport (KPPO). Prices range from $75 to $150/month. Move in by April 1, sign a 15 month lease and receive three free months. Call 219-324-3393 or email diane@ laporteairport.com. KRNO T-HANGARS, 976-2742 sqft. Monthly or multiyear leases. Move-in incentives. Google: renoairport.com T-Hangar Leases or call 775-328-6486. T-hangars with 40-foot doors Tacoma Narrows Airport $379.65 (tax included). 253-798-8550

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We design and ship pre-engineered steel hangar buildings. The Hangar door style of your choice is included in the design. Imperial or Metric, containerized for export or shipped domestic. 719-268-1325, RapidsetBuildings.com ELMA, WA T-Hangars $97.50/mo Completely enclosed w/lockup. Pilot controlled runway lights. 360-482-2228. 7340 - Inspections Annual Inspections specializing in Piper Cherokee 140, 160, 180, 300. Cessna 150, 152, 172, 182. Aero Mechanical Service Inc, Cochran, Georgia 48A, 478-230-2706. 7350 - Instruction

Para-Phernalia, Inc. has designed and manufactured the SOFTIE line of pilot emergency parachutes since 1979. Our emergency parachutes are known world wide for being the highest quality, most comfortable, and reliable emergency parachutes available.

(815) 233-5478

FAX: (815) 233-5479 info@hookerharness.com

Need new RESTRAINTS? www.hookerharness.com

Factory Directory Sales

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www.softieparachutes.com 8225 - Parts

ONLIN LEARNE IN

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Go to WINGsRealityEDU.com for topics and to reserve your spot We are VFR year round. Come to Palm Springs and finish up your training. PalmSpringsFlyingSchool.com 760-3998371. 7360 - Instruction-Seaplane

CUBS, FLOATS and FUN Seaplane Training in LA & TX

318-880-7787

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Cessna 120 to 210F Champ Scout Citabria Decalathon TITLE SEARCHES: Same day reports if called before noon C.T., most searches. 800-666-1397 or 405-2328886. Visa/ MC. Aircraft Title Corp. Established 1957.

Hey there Smart Birds!

AIRCRAFT CORPORATION

For 70 years, Univair has been a leading supplier of quality parts and supplies for General Aviation enthusiasts and “classic” aircraft owners. Remember, we’re as close as your phone, computer or mailbox! Toll Free Sales: 1-888-433-5433 2500 Himalaya Road • Aurora, Colorado • 80011 Info Phone ................................... 303-375-8882 Fax ....................800-457-7811 or 303-375-8888 Email ........................................info@univair.com Website ...................................www.univair.com

McCauley, Hartzell, Sensenich, Hamilton Standard, MT, PZL Authorized McCauley Service Center Approved Hartzell Network Shop Visit our website: NWPropeller.com NORTHWEST

Propeller Service, Inc.

253-770-7400 nwpropeller@seanet.com 16607 103rd Ave. Ct. E. Puyallup, WA 98374 Pierce County Airport (KPLU) FAA Approved Repair Station #IT6R625N 8870 - Skis

WHEEL REPLACEMENT METAL SKIS FAA Approved Up To 3700 Lbs.

Also retractables, homebuilt & ultralight skis

AERO SKI MFG CO., INC.

Box 58, Brooten, MN 56316 • (320) 346-2285 aeroski@tds.net www.aeroskimfg.com

General Aviation News prints stories you can relate to ... No Gulfstreams or Learjets here. Like the old saying about business says “location, location, location” General Aviation News is about “flying, flying, flying” and more! We bring you articles that help you become a better pilot and plenty of stories about people and planes that will keep you reading about flying until you can’t keep your eyes open anymore.

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February 8, 2018

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TIME TO UPGRADE? Sell your “classic” in our classifieds Classified Ad Pricing Info

Call (800) 426-8538 to place an ad 9650 - Arizona

Two issues

Addt’l Issues

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Color Photo (3” max) + word fee

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9650 - Michigan

9650 - Washington

BEAUTIFUL SECLUDED House near Torchport Airport in N. Michigan. 8+ acres AND shared frontage on Torch Lake. 349K. Call Joyce Barnard (Realtor). (231) 632-6340, http://taar.paragonrels.com/CollabLink/#/?id=822f84309528-4525-9f81-0c921cc02d51 9650 - Real Estate PRIVATE RUNWAY PRIVATE RUNWAY on 45+ acres of beautiful Northern Arizona. Call Shelbi Haering 928-2302918. 9650 - Florida 3.5A zoned Res Ag, high dry, airstrip community, 294’ pond front Melrose Landing, Florida, $25K. dewdropdrive@gmail.com for information. PILOT COUNTRY Estates X-05 one acre lot on 3640’ paved and lite runway. North of Tampa Florida, $82,000, 813-842-9374.

Publishers Notice: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limited or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living w/parents or legal custodian, pregnant women & people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are avail on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free 800-669-9777. Toll-free for the hearing impaired: 800-927-9277.

CUSTOM HOME built 2006. 4bd, 3ba, 2600sqft, two story w/1800sqft hangar!!! Automatic door, holds 3 airplanes with 40’ wingspan. 12’ ceilings in home and hangar. Custom cherry cabinets and granite counters in kitchen. Walkin closets in 3 bdrms. 2 water heaters, central vacumn! Even has ships ladder to a control tower. Imagine watching planes fly in to the 7Bays Airport. Overlooks majestic Lake Roosevelt. Boat launch, marina, store minutes sway. $369,000. Tina Craig, Winderemere City Group, 509-9772002ww.lakerooseveltproperties.com tinacraig@windermere.com BLAKELY ISLAND, WA. San Juan Islands’ Premier Airpark. Paved lighted runway. Marina. Owner access to two 70ac lakes in 3000+/-ac protected private forestland. RUNWAY HOME: $465,000, TAXIWAY CABIN: $349,000. MARINE VIEW LOG HOME: $435.000. Judy, Flying Island Realty, judy@flyingislandrealty.com, 360375-6302. www.flyingislandrealty.com.

Call (800) 426-8538 now to put your ad in the next marketplace

Aviation Abbreviations A/C .................................. Air Conditioning ADs ......................Airworthiness Directives ADF ................. Automatic Direction Finder AH ...................................Artificial Horizon A&P ........................Airframe & Powerplant AP .........................................Audio Panel A/P ............................................Autopilot CDI ...................Course Deviation Indicator CHT ................. Cylinder Heat Temperature Com .......................Communication Radio C/R ................................ Counter Rotating CT ........................ Carburetor Temperature DF ...................................Direction Finder DG ...................................Directional Gyro DME ..........Distance Measuring Equipment EFIS ................................Electronic Flight Instrument System EGT.................... Exhaust Gas Temperature

ELT ............ Emergency Locator Transmitter FD ......................................Flight Director FWF .................................Firewall Forward GPS .................. Global Positioning System GS ...................................... Groundspeed G/S ........................................ Glide Slope GSP ...........................Ground Service Plug HF ................................... High Frequency hp.......................................... horsepower HSI ............... Horizontal Situation Indicator IFR ....................... Instrument Flight Rules ILS.................. Instrument Landing System LE ...........................................Left Engine LMB..........................Light Marker Beacon LOC ........................................... Localizer Loran............. Long Range Area Navigation LR..........................................Long Range LRT ...............................Long Range Tanks

Advertising Spaces Now Available The official newspaper of the SUN ’n FUN Fly-In April 10-15, 2018 in Lakeland, Fla. Reserve your advertising spot by March 27, 2018 Call Ben Sclair at (800) 426-8538 or see GeneralAviationNews.com/advertise

MB ...................................Marker Beacon MDH .......................Major Damage History MP ...............................Manifold Pressure NDH ...........................No Damage History NM .................................... Nautical Miles Nav................................ Navigation Radio NavCom .................................Navigation/ CommunicationRadio OAT...................... Outside Air Temperature OH ............................................. Overhaul RB ..................................Rotating Beacon RDF ........................Radio Direction Finder RE ........................................Right Engine RG ................................. Retractable Gear RMI ....................Radio Magnetic Indicator RNAV ............................... Area Navigation SBs ................................Service Bulletins SCMOH .......Since Chrome Major Overhaul

SFRM .......... Since Factory Remanufacture SHS ..............................Since Hot Section SMOH......................Since Major Overhaul SOH.................................. Since Overhaul S/N ....................................Serial Number SPOH ....................... Since Prop Overhaul STOH .......................... Since Top Overhaul STOL........................Short Takeoff/Landing TBO ......................Time Between Overhaul TT ............................................ Total Time TTAE ................ Total Time Airframe/Engine TTAF ........................... Total Time Airframe TTSN .......................Total Time Since New XPDR .................................... Transponder VLF ............................ Very Low Frequency VOR ............................... VHF Omni Range


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General Aviation News —  800.426.8538

“I have been dealing with you folks for 30 years as a corporation customer and personally. You are the industry standard on quality of product and service.”

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February 8, 2018

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www.aircraftspruce.com • Call Toll Free 1-877-4-SPRUCE

Feb. 8, 2018  

The February 8, 2018 edition of General Aviation News

Feb. 8, 2018  

The February 8, 2018 edition of General Aviation News