Page 1

1


ON THE COVER

PHOTO & EDIT Ebba Ågren MODEL Daniela S. Lind Models MAKE-UP Melinda Forsberg STYLING Ebba Ågren & Natan Nygård ASSISTANT/LIGHTS Natan Nygård SHIRT Klara Modigh

2

© Copyright 2016


TABLE of CONTENTS 04. MODIG 12. EDITORS INTERVIEW - STASIA MICHAEL 16. INTERVIEW - SEAN BRADFORD 20. BREEZE 24. INTERVIEW - MY BAD SISTER 28. MONKI MOOD 32. INTERVIEW - ADRIAN MODIGGÅRD 36. FUCK YOU VERY MUCH 40. INTERVIEW - ANJA SCHNEIDER 44. PRETTY BOYS 48. INTERVIEW - VILDA UNKILA POSADA 52. PRIDE GLAMOUR 56. FASHION TALK 60. BODY LOVE 64. FUMES 68. INTERVIEW - RICKARD SÖDERBERG 72. MICHA 76. SUMMER IN RUSSIA 80. I’M ALLERGIC TO LOOKING TOO NEAT 84. FEMME WITH ISSUES 90. CREDITS

3


4


MODIG PHOTO & EDIT Ebba Ågren MODELS Daniela S & Eira, Lind Models MAKE-UP Melinda Forsberg STYLING Ebba Ågren & Natan Nygård ASSISTANT/LIGHTS Natan Nygård DESIGN Klara Modigh

5


6


7


8


9


10


11


INTERVIEWER MIKAELA ANDERSSON PHOTO LANNA OHLSSON STYLING SABA PETRÉN DESIGNER JOSEPHINE BERGQVIST

Stasia Michael, editor-in-cheif for The New Issue, model and transactivist talked to us about her career, the magazine and some fun facts about herself.

12

How did you become a model? To make a long story short, I was scouted by a big agency in Sweden when I was in Stockholm and visited my mother. I was gonna turn 15 and got extremely chocked. I then built up an interest for the business and applied to more agencies and choose one of the three agencies who wanted to sign me. Why did you want to become a model? That is never something I wanted, to be honest. My mother always dished about sending me to different model-competitions and magazines, but it never happened because I didn’t want to. I’ve always been self-critical, especially when it comes to my looks and I never thought I would be able to become a model. But when the chance knocked on my door, I opened it and I am really happy that I did. How has your life and career been affected by you being transexual? Not more than what I allow it to, at least not in the past few years. When I was younger it was harder to avoid the transphobia and oppression. Of course it’s still hard, but now I choose what people I surround myself with and I work/hang out with people whom I know have good valuations. It was harder to

avoid oppression when I was younger and went to school. I work in a very creative and open-minded business, so I haven’t had to worry about it in that matter. Of course it has been a great battle to accept myself and be accepted by others, but it has become a lot easier along the years. Why and when did you create ”The new issue”? The magazine was born with the name FLUiD about a year ago. It started out as a webpage with norm-breaking fashion and people, where we updated as often as we could. The idea from the start was to co-operate with my current model agency, but as I left them at the very same moment I decided to work it by myself. The team grew bigger in just a couple of months, so it felt like the right thing to release whole issues. A lot of people started to notice us in a very short time, and here we are now. I created the magazine because, at first, I wanted to do something out of pure passion because I was working so hard. I wanted to do something norm-breaking and crazy. Something that stomped on all the awful stereotypes and structures in today’s society, as well as being high fashion and editorial. It went quite well, I have to say.


EDITORS INTERVIEW

STASIA MICHAEL

13


What dreams do you have, both in your career and private? I want to become an actress in some way. I’m not sure what genre yet, since I can see myself both as a bond-chick and a swedish Amy Schumer. Other than that, I just want to keep doing what I do now, at least work with media and make ”The New Issue” to one of Europe’s most read magazines. Privately, I would like to live in a smaller city to get some inner peace, ride a lot of trains and have at least three cats. Definitely be single. You are a very open-minded person and have told your story on TV, in magazines and on the radio. Is it important for you to be this open and honest? That’s just the way I am. I’m not ashamed of anything and I’m a very honest person. I have virtually processed much of the things that have happened in my life. I know my say can help other who are e.g. LGBT-people, bullied, gone through sexual assault or someone who has an abusive parent. To be ashamed of tough times I have been through feels unnecessary and unreal to me. Those things made me the person I am today. Even though some of them are abominable. Could you tell us three things about yourself that people maybe now know? First of all, I am a very shy person who most of the time avoids eye contact. I’ve had social phobia and I still struggle when I hang out with a lot of people. I fight to feel comfortable. But I’ve made huge progress. Two years ago I could barely go out amongst people. And

“The only thing close to a horror movie I’ve seen was when my friends showed me a clip on Youtube from “House of Wax” when Paris Hilton gets murdered in doggy style” second - when I was little I was a talent-show nerd. My entire family and I had decided that I would become a pop star, so my entire childhood consisted of applying to all these different talent shows like UKM, ”Talent” on the swedish channel 4, a program called ”Småstjärnorna” and ”Lilla melodifestivalen” and many more. I even won a few talent shows. And the third - I have never seen a horror movie. That’s something I just can’t do. I consider the world being dark and filled with enough terrible things already , so I don’t need horror movies. It’s so unnecessary to expose yourself to fear, sadness and dread. The only thing close to a horror movie I’ve seen was when my friends showed me a clip on Youtube from ”House of wax” when Paris Hilton gets murdered in doggy style. What do you appreciate the most in a person, both businesslike and private? Regardless of activity, weather it means we are business partners or hanging out eating ice-cream, there are always three qualities I look for in a person. Honesty, good values and respect. If you have those qualities I can hire you to work for the magazine or you could become my new best friend. What’s your worst and best decision? I think my worst decision was to turn down a contract with Elite Model Management when I was 15. And my best decision was to tell my dad that I am transexual. I usually don’t make bad decisions, because I always do what feels right in the moment. Have you got any other current projects you would like to share with us? I manage a swedish podcast ”Starta Miken” and it’s available on iTunes. We talk about many different subjects e.g. periods, transsexualism, porn, body-image and much more.

14


15


16


INTERVIEW

SEAN BR ADFORD PHOTO & INTERVIEWER Claire Hardman CLOTHES Beyond Retro

17


INTERVIEW

After 3 years on Broadway and a brush with Berlin, Sean Bradford decided to take his love for electronic music and for pop and soul music and blend them together. His upbeat cover of Adele’s Hello garnered a Snapchat Story from Ariana Grande and a solid dance album released last year has given Bradford a promising start to a bright future.

B

radford grew up in Texas where he explains that he was exposed a wide spectrum of music. “I was really into the UK with Radiohead and Travis and Coldplay, and my mum was really into Anita baker and every once in a while Aretha but it was very sporadic, growing up there wasn’t one thing I listened to,” says Bradford. “One of the first things that grabbed me was Blood, Sugar, Sex, Magic from the Red Hot Chili Peppers. It just felt so wrong and dangerous”, explains Bradford. Bradford was living in New York doing theatre when he started with an acoustic band but says “It wasn’t really till I started coming to Europe a bit more, that’s when I started playing with two DJs in Berlin”. “I was in a club one night with a friend”, says Bradford “and I whispered in his ear and started singing and he just said that I should be happening over this”. Bradford’s album from 2015; Up the Down Staircase is a homage to

18

a night out. “The album is sort of written in three parts - a night out in Berlin- starts out, getting ready, with a sort of pop sensibility” starts Bradford. “And then right before you go into the club; I wanted it to be this old school house vibe; part of what makes the night so fun, and that’s why raves have become so popular”, he continues, “because there’s this freedom to express yourself, and you can get crazyand dress up because nobody’s going to judge you because we’re raving” Bradford explains enthusiastically. “You go out to have this theatrical experience where you can be wild and free and leave and no-one’s going to judge you because you’re a different person or you have a different energy when you’re inside wherever you are”, says Bradford. Sean Bradford will be touring with Corona around Sweden this summer and is currently working on his sophomore album.


19


Breeze

20


PHOTOGRAPHER Hilda Randulv MODEL Caroline A. Lind Models

21


COAT & SHIRT SECOND HAND / CHEMISE WEEKDAY

22


23


24


INTERVIEW

bad my sister PHOTO & INTERVIEWER Rebecka Slatter CLOTHES TEIN Clothing 25


The girls are based in Deptford, their studio being only walking distance from their home. ”There were many areas in and around New Cross that were squatted in the 80’s, then the squats turned into a co-ops for the people who lived there. South East London is our favorite area. That’s why we live here”. When they’re not touring they’re busy teaching dancing at dance academies around London, everything from fitness-twerk for adults to tap dancing for kids. “We’re still dancing, singing, acting, but teaching is our bread and butter. Our mum’s a dance teacher so we always danced. She taught us the trade, we used to busk, going to Brick Lane on a Sunday and get about 100 quid for a few hours dancing”. Being identical twins, how alike are they and do they always co- dress? They both admit their style is inspired by the Tank Girl comic. ”We always look similar, we like each others styles and wear each others clothes but for shoots and shows we dress up, the more similar we are, the more impressive it looks. When we coordinate our dance moves it looks striking”. As a twin you experience the teenage years together and you get closer than most other siblings: ”We like the same things, music, the same people, the same friends

to hit a few festivals around Europe like headlining at the 10-year anniversary of Freequency Festival in Portugal. But being two girls, going your own way by making your own stuff and trying to spread your music to bigger masses isn’t always easy. “When we went on X-Factor our mates questioned us. Belonging to the traveller’s scene and being a part of the new age culture they were mostly known for playing at illegal raves and being very anti establishment.”  “It was a good way for us to reach out, to inspire people who wouldn’t see us at a free party. There are cool people watching X-factor too. We were lucky to get kicked out early otherwise we’d be doing an X-Factor UK tour right now instead of talking to you and playing gigs all over Europe. ITV knew they couldn’t trust us to behave. We happened to release our “2tears in a Bucket” official video while we were on the show, which was pretty much a nail in the coffin!” The girls started their own label, MBS RECORDS, because they wanted to have all the creative control. Their dream is to invite all their friends to produce and collab in their studio and not be controlled by a third part, a bigger person. “There’s so many talented people here in London; rappers, producers,

“Someone might get punched but then it’s all forgotten about very quickly” (not boyfriends, that’s a no go!) but we know twins who aren’t like that. Considering we are together pretty much all the time we do get on really well. However, we do have massive arguments usually to do with what we are creating at that time. Someone might get punched but then it’s all forgotten about very quickly”. When I asked if they ever used their striking resemblances to swap places like in the Lohan remake of the classic “The Parent Trap” they  simultaneously  burst into laughter:  “We actually auditioned for that movie! Then we heard that this one american girl got it... But yeah, she did a good job!” There were days when they swapped places to test their friends, it’s quite easy to trick everyone. It’s all about the details, the way they roll down their socks or certain gestures. “The teachers never had a clue, and neither did our parents, but our mates knew.” The twins have been busy touching up their second album, which is due to be released later this year. Vol2 will be more true to their “sound” and MBS tell me they have already started fiddling on a third record. Between mixing tracks and recording videos while teaching Londoners to get down low, the girls have also managed

26

designers, dancers and stylists who we would love to invest in, we dream that MBS RECORDS can become a successful record label so we can promote our friends in a fair way. Polly tells me about this theory where reptilians rule the world and control the masses through frequencies and occult symbolism through mainstream media to keep the order. “If Rihanna would just turn around one day and say;  Hey everyone, stop eating meat, it’s bad for the environment and cruel to animals! So many of her fans would ditch their bacon and that could create a new wave of vegetarianism. This could change the world.” They tell me that the illumicorp can’t let something as powerful as music be free, it’s too influential, it has to be controlled, like the media. If an individual becomes too influential with radical views they have to be shut down. Sophie agrees but says she needs facts. Polly is the believer but Sophie is the scientist. They start to get me thinking the Illuminati is real. “When we were kids we wanted to be pop stars, like The Spice Girls. We want to do tours, inspire people and sing out and do big shows but not work under the control of a major corporation and have to take part in satanic rituals!”


The girls laugh. They still believe there are some good role models left in media though, musician MIA is an inspiration to the girls because she keeps true to herself even though she is considered mainstream. “If we actually did win X-Factor we would use the tv-time to try to make people wake up. We did give a good show while we were on there but they had to edit us out in the end because we were too much.” “We also love Missy Elliot, she’s a love warrior, she did a music video similar to ours ‘Pump up ur kicks’ but we shot ours before hers came out. We could not believe it when we saw it, but it shows we’re on the same wavelength.” Polly sees another chance to talk about the reptillians: “I would love to collaborate with David Ike on lyric ideas. He’s one of the first people to start talking openly about shapeshifting, bloodsucking reptilian humanoids running our planet. To most people this sounds ridiculous but I fear it’s real. Because he is portrayed as a nutter he is not seen as a threat.” “Too rude for radio” is their upcoming single which funny enough only contains one swearword. The track has a kind of Major Lazer vibe and the girls tell me that they would love to collaborate with Diplo in the near future. MBS also wants to give a shout out to Swedish musician Elliphant who they shared a stage with at a Swiss music festival. Don’t miss your chance to see them live and witness the original Cabarave over the summer! Subscribe to their YouTube channel to check out all their music videos & latest releases.

27


MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI MOOD MONKI 28


I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I-

PHOTOGRAPHER Peter Gaudiano MODELS Sebastian Boukachabia & Rebecca Zetterlund MAKE-UP & STYLING Stasia Michael 29


30

CLO ED SOR AND CLO ED SOR AND CLO ED SOR AND CLO ED SOR AND CLO ED SOR AND CLO ED SOR AND CLO ED SOR AND CLO ED SOR AND CLO ED SOR AND CLO ED SOR AND CLO ED SOR AND CLO BY M


OTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROV BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCES RIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOT D ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY M OTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROV BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCES RIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOT D ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY M OTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROV BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCES RIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOT D ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY M OTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROV BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCES RIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOT D ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY M OTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROV BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCES RIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOT D ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY M OTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROV BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCES RIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOT D ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY M OTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROV BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCES RIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOT D ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY M OTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROV BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCES RIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOT D ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY M OTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROV BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCES RIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOT D ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY M OTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROV BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCES RIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOT D ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY M OTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROV BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCES RIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOT D ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY M OTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROV 31 MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES PROVIDED BY MONKI CLOTHES AND ACCESSO


32


INTERVIEW

Adrian modiggArd i PHOTO, MAKE-UP & STYLING Emily Majrell CLOTHES Beyond Retro

Adrian has lived with music his whole life as he grew up in a musical family. His father, Werner Modiggård, is the drummer in the band Eldkvarn and he too started playing music very early in his life. He makes pop music with inspirations from both the 60s and 70s soul and blues rock. The motivation for his Ted Gärdestad scholarship said: ”Music we recognize, but still feels brand new”

33


What is Pride to you? – It means a folk festival where everyone is happy and proud of who they are. How would you describe your style? – It’s pretty versatile. I like odd things. It’s not constant, it keeps on moving. In what fashion-era would you want to live in if you could travel back in time? – I’d say the 80s. Your favorite places to pick up a real bargain? – At garage sales and such. Places where they don’t really know what treasures they might have. Is your music inspired by your style, or the other way around? – Haha well, my style is inspired by garage sales and my music is inspired by stuff I’ve heard before, to be honest. But I never steal music. About your current album, why now? What was the easiest job in the process and what was the hardest? – It was written in the stars. Nah, but I was ready and it was easy to come up and play around with the songs. The hardest part was mixing it, since you get tired of hearing the material and you stagger back and forth, but music is not that important. It is as it is and you can do anything you want. What are you most proud of about your life? – The album. And my future albums. How do you define fashion? – A song by David Bowie. Your biggest style-inspiration? – Prince and Plura Johnsson, the ideal. What are you plans for the rest of 2016? – Play music and have as much fun as I can. That is the meaning of life. What do you wish for in the future? – A world without war and filled with love.

34


35


36

FUCK YOU VERY MUCH!


PHOTOGRAPHER Sara Rosengren MODEL Cajsa Wessberg MAKE-UP Carolina Karlsson

COAT AMANDA BLOM / SHIRT PETRA NORDEN / JEWELRY SECOND HAND

37


38


JACKET & JEANS PETRA NORDEN

39


“SOMETIMES I MISS JUST BEING A NORMAL RAVER WHERE I GO OUT AND DANCE AND JUST FORGET MYSELF”

40 40

– ANJA SCHNEIDEN


INTERVIEW PHOTOGRAPHER Patrice Brylla INTERVIEWER Claire Hardman

41


42


INTERVIEW

All it took was one weekend in Berlin to make Anja Schneider leave her job, home and move to Berlin to be a part of the Berlin music scene. So strong is the drawing power of one of the world’s most lively cities and so strong was Anja Schneider’s desire to be apart of it. Many can only dream of the heights she’s reached. Founder and head honcho of one of Berlins biggest electronic record labels, world-renowned producer/DJ and radio announcer. And there’s still more loads to come for Anja Schneider.

Anja Schneider’s foray into the music world started in radio and soon led to her own weekly show at Fritz Radio with the Dance Under the Blue Moon show that has been bringing electronic music to Berliners for over 12 years. She started Mobilee records after being asked by a distributor friend who had noticed how much music was being sent to her at the radio show.Over the years it’s flourished into a staple of electronic music; home to the likes of Pan-Pot, Sebo K, Catz n’ Dogz, Rodriguez Jr., Maya Jane Coles and Solomun among others. “I’m always working for my artists so that everything runs smoothly. I’m always in the office Mon to Fri”, says Schneider. This hard working attitude is one of the keys to Schneider’s success. The other key is just how disarming Anja is. When I met her after her gig at the Stockholm Love Affair she came into the pressroom and unlike the majority of artists, she engages people with a genuine interest in them; eager to know them and a bubbling energy that transcends all boundaries. It definitely is a lesson for not only artists but also the masses in how to win friends and influence people. I’m interested in her view of what a DJ does; everybody knows what they want a DJ to do. Play the music they want to hear. At the exact time they want to hear it. Which can be a difficult task depending on the crowd or what type of DJ is playing. “I’ve worked with a lot of younger DJ’s and they try to prepare their set”, says Schneider, “but it makes no sense. You have to absorb the atmosphere. It’s a different crowd every time, different countries. You have to bring the people what they need and take them on a ride”, explains Schneider. We go a little further and try to figure out the purpose of a DJ. I mention that I read the article she posted on her Facebook written by Canadian Dance music producer/DJ Tiga that tries to shed light on the currently controversial question of whether DJing can be considered an art

form. “It’s quite hard for me to tell you this because I’ve been a DJ for over 10 years” says Schneider ponderingly. “And sometimes I miss just being a normal raver where I go out and dance and just forget myself. Everything is so business related now. Because when I go out now I’m always thinking what track is this and how did they mix this”, she finishes laughingly. “But the purpose of a DJ is to make you forget, while you’re on the dance floor, you just let everything go”. With over 16 releases and an upcoming album, which, she laughingly admits “won’t be coming out this year” she is in a good position to comment on what makes a good artist.
“An artist can be an artist if you have an amazing social media manager and it doesn’t mean you’re a good artist. Of course you have to play the game, and you have to play the social media thing but I don’t think people aren’t stupid. They are going to react if they feel you aren’t authentic. You have to have it in you”. She adds that for younger artists you need to “be your own artist, be your own creator. Try to make what you feel in your heart. Be honest with yourself. When you are young you want to be like your idol, and you try to be. But it won’t take you so far”. Producer, DJ, Mobilee boss and radio presenter. So what is it exactly that drives Anja Schneider? “It’s the love for what I’m doing”, says Schneider “If I didn’t love what I was doing, I would stop straight away. It’s the love for the music”, she says. “It doesn’t feel like stress to me because it’s all really organic, it comes from my heart. This is what drives me because it’s the love of my life”, finishes Schneider.

Schneider’s Latest release Soul Traveler was released in March and for extra Mobilee goodness check out their playlists on Spotify with a selection of the best tracks released from the artists on Mobilee Records.

43


44 44


PHOTO & STYLING Ebba Ågren MODELS Natan Nygård & Michael Sjösten MAKE-UP Carolina Karlsson & Melinda Forsberg CLOTHING Beyond Retro 45


46


47


ALL CLOTHES ARE FROM VILDAS PRIVATE WARDROBE

48


INTERVIEW

VILDA PHOTO & MAKE-UP Ebba Ă…gren INTERVIEWER Natan NygĂĽrd

In a bright apartment at Stora Essingen, an island on Kungsholmen borough in Stockholm, I met with trans activist Vilda Unkila Posada to chat about who she is and her views on the theme of this issue, Pride. When I ask her to tell me about herself, she smiles and looks out the window while her mind is finding a good place to start.

49


– I’m Vilda. I’m from Västerås, a city located in the middle of Sweden, where I was born and raised by my Colombian father and Finnish mother. I initially came to Stockholm for my gender identity diagnostic evaluation. I’m currently studying here while working as a treasurer and board member of RFSL Ungdom Öst, a Swedish youth organization for LGBTQ rights. This is something that is very close to my heart because I can relate to a lot of the questions we’re working with. I found, only months ago when I was posting for the Instagram account @kvinnohat, that writing is my tool for activism. My activism is raising questions about trans, specifically regarding trans women. Do you have any role models or people you look up to regarding these questions? – Janet Mock. She is also a writer and she was the first trans woman that I thought of as a role model. There are a lot of models and actresses that are trans that I knew of before noticing her, but she was the first one that I thought took trans issues to an educating level, yet being fierce and unapologetic. She is a huge inspiration to me! What does pride mean to you? – The first thing that comes to mind is last year watching the Pride parade. I was at Mariatorget and I remember thinking that

will have to use the girls’ locker room, which I haven’t really done before. I don’t know how safe I will be, so I’m kind of anxious as to how the experience will turn out. I know I will try to cover myself because I don’t want to feel obligated to come out. My agenda is that I decide when I want to come out. That’s everyday life for me and cis people will never know how it feels. No matter what toilet or locker room I use I will still feel uncomfortable and even unsafe at times. Coming out could sometimes mean safety to me though, because people will know how to treat me, and it won’t have to be a secret. What changes has to be made for your insecurity to reduce, or even disappear? – Quite a lot of changes. It’s mostly about people’s views on binary genders. I think there is a big structural problem that isn’t politically visible in a way. You know, we could put up more gender neutral toilets, and that’s great, but it doesn’t necessarily get people to really understand why it’s so important. The most important thing that will have to change is people’s mentality towards gender and trans and feminism - and everything. I think the problem lies therein, and the biggest change has to be in people’s mentality. Then the LGBTQ politics will truly have an effect on society. Pride could also be seen as a notion, a stance

“I want to see changes in politics and in people’s mentalities. I want to see change” I was proud to live in a country where LGBTQ-people have a (still somewhat moderate) existing political voice. The feeling I had at that moment is not something that I feel everyday. I also feel pride regarding my own self when I’m brave enough to challenge myself in situations that may be uncomfortable, which is something I’ve had to do a lot recently. I’m pretty humble as a person and when I get positive feedback from my activist writing I feel appreciated. People are telling me that I’m important and that I make a difference, which makes me feel so honored. Affirmation is something that I really cherish. To be proud could also entail feeling safe. Are there situations where you feel insecure? – Yes, sometimes I feel insecure when I don’t pass [as a woman]. There are a lot of situations that come to mind, but for instance when I’m out with friends. I remember a night out at a club where there was a guard outside the ladies bathroom and they stopped me to ask me if I really need to pee sitting down. I just told them “yes, let me in”. Luckily, I eventually got to use the ladies’ room, but if it was a different guard I might not have been granted. Another more recent situation is regarding locker rooms. I’m starting a new job soon and it’s the first time where I

50

towards discrimination, a forum et cetera. What are your experiences about this? – When I told you I was proud when I saw the Pride parade, it’s because I understand it. I know why people are parading. But Pride is not only rainbows, colours, glitter and happiness. People barely even know about Pride House at Stockholm Pride, where all the important political lectures and seminars take place. That is the important part of Pride - where you get the chance to learn and understand. I want more politicians to engage in Pride House. They are not making important changes by dancing in the parade. It’s not enough. Pride is about so much more than just this false idea of the LGBTQ community as being substantially glitter-y and rainbow-y. Do you feel included in the Pride community? 
 – Not if it continues like this. Not if Pride is only about love between white, cis gays. You’re not LGBTQ-friendly if you only care about the “G”-questions. I want to see more trans flags. I want to see more people taking it seriously. I don’t want to see empty seats at Pride House. I want to see changes in politics and in people’s mentalities. I want to see change.


INTERVIEW

51


52 52

SHIRT GIVENCHY


PRIDE GLAMOUR PHOTOGRAPHER David Möller MODELS Peggy Persson, Ida Emilsson & Herkules Jansson MAKE-UP Linh Thorngren

“I think the way we “celebrate” pride nowadays is very problematic. We should have the Stonewall riots in the back of our mind. The LGBTIA+ community would be nothing without stonewall. Pride is too commercialized, when people make money on human rights we have a problem. Pink washing and the white male supremacy are two huge problems in today’s pride celebration.” - Herkules Jansson

53


54 54

DRESS H&M LEATHER JACKET BALMAIN FOR H&M


DRESS VINTAGE

55


56


FASHION TALK

HANNA HASSELBERG PHOTO & INTERVIEWER Madeleine Martinsson

Age: 23 Pronoun: They City: Gothenburg, Sweden Employment: Student and an artist

What kind of clothing and style do you most prefer to wear? – Me, like many other people, do get affected of fashion trends and get cravings for flared jeans when everyone else has a craving for that haha. But right now, the 90s style. Your absolute favorite garment? – A pair of super basic norm core jeans. They are pretty light in the colour, but still jeans colored. Norm core jeans? – Yeah, like a dad in the 90s haha. What do you look for when you’re going to clothing stores? – An outfit that is a character, specially when I go to thrift shops which I do the most. Like when we saw a dress today that looked like something from an Hilary Duff movie! Clothing that looks like you’re dressing up to something. Your best buy? – I think of something I’ve bought that I will have for a long time.. Probably my green coat from Monki that first cost 800SEK and then 150SEK on the sales. That’s a really great buy. How often do you look for clothes? – I don’t go to stores and look super often, but I get clothing to me every day like in feeds in social media. So everytime I’m checking Instagram, I see things that people or stores are uploading and get pepped to buy new clothes. What’s your favorite stores? – UNIF has a loot of nice things and Beyond Retro aswell. It’s nice if your best basic trousers breaks, you always can go to Beyond Retro and buy new ones. But I have a limit that I only can buy 10 newly garments a year and if I’ve already done that and see clothes I won’t find second hand, I sew it myself. So for the list: also myself haha. Have you sewn many clothes? – Yeah pretty much. Like the brand Di$count Universe that I drooled over a lot last year and instead of buying their

very expensive clothes, I sew my own copies of what I would like to have. If you could decide what would be trendy, what would that be? – When I was a kid I watched two different series that was kind of future and science faction, like kid series. And there was a futuristic fashion, hair in many different colors. We can see that trend now, there’s nothing weird that someone has blue hair for example. That was a dream I never thought would happen and I love it! So if I change the question, I’m pretty happy with that trend. What would you never wear? – A while I thought that I would never wear really low waisted jeans again when that trend disappeared. But it’s actually pretty fun to go back to trends and maybe even things that are kind of ugly. Hm, maybe to be a good vegan but wear a leather jacket or a mocca jacket. What do you look at the first in another person’s outfit? – Their smile and contouring. Just kidding haha. Many people look at shoes, but I’m not really. Maybe just their most funny garment, if there’s something that stands out. Do you have a style icon? – Oh I don’t know, I get inspired by people I see. Nicky in the band Dolores Haze has a fun style! But maybe also myself, cause I take from here and there from other people. If you got a lot of money to buy someone else’s clothes, who would that be? – Every dress that Hilary Duff has been wearing in like Lizzie McGuire and other movies. Not a true answer, but a funny one haha! Do you have any tips for people who would like to expand their style? If they think they have a boring style? – Look at people who you think have a nice style. Follow cool people on Instagram and copy them!

57


58


59


Body Love PHOTO & STYLING: Ebba Ã…gren MODEL Helena Rosenblad MAKE-UP Carolina Karlsson CLOTHES Humana Second Hand

60 60


61


62 62


63


64

FU ME S

PHOTOGRAPHER Martin Bohm MAKE-UP & HAIR Agnes Arnell MODEL Molly Wikingsson ASSISTANT Johan Nyström

DRESS LULU’S / NECKLACE BARBARA C. PELLEGRINO SOCKS ADIDAS / SHOES RUBI


FAUX FUR MONKI / 
NECKLACE DANGEROUS GOODS / SKIRT ROMWE / BRA CALVIN KLEIN SOCKS ADIDAS / SHOES VINTAGE

65


66 66


67


INTERVIEW

RICKARD SÖDERBERG PHOTO & INTERIEWER Emely Majrell

What’s going on in your life at the moment? – Right now there’s a lot of dancing, that’s the thing. It takes a lot, more than I ever thought it would. But it’s also fantastic, I want to live in the moment not to lose this opportunity I’ve been given. A part from Let’s Dance, it’s my story in ”Metro”, and then I’m doing two opera performances this summer (Glada Änkan and Syster Angelica), a new album is on the go and, behold, we’ve already started planning the christmas tour. There are things to be done all the time and it’s kind of an inner labour. But I’m not complaining, I wouldn’t trade this for the world.

68


69


INTERVIEW

“To be in this creation was the rescue when the world turned its back on us.”

Have you always known that you want to do what you do now? – I still don’t know. Or well, the fact is that I wouldn’t imagine doing anything other than what I do now, even though I really don’t know what I’m doing. When someone asks me what I’ll be doing in ten years I always reply: exactly what I do now. Even though I don’t know what I’m doing. Play, dance, sing and write a little. I consider that what you’re doing is very clear and important to many people. You have become a spokesman for the LGBTQ-stage. – Yes, those are important questions. At the same time I’m trying to be myself, and raise the question: what world do we want to live in? Do we want a world with more love or less love? That’s the only thing that matters. What is your fondest childhood memory? – During my growth there was a theatre where I spent a lot of time, I basically lived there. They didn’t divide people into groups - young, old - you were who you were. All of the people were in the middle of creation. We were all amateurs in the middle of creation. To be in this creation was the rescue when the world turned its back on us. When did you decide to commit to the LGBTQ-stage? – I’ve always been driven by my wish for change, to be a part and contribute to something other than what we have - a better world. The right to be yourself and the right to love and be loved. That’s something I consider a right of man. In other words, there’s not a specific moment where I decided to fight for this, it has come gradually and became more and more important. I was in the RFSL management when I was younger, but afterwards it has become a lot more important and I felt the need to do something about it. What are your dreams for the future? – Being able to do what I do now - no one is happier than me. And I hope to leave a mark in our society by asking the question over and over again: What world do we want? When people feel like they have an answer and they can live in that world. My

70

measure is: Be the change you want to see in this world. And of course feel well, be close to my friends and work with what I do. What’s your favorite word? – The phrase I use the most is: We will make it alright, not ”it will be alright”. Because that would mean someone else would have to solve it. I will be a part of the solution to the problem. What’s your least favorite word? – ”Things have always been this way”. So what?! That really is my least favorite saying. The most important thing is to create new point of views, here and now. Describe your style! – Hopelessly stuck in 1985, when I felt cool, and since then I haven’t changed. An irrevocably preserve, perhaps. How much influence does your style have on your art? – It has that much influence that I know it’s like a identification factor for me. Other people know me through it and I feel comfortable in it. I would feel disguised if I e.g. put on a tie or something I can’t relate to. I know that if I wear a shirt with a statement, then it’s a statement. It becomes a way of communicating, my clothing becomes political. What makes you happy? – The moments where you’re together with people and that’s enough, no matter what you do. If you share a meal, watch an episode of whatever or smell flowers. It sounds kinda dopey, but being in the moment. What does a normal morning to you look like? – I’m such a morning person. Let’s say I wake up at six, half past six. I work for about an hour, my mind is clean and my heart is pure - all blank. I usually write. If I’m at home I have porridge with my husband Anders and my two mice. We prepare porridge for the four of us. So they get a spoon each and Anders and I get a plate each. And then we eat together. After that the day has begun. But it usually starts with waking up and starting up the computer at once. The best comes at that time, and as the day goes it only gets worse.


71


MICHA PHOTOGRAPHER Nora Ceredin MODEL & MAKE-UP Michael Fant

CAP URBAN OUTFITTERS / JACKET LEVIS / POLO WEEKDAY SWEATSHIRT MONKI / TIGHTS H&M / SHOES BUFFALOS, EBAY

72


73


74


75


Summer in Russia PHOTOGRAPHER David Mรถller MODELS Kajsa Frank & Emil Gustafsson STYLIST Truls Mรฅrtensson

76 76


CAP ACNE / POLO VINTAGE / SPORT JACKET ADIDAS

77


BOMBER JACKET OUR LEGACY

78


JACKET OUR LEGACY / JEANS LEVIS

79


I’m allergic to looking too neat PHOTO, STYLING & MAKEUP Freja Blomstrand MODEL Gia A. CLOTHING & DESIGN Livia Schück & Monki

80


81


82 82


Pride means a lot more than who you are - as well as what you are capable of, what you want to know and should know. It’s about celebrating and proudly show what you, individually and collectively, have accomplished - both historically and recently. It’s about daring to flourish with all you want, can and will achieve. Personally, it’s about the trans-fight where those who have been constraint-sterilized have the right to compensation, but it’s also about keep being angry about having a parliament and government that ignore all investigations in that area and don’t seem to do anything about it whatsoever. I’m proud of what moves forward and angry about what will happen. Pride is about what has been, will be and should be individually and collectively.

83


FEMME WITH ISSUES PHOTO & STYLING Freja Blomstrand MODEL & MAKEUP Tuva R. DESIGN Livia Schück

84


85


The word ”Pride” is a form of inner strength, which is not always specific to what part of identity it concerns. For me, it’s very complex and a lot less specific. For example, no matter where I am or what I say I am, the ground strength is always there. Even when I’m not entirely open about who I am, or even entirely sure, there is a ground identity, a ground strength that comes from deep within.

86


87


88


89


/ C R E D I T S

90

EDITOR-IN-CHEIF

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Stasia Michael

Rebecca Zetterlund

PHOTOGRAPHERS

MODELS

Freja Blomstrand Martin Bohm Nora Cederin Peter Gaudiano Claire Hardman Emily Majrell Madeleine Martinsson David Möller Lanna Ohlsson Hilda Randulv Sara Rosengren Rebecka Slatter Ebba Ågren

Caroline A. Lind Models Gia A. Sebastian Boukachabia Sean Bradford Ida Emilsson Michael Fant Kajsa Frank Emil Gustavsson Hanna Hasselberg Herkules Jansson Eira Lind Models Stasia Michael My Bad Sister Natan Nygård Peggy Persson Tuva R. Helena Rosenblad Daniela S. Lind Models Anja Schneider Michael Sjösten Rickard Söderberg Vilda Unkila Posada Cajsa Wessberg Molly Wikingsson Rebecca Zetterlund


/ C R E D I T S STYLISTS

MAKE-UP ARTISTS

Freja Blomstrand Stasia Michael Truls Mårtensson Natan Nygård Saba Petrén

Agnes Arnell Michael Fant Melinda Forsberg Carolina Karlsson Tuva R. Linh Thorngren

DESIGNERS

BRANDS

Josephine Bergqvist Amanda Blom Klara Modigh Petra Norden Livia Schück

Acne Adidas Balmain for H&M Barbara C. Pellegrino Beyond Retro Calvin Klein Dangerous Goods Givenchy H&M Humana Second Hand Levis Lulu’s Monki Romwe Rubi TEIN Clothing Urban Outfitters Vintage Weekday

91


92


WY - “IN BLOOM” May 27th Avaliable on Spotify

93


Do you want to advertise in our next issue? Contact us at thenewissue@mail.com for more information!

thenewissues 94

fb.com/thenewissue


95


s hi

”w el of ov p aWe elove pe the r a p r the art of rin t t” Paperprint

does exis T. per pa Fe

el

T

"Founded by the artist and entrepreneur Birger Hammarström 1967 - still a family buisness"

tructure , s es me th ll

nd enjoy nk a . ei th

Signed by the entrepreneur Birger Hammarström (sign. Birjer), founder of Markbladet Tryckeri AB year 1967. Print Technique: Newspaper Printing Press

96

www.tidningstryckeri.nu

THE NEW ISSUE #3 - PRIDE  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you