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CITY LIFE STYLE

S A S K AT O O N @flowzineSask VOLUME 7 ISSUE 4

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2019

FREE

SOME FELLOW CITIZENS OF SASKATOON GIVE PAUSE FOR THOUGHT IN A BUSY WORLD

A DOSE OF INSPIRATION THE TECH HUB PUTTING THE PRAIRIES ON THE MAP 07 HOW THE ART OF FOLDING IMPROVES A WARDROBE 14 ANTHOGRAINS AND A SMALL LOCAL DISTILLER 26 Extensive listings for dining, shopping & more at www.flowmagazine.ca.

food+drink music+events fashion/health local attractions maps


THE LEADERS IN

15

OUTDOOR LIVING

Years

PRE-SEASON BOOKING 25% OFF CUSTOM FRAMES & FABRICS

Garden Architecture & Design 315 Avenue A South

306 651 2828

gardenarc hit ecture.ca

@gardenarchitecture


“Think left and think right, think low and think high. Oh, the thinks you can think up if only you try!” - Dr. Seuss

We love to give good ideas a lift.

From the transformation of the new Children’s Discovery Museum and several urban renewal projects to sponsorship of festivals and support of dozens of local charities and organizations*, Strata continues to illustrate a growing commitment to the community, its people, and a bright future for all. Aberdeen Minor Hockey . Broadway Theatre . Care for Kids by Wiegers . Children’s Festival . Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital Foundation . Choc’la Cure . City Hospital Foundaton . def SOL Productions . Design Council of Saskatchewan . Easter Seals . Heart & Stroke Foundation . Homeowner Providers of Saskatchewan . Hoops for Hope . L80 Breast Health . Movember . Princess Shop . Saskatoon Bobcats Hockey . Saskatoon Construction Association . Saskatoon Preschool Foundation . Stars Air Ambulance . Swinging With The Stars . Synergy 8 Community Builders . United Way . University of Saskatchewan

New Commercial / Interiors / Exterior Renovations / Residential / Design-Build @StrataDevelopment

stratadevelopment.ca

@stratadevelopment


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contents

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FEBRUARY/MARCH 2019

MAKING THE MOST OF THEIR TALENTS

Amy Thorp Photography

For a sixth year, flow presents a group of 8 women in honour of March 8, International Women’s Day, who are making things happen and trying to shape a better world for themselves and others.

Designer and serial entrepreneur Jeanny Buan, seated in her newly acquired bridal shop, knows what it takes to make a difference to the people in her life. (Photo by Amy Thorp)

TOP CANUCK TALENT

MEN OF HONOUR

DON’T JUST GO DUTCH

BELIEVE IT OR...

Daniel Romano takes his genre-bending stuff to the Capitol stage

It’s not just the women of this city who have done lots of amazing things

Ideas for sharing things on a date: dipping, skipping and zipping!

The quirkiest museum on the prairies has a haunted doll, Bigfoot stuff and...?

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14

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ALSO IN THIS ISSUE

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music+events

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food+drink

24

secret Saskatoon

30

lifestyle

8

returns next issue

fashion

14

PLUS:

city maps

28

Corrections: In the Dec/Jan 2019 issue, we incorrectly credited Paul Miazga for the article on Doughnuts when Naomi Zurevinski should have gotten the credit. We regret this error. Cover photo of Mallory Guenther by Amy Thorp Styling by Amanda Brown and Laura Crossman Shot on location at Soul Foods Conscious Grocer

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editor’s notes

Being an Inspiration at All Times

A few years ago, someone wrote to the magazine asking us to showcase some inspiring young men alongside the women we have been featuring. It took a long time to get to his request. The reason we took to starting with women is that their roles in society are often less heralded. You don’t often have heroic figures in society who are women, at least when using the standard criteria of heroism. But heroes come in all shapes and sizes, and we wanted to recognize that in part much like the YWCA does in their annual Women of Distinction awards gala. (And for the record, flow’s first cohort of 8 women came out before CBC began their Future 40 lists.) Fast-forward to today and this year we celebrate both men and women and, as in previous years, while age is a factor, it’s also not: not everyone who leads by example comes into their own under the age of 40, but I digress. I hope

you enjoy reading about these wonderful people, men and women all, and take some inspiration from them for your own personal journey. Looking to the months ahead, there’s lots going on as usual in the city: the Saskatoon Chefs’ Gala & Showcase (a personal favourite of mine; see p. 8), then Snoop Dogg plays here, there are concerts and theatre performances galore, comedy specials and way more besides. Lots of options for a Valentine’s Day date too (p. 27), to be sure. Also of note in this issue: after many requests for it, flow now offers subscriptions for delivery right to your door, so you’ll never have to miss out on getting a copy, and you’ll be that much further ahead of your friends, family and neighbours when it comes to knowing what’s going on in Saskatoon and where to find the latest dining hotspots. Just have a look to the right of this column just above the blue squiggle that is our publishing company’s logo. Support professional, independent journalism that specializes in local content! Finally, I want to say a huge thank you to the wonderful women who put together the feature for this issue: photographer Amy Thorp; journalists Naomi Zurevinski and Marina Pshebylo; and, makeup artist Amanda Brown and fellow stylist Laura Crossman. They put together an amazing piece of journalism and made each woman look great and feel right at home in front of the camera (not an easy task!). They are a tribute to everything we do here at the magazine and I look forward to working with them all in the coming year!

FreshWest Media Ltd. 122 Edmund Park Saskatoon, SK S7H 0Z4 flowmagazine.ca @flowzineSask info@freshwestmedia.com Published 6 times per year by FreshWest Media Ltd. Readership: 30,000 (estimated) in Saskatoon and area. Copyright (2019) by FreshWest Media Ltd. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the expressed, written consent of the publisher. Publisher & Editor Paul Miazga Senior Art Director Zhanybek Nurgozhayev Map Designer Danna Contreras-Chapa Ad Designers Crystal Klassen, Paul Miazga, Zhanybek Nurgozhayev Proofreader Olga Bondarenko Contributors Sarah Dorward, Cathy Engel, Tyson McShane, Paul Miazga, Marina Pshebylo, Kevin Sorokowski, Naomi Zurevinski Lead Photographer Amy Thorp Contributing Photographers Cathy Engel, Paul Miazga, Lisa Patrick, Lauren Spear, Dave Stobbe, Tourism Saskatchewan, Tourism Saskatoon Printing TC Transcontinental Distribution FreshWest Media Ltd., Canada Post Corp. Subscriptions Available for $25 per year (+GST & PST). Please email info@freshwestmedia.com.

FRESHWEST MEDIA LTD. President and Publisher Paul Miazga

Paul Miazga Publisher and Editor paul@freshwestmedia.com

Project Consultants Michael Miazga (Nimble Storage), Terry Rock (Rock Strategy & Leadership), Jed Sunden (KP Media), Carmen Villadar (@digitalfemme) Advertising Inquiries Paul Miazga 306-261-0883 paul@freshwestmedia.com FreshWest Media Ltd. is proud to support Tourism Saskatoon, DTNYXE and other local business & tourism promotion agencies.

Sarah Dorward

Tyson McShane

Naomi Zurevinski

She’s moving ever-closer to her MA in English, so with the goal in sight, we’re proud as peaches to have this witty wordsmith continue to write for the magazine. What’s more impressive still is that she has her sights set on doing a PhD. She clearly loves the classroom!

For a guy with a young family, this city planner-cumrockstar either has a great relationship with his wife or manages to sneak out of the house regularly without anyone noticing (he really does attend a lot of gigs, hence the forte of his column).

Just give her a topic and she’ll take it from there: Naomi puts pen to paper in this issue on enterprising women and the quirky ins and outs of a small museum full of curios. She loves a challenge too, as evidenced by the fact that she enjoys dining out despite being gluten-intolerant.

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the city

A Tech Laboratory Right on the Prairie

Co.Labs has many in the tech world abuzz, proving a small centre such as Saskatoon can develop and attract world-class talent and investment

Text by Sarah Dorward Amidst the tech talk that continues to generate buzz these days is Co.Labs—an innovative and supportive organization that is the first of its kind in Saskatchewan. Its purpose? To enable local startups to move confidently and swiftly towards success in the market. As Saskatchewan’s first tech incubator, Co.Labs supports technology startups in the early stages of their journey towards commercialization. It’s a community gathering point for innovators, builders and creators to collaborate, mentoring individual businesses and giving each a toolkit of everything they need to begin building for the future. So far, 52 startups have come through Co.Labs, attracting over $5 million in private investment, and creating more than 75 jobs in the process. Founder Jordan Dutchak (pictured at bottom) says that the true essence of Co.Labs is grounded in “enabling in a qualitative sense. By focusing on meeting and mentorship, we are able to strengthen interaction, support ingenuity, build a community of creators and innovators, and make a long-term impact on Saskatchewan’s tech culture.” Co.Labs collects leaders who become “champions of an incubator, developing and solidifying a sense of community (with them) in the local tech industry,” Dutchak says. Board members include Jacqueline Cook (CSO of Vendasta Technologies Inc.), Greg Sutton (CEO of TinyEYE Therapy Services), and Wes Jickling and Kari Harvey, (CEO and COO, respectively, of Innovation Saskatchewan). Dutchak mentions that Co.Labs has recently hit a milestone in its existence and brought some major

(Courtesy photo) attention to the tech industry not only in SK but across the prairies. The Prairie Investment Forum last February was a two-part event which brought together more than 500 people at the Remai Modern to hear private investor pitches followed by a gala at the Delta Bessborough Hotel where representatives of various local startups networked with and received both financial and moral support from industry peers. Moreover, it was a defining moment for the city’s tech industry, as Saskatoon shed its underdog status and showed the world that some of the best tech companies going are right here. Dutchak believes that the forum was crucial to develop a “macro level economy in Saskatchewan in regards to innovation. By gathering the tech community, building programs and investments in both private and public sectors to raise capital, we can both breed talent in and draw it to Saskatchewan.” As Co.Labs looks to encourage each of its startups to develop their own individual culture, it is also happy to facilitate and encourage meaningful collaborations whenever possible. With Slack chats online, weekly coffee dates and after-hours beverage socials, the energy at Co.Labs’ Googleesque office space brims with welcoming words and a tangible buzz. Going forward, Co.Labs will continue to focus as a gathering place, support hub and innovation space: “We’re here to support and encourage the beauty of tech in Saskatchewan, and enjoy the unique and transparent environment of each startup so that the prairies become a place of innovation and enterprise.”

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February events Feb09

Chefs’ Gala & Showcase

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Arkells

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7:30pm; tickets from $36 This popular band from Hamilton arrives to play hits “Come To Light”, “Relentless” and more. Opening will be L.A. indie band Lord Huron. SaskTel Centre (3515 Bill Hunter Ave.; sasktelcentre.com)

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Kôna Winter Festival

Cocktails 5:30pm, dinner 6:30pm; tickets $170/table of 8 $1,300 Combine the city’s most talented chefs—each presenting one of six courses—with performances by top local artists and you get this amazing gala. The social event of the year comes early in Saskatoon, with all proceeds (including those from a range of silent auction items) going to support local arts organizations: LOOP (Little Opera on the Prairie), LiveFive Theatre and the Ritornello Chamber Music Festival. saskatoonchefsgala.com Prairieland Park, Hall A (503 Ruth St.)

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10am–4pm; free admission A family-friendly event celebrating Indigenous culture with dog sled rides, kick sled tours, snowshoeing, storytelling and the “Really, Really Antique Road Show.” Wanuskewin Heritage Park (RR4/ Penner Road; wanuskewin.com)

(Photos by Dave Stobbe)

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SSO: Tainted Love

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Feb19

Snoop Dogg & Friends 8pm; tickets from $84 The Doggfather of hip-hop has gone on tour to celebrate 25 years in the spotlight. He’s got his own brand of weed, he’s produced records and films, does charity work in his hometown of LA, and he can still MC with the best of them. Coming to town with him will be a formidable lineup, including Bone Thugs-N-Harmony, Warren G, Kurupt and Luniz. SaskTel Centre (3515 Bill Hunter Ave.; sasktelcentre.com)

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Feb20

Little Big Town

7:30pm; tickets from $65 Still going strong after 20 years, 4 Grammys and with the same lineup since the very beginning, Little Big Town (Karen Fairchild, Kimberly Schlapman, Phillip Sweet and Jimi Westbrook) provide four-part vocal harmonies that have been their signature sound since Day 1. Opening for them will be Midland and Ashley McBryde. SaskTel Centre (3515 Bill Hunter Ave.)

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7:30pm; tickets from $34 The Symphony presents selections from Prokofiev’s masterpiece Romeo and Juliet with guest violinist Andréa Tyniec. saskatoonsymphony.org TCU Place (35 22nd St. E; tcutickets.ca)

Choir! Choir! Choir!

7:30pm; tickets $28.50 DaBu (Daveed Goldman and Nobu Adilman) are the basis of this wildly successful pop collaboration. Sing along as they do ABBA’s “Dancing Queen”. Broadway Theatre (715 Broadway Ave.; broadwaytheatre.ca)

Snowed-In Comedy Tour

8pm; tickets $51.50 With Pete Zedlacher, Dan Quinn, Paul Myrehaug and Erica Sigurdson, it’s another side-splitting tour of epic Canuck comics. Broadway Theatre (715 Broadway Ave.)

Young the Giant

8pm; tickets $42.50/VIP $205.50 Hailing from Irvine, CA, and fronted by lead singer Sameer Gadhia is this indie band touring to support their fourth studio album, Mirror Master. Coors Event Centre (241 2nd Ave. S; coorseventcentre.com)

Saskatoon Blues Festival

Main shows Mar. 1, 9pm & Mar. 2, 8pm; tickets $40; saskatoonbluessociety.ca Now into its 17th year, the 2019 festival features Morgan Davis with Crystal Shawanda (Mar. 1) and Amos Garrett with Harpdog Brown (Mar. 2). The Bassment (202 4th Ave. N)


music&events Under the Radar:

Canada’s On-stage Chameleon Genre-bending music maker Daniel Romano put out three very different albums in 2018 alone. Try to imagine what he’s going to play when he arrives in town this March to perform Text by Tyson McShane Photo by Lauren Spear

Feb16

Mar02

10pm; tickets $15 in advance/$18 at the door Shad’s always been one of Canada’s more clever MC’s, but in the past his wordplay bordered on comedy through his casual observations on the day to day. Over the five years between his last album, Flying Colours, and his latest, A Short Story About War, something has changed, as Shad shifted his lyrical lens towards some of society’s heavier topics. Despite the shift in tone, his instrument-heavy sound remains some of the fullest and most engaging hip-hop coming out of Canada. Amigos Cantina (806 Dufferin Ave.; amigoscantina.ca)

9pm; tickets $15 in advance, $20 at the door Romano (pictured) was a mainstay of Canada’s punk scene for years as a member of Attack in Black, but since that band’s dissolution, he’s built a reputation as a musical chameleon, who can take any sound and make it his own. He’s gone from writing old school country gems to near fullon David Bowie-esque glam back to raging punk rock. And while jumping from genre to genre, he’s become one the most prolific musicians of his generation, releasing three albums in 2018 alone. His latest, Finally Free, was an exercise in musical spontaneity reportedly written and recorded in a series of first takes before he over-thought the

Shad

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Daniel Romano + The Dead Soft

song structures and lyrics. The resulting set of songs leans more toward folk music than some of his other recent releases, but when he sets foot on the Capitol Music Club stage on March 2, he may have reinvented himself once again. One thing is for certain: whatever direction he takes, he makes it his own and delivers as one of Canada’s finest performers. Opening will be Vancouver-based trio The Dead Soft. Capitol Music Club (244 1st Ave. N; capitolclubyxe.ca) Tyson McShane has toured across Canada, the US, UK and Europe, and released four albums with his band, Slow Down Molasses. A co-curator of MoSoFest over 2012–2016, he presented some of the most exciting new music from across North America, next to Saskatoon’s finest bands. @TysonMcShane @SlowdownMolasse


Feb09

Saskatchewan Rush vs. Calgary Roughnecks

(Tourism Saskatchewan)

Winter Wonderland on the Prairies

7:30pm; tickets from $25 The season is well under way for the returning NLL champions, and the Rush play five home games in the next two months, including two against their West Division rivals from Calgary. Other tilts include: Feb. 22 (vs. Colorado Mammoth); Mar. 2 (vs. Calgary); Mar. 16 (vs. Buffalo Bandits); and, Mar. 30 (vs. Vancouver Warriors). For ticket and other information, visit saskrush.com. SaskTel Centre (3515 Bill Hunter Ave.)

GALLERIES Remai Modern (102 Spadina Cres. E; remaimodern.org) Open Tue/Fri 10am–10pm, Wed/Thu/Sat/ Sun 10am–5pm; admission $12.

Through Mar. 3: Amanda Strong Flood and How to Steal a Canoe. Stop-motion films by the award-winning Michif artist consider Indigenous lineage, language and unconventional methods of storytelling. Through Mar. 3: Lost + Found. Stop-motion films by the award-winning Michif artist consider Indigenous lineage, language and unconventional methods of storytelling. Through Apr. 7: Pablo Picasso: Process & Poetry. The exhibit includes scenes of languid musicians and acrobats in classic bacchanalia. Picasso’s images are vibrant and joyous, executed with a skill that elevates them beyond depictions of debauchery. Ceramic works showcase similar imagery in three-dimensional space. In the Picasso Gallery. Through 2019: William Perehudoff—Intercontinental Packers Cafeteria Murals and Reception Room Murals. In the late 1940s, local farmer William Perehudoff supplemented his income by taking a job as a labourer at Intercontinental Packers Ltd. During one annual layoff period, he approached Fred Mendel with an idea to paint murals for the staff cafeteria. The project took three months to complete and Perehudoff was paid his regular hourly wage to do them. Each panel depicts various aspects of meat processing,

from delivery of the animals to butchering, canning, packing and shipping of finished products. An avid reader, Perehudoff was interested in the methodologies of Mexican social realist artists such as Diego Rivera and felt that the purpose of art was to express daily life in an honest, matterof-fact manner. Given their size and dimensions, murals were popular modes of art then as they could be seen by all types of people. The bustling activity Perehudoff portrayed shows dozens of workers framed by dark curving lines. The adjacent reception room murals (below)

demonstrate the artist’s evolving style. Through 2019: The Mendel Gift. In 1965, the Mendel family donated 13 paintings to form the nucleus for the permanent collection, including work by prominent Canadian modernists. The collection now totals more than 8,000 works by notable artists John Baldessari, Bob Boyer, Georges Braque, Janet Cardiff & George Bures Miller, Anthony Caro, Marcel Dzama, Larry Fink, General Idea, Jack Goldstein, Dan Graham, Rodney Graham, Ken Lum, Louis Marcoussis, Kenneth Noland, Jules Olitski, Michael Snow and Nancy Spero.

(Courtesy photo)

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March events 1 2 3 4 5

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Coeur de pirate

8pm; tickets from $39.50/VIP from $164

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SSO: Finding Heinz Mohen 7:30pm; tickets from $34 A violin concerto by this noted German editor, whose version of Mozart’s Requiem is beloved by orchestras worldwide, was recently discovered by his grandson here in Saskatoon. The Saskatoon Symphony, working with local composer Paul Suchan, created parts to be performed for the first time in 80 years. Joining the SSO for this momentous event will be Timothy Chooi (violin; pictured), PA-born soprano Andrea Lett, tenor Michael Harris, the U of S Greystone Singers and the Saskatoon Symphony Chorus. saskatoonsymphony.org TCU Place (35 22nd St. E; tcutickets.ca)

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Donovan Woods

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Empire of the Son 23

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The Buddy Cole Monologues

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Evenings 8pm, Wed/Sun matinees 2pm; tickets $30; persephonetheatre.org Written and performed by Tetsuro Shigematsu, this very personal story portrays Shigematsu and his late father, Akira, who both revelled in communicating with their listeners but rarely spoke with each other. Once Akira’s health begins to decline, Tetsuro bridges the gap between them with… a microphone. Akira’s fascinating personal history, spanning post-war Hiroshima to 1960s London, comes alive as an evolving connection and deep-seated love between him and his son. Remai Arts Centre (100 Spadina Cres. E)

9pm; tickets $37.50 The Montreal-born starlet who has taken France and the francophone world by storm returns for a gig downtown. Presented by the Broadway Theatre (broadwaytheatre.ca). Coors Event Centre (241 2nd Ave. S)

8pm; tickets $39.50 Kids In The Hall alum Scott Thompson brings the wonderful irreverence of this over-the-top sketch comedy series which plays on stereotypes and teems with pop-culture references. Broadway Theatre (715 Broadway Ave.)

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From Mar27

PIGS

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Mar23

Evenings 8pm; Wed/Sun matinees 2pm; tickets $30; persephonetheatre.org Change comes quickly in the jet age and a suave young pilot suddenly has to deal with three stewardesses who arrive at his door simultaneously. Remai Arts Centre (100 Spadina Cres. E)

7:30pm; tickets $47.50 Canada’s top Pink Floyd tribute band brings to life the sounds of this legendary British duo with its hits “The Wall”, “Money” and more. Broadway Theatre (715 Broadway Ave.; broadwaytheatre.ca)

Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox

Some say Bradlee’s reworking of the biggest pop music hits (e.g. “Small Town Girl” by Journey, “All About That Bass” by Megan Trainor, etc.) as lounge music brings them closer to what they should be. And with true musicianship to boot: there’s no autotune with anything Bradlee and his talented bunch do. TCU Place (35 22nd St. E; tcutickets.ca)

Boeing Boeing

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10pm; tickets $29.50 The breathy singer/songwriter brings his heartfelt melodies (“What They Mean”, “Put On, Cologne”) to the stage. Opening will be Katie Pruitt. Amigos Cantina (806 Dufferin Ave.; amigoscantina.com)

Shakey Graves

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8pm; tickets $44.25 With a stage presence as big as his home state of Texas, this consummate one-man folk, blues and rock act lives, breathes and sweats good tunes. Coors Event Centre (241 2nd Ave. S; coorseventcentre.com)

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Kinky Boots

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Sat 2:30pm, 8pm/Sun 1pm; tickets from $59.50; tcutickets.ca A Broadway musical by Cyndi Lauper based on the 2005 British film of the same name (and inspired by true events) written by Geoff Deane and Tim Firth. TCU Place (35 22nd St. E)


LIVE MUSIC Amigos Cantina (806 Dufferin Ave.; amigoscantina. com) Shows at 10pm, cover $10 except as noted. Feb. 1: Pocket Watch w/ Hollow Oax, The Radiant Feb. 2: The Liquor Shakes w/ Kaye & Co., Mabaleka Feb. 8: Ecila w/ The Reckless Famous, BOOMlag Feb. 9: Stone The Witch w/ The Dactyls, Junkyard Ballroom Feb. 15: Chasing Illusions w/ Ezra James Phillip, Sonnet Feb. 21: Carmanah w/ Ocie Elliott (9pm; tickets $10 in advance/$12 at the door) Feb. 22: Arson Cult w/ Man Meat, Yarbo et al Feb. 23: Girls Rock Saskatoon presents Y2K Covers Night (9pm) Mar. 1: The North Sound w/ LJ Tyson & the Haus of Nonsense, Marentin Fehr Mar. 2: Anna Haverstock w/ Lyzanne Foth, Justin Ryan Mar. 14: Single Mothers w/ guests ($13) Mar. 16: Johnny 2 Fingers w/ Velvet Threads, Taylor Jade

The Bassment (202 4th Ave. N; thebassment.ca)

Feb. 1: The Garrys w/ Taylor Jade (9pm; tickets $23/ members $18) Feb. 2: The BMC Organ Trio (8pm; $28/$23) Feb. 7: Wilma Groenen CD release party (8pm; $27/$22) Feb. 8: The U of S Jazz Ensemble w/ Michelle Grégoire (9pm; $20/$15) Feb. 9: BC Read Big Band (8pm; $28/$23) Feb. 12: Samantha Crain & Scott Nolan (8pm; $25/$20) Feb. 16: Champian Fulton (8pm; $50/$40) Feb. 22–23: Saskatoon Summer Players present The Movies Go To Broadway (Fri 9pm, Sat 8pm; $28/$23) Mar. 8: The Slocan Ramblers (9pm; $35/$25)

Black Cat Tavern (801 Broadway Ave.; on Facebook) Shows at 9pm, cover $10 except as noted. Feb. 2: Funkjoint w/ Hoodoo Mafia, Gargyles Feb. 8: Jezebel w/ Dr. Doak, Myles & The Blanks Feb. 9: Wacken Battle 2019 (8pm) Feb. 16: Alien to the Ignorant w/ Killjoy, Friends, et al Feb. 19: Mike Edel w/ Marentin Fehr (8pm) Mar. 6: Tourist Company w/ Long Range Hustle, Ritual Rabbits (8pm) Mar. 9: JUNK

Mar. 15: Dylan Cooper, Raeburn, Drake Mark Mar. 16: Enterprise Earth & Aethere w/ Dusty Tucker, Cryptorchids (8:30pm) Broadway Theatre (715 Broadway Ave.; broadwaytheatre.ca) Shows at 8pm except as noted. Feb. 5: Tyler Shaw (7:30pm; tickets $28.50/VIP $75.75) Feb. 7: Dan Mangan w/ La Force (8pm; $41.50) Feb. 15: Matt Dusk (8pm; $45.50) Feb. 18: Matthew Good w/ Poesy (7:30pm; sold out) Feb. 20: Thank You For Being A Friend (7:30pm; $45.50) Feb. 28: Back to Black—The Passion of Amy Winehouse feat. Heidi Munro (8pm; $45.50) Mar. 14: The Arrogant Worms (7:30pm; $42.50) Mar. 22: The White Buffalo (8pm; $36.50) Mar. 29: Lighthouse 50th anniversary tour (8pm; $55.50) Capitol Music Club (244 1st Ave. N; capitolclubyxe.ca) Shows at 9pm, cover $10 except as noted. Feb. 1: Electric Sky Pre-Party feat. Homesick & Guru (9pm; tickets $10) Feb. 22: Chali 2Na & The House of Vibe w/ The Gaff ($20) Convocation Hall (107 Administration Pl., U of S campus) Feb. 3: If Music Be The Food Of Love (2pm; tickets $30) Mar. 17: In Recital: Johannes Moser (cello) w/ Chiharu Iinuma (piano) (7:30pm; $60) Coors Event Centre (241 2nd Ave. S; coorseventcentre.com) Shows at 8pm except as noted. Feb. 8: The Trews (7pm; tickets $30/VIP $50) Feb. 16: Mother Mother (8pm; $42.50) Dakota Dunes Casino (at Whitecap, SK; 20 min S on Hwy 219; dakotadunescasino.com) Feb. 7: Neil McCoy (8pm; tickets $40) Feb. 14: The Duelling Piano Show (8pm; $45) Mar. 12–13: Dolly, Patsy, Loretta: The Legendary Ladies of Country Music (8pm; $45) Louis’ Pub (Memorial Union Bldg., 98 Campus Dr.; on Facebook) Feb. 2: Vanic (9pm; tickets $15 in advance/$20 at the door) Feb. 17: Monster Truck (8pm; $30) Feb. 28: Scott Helman (8pm; $20) The Refinery (609 Dufferin Ave.) Mar. 3: Elixir Ensemble presents Music of China and France w/ Bright Sheng (piano), Gabriel Fauré (piano), Véronique Mathieu (violin) (2:30pm; tickets $33)

SaskTel Centre (3515 Bill Hunter Ave.; sasktelcentre.com) Feb. 7: Paul Brandt w/ Jess Moskaluke, Hunter Brothers (7pm; from $43)

TCU Place (35 22nd St E.; tcutickets.ca)

Feb. 21: Home Free (8pm; tickets from $39.50/VIP from $114.50) Mar. 9: A Dream Is A Wish—Disney in Concert (7:30pm; sold out) Mar. 11: Randy Bachman Band (7:30pm; $67.50) Mar. 16: Mini Pop Kids (1:30pm; from $30/VIP $90)

Village Guitar & Amp (432 20th St. W; villageguitars.ca) Feb. 11: Danny Michel (8pm; tickets $26.50) Mar. 1: Daniel Julien Quintet (8pm; $25)

COMEDY Amigos Cantina (806 Dufferin Ave.) Feb. 4: Lady Bits and Pieces Show (7:30pm; cover $10)

Broadway Theatre (715 Broadway Ave.)

Feb. 8: The Saskatoon Soaps Improv Comedy troupe (9:30pm; tickets $14.50) Mar. 15: The Saskatoon Soaps (9:30pm; $14.50) TCU Place (35 22nd St. E; tcutickets.ca) Feb. 7: Jeremy Hotz (7:30pm; tickets $42.50) Feb. 13: Haters Roast (8pm; from $35/VIP $150) Mar. 29: Gerry Dee (8pm; from $39.50) Yuk Yuk’s Comedy Club (924 Spadina Cres. E., in the Park Town Hotel; parktownhotel.com) Shows Fri at 9pm; tickets from $20.

Feb. 8: Matthew Murray w/ Ben Cannon Feb. 22: Jane Stanton w/ Adam Blank Mar. 1: Brittany Lyseng w/ Amy Bug Mar. 8: Adam Delorey w/ Tom Liske Mar. 29: Sean Lecomber w/ Mike Lynch

SPORTS SaskTel Centre (3515 Bill Hunter Ave.; sasktelcentre.com) Feb. 2: Saskatoon Blades vs. Edmonton (7pm; tickets from $19) Feb. 6: Saskatoon vs. Moose Jaw (7pm; from $19) Feb. 15–16: RAM Motorsports Spectacular (Fri 7pm, Sat 1pm/7pm; $27.50) Mar. 3: Saskatoon vs. Red Deer (2pm; from $19) Mar. 15: Saskatoon vs. Prince Albert (7pm; $19)

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fashion

Back to Basics

Your wardrobe reflects your priorities in life, so declutter, tidy up and enjoy it more!

Text by Olenka Martynyuk Everybody has some basics. Whether we talk of men or women, it is most likely a set of several styles that flatter the wearer and look appropriate for his/her style, occupation. They work in almost every setting. Each of us has about 10 of these - good quality pieces, usually made by trusted brands. Think of a beige trench coat, that perfect cashmere sweater, a dark classically shaped skirt, a pair or two of jeans, a navy blazer and a crispy white dress shirt or blouse. Such basics all fit into the philosophy of Marie Kondo* (@mariekondo) a Japanese woman and author of “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up” who invented the art of decluttering living spaces. She believes that we should only have things in our life that “spark joy”: if we don’t have a use for something and it’s just taking up space needlessly, it’s clutter—and is detrimental not only to our wardrobe but to a healthy mind. Kondo’s formula makes perfect fashion sense for men and women today: don’t cram your wardrobe with things you never wear and, consequently, make more conscious choices as a consumer; reflect on the effect they have on the world around you. “Waste not, want not”, as the saying goes. Anyway, most people have items that look good on them and which make them feel comfortable—a second skin of sorts. Look at the way Wall Street tycoons dress and the simple conclusion is that they mostly present a phalanx of pristine white or blue shirts—all cut in the same style—plus perfectly fitted, made-tomeasure suits (red carpet dresses for Hollywood’s female celebs notwithstanding). Few of us these days care to waste time thinking about what to wear in the morning, so no different from people with some serious dosh to spend. You’re not going to hire a stylist who puts together

looks for you on special occasions; most of us don’t have that kind of money. We waste time staring at the wardrobe in the morning or just before the big party fretting about what we don’t have. Consider an approach I call “creative basics”: find a middle ground that stays true to your daily palette while also allowing you to think outside of the box on special occasions. Is this boring? Perhaps, but it should reflect your priorities: respecting what’s truly important and giving thought to the world we live in. Is this threatening to the fashion industry? Hardly. Fashion will always adapt.

A Few Good Men

They’re not all under 40, but they don’t have to be in order to continue inspiring others Chris Randall

homeless persons advocate The director of the Saskatoon Housing Initiatives Partnership, Randall has helped vocalize the plight of the city’s homeless and worked over the years with various local social welfare agencies to find shelter for such people in the city. He has also been active in a SHIP initiative to provide safe housing for members of the city’s LGBTQ2S youth, he was the director of StreetForce (which provided work opportunities for Indigenous teens without formal work experience), and is a former pastor at the City Centre Church in Riversdale.

Kevin Wesaquate

Aboriginal rights advocate, poet, artist This spoken-word poet and now Artist and Writer in Residence at Sas-

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The bottom line? Understand what’s important to you. Accept the fact that we’re not living the life of the Kardashians, but don’t shy away from being your best self. Specialty items and designer brands remain relevant in today’s world as long as we know their place in our lives and can still look ourselves in the mirror before we head out of the door. *On January 1, 2019, Netflix released a series called “Tidying Up with Marie Kondo”. In it, Kondo helps various American families declutter and guides them in tidying up their houses using her KonMari method.

katchewan Polytechnic first began to gain notoriety in Saskatoon with the Indigenous Poets Society, which he founded in the early 2010s to collaborate with other Indigenous poets and give voice to their stories and unique life experiences. At both Sask Polytechnic and SCYAP (Saskatoon Community Youth Arts Programming), where Wesaquate acts as mentor and inspiration to other Indigenous students and youth, this member of the Piapot First Nation is proving that a career in the arts can be fulfilling, financially viable and help express the culture of the Plains Cree people.

Curtis Olson

property developer In just the past five years, Olson’s office and residential projects have become well-known for their modern design, his interest in doing things with sustainability in mind, and his focus on inner-city revitalization. This father of two has also worked to give back to the community where his projects are located thanks to his past sponsorship of Park(ing) Day (an urban renewal initiative) and his involvement in the Riversdale Business Improvement District. Continues on p. 23


THEATRE

Greystone Theatre (118 Science Pl., U of S cam-

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pus; artsandscience.usask.ca/drama) Feb. 6–16: The Cripple of Inishmaan by Martin McDonagh (8pm; tickets $22). In 1934, the people of an Irish town learn that Hollywood director Robert Flaherty is coming to a neighbouring island to film his documentary, Man of Aran. Cripple Billy, an unloved boy who’s been gazing at cows and yearning for a girl who doesn’t want him, is determined to audition for a part. It’s a merciless portrayal of a world so comically cramped and mean-spirited that hope is an affront to order. Directed by Dwayne Brenna. Mar. 20–30: Machinal by Sophie Treadwell (8pm; tickets $22). Considered one of the best plays of all time, this drama is told through the eyes of a young woman who feels disposable in a paternalistic society. What lengths will she go to in order to survive in a world where she is objectified at every turn? Directed by Natasha Martina. Gordon Tootoosis Nikaniwin Theatre (914 20th St. W; gtnt.ca) Mar. 7–14: Native Studies 101 by Dakota Ray Hebert (8pm; ticket prices TBA). A Dakota, a Dene, a Cree and a Metis walk into a Native Studies class being taught by a Settler professor. Who teaches who? It’s a compelling play meant to stimulate discussion as to what colonialism and its competing narratives were really about. Presented by the Circle of Voices theatre troupe. La Troupe du Jour (914 20th St. W; latroupedujour.ca) Through Feb. 3: Le Petite Prince by Antoine de Saint Exupéry (evenings 8pm, Sun matinee 2pm; kids $9, adults $21). Access your inner child through this adaptation of this most celebrated work by the famed French author. Directed by Denis Rouleau. Mar. 30: Élise Fights Total Extinction by Paula Humbly (2pm; $21). In her science class, Élise learns the Earth’s atmosphere is warming at an alarming rate, with icebergs melting and 16,306 species currently at risk of extinction. How can she protect the environment from destruction? Directed by Joelle Prefontaine. Live Five (at the Refinery, 609 Dufferin Ave.; livefive.ca) Feb. 15–24: Elemental by Danielle Altrogge and Charlie Peters (Thu–Sat 8pm, Sun matinees 2pm; tickets $25). This funny and moving double bill comprised of National Slam Champion Danielle Altrogge's On the Rocks and award-winning theatre artist Charlie Peters' Many Fires features their new solo shows. Artistic disciplines merge as poetry, monologue, clown and puppetry are used to explore gender, sexuality and healing. Directed by Yvette Nolan. Mar. 8–17: SCUM: A Manifesto by S.E. Grummett and Caitlin Zacharias (evenings 8pm, Sun matinees 2pm; $25). In 1967, Valeria Solanas, the woman who shot pop-art legend Andy Warhol wrote a manifesto suggesting women would be truly liberated only by overthrowing the government and exterminating men. Juxtaposed with the story of two women navigating the world of modern feminism is this playful look at radicalism, feminists, and the wild life of an anti-hero. Wide Open Children’s Theatre (at The Refinery, 609 Dufferin Ave.; wideopentheatre.ca) Feb. 15–24: Memorable Munsch (various showtimes; kids 2–12 $10, adults $15). An afternoon of Robert Munsch stories is like a rock concert: the kids know all the words and love to sing along! It’s a show full of audience participation featuring “Give Me Back My Dad”, “Pyjama Day”, “Something Good”, “The Paper Bag Princess” and two others. Adapted by WOCT.

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inspiring

Feeling Inspired!

Text by Naomi Zurevinski and Marina Pshebylo Photos by Amy Thorp Makeup and styling by Amanda Brown and Laura Crossman

For a small city, Saskatoon is home to many people—women and men alike—who are creating positive, lasting change (and looking good too) Darla Lindbjerg is certainly not afraid of change. As the first female CEO for the Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce, she’s been busy establishing a fresh perspective at the Chamber since taking on the role in May 2017. “Based on surveys, the Chamber has been seen as a bit of a boy’s club in the past. When it was created 115 years ago, the majority of business owners and Chamber leadership were overwhelmingly white and male,” Lindbjerg says. “The fact that we now have a very balanced and diverse board, and strong female staff, is changing that perception. People have said we’re ‘new and fresh’, and I like that. I like that you can take an organization that has such a strong, positive history, and you can build on it.” Some of the developments Lindbjerg has spearheaded include relocating the Chamber’s offices downtown, updating the annual Saskatoon Achievement in Business Excellence (SABEX) awards, and developing a five-year strategic plan, with a new team to implement it. Although Lindbjerg has a host of education credentials Continues on p. 29

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Darla Lindbjerg, 38 President and CEO of the Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce; wife and mother of three


Carly Rae Beaudry, 31 Sexual health advocate; somatic sex educator; Structural Integration practitioner; Holistic Pelvic Care practitioner; Arvigo Therapy practitioner; full-spectrum doula

For Carly Rae Beaudry, empowering and educating women about their bodies is something she sees as imperative in today’s world. “Most women have no idea about their female anatomy. We’re not educated about uterine, menstrual or vaginal health, and women suffer tremendously because we don’t have the proper resources or know how to care for our bodies fully,” Beaudry says. “[My work is] about teaching women how to connect and have a relationship with their bodies.” Beaudry, originally from Naicam, SK, has spent the last 13 years in manual therapy and body work, with training as a full-spectrum doula and a practitioner in holistic pelvic care, arvigo therapy and structural integration—all forms of body work centered on creating positive physical, emotional and psychological change. For Beaudry, the inspiration behind her work comes from personal experience. “I’ve always dealt with painful periods, I’ve had some really traumatic experiences with IUD insertion and removal, and I’ve had a lot of pelvic and uterine pain, so it was a lot of personal experience that got me into this work,” she says. “I’ve also done some humanitarian work in Kenya and Uganda, and that’s where I learned about birth work as well. It really opened up my whole world to women’s health and women’s healing.” Beaudry says that many women have no idea what’s going on in their bodies, and very often symptoms and pain are seen as normal when they’re not. “A painful period is not normal,” she says. “Women have come to accept that symptoms during their period are completely normal and we should just deal with it. A healthy period Continues on p. 20

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inspiring Jeanny Buan, 32 Entrepreneur and business owner; designer; TV presenter; beauty pageant coach & judge

Continues on p. XX

Jeanny Buan literally does it all. Originally from the Philippines, Jeanny moved to Canada with her family in 2011 after graduating with a Degree in Marketing from a university in the Philippines. She immediately went to work creating her own path to success. Today, she owns a bridal wear company, an event planning agency she started herself, she has her own brand of handbags, and she still has time to coach and judge beauty pageants and host a show on local community TV. At 30, Jeanny decided to go back to school and take a business course when she obtained a government scholarship to study entrepreneurship. Part of the program involved launching a business, and having always wanted to start a fashion brand, Jeanny launched Viahera Canada in 2017. From the Spanish word viajera, meaning female traveller, Jeanny started a handbag line that tied her love of travel with her cultural background. She designs the bags herself in Canada and has them made in the Philippines by Filipino women (who were economically devastated by Typhoon Haiyan in 2013). They use all-natural materials, including grass, leaves and recycled materials, with turmeric and more for dyes. Not only is Viahera successful and thriving, part of her business plan involves giving back and making sure children in less fortunate countries have the opportunity to go to school. “I’ve partnered with a school in Indonesia and in the Philippines, and a portion of the proceeds from the bags are sending kids to school there,” Jeanny says. “The money’s being used to build bigger schools and send more kids to school, the majority of which are girls. We’ve sent about 200 girls to school in the past year, and I’m hoping to increase that number this year.” So not only does her business create jobs in the Philippines with good wages and opportunities, but it also gives hundreds of children an education who otherwise might not have the opportunity. Jeanny’s also no stranger to the beauty pageant world: she placed in the top 10 at Mrs. Worldwide, which comes as no surprise. She still frequently coaches and judges beauty pageants in Continues on p. 29

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Mallory Guenther, 31 Co-owner of Soul Foods Conscious Grocer; yoga instructor; Psychosomatic Therapist; advocate for sustainable and local living; step-mother of three When Mallory Guenther moved home to Saskatoon in 2009 from Vancouver, she had plans of finishing her nursing degree. But after being diagnosed with a tumor on her pituitary gland, she shifted her focus and began looking at alternative forms of medicine. “I tried the Western medical approach to healing, but my symptoms got a lot worse and I started to experience physical and mental health side effects from the medication I was on,” Guenther says. “I couldn’t spend time with friends and family and I became very isolated. It got to a point where I was like, ‘I can’t wake up every day feeling this way—there must be another way.’” It was at that point that she decided to look into alternative health and began practising yoga. After making a decision to take some time off from school, she dove into the world of nutrition, completed a yoga training in Brazil, and hasn’t looked back since. “I’ve been teaching yoga for seven years now. Through yoga, nutrition and looking at different healing experiences, I really attached to alternative forms of healing, and that’s how Soul Foods was born. It’s really a culmination of all the experiences and training I’ve received over the past decade,” she adds. Guenther and her partner Chady Nasr own and operate Soul Foods, a community and health-conscious grocer, along with seven other co-partners. The pair initially opened Soul Foods in May 2017, and in July 2018 they expanded to a larger location in Riversdale. They have also been partners in another health-related business, Three Treasures Tonics, which they opened in 2017 with business partners and friends Mike Gaff and Sarah Rose. Continues on p. 29

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inspiring

Arlie LaRoche, 34

Co-owner of Farm One Forty; advocate for holistic and regenerative agriculture; wife and mother of two; soon-to-be restaurateur Carly, from p. 17 is pain-free, symptom-free, and bright red; fresh blood for a few days and that’s it. Another thing is pain during sex: that’s not normal and we should not experience any pain during intercourse, but most women experience a lot of it.” Beaudry explains that these are signs the body is not functioning as it should and something needs to be corrected. Educating women on what’s normal for their bodies stands out as her favourite part of her work. “It’s amazing what happens when a light bulb goes off, especially working with teen girls that suffer every month with painful periods, and then after a few sessions you alleviate that pain for them. That can literally change a girl’s life. I know a couple of girls in Saskatchewan alone who have committed suicide because of their periods. That’s so wrong—this should never happen. We live in a system where girls are put on

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the pill at an extremely young age, and then end up depressed, so they’re on antidepressants, and then they’re put on narcotics as painkillers. That’s not an answer.” Moving forward, Beaudry has been training her dog to be a therapy dog, which she can use in her work too. She loves animals and has immense passion for travelling across Canada with her dog, and teaching workshops about menstrual, pelvic and sexual health. “It’s our birthright to know about our bodies,” Beaudry says. “We’ve had that taken away from us through the patriarchal system that we live in. The amount of pelvic diseases and hormonal imbalances that women suffer through is skyrocketing, and in my opinion, all of this is unnecessary and can be prevented if we know how to care for our bodies.” For more information on Carly Rae Beaudry and her work, visit carlyrae.ca. – NZ

For Arlie LaRoche and her husband Brett, the opportunity to farm their own food went from a side gig to a full-time of job. Today, the pair own and operate Farm One Forty, a holistically managed farm in Vanscoy, SK. “My first concern was being able to supply my family with clean food, and then the community as well,” she says. “We started out both working full-time in the city and doing farming on the evenings and weekends as a hobby, just to grow enough food for ourselves and our family. And then it was like, ‘Why should we get to eat this amazing food and not share it with anyone else?’” Both Arlie and her husband grew up on conventional farms in Saskatchewan, and after attending university and travelling, they realized they wanted to get back to their roots. While Brett still works in the city, Arlie works full-time managing the day-to-day on the farm. “I used to have a desk job and I loved the people I worked with, and I was interested in the work I was doing, but I didn’t feel like it was my calling,” Laroche says. “I come from a long line of Scandinavian farmers and it was just in my blood, so it’s hard to ignore. “The best part is working outside and with animals, and doing something physical every day.” Farm One Forty is named after the 140 acres of land that they work, and what makes it unique stems from their holistic management style: they work to restore the land by mimicking the way that animals and their environment interact together naturally. They don’t use chemicals, hormones or routine antibiotics, and they raise grass-fed cattle and sheep, and pasture-raised pigs and chickens. They even produce their own honey. “By definition, holistic management means dealing with the farm as a whole, which is why we don’t have only cows, or only pigs, or only chickens; we have a very diverse farm. It’s a lot more work because we have to have different infrastructure for all the different animals, but we feel that it’s worth it because that’s how nature works,” she says. In addition to Farm One Forty, Arlie, Brett and two other partners have been preparing to open a restaurant in spring 2019 on Broadway Avenue in Saskatoon. “It will be called Odla, which means ‘to farm’ in Swedish, and we’re working towards supplying the restaurant from our farm. We will definitely do that on the protein side, and then we will use as many vegetables as we can from the farm too. The restaurant is also going to have a retail side to it with a butcher counter. So it will be both a restaurant and butcher counter.” When she’s not working, Arlie loves to do yoga, travel and spend time with family. Farm One Forty allows her the opportunity to watch her kids enjoy the same things she did as a child, and offers a chance to approach farming Continues on p. 29


Tara Campbell, 33 Hip-hop artist and rapper; writer; owner of Beads, Rhymes & Life; mother of three Tara “T-Rhyme” Campbell grew up listening to all kinds of music, but says she fell in love with hip-hop and rap in Grade 3. From there, she began writing her own music by age 10. “My mom has a baby book and she said that when I was two years old my favourite singer was Michael Jackson. I’ve always been attracted to the rhythm and beat of R n B music, which is why I love hip-hop,” Campbell says. “I started making up songs which didn’t really make sense, and then I realized it was poetry. Once I understood cadence and flow through listening to other rappers, that’s when I started to write poetry that rhymed.” In 2016, Campbell—who is Dene, Swampy Cree and Métis, and hails from Treaty 10 Territory—released her debut EP, Diary of a Mad Red Woman, which consists entirely of original music. Much of the inspiration for her music comes from her own life experiences. “I think it’s important to portray your true self and true essence through your music, and I wanted to give an introduction to myself that was very real and raw,” Campbell says. “I get into a bit of storytelling in my tracks “Kill H.E.R.” and “Start Over” where I talk about my journey through a harder time in my life, where I fell into addictions and had to bring myself back to reality and my path. I think it’s super important to tell your story and to make sure that you include every bit of you, whether it’s your culture, beliefs or dreams.” Campbell is currently working on a full-length debut album, which is a solo project. In January 2018, she released a collaboration project with Saskatchewan rapper Eekwol (Lindsay Knight)

called For Women By Women. “The idea and title came to us after we took part in a local event for women in hip-hop. We were given a platform to create dialogue on what it’s like to be a woman in the hip-hop industry, and we noticed that a lot of people, particularly men, who claim to be part of the scene, were not in attendance. It was clear that they were not there to be an ally to us or our voices. That really spoke to us, and we decided we needed to do our own thing because we need to be the voices sharing our own truths and make it available for other women to listen to and feel like they can relate.” Although Campbell is busy with her music career and being a mom—which she calls one of her biggest passions—she also runs a handmade beadwork business called Beads, Rhymes & Life, which is a form of therapy for her. In all aspects of life, Campbell emphasizes the importance of being true to yourself, “because when women inspire other women, we all become more powerful.” “It’s super important that women and girls are given platforms and spaces that are safe to share their art, words and creative side. We all have to share these spaces and make room for one another, because at the end of the day, we’re more powerful when we work together rather than being in competition,” she says. “The (hip-hop) industry is very cut-throat, but your voice is super important and there are other little brown girls out there that are going to look up to you.” To listen to T-Rhyme’s music and learn more, visit t-rhyme.bandcamp.com and t-rhyme.com. – NZ

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inspiring Ying Tan, 28 Entrepreneur; fitness trainer & nutrition consultant; RMT; designer; Qigong practitioner

of creativity, and it was not a project that I envisioned myself doing (right after university),” she says. The cool, sexy pieces have all been designed by her, and to make them she bought a sewing machine, learned to sew, created her brand from the ground up and made a website all by herself within just four months! Strapped is also size inclusive with a heavy emphasis on body positivity and enabling women to feel beautiful—and sexy. So what does Ying do in her spare time? When not running her businesses, Ying keeps busy weight training, drawing, drumming in the band “Deige & the Dreamfish,” taking Mandarin les-

Ying shares two pieces of advice that she feels may help others reach their goals. First, take care of yourself before anything else: “When I put myself as a priority, my performance level increases and I know I can accomplish anything I want to!” she says. Second, pursue meaning through sacrifice rather than happiness through pleasure: “Your life choices, events and projects will have so much more meaning when you put in the effort to make your dreams happen.”

For Ying Tan, owning one business wasn’t something she could have envisioned for herself, nevermind the three she owns today. Having gone to university studying to be a mechanical engineer, she has been on a different career path ever since led by self-discovery, creativity and a pursuit of her passions. Visitors to the Saskatoon Farmers’ Market might recognize her as being one half of the “Those Girls at the Market”—a raw chocolate business initially created five years ago by Ying to get her sister Julianna, who was studying in Halifax at the time, back to Saskatoon for the summer. After seeing some success at this venture, they set up shop at the Farmers’ Market and have now been doing creating tasty chocolate ever since. Both sisters have a background in the health and fitness industry: Ying owning a fitness

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company (she’s a former fitness model) and as a trainer and nutrition consultant, and Julianna with a degree in Kinesiology, decided to tackle the bad rap that chocolate has. So, what’s so special about their chocolate? “We truly believe in the benefits of dark chocolate, so our business has a health focus. We only have three base ingredients [cacao paste, cacao butter and maple syrup], and then we add whole ingredients for flavour [coffee beans or cranberries and salt]. Our ingredients are also top quality organic, and we use the raw form of the cacao bean to maintain its nutrients,” Ying explains. They’ve mastered a treat that’s healthy for you without compromising on flavour or sweetness. Ying’s second business, Strapped Lingerie, was very much a passion project she felt she needed to bring to life. “This was born out

sons once a week, reading and doing Qigong, a body-mind connection exercise similar to yoga. “Just last year I travelled to Thailand for a Qigong Teacher Training course. I fell in love with it and travelled to Europe, and back to Thailand to learn more,” she says. Ying shares two pieces of advice that she feels may help others to reach their goals. First, take care of yourself before anything else: “When I put myself as a priority, my performance level in everything increases and I know I can accomplish anything I want to!” she says. Second, pursue meaning through sacrifice rather than happiness through pleasure: “Your life choices, events and projects will have so much more meaning when you put in the effort to make your dreams happen.” – MP


Naomi Mihilewicz, 37 Sustainable living spokesperson; horseriding teacher; mother of two Naomi Mihilewicz wears many different hats and spends her time doing things she’s most passionate about: waste. She’s the Communications Coordinator for the Saskatchewan Waste Reduction Council, a certified horse riding teacher, sustainable living pro and most importantly, she believes, a loving mother to two children. While Mihilewicz loves being at home with her kids or out riding horses, her job is to be the face of anything and everything relating to sustainable living for the SWRC—a non-profit, non-governmental organization that champions the cause of reducing waste in Saskatchewan. “My role is to make sure we are providing quality information to our members and the general public in the best way possible,” she says. “I publish a member newsletter, update our web content, assist in organizing our annual conference, organize Waste Reduction Week activities [Oct. 21–27, 2019] and run our social media,” Mihilewicz explains. She’s been with the SWRC since 2007 but eco-friendly living was how she was raised and how her parents met, both being involved with the Saskatchewan Environmental Society. Now as she raises her own children, Mihilewicz is even more conscious of what she’s leaving behind for her children and those that will come after her. “My kids are seven and three right now, and they both know how to separate their waste into compost, recycling and garbage. I am also really proud of the fact that I raised them both in cloth diapers and didn't use any disposable diapers or wipes on them,” she says. With her expertise in raising a family in an eco-friendly environment, she’ll be speaking at the Saskatchewan Living Green Expo in April on zero-waste parenting. Mihilewicz also wants people to know that life doesn’t have to change drastically all at once to accommodate greener living standards; she recommends starting with composting. “There are ways to do it even if you live in an apartment. It makes such a big impact on the volume of what gets put in the garbage,” Mihilewicz says. Reflecting on the past two years in particular, Mihilewicz feels proudest of two things: in 2017 during Waste Reduction Week, SWRC and The Hollows put together the Rubbish Dinner, which featured a three-course meal made primarily of ingredients sourced from local farmers and grocery stores that would have gone to waste. Then last year, she organized a car seat recycling drive and collected more than 300 seats that would have otherwise ended up in the landfill. So what does the New Year have in store for this enterprising eco-warrior? “New for 2019, I will be doing four zerowaste webinars for the public to teach and answer questions about living Men, from p. 14

Dean Dodge

a more sustainable lifestyle. I have some great plans for Waste Reduction Week in October—including more repair cafes where people can have items repaired for free—plus teaching more riding lessons and taking on more students, which I am so excited about!” This busy mom has no plans to slow down any time soon! For lots of great tips and simple ways to reduce household waste, check out The Green Living blog on the SWRC website: saskwastereduction.ca. – MP large-scale animal farming, big-game hunting and over-fishing.

CEO of Saskatoon YMCA Being a part of the Y has been part of Dodge’s life since almost as early as he can remember, having attended YMCA summer camp in his teens and learning to swim with the organization. After 15 years working for the Regina YMCA, he’s been CEO of the Saskatoon branch for five years now and is credited with helping turn around this once-struggling organization. Affable, outgoing and self-assured, Dodge will help lead the organization at events later this year to celebrate the 50th year of the Y in its present location.

Beau Atkins

Chris Cole

Andrew McDonald

restaurateur It’s hard to think of a person who lives his creed and beliefs so completely every day. A vegan and animal rights advocate, Cole started his own food truck two years ago and the success was such that not only has he started his own bricks-and-mortar restaurant serving “crave worthy, plant-based eats”, but he has also turned the entrance to the restaurant into a mini vegan grocery. In addition, Cole works tirelessly on social media and by volunteering to further education about the negative effects caused by

lawyer Bucking the trend to just clock hours and watch the fees roll in, Atkins made a change in his profession by starting a law firm—Edge Family Law—with a mission to keep struggling families together or, failing that, make the transition to separate life as painless as possible. In addition to his practice, Atkins volunteers with the local chapter of the Kinsmen Club, where he donates his time and energies to raise money for local charities. marketing director, comedic actor More well-known for creating memorable sketches with fellow members of the Saskatoon Soaps improv comedy troupe, McDonald is one of the driving forces at Wanuskewin Heritage Park, which in addition to pushing for UNESCO World Heritage Site status for the park, is successfully raising millions as part of a renewal and growth campaign to expand the park’s facilities, provide a welcoming place for understanding Aboriginal culture in Saskatchewan, and grow its appeal as a major regional tourism destination.

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food+drink

Fresh, Blockrockin’ Beets! It’s still winter, so what’s left in the pantry? Delicious, hearty and healthy beets! Oh, the lowly beet, deepest of roots, purplest of in-grounders, relegated to Eastern European soups and the pickling process. But, can it stop the show and shine on as the main flavour of a dish, unadorned by broth or brine? Read on, hungry reader… We sought out four local restaurants willing to highlight the beet as a main course feature and serve it for lunch. The following begins strong and ends with some mad, mad beet skills. If you seek gluten free fare and healthy options for your lunch, Leyda’s Restaurant (112 20th St. West) is your go-to. Their take on the modern beet is the Beet and Goat Cheese Pizza, which has roasted beets, a dill béchamel sauce, arugula, toasted pepitas, goat cheese, red onion and mozzarella Admittedly, this pie was consumed off-site from out of a take-out box, some 10 to 15 minutes after its creation, so some of the original aroma and flavour may have been dulled by the travel time. However, the first few bites had this eater enjoying the effort. From strength to strength, the next beets on offer we found were at McNally Robinson’s Prairie Ink

(3130 8th St. East). The Roasted Beet and Caramelized Onion Wrap is hearty and health-conscious; it comes in only just shy of making it to the top of my list. Inside the layers of the whole wheat wrap, one discovers a good portion of roasted beet, in big, crunchy chunks, caramelized onions that full of flavour, goat cheese and spinach, all of it spun together and through with a garlic-tinged lemon aioli that fairly dances it’s way down the gullet. The final entrant, from Calories Café (721 Broadway Ave.), is that restaurant’s Autumn Vegetable Crunch Salad, is relentless in flavour, presents like a champ, and brings together tastes and textures that are risky even as they are familiar. Buckwheat granola and green leaf lettuce? It works, as do the big chunks of roasted and raw beets (sourced locally from Mole Mountain Farms) and avocado, over which is drizzled a terrific, housemade Garden Tarragon dressing. Simple, clean, easy and organic, this confection felt inspired, even in a crave-worthy locale such as Calories. As a side note, Calories offers a free in-house created cocktail starring beet juice (I know!) with lemon juice, ginger and gin,

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(It’s) relentless in flavour, presents like a champ, and brings together tastes and textures that are risky even as they are unfamiliar. Buckwheat granola and green leaf lettuce? It works, as do the big chunks of roasted and raw beets and avocado, over which is drizzled a terrific, house-made Garden Tarragon dressing.

shaken with ice (oh Mama) called Love Beet. It’s not a bad way to steal hearts at your establishment, especially when the Valentine’s Daythemed cocktail features the very

(Google images)

Text by Kevin Sorokowski with files from Paul Miazga

vegetable that inspired this quest. Broadway’s Nosh Eatery & Tap once made lively use of their beets and had a couple of entries on their menu with this underappreciated veggie. With their demise, consider the surprising pub fare just down the street. The Burning Beard (731 Broadway Ave.) does a tantalyzing grated beet root and panko-crustted goat cheese salad that comes with shredded carrost, spicy arugula, a mint-citrus vinaigrette and a berry coulis. Over at Innovation Place, Boffins Public House (106-111 Research Dr.) does a classic beet borscht with dill creme fraiche to make any Ukrainian who’s aching for the old country feel right at home. No hugs from the chef like at baba’s though. Across the river downtown sits the Rook & Raven (154 2nd Ave. S), an upstanding gastro-pub with the know-how to make beets you want to write home about. Their pickled beet and goat cheese salad (which they highlight as being gluten-free and good for lacto-ovo vegetarians) comes topped with crisp slices of Granny Smith apple, sublime candied pecans, black mission figs and an apple cider vinaigrette. If a quick and heart-smart lunch option is what you need, look no further.


306-933-3385 griffintakeaway.com @thegriffintakeaway 50-741 7th Ave. N (across from City Perks)

Photos: Mattea Delane

We bake stuff! Gluten-free and vegan-friendly stuff, plus lunches to eat in or to go!

GLOBAL

ITALIAN

Afghan Kabob & Donair 3-100 2nd Ave. S; on

Bar Gusto 707 Broadway Ave.; bargustoyxe.com. The

Facebook. The full menu is worth the wait, the kebabs are delicious and they also have regular hookah pipe nights. Open Mon–Sat 11am–10pm. $ Bon Temps Café 223 2nd Ave. S; bontempscafe.ca. Seafood creole, chicken and sausage Jambalaya, big crawfish boils, bartenders slinging cocktails and regular live music. Open daily 11am–9pm. $$ Botté Chai Bar 117-123 Ave. B S; bottechaibar.com. This Persian-influenced nook has light breakfasts and lunches, with infused teas, baklava and other sweets. Open daily 10am–midnight. $$ Cesar’s Cakes & Café 11-3000 Diefenbaker Dr.; on Facebook. Filipino kare kare (peanut stew w/ beef), tokwat baboy (steamed pork and fried tofu) and more. Open Tue–Sat 8am–8pm, Sun 8am–5pm. $ Konga Café 204 Ave. H N; kongacafe.com. It’s the place to go for classic Jamaican jerk or curried chicken (or goat). Open Tue–Thu 4–9pm, Fri–Sat 11am–11pm. $ Lebanese Kitchen 1005 Broadway Ave.; on Facebook). Middle Eastern tastes (falafels, fatayer, shawarmas, hummus, tabbouleh and more) always served with a smile. Open Mon–Sat 11am–9pm. $ Saba’s African Cuisine 901 22nd St. W. Use the bread, called injera, and with your hands scoop up spicy servings of delicious Ethiopian/Eritrean food. Open Tue–Sun 4:30–10:30pm. $$ Wanuskewin Restaurant RR 4, Penner Road; wanuskewin.com. Enjoy the surroundings and “First Nations cuisine with a modern flair.” Open daily 9am–4:30pm, holidays 11am–4:30pm. $

philosophy is farm-to-fork, with lots of local produce on the enticing menu. Open Wed–Sat 5–10pm. $$$ Chianti Café 102 Idylwyld Dr. N; chianticafe.ca. The Sunday and Monday pasta feasts bring in the sports teams; the other days draw the gourmands. Open daily 11am–10pm. $$ Primal 423 20th St. W; primalpasta.ca. Local chefs Christie Peters and Kyle Michaels serve fresh pasta and local meat in this moody space. Open Wed–Fri 11:30am–1:30pm, Wed–Sun 5pm–10pm. $$$ Taverna 219 21st St. E; on Facebook. A downtown staple for Italian dining since the 70s, the new makeover has created a more open atmosphere. Open Mon–Fri 11am–10pm, Sat–Sun 5–10pm. $$$

JAPANESE, KOREAN

Samurai 601 Spadina Cres. E (in the Delta

Bessborough Hotel). True Japanese teppan yaki— grilling on stainless steel with all the fire and flair. Open daily 5–10pm. $$$ Seoul 334 20th St. W; seoulsaskatoon.com. Use the iPad menus to order soups with kimchee, everpopular bibimbap or table-top barbecued meats. Quick service and free appetizers. Open Mon–Sat 11am–9pm. $$ Sticks & Stones 226 2nd Ave. S; sticksandstonesyxe.com. This place has everything: ramen, gyoza, steamed buns, sushi rolls and cocktails. One of Open Table Canada’s Top 100 restaurants. Open Sun, Tue– Thu 11:30am–1am, Fri–Sat 11:30am–2am. $$

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food+drink

Stumbling Onto Something Text and photo by Cathy Engel

To stumble upon: To discover something or meet someone casually or by chance. Brothers Craig and Caylin Holland like to stumble upon good things. Like their new Stubletown Distilling (stumbletown.ca) just off Quebec Avenue in the north end, they hope visitors will stumble upon their tasting room, nestled as it is among well-groomed corporate offices, small, specialised retail outlets as well as a restaurant or two. Across the street lie scrap metal heaps and fanciful, upcycled sculptures of a T-Rex, a globe and a Transformer. Right next door, High Key Brewing creates righteous beer in its inviting and airy space. Craig Holland stumbled upon the culture and industry of distilling when the winds of change blew into his life. He understood distilling was about creating community, pleasing people, connecting with resources and creating something new, expressly to be shared. He stumbled upon the Quebec Avenue location when a lease agreement for another potential tenant fell through. An opportunity for collaboration with High Key blossomed: sharing equipment, a parking lot, and attracting people to both locations. It also doesn’t hurt that Craig’s wife is cousin to the owner of High Key—the craft industry is all about connecting. Craig and Caylin also stumbled upon AnthoGrain™ (pictured) from InfraReady grain products here in Saskatoon. They were thrilled with the sweet, fruity and silky results they discovered from a trial batch. AnthoGrain was developed at the University of Saskatchewan for the purpose of hiking up the anthocyanins (and therefore the health-supporting antioxidants) in food grains. At the moment, Stumbletown’s distilled products don’t transmit the colour and nutritive properties, but give these guys some time…. they are working on it. They were kind to let me taste a test batch, a distilled vodka infused with the grain hulls. The colour was more amber than purple, and the flavour was surprisingly chocolatey, with a hint of caramel! Since the New Year, Stumbletown’s products have hit the retail shelves in Sobeys Liquor as

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well as at the distillery. Their vodka strikes me as… yes, sweet and silky, but also grapey, almost like a brandy, with a citrus finish. Caylin, who is in charge of distilling and recipe development, suggests building cocktails with the vodka, using it as a brandy substitute or simply experiencing it very simply over ice with soda to focus on and experience its unique flavours. Add a twist of citrus and call it a Naked Cocktail. Exciting! Stumbletown’s gin is classic with peppery mid-notes, seabuckthorn from Nvigorate (of Saskatoon Farmers’ Market fame), which contributes a tart fruitiness as well, with high notes that are classic stroll-through-the woods juniper. But there is an intriguing, rich, low note of vanilla bean which gives it a balanced flavour. Speaking of a walk through the woods, you have got to try their Mate Amaro, their answer to the Italian Amaro craze. This dense, woodsy and smoky distillation—available for tasting and purchase at the distillery—utilizes yerba mate tea in addition to lime, cardamom, black pepper and wormwood. Try this simple cocktail as soon as you can get your hands on it:

Stumbling Mule • Muddle two sprigs of mint and a lime wedge in a mule glass • Add: 1oz (50ml) of Stumbletown Vodka • 1 oz (50ml) of Stumbletown Classic Gin • 1/2 oz (25ml) of Mate Amaro (heck, throw in more, if you are fond of that “schmokey” taste!) • Fill the glass with ice, top up with ginger beer, garnish with a fresh sprig of mint and a lime wedge. When the weather warms up, try whipping up a Negroni-style cocktail with the Mate Amaro in place of Campari. Smokin’! What is next at Stumbletown to stumble upon? Casks of whisky are patiently ageing in French Oak casks in the back, the whiskies distilled from Rosthern’s own Maker’s Malt, using premium pale malt, Vienna and a range of Munich-style malts. But for now, we will have to wait. Waiting builds character.

Key: $ - meals under $15; $$ - $15–30; $$$ - over $30

CAFÉS & DINERS City Perks 801 7th Ave. N, 627 Brand Court;

cityperks.ca. Tastefully lit, great coffee and a fine weekend brunch. Open Mon–Fri 7am–10pm, Sat 8am–6pm, Sun 10am–6pm. $ Collective Coffee 220B 20th St. W, 210 Ave. P S; collectivecoffee.com. It’s where to get coffee (and now breakfast and lunch to go) in Riversdale. Open Mon– Sat 8am–6pm, Sun 10am–6pm. $ d’Lish by Tish Café 702A 14th St. E; on Facebook. A sublime hideaway off Broadway with cozy nooks and delicious, fresh food. Open daily 8am–10pm. $ Drift Sidewalk Café 339 Ave. A S; driftcafe.ca. This creperie is airy, sunny and always buzzing with energy. Open Tue–Sat 8am–4pm, Sun 10am–3pm. $$ Earth Bound Bakery+Kitchen 220-1820 8th St. E; earthboundbakery.ca. A mostly organic bakery also serving memorable sammys, soups, ‘za and desserts. Open Tue–Sat 7am–5pm, Sun 9am–3pm. $$ Little Bird Patisserie & Café 258 Ave. B S; thelittlebird.ca. Croissants, macrons and other French pastries, plus High Tea that is the toast of the city. Daily lunch options too. Open Tue–Sun 10am–5pm. $$ Underground Café 430 20th St. W; undergroundcafe430.ca. Grilled panini for lunch and the dreamy Etta James latte for afternoon. Open Mon–Thu 7:30am– 6pm, Fri 7:30am–midnight, Sat–Sun 10am–5pm. $

LOCAL/GASTRO Ayden Kitchen & Bar 265 3rd Ave. S; aydenkitch-

enandbar.com. Owner Dale MacKay is putting the city on the map foodwise for good reason. Open Mon–Fri 11:30am–2pm, 5:30–11pm, Sat 5:30–11pm. $$$ Boffins Public House 106-111 Research Dr.; boffins.ca. Beautiful plating of artful food at this hideaway in Innovation Place. Open Mon 9am–2pm, Tue–Thu 9am–8pm, Fri 9am–9pm. $$ Hearth 2404 Melrose Ave.; hearth.restaurant. It’s the city’s newest local food eatery serving pickerel, polenta, lentils and more. Open Wed–Sat 5–10pm, Sun 11am–2pm. $$$ The Hollows 334 Ave. C S; thehollows.ca. An eclectic Riversdale eatery using locally sourced ingredients in every delightful dish. Open Wed–Sat 5:30–10pm, Sat–Sun 11am–2pm. $$$

VIETNAMESE, THAI,... Asian Hut 320 Ave. C S. The best pho soup in town and daily lunch deals at this nook in Riversdale. Open Mon–Fri 11am–2pm, 5–9pm, Sat–Sun 11am–9pm. $ Golden Pagoda 411 2nd Ave. N; goldenpagoda. ca. Try the green tea salad or coconut chicken soup, and chat up owner Lujo for some friendly banter. Open Mon–Fri 11am–2pm, Mon–Sat 5–9pm. $$ Keo’s 1808 Broadway Ave.; keoskitchensaskatoon. com. Lao, Cambodian and Thai mainstays in one locale. Not cheap, but tasty! Open Sun–Mon 4:30–10pm, Tue–Sat 11am–2pm, 4:30–9pm. $$$ Saskatoon Asian 136 2nd Ave. South, 306-6655959. Pan-Asian cuisine in a sunny upstairs dining room. Open Mon-Sat 11am–2:30pm, 4:30–9pm. $$ Seasoned Fusion Tastes 230 21st St. E; on Facebook. A must for pho, Bento boxes, ramen and sushi. Open Mon–Thu 11am–9pm, Fri–Sat 11am–10pm. $$


Date Night! Going out should be about sharing the experience: good food & drinks, stimulating conversation, and who got the highest score

Lunch . Desserts . Catering 258-B Ave. B S Open daily 10am – 5pm thelittlebird.ca

flow

Reaching the right people... for all the right reasons.

magazine

Your guide to what’s on in Saskatoon! • Delivered to 4,000 offices & more than 25,000 consumers across the city • Staunch local advocate, in-demaned & dialled in to what consumers want

new restaurant openings

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306.261.0883

VEGETARIAN güd eats inc. 2917 Early Dr.; gudeatsinc.com. You

won’t miss the meat at this hip, new, all-vegan fast food joint. Open Mon–Sat 11:30am–10pm, Sun 11:30am–8:30pm. $$ The Karma 2-157 2nd Ave. N; thekarmacafe.ca. Coffee and lattes to go, plus scrumptious lunches fusing Mediterranean, Indian and other cuisines. Open Mon– Fri 7:30am–6pm, Sat 10am–6pm, Sun 10am–5pm. $$ Thrive Juice Bar 137 20th St. W; thrivejuiceco.com. Fresh, organic, cold-pressed juices, super-food smoothies, lunches and more. Open Mon–Tue 8am–6pm, Wed– Fri 8am–7pm, Sat 9am–6pm, Sun 10am–4pm. $$

1. Tandoori Tadka Fine East Indian cuisine in Erindale, with buffet service and regular menu offerings (527 Nelson Road; tandooritadka.ca) 2. Dylan & Cam’s @ Shelter Serving up some of the city’s best Mexican fare out of the kitchen at Shelter Brewing downtown. (255 2nd Ave. S; on Facebook) 3. Vietnamese Roll Owner Hoang Ly and his family have opened this eatery north of the city centre and produce great phô, spring rolls, noodle bowls and even Vietnamese hot pot. (489 2nd Ave. N; on Facebook)

4. Tandoori Palace Taking over from Meg’s downtown is this spot serving up a full array of Indian meat and veggie dishes, plus samosas, naan, etc. (101 3rd Ave. N)

TAP ROOMS 9 Mile Legacy Brewing 229 20th St. W; 9milele-

gacy.com. A rustic space with a rortating selection of craft selections, plus regular live events. Open Tue– Thu 1–9pm, Fri–Sat 11am–11pm, Sun noon–8pm. $$ High Key Brewery 1905 Quebec Ave.; hkbrew. ca. Bright, clean, wide open, plus serving their own and others’ craft brews. Open Wed–Fri 3–9pm, Sat noon–8pm, Sun noon–6pm. $$ Prairie Sun Brewery 2020 Quebec Ave.; prairiesun.ca. Crazy Farm Ale, Prairie Lily Lager and others on tap, plus it’s dog-friendly. Open Mon–Wed 11am–7pm, Thu/Sat 11am–9pm, Sat 11am-11pm, Sun noon–5pm. $$ Shelter Brewing 255 2nd Ave. S; shelterbrewing. ca. A massive cantilevered bar, seven rotating beers on tap and great Mexican eats. Open Tue–Thu 4–11pm, Fri–Sat 3–11pm. $$

Text by Paul Miazga The Swiss got a good thing going when they started dipping bread into gooey, melted cheese, meat into hot oil and strawberries into liquid chocolate. U Fondue (613 8th St. East) continues that traditional locally. Share just one (cheese is the most popular of the five options available) or their Four Course Classic (if really hungry). The Chinese or Lunar New Year is Feb. 3–19 this year, so for a date why not celebrate with hot pot, a 2,000-year-old Chinese tradition? Available at Little Sheep Mongolian Hot Pot (140-1701 Preston Ave. North) and elsewhere, hot pot makes conversation flow naturally as you take turns with chop sticks dipping noodles, veggies (including lotus root, tong ho— Chrysanthemum greens—and winter melon), mushrooms and meats into the steaming broth. Can’t rock the chops? Just ask for a fork. At Güd Eats Inc. (2917 Early Dr.), the slogan for which is “Crave-worthy plant-based eats”, date night offers lots of potential: the “Fo’ Sharing” section has Mini Chick’n Drumsticks (they go good with gud bourbon bbq or the bastid’s jerk sauce), gluten-free Not-Chos (with pico de gallo, spiced black beans, gud guac and more) and Edamame Hummus N’ Bean Beet Dip. Make sure to divvy up the napkins. For dinner and a date on Valentine’s Day (Thursday, Feb. 14), play hookey from work and head to the Remai Modern (102 Spadina Cres. East) before the gallery closes. Arrive mid-afternoon and spend time with your significant other admiring contemporary art in this beautiful building. At 5pm, return to the main floor and Shift Restaurant to discuss the Picasso linocuts while sampling great local cuisine—just be sure to make a reservation! Not set on a meal? Play the game that’s perfectly designed for date night: pinball! Pokey’s Pinball Café (211B 33rd St. West) rotates in a half dozen machines with plenty of flashing lights to excite 1 or 2 players, plus it’s fully licensed with local craft beers on tap and daily drink specials. Looking for something more active? Wilson’s Lifestyle Centre (303 Owen Manor) in Brighton is home to the city’s only indoor zipline, so clip into a harness at their Stoked Centre and show off your daring side high above the ground. If that’s not enough of an adrenaline rush for your date, trade in the harness for a jumpsuit and helmet then pilot one of their electric go-karts and chase each other around the course for a few laps!

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Darla, from p. 16

1. Best Western Blairmore (H2; 306 Shillington Cres.,

and experience behind her—including being CEO for the Swift Current Chamber—she says her career path has been anything but linear. “When I was young, did I think I’d be CEO of a Chamber of Commerce? No, I didn’t,” Lindbjerg says. “I did things a bit backwards. I focused on family first before my education and career. I got married when I was 19, and then we moved to Denmark because my husband was playing professional hockey there. When we came back, I entered the workforce and picked up random jobs that I thought would be interesting.” In 2003, Lindbjerg simultaneously began her post-secondary journey and started a family with her husband. Upon completion of her Business Administration diploma, Lindbjerg entered the workforce again. After working in communications and housing, she made a jump that changed everything. “After I had our third child, my husband and I decided that if we could manage it, one of us should stay home. My husband said, ‘I’ll stay home—you go finish your education.’ And that’s what we did. I spent five years driving between Swift Current and Regina every week to finish my

306-242-2299)

2. Best Western Plus East Side (I10; 3331 8th St. E, 306986-2400)

3. Colonial Square Inn & Suites (I8; 1-1301 8th St. E, 306-343-1676)

4. Comfort Inn (D7; 2155 Northridge Dr., 306-934-1122) 5. Comfort Suites Saskatoon (A5; 203 Bill Hunter Ave. 306-955-6565)

6. Confederation Inn (H3; 3330 Fairlight Dr., 306-384-2882) 7. Country Inn & Suites (D6; 617 Cynthia St., 306-934-3900) 8. Days Inn Saskatoon (E7; 2000 Idylwyld Dr. N, 306-242-3297) 9. Four Points Sheraton Hotel (K8; 103 Stonebridge Blvd., 306-933-9889)

10. Hampton Inn (K8; 105 Stonebridge Blvd., 306-665-9898) 11. Hampton Inn & Suites (E5; 110 Gateway Blvd., 306933-1010)

12. Heritage Inn (E5; 102 Cardinal Cres., 306-665-8121) 13. Holiday Inn Express (map 2, A3; 315 Idylwyld Dr. N, 306-384-8844)

14. Home Inn & Suites (K9; 253 Willis Cres., 306-657-4663) 15. MainStay Suites (E5; 317 Aerogreen Cres., 306-933-2622) 16. Marriott Courtyard Saskatoon Airport (E5; 333

Aerogreen Cres., 306-986-4993) 17. Motel 6 Saskatoon (A5; 231 Marquis Dr., 306-665-6688) 18. Northgate Motor Inn (G7; 706 Idylwyld Dr. N; 306664-4414) 19. Northwoods Inn & Suites (G7; 610 Idylwyld Dr. N, 306-244-2901) 20. Quality Inn & Suites (E6; 1715 Idylwyld Dr. N, 306244-5552) 21. Ramada Hotel (F7; 806 Idylwyld Dr. N, 306-665-6500) 22. Refresh Inn & Suites (H8; 1220 College Dr., 306-934-5555) 23. Sandman Hotel Saskatoon (D6; 310 Circle Dr. W, 306-477-4844) 24. Saskatoon Inn Hotel (E6; 2002 Airport Dr., 306-242-1440) 25. Riviera Motor Inn (E6; 2001 Ave. B N, 306-242-7272) 26. Staybridge Suites (H9; 1838 College Dr. E, 306-952-4888) 27. Super 8 Saskatoon (D7; 706 Circle Dr. E, 306-384-8989) 28. Super 8 Saskatoon West (G5; 1414 22nd St. W, 306974-2900) 29. Travelodge Hotel Saskatoon (D6; 106 Circle Dr. W, 306-242-8881) 30. Thriftlodge Saskatoon (E6; 1825 Idylwyld Dr. N, 306-244-2191) 31. TownePlace Suites by Marriott (K9; 247 Willis Cres., 306-952-0400) 32. Westgate Motor Inn (H5; 2501 22nd St. W; 306-382-3722)

1. Delta Hotels Bessborough – Marriott (map 2, E6; 601 Spadina Cres. E, 306-244-5521) 2. Hilton Garden Inn (map 2, C4; 90 22nd St. E, 306-244-2311) 3. Holiday Inn Saskatoon (map 2, C3; 101 Pacific Ave., 306-986-5000) 4. The James Hotel (map 2, E7; 620 Spadina Cres. E, 306-244-6446) 5. Obasa Suites* (3 locations; map 2, B4, B6; map 3, B2; 1-877-996-2272) 6. Park Town Hotel (map 2, B7; 924 Spadina Cres. E, 1-800-667-3999) 7. Delta Hotels Saskatoon Downtown (map 2, E5; 405 20th St. E, 306-665-3322) 8. Hotel Senator (map 2, D4; 243 21st St. E, 306-244-6141) 9. Sheraton Cavalier Hotel (map 2, D5; 612 Spadina Cres. E, 306-652-6770) 10. Alt Hotel Saskatoon (map 2, F4; 480 2nd Ave. S, 1-833-258-4480)

Jeanny, from p. 18 Saskatoon when she can fit it into her rather busy schedule. Buan recently took over Mylynh Bridal after the original owner of 22 years wanted to retire but was worried about finding someone who could maintain and grow what she had built. “The amount of things she was able to accom-

Prior to owning the bridal shop, Buan had no sewing experience, but with 18 years in the pageant, fashion and television industries, plus support from the previous owner, she took over Mylynh Bridal. plish with this shop is astounding,” Jeanny says. Prior to owning the bridal shop, she had no sewing experience, but with 18 years in the pageant, fashion and television industries, plus support from the previous owner, she took over Mylynh Bridal and now also has a physical location to feature Viahera handbags. “This was all just at the right place at the right time,” she laughs. Jeanny even has her own events company, Red Peak Productions, and when she needs time away from running her businesses, she travels, paints, goes to the gym, camps and goes hiking. What advice would she give young entrepreneurs? Her insight crosses all industries, ages, backgrounds and genders: “Separate yourself and your personal life from your business, and in any kind of business it’s important to have a mentor.” – MP

degree in Business Administration, and then take my Public Relations and my Executive MBA, all while working.” Today, her husband homeschools their three kids, and Lindbjerg says that his support has been instrumental in her career progression. “If my husband had not given me the support to move in this direction, I wouldn’t be in this role. There’s just no way; that changed our whole trajectory,” she says. “If a relationship is something that you want, it’s really important to find that person who is going to be a support system for you, especially if you want to take on more responsibility at a leadership level.” When she’s not working, Lindbjerg loves to be outside or enjoy the day with family. When asked about the best part of her job, she had a hard time picking one thing. “I love everything about my job, so I’m always having fun. We have an amazing team right now and my job on a day-to-day basis is always different. Business is not simple; it’s complex, and one business owner will have a completely different set of needs than the next. I thrive when everything around me is interesting and diverse, and it definitely is.” – NZ Mallory, from p. 19 “Our whole principle at Soul Foods is to nourish the body, awaken the mind and feed the soul. It’s about getting that baseline nutrition in because if we’re malnourished then that leads to mental (and other) health issues, and how can we feel purposeful or joyful when that bodymind connection isn’t at ease?” With the new location, Soul Foods will also offer group classes on traditional food preparation, including fermentation. Guenther also works as a Psychosomatic Therapist at Soul Foods and Modo Yoga, where she also teaches yoga. “Psychosomatic therapy looks at the relationship between our mind and our thought patterns, and the physiology of our body and our nervous system,” Guenther says. “I offer a class called Emotional Anatomy, and one called Authentic Alignment, and then I do one-on-one sessions for people who are working through difficulties and trauma.” – NZ Arlie, from p. 20 in a way that is good for the planet, the animals and the community. “It’s not a monoculture; it’s animals working with other animals and creating synergies between them. That’s the biggest part of why we’re different. We try to be responsible environmentally, ethically and socially—those are our first requirements when making decisions (about what we do).” For more information on Farm One Forty, visit farmoneforty.ca. – NZ

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2019

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secret Saskatoon

Glitchy’s Unbelievable Oddity Museum Text by Naomi Zurevinski Photos by Paul Miazga Located in the back of Glitch Gifts and Novelties is no ordinary museum. Filled with weird and wonderful paraphernalia, the Believe It Or Don’t Oddity Museum has become home to treasures and trinkets to provoke wonder and curiosity in the beholder. One such item is Sophie, a supposedly haunted doll, with a backstory as interesting as her intriguing appearance. Legend has it that at the turn of the last century, a young girl died in the South Saskatchewan River and left her doll behind. Owner Mike Erman calls Sophie one of their most popular attractions.

“It’s a throwback to dime store museums and the Ripley’s Believe It or Not! Museum (...). When you take road trips through the US, there are all these little museums and weird attractions all over the place.” – Mike Erman

Glitch Gifts and Novelties Then there’s the human Zoltar machine. Erman originally wanted to buy a Zoltar fortune-telling machine but, given the price, he opted to build one instead. Once a month, Erman has an actor come in and play Zoltar, and for just a loonie, guests can have their fortunes told by the legendary fortune-teller. Erman says the inspiration for the museum stems from his own lifelong affinity for quirky stuff. “I’ve been collecting weird stuff most of my life, so most of the items are mine,” he says. “It’s a throwback to dime store museums and the Ripley’s Believe It or Not! Museum, hence the name. It’s sort of a fun, little parody museum. When you take road trips through the US, there are all these little museums and weird little attractions (all over the place), and we’ve never really had anything like that here, so I thought I’d try and give Saskatoon something to compare.” Other interesting features include shrunken heads obtained in 1970s New Orleans, a Fijian mermaid, and an original first-generation cast of a Bigfoot footprint from B.C., on loan from local artist Dave Geary. Other local museum co-curators include Joanne Brothwell, Zoë Elise, Elyse Jensen and Tyler Danyluk.

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Main photo: one of two shrunken heads sourced from New Orleans. At right: the original cast of a Bigfoot footprint from British Columbia. Since opening in October 2018, Erman said they’ve had a great response, and he plans to continue adding to the collection in the future. “The general theme is that it’s a little bit on the creepy side of things, but it’s there to add a bit of fun, wonder and excitement.” The Oddity Museum is free and open during the same hours as Glitch Gifts and Novelties (510 33rd Street West). Visit glitchgifts.ca for more information.


flow can be found at 100s of fine local businesses & organizations: SASKATOON INT’L. AIRPORT (YXE) CAFÉS, LOUNGES & RESTAURANTS Downtown 2nd Avenue Grill 6Twelve Lounge Afghan Kabob & Donair Bon Temps Café The Capitol Music Club Citizen Café Congress Beer House Cut Casual Steak & Tap Frankie’s Bahn Mi Golden Pagoda Good Earth Coffee Co. Grandma Lee’s Karma Conscious Café Living Sky Café Mystic Java locations O’Shea’s Irish Pub Otowa The Rook & Raven Royal Thai The Saskatoon Club Saskatoon Asian Sticks & Stones Spicy Bite Taverna Thien Vietnam Thirteen Pies Three Treasures Tonics

THE BROADWAY THEATRE

Broadway Amigo’s Cantina Broadway Café Broadway Roastery Café Japa Bowl Christie’s Il Secondo Herbs n’ Health d’Lish by Tish Café Keo’s Kitchen Lebanese Kitchen Museo Coffee Nosh Eatery & Tap Venn Coffee Roasters The Yard & Flagon

PUBLIC LIBRARIES & LEISURE CENTRES

The Underground Café 8th Street East Broadway Roastery on 8th Earth Bound Bakery+Kitchen Fuddrucker’s Montana’s Prairie Ink Red Lobster Other Bernard Callebaut Chocolates Booster Juice* Cesar’s Cakes & Café City Perks Coffeehouse EE Burritos The Griffin Takeaway Riversdale High Key Brewery 9 Mile Legacy Brewing Co. The Irons (The Willows) Asian Hut Jerry’s locations Botté Chai Bar Konga Café Collective Coffee Manhattan Gastropub Drift Sidewalk Café Prairie Sun Brewery Genesis Starbucks* Hometown Diner Subway* Leyda’s Restaurant Tastebuds Little Bird Patisserie Yip Hong’s Mandarin Restaurant CLOTHIERS Odd Couple Better Off Duds Park Café Brainsport Seoul Broadway Shoe Repair Thrive Juice Co Era Style Loft

SASKATOON FARMERS’ MARKET

Escape Sports Hats & That Manhattan Casuals Mo-mentum Outter Limits The Sandbox in the City Spank Tryst Boutique Two Fifty Two Boutique Wanuskewin Craft Boutique

CULTURAL VENUES

Art Placement Gallery Escape City Handmade House Persephone Theatre Rainbow Cinemas The Refinery The Roxy Theatre Sask. Craft Council Gallery TCU Place box office Tourism Saskatoon Ukrainian Museum of Canada Western Development Museum

HOTELS & INNS Best Western locations Days Inn Delta Bessborough Hotel Delta Hotel Downtown Four Points Sheraton Hampton Inn

Heritage Inn Hilton Garden Inn Holiday Inn locations Home Inn & Suites The Hotel Senator The James Hotel Marriott Courtyard Park Town Hotel Quality Inn Ramada Hotel Riviera Motor Inn Sandman Hotel Saskatoon Inn Sheraton Cavalier Super 8 Motel Travelodge Thriftlodge

SPAS, SALONS & GYMS Alchemy Collective Capelli Salon Studio Changes Salon Chrome Salon Spa Color Bar Damara Day Spa Edgewater Spa Ethos SalonSpa Grea Salon Lavish District Lemon Tree Salon Modo Yoga

SHOPPERS DRUG MART MC College Paramount Day Spa Prairie Bliss Laser Riverstone Massage Therapy Sunsera Salon locations Vamp Salon Visions Salon & Spa Goodlife Fitness Motion Fitness locations YMCA, YWCA

SPECIALTY RETAILERS Anthology/Blossoms Area Home + Lifestyle Churchill’s British Imports CoCoCo Co-op Liquor Dad’s Organic Market Eastern Market Garden Architecture & Design Glitch Gifts Indigo Books LB Distillers McNally Robinson McQuarries Tea & Coffee Paddock Wood Brewery SaskMade Marketplace Silver’s Market Sobeys Liquor Urban Cellars *-select locations

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2019

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