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Visioning a New Wadsworth Corridor in Arvada: Highlighting Existing Spaces and Targeting New Development

University of Colorado Denver Department of Urban and Regional Planning Spring Studio II 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision

Table of Contents 1.0 Vision Statement 2.0

Wadsworth Corridor Background 2.1 Background and Scope of Plan 2.2 Existing Conditions • Land Use • Public Open Space/Undeveloped Land • Zoning • Demographics • Transportation 2.3 First Public Workshop 2.4 SWOC 2.5 Second Public Workshop 2.5 Summary of Findings

3.0

Vision and Guiding Principles 3.1 Guiding Principles 3.2 Implementation • Transportation • Connectivity • Landscaping • Branding/Signage • Zoning

4.0

Nodes 4.1 Gateway 4.2 80th and Wadsworth 4.3 Arvada Center for the Arts 4.4 64th and Wadsworth 4.5 Olde Town 4.6 Hotel/Entertainment 4.7 Small Area Examples

5.0 Wadsworth Corridor Phasing Plan 6.0

Conclusion

University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision

A Special Thank you Arvada City Council City Manager’s Office of Arvada The Arvada Center for the Arts City of Arvada Staff and Departments: Community Development Economic Development Parks, Golf and Hospitality Information Technology Public Works and Utilities All community members for their invaluable participation!

University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision 1.0

Vision Statement

The Wadsworth Corridor vision is based on the ideas and feedback received from the residents of Arvada. The public’s primary aim for the corridor is to create long-range goals and strategies to heighten existing spaces along Wadsworth Boulevard and to channel reinvestment and development. The crucial first step towards meeting these goals is articulating a community vision that will provide the foundation for all future development and activity on the corridor. The agreed upon vision is as follows: To promote the balance of vibrant and compatible interconnected land uses over the next 40 years.

The vision is supported by eight accompanying principles detailing specific topics like land use, transportation, branding, and new infrastructure. Six individual nodes are also addressed along Wadsworth Boulevard, and they detail particular strategies to better integrate diverse land uses and senses of place on a single corridor. This vision document will be a valuable tool to guide and evaluate the City of Arvada’s decisions regarding planning, zoning, and economic development along Wadsworth Boulevard. Yet the document itself is not a static plan. It is a general vision of the citizens of Arvada for the Wadsworth Corridor that will require additional planning, implementation and investment from the City of Arvada to be achieved over the next 40 years.

2.0

Wadsworth Corridor Background Information

2.1

Background and Scope of Plan

The Wadsworth Corridor Vision Plan examines a 4.5 mile stretch of a multi-lane state highway within the City of Arvada, Colorado. Arvada attracted its first settlers as early as 1850 when gold was discovered by Lewis Ralston. The gold stride was short-lived due to a limited supply, however the area proved to have great agricultural potential, and as a result, evolved into a farming community. In 1870, Benjamin Wadsworth and Louis Reno platted the town, and by 1904, Arvada was officially incorporated with a population of one hundred residents. As population grew over the decades, Wadsworth Boulevard became an extension of what is now referred to as Olde Wadsworth Boulevard. This new street diverted through traffic to the east side of Olde Town Arvada allowing fast access to the south and Interstate 70. Today, Wadsworth Boulevard is a north/south, 25-mile lonclug arterial road that connects six cities and three counties. Our study area coverage begins at Interstate I-70 and concludes at 88th Avenue to the north. This state highway is a highly utilized corridor that serves access to commercial destinations while supporting a large volume of commuter traffic. Demographics show that over 250,000 area residents live within one mile of Wadsworth Boulevard. Developments along the corridor have been incrementally introduced over the years without the framework or organization of an overall vision. The typical construction of strip malls and retail centers line the boulevard in an inconsistent manner. Without a structured corridor plan, Wadsworth has developed into an eclectic hodge-podge of commercial uses. Additionally, as the population of Arvada grew, the boulevard expanded its traffic lanes to push higher vehicle counts through at faster rates. This engineering has produced problem points along the corridor. The extra wide street makes it difficult for pedestrians to cross within the streetlight limits. Safety has become an issue defined by the combination of faster traffic speeds, a higher vehicular presence, and poorer visibility. Wadsworth Boulevard has reached a point where the existing, outdated conditions no longer efficiently serve commuters and area residents. University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision The Vision Plan offers alternative solutions that could steer infrastructure improvements and future developments. Implementation of the plan has the potential to transform the corridor into a vibrant experience that captures the interests of residents and shoppers. This plan was produced by creative, insightful applications based upon a compilation of community inputs, student observations, and effective planning practices. The analysis for the study was prepared over a three month period by a team of nineteen University of Colorado students in the Urban and Regional Planning Graduate Degree Program. Conclusions of the study resulted from a collaborative effort involving the Arvada City Council staff, resident participation at public workshops, and data collection by the University students.

2.2

Existing Conditions

Examination of the corridor begins at the southern intersection of Wadsworth Boulevard and Interstate 70. The south end of the Wadsworth corridor is dominated by retail and commercial uses that take advantage of high traffic volume and accessibility from the freeway. Some of the uses include large “anchor” retailers such as Costco and Sam’s Club that rely heavily on the close proximity to high-traffic corridors. In addition, these large retail anchors are surrounded by complementary uses including restaurants and a movie theater. This part of Wadsworth Boulevard is defined by its high level of retail developments, and traffic congestion. Heading north of Grandview Avenue and Olde Town Arvada, the commercial uses dissipate and become more sporadic. Retail centers are grouped primarily at intersection nodes as destination points for area residents. The remainder of the corridor is predominantly surrounded by low-density residential neighborhoods. The north end of the Wadsworth Boulevard at the intersection of West 88th Avenue has a substantial concentration of commercial uses, surrounded by major retail developments including the Brookhill Shopping Center. Located at the confluence of two major arterial streets, this retail center development also takes advantage of the high volume vehicular traffic. Older areas of retail establishments along the corridor are currently showing signs of decline. The transitions between these developments are abrupt and disjointed with little or no buffer zones between commercial and residential uses. The outdated centers are aesthetically unappealing, and could become a concern for blight. If left unaddressed, these underperforming developments may negatively influence the remaining portions of the boulevard. If a trend of complacency continues, the corridor could evolve into an economic liability featuring vacant store fronts among a demographically declining community. This study seeks to enhance the current attributes presently offered by the corridor while phasing the undesirable elements out over time. Major improvement points will address overall aesthetic enhancements, transportation efficiency, public health and safety, development alternatives including mixed uses, and establish a community identity promoting pride and character. A major facilitator in the revitalization of Wadsworth will be the introduction of the Gold Line, light rail station into the recently restored, Olde town Arvada. This commuter rail will provide the opportunity to capitalize on a new sector of potential residents and visitors. Wadsworth Boulevard could take advantage and be repurposed to accommodate a fresh demographic of light rail commuters who seek a quality life style within a mixed use development. Possibilities for revitalization were focused on key locations along the corridor. The Arvada Art Center, Olde Town Arvada and an opportune retail site at 64th Avenue were designated as points of interest to enhance the vision plan. With the direction of a corridor vision plan, Wadsworth Boulevard would promote an identifiable theme throughout the corridor while instilling sustainable development standards. As the character is defined by Arvada’s Wadsworth Corridor Vision Plan, neighboring jurisdictions may introduce their individual identity for Wadsworth within their community. This vision plan could serve as a guide for creating a vibrant regional corridor that offers development alternatives for economic vitality and improved quality of life.

University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision Land Use

The corridor’s development pattern is comprised of mostly residential and retail developments. As seen in the land use map, retail concentrations are predominant in the north and south of the corridor. The majority of residential areas are single family, low density housing. The presence of higher density residential is sparsely represented. Large distances separate different retail nodes by limited pedestrian access. Entertainment establishments are in short supply in respect to the area population and other commercial uses. Office development is another sector that is in short supply. The homogenous landscape along the corridor suggests there is a good opportunity for more diverse uses to stimulate the existing retail, and offer room for new supporting enterprises. The result of current land use developments is a reflection of the zoning for the corridor area. Some underdeveloped areas are present that have not capitalized on permissible uses. For example, a few sites are designated as residential planned unit developments have not been built-out. Construction is down in this current economy and may attribute to the lack of activity along Wadsworth Boulevard. Residential, low density zoning dominates the corridor from Old Town to 80th Avenue. A reassignment of zoning allocations for key sites may offer more diverse development patterns that Wadsworth is currently lacking. North South

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision Parks Open Space, Undeveloped Land According to the undeveloped land map, there are few areas still available for new construction. The vision plan focuses on the conditions of existing developments and the possibilities for revitalization. Small parks are dispersed along the either side of the boulevard as indicated by green spaces on the park map. The distance between parks is suitable to apply a creative linking system for pedestrian and bicyclists. The Indian Tree Golf Course occupies a large stretch of Wadsworth north of 72nd Ave. A well-design landscaped trail system may provide the incentives for a muli-modal connection between the distant nodes. Parks and Open Space

Undeveloped Land

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision Demographics Currently the population is 107,702 residents with the median age of 39.4 years old. There are a projected 44,486 household units within the city limits assessed at an average home price of $263,373. According to a market analysis performed by EPS Inc., employment growth in the Denver region is expected to drive household growth into the future. However, DROCOG forecasts slow growth in Arvada, potentially because the City is already considered mostly built out. They predict an annual growth rate of 0.5 percent leading up to the year 2030. This roughly translates to 225 new housing units per year for the city. These figures are significantly lower than previous years when residential permit activity averaged over 580 units annually between 2000 and 2007. Of the current housing units, the City of Arvada has a 73 percent owner-occupied rating. The average household size is measured at 2.5 persons per unit. Finally, the housing vacancy rate is represented at a 5 percent unoccupied status. Transportation Currently, the Wadsworth corridor is extremely auto-dominant. The corridor is a six-lane state highway with some four-lane applications between major intersections. At some busy connections, added turn lanes make the intersections as wide as ten lanes. Walking is problematic in these areas. The average annual daily traffic volumes on the corridor are approximately 56,000 vehicles per day. The primary transit choice along the corridor is traditional bus service provided by the Regional Transportation District (RTD). Other transit choices are available, but are limited to elderly or disabled persons. Funding for these services are constrained and limited. In addition, these alternative services are excluded from the majority of the population.

2.3 First Public Workshop

An essential component in gathering data about the corridor involves public participation. Workshops were held for area residents to gain new knowledge. The goal of the vision plan is to provide solutions for a desired future based on residential preferences. The corridor plan must serve the community needs before it can attract visitors as a revenue stream. Workshop participants were able to relate their experiences, and provide valuable insights to the daily interaction with the corridor. Prior to the scheduled workshop, the team of students gathered and organized data, including their own assessment of the corridor represented in the SWOC analysis. Maps and pictures were produced outlining five distinct aspects of the corridor. In addition, the public was invited to participate in an Online Web survey about their experiences with the corridor. The five presentation categories are listed below with the summary of workshop findings. Presentation – 5 groups 1. Transportation 2. Recreation, open space, Arvada Art Center 3. Retail and Business Development 4. Visioning 5. Arvada Attributes (Best parts of Arvada) / Desired Future Considerations Summary of Findings 1. Majority feedback on traffic related concerns – congestion / safety 2. Sidewalk and pedestrian safety – attractive and walkable corridor 3. Landscaping and beautification of corridor 4. Traffic noise control implementations 5. Better trail connectivity for pedestrians and bicyclists / residences and shopping nodes University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision 6. Would like public transit service circulating from Gold Line station throughout the corridor. (Possible streetcar application) 7. Multi-modal corridor with more intense land use density

2.4 SWOC

A part of understanding the dynamics of the corridor involves an analysis of existing conditions. Site observations provide the valuable insights for assessing beneficial aspects as well as areas of concern. A study was constructed under what is termed, a SWOC (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, constraints) analysis. Findings were tabulated in a matrix format to be used as a cross-reference of existing conditions. The table matrix shows the summary of the class conclusions. The outline below highlights the major considerations for the Vision Plan. Strengths a. Good existing retail b. High volume traffic c. Higher income demographics (educated, low unemployment)

Weakness a. Aesthetically challenged b. Outdated commercial developments c. Traffic congestion

Opportunities a. Introduction of Gold Line Station b. Arvada Art Center c. Existing retail centers at intersection nodes

Constraints a. Cooperation from current retail owners b. Wadsworth is a state highway – need CDOT approvals c. Multi-lane boulevard acts as a barrier / limits pedestrian connectivity.

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Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision 2.5

Second Public Workshop

The second public workshop was designed to apply previous workshop findings, student

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision observations, and relevant data into four separate alternative futures. These considerations were presented as corridor visions of alternative possibilities. Major large-scale elements were compiled into themes that would define the corridor’s purpose. The two areas of focus were concentrated in transportation suitabilities in conjunction with densities of the built environment. The class was divided into four groups representing alternative visions. These categories included low density – low traffic volumes, low density – high volume traffic, high density – high volume traffic and high density – low volume traffic. The workshop started with an introduction to the concepts followed by a PowerPoint that outline the definitions of each vision. After the introduction, the public was invited to visit the four stations that offered these solutions. They were encouraged to comment on each station’s concept for its suitability as a prospective alternative future. Comments were documented and later applied to the final visioning plan. This collaborative process allowed the area residents to submit valuable feedback in the shaping of the corridor plan. Key findings are summarized in the bullet points below. Low Density/ Low Volume The Low Density/Low Volume Vision attempts to maintain the existing density along Wadsworth Boulevard while calming traffic and creating a more multimodal friendly corridor. Our mission is to enhance the corridor’s safety and livability by developing and implementing innovative and effective transportation solutions. In order to reach this goal, we have divided the corridor in to three districts, Retail, Art, and Residential.

Retail (I-70 to 64th) • Maintain the traffic flow • Add retail stores

Art (64th to 72nd) • Add sculpture on the street • Encourage safe vehicle speeds • Increase the safety and the perception for non-motorized users of the street • Enhance the street environment

Residential • Incorporate the preferences and requirements of the people using the area • Create sage and attractive streets • Help to reduce the negative effects of motor vehicles on the environment • Promote alternative modes of transportation

Low Density/High Volume The Low Density/High Volume Vision will highlight concentrated developments in specific nodes and increased traffic volume on Wadsworth Boulevard. Four distinct nodes have been selected as opportunities for increased commercial and residential developments. Using a low density approach, these developments would be no more the 2-3 stories in nature and attempt to provide a transition to the existing single family residential neighborhoods along the corridor. The land use between the nodes would remain consistently single family residential; however there would be new design standards for landscaping, screening, and sound barriers to protect the neighborhood from the increased traffic demand along Wadsworth.

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision New developments would focus on pedestrian oriented landscaping and buildings fronting the street rather then set back with parking in front. Wadsworth Boulevard would be transformed in to a superstreet which eliminated the need for left hand turns. Left hand turns create a congested intersection, and the superstreet design allows for greater flow of traffic and lessens the need to stop. Additionally, a trolley would provide greater access to Olde Town and the Arvada Center for the Arts. The trolley, buses, and bicycles would be separated uses from auto traffic in order to provide for a safe commute. Through these varying steps, the Wadsworth Corridor would transform into a walkable unique community that serves the needs of local residents, while providing for a unique destination for visitors. High Density/ High Volume The High Density/ High Volume Vision have examined land use and traffic alternatives for their potential to revitalize the Wadsworth Corridor and have come up with two common goals: 1. To encourage higher land use intensity that will result in more compact developments, visual community enhancements, and greater economic vitality. 2. To redesign Wadsworth Boulevard to improve safety, aesthetics, and functionality for pedestrians, bikers, transit users, and motorists. Development principles include: 1. Greater land use intensity that promotes compact, vertical mixed-use developments. 2. Spatial containment along the corridor that removes large parking lots moves building facades to the street, generates activity on area sidewalks, and shortens block lengths. 3. Economic vitality supported by local and national retail chains, improved commercial properties, and new housing options. 4. Quality urban design and landscaping that creates visually appealing places. 5. New signage and way-finding to make the corridor easy to navigate. 6. Roadway and intersection improvements that improve traffic flows through the corridor and connectivity to destinations along the corridor. 7. A safe and pleasant environment for walking and biking. 8. A healthier community that is more environmentally friendly and has access to green space and public gathering spaces. University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision High Density/Low Volume The High Density/Low Volume Vision incorporates pedestrian oriented landscaping and design, while allowing for buildings to meet a higher intensity at specified nodes. The traffic along Wadsworth would be calmed by using bike lanes, and greater pedestrian access. There will be an increase of unique pedestrian crossings along with greater screening through landscaping. This treatment will seek to create a more walkable, inviting district along the corridor. The intensity of developments at the nodes will seek to add a greater demand to the district. By creating higher density residential developments, there will be an increased desire for retail and commercial districts. The design of the district will facilitate each use in each of the specific nodes by providing for commercial uses on the ground floor and residential uses on the upper stores. By increasing the residential demand along the corridor, and decreasing the dominance of the car corridor, there will be a new vibrancy added throughout the area that will attract new retail and commercial opportunities along the corridor.

2.6 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Summary of Findings Use Olde Town as the inspirational influence throughout the corridor. Consider building height restrictions to preserve viewsheds. Concentrate the majority of high density in the south between Olde Town and the freeway. Decrease traffic volume with the use of a street car in dedicated lanes. Capitalize on increasing density on under-developed properties. Encourage hotel development to increase density. Encourage the Art Center to act as a catalyst for more creative developments supporting that theme.

3.0

Vision and Guiding Principles

3.1

Guiding Principles

Final Vision principles for the Wadsworth Corridor • Promote the balance of vibrant and compatible interconnected land uses • Facilitate infill redevelopment of underutilized areas along the corridor and promote a diverse economic base • Integrate the surrounding communities onto the Wadsworth Corridor with gateways and complete streets • Provide a variety of housing opportunities and neighborhood retail along the corridor with mixed-use developments • Create a unique identity for the Wadsworth Corridor through design standards for urban form, architecture, landscaping, street improvements, and wayfinding elements • Calm traffic along Wadsworth Boulevard with enhanced street designs and pedestrian amenities • Provide multi-modal alternatives to single occupancy vehicles • Create a desirable pedestrian environment along the length of Wadsworth Boulevard • Expand the accessibility of parks, open space and trails for those living along the Wadsworth Corridor

3.2 Implementation Guiding Principles After visiting the corridor, completing a SWOC analysis, and gathering feedback from the public workshops an overall vision was developed along with a set of 8 principles that defined the vision for the Wadsworth Corridor. University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision The vision statement, to promote the balance of vibrant and compatible interconnected land uses, sets the tone for the entire corridor. It also addresses the main concerns that City council presented to our studio from day one. Principle #1 The first principle seeks to facilitate infill redevelopment of underutilized areas along the corridor and to promote a diverse economic base. This requires an extensive review of underperforming areas in order to adapt programs and facilities that will better suit the needs of businesses and residents along the corridor. Principle #2 The second principle is to integrate the surrounding communities onto the Wadsworth Corridor with gateways and complete streets. The focus is on redevelopment in the area bordered by 88th Avenue on the north and Interstate 70 on the south. These intersections offer many different opportunities that are currently being underutilized. Placing a focus of redevelopment on specific gateways to the Corridor means users will have a better experience entering, utilizing, and exiting the corridor. Completing connections on specific non-arterial streets will provide a more efficient experience for the corridor’s vehicular users.

Principle #3 The third principle is to provide a variety of housing opportunities and neighborhood retail along the corridor with mixed-use developments. The council mentioned economic welfare as a concern. A mixed-use develop-

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision ment offers a host of benefits to both residents and retailers. Retailers are secure, always having customers that live close to their stores, and residents benefit, being able to walk a short distance to get groceries, household items, or even see a movie, therefore securing the tax revenue from the stable businesses and residences. Principle #4 The fourth guiding principle was heavily influenced by the input we received during the public workshops. Almost every community member present had a comment about Wadsworth Boulevard’s lacking identity. It is important to create a unique identity for the corridor through design standards for urban form, architecture, landscaping, street improvements, and way-finding elements. Principle #5 The fifth principle is to calm traffic along Wadsworth Boulevard with enhanced street designs and pedestrian amenities. Currently the emphasis on Wadsworth is placed almost exclusively on the automobile. As we heard from

many concerned residents in the public workshops, people who live close to Wadsworth are plagued by dangerously fast traffic, and unsettling traffic noise. By improving street designs and providing pedestrians with basic amenities like better crosswalks, Wadsworth will transform into a safe destination for both pedestrians and drivers. Principle #6 The sixth principle is to provide multi-modal alternatives to single occupancy vehicles. This requires improvements to public transit lines, bicycle routes, pedestrian paths, and the creation of a trolley line so that residents and visitors feel they have more than one transportation option on the Corridor.

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision Principle #7 The seventh guiding principle serves to create a desirable pedestrian environment along the length of Wadsworth Boulevard. This goes beyond simply making Wadsworth accessible by foot. It requires the successful combination of all previously mentioned principles—enhancing gateways, establishing mixed-use development, creating identity through the use of plants, signage, and architecture, calming traffic with enhanced street designs and pedestrian amenities, and improving the accessibility of parks, open space, and trails.

Principle #8 The final principle is to expand the accessibility of parks, open space, and trails for those living along Wadsworth. Building upon recreation space currently existing along the corridor, and through the introduction of new open space and bicycle trails Wadsworth will transform into a healthy destination not only for residents, but for all users and visitors

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision 3.2

Implementation

Transportation Transporting people from point A to point B safely and efficiently while respecting certain environmental and economic constraints, is the number one goal of the transportation vision. Previously stated, the corridor should provide alternate modes of transportation to facilitate a healthier equitable environment. Bus lines, bicycle lanes and trails, pedestrian paths, and a trolley system should all be used harmoniously with existing traffic lanes. Currently, it is almost impossible to navigate areas of Wadsworth without a car. Successful high density and mixed-use developments cannot exist without using alternative modes of transportation. The vision includes plans for a proposed trolley route that runs north and south along Wadsworth Boulevard from Olde Town to 88th Avenue. The trolley will make stops on almost every block with a 10 minute frequency that could increase with demand. A trolley line is convenient for shoppers, residents, and visitors along the corridor. It will connect key nodes of activity along Wadsworth, including the Arvada Arts Center and Olde Town. The trolley will decrease traffic along Wadsworth while increasing economic activity for business owners along the trolley line. Enhancing bicycle access is also important to the vision. Bike paths will be placed directly along Wadsworth either in a separate lane along a pedestrian path or behind existing establishments. Improving the connections on existing bike routes and placing safe bike racks in strategic locations will encourage bicycle use, reduce traffic, and make Arvada healthier by decreasing carbon emissions and encouraging outdoor activity. Improving pedestrian access is key to the vision plan for the Wadsworth Corridor. Improved sidewalks will be conducive to pedestrian activity, and increase the viability of high density and mixed-use development. We found crosswalks on Wadsworth Boulevard to be dangerous to both pedestrians and drivers. Crosswalks will be made safer by implementing signage, street lighting, traffic barriers, and unique paving strategies. Connectivity While improving accessibility along Wadsworth the vision aims to connect surrounding residents to the corridor as well. While privacy and quiet are concerns for the surrounding residents the vision strives to provide safe accessible, efficient routs to Wadsworth. We aim to do this by completing connections to Wadsworth on existing bike paths and connecting residential areas with pedestrian and bike paths cut-throughs in some neighborhoods. Car Corridor • Wadsworth is a state highway currently with six lanes of vehicular traffic. • Provide safer turning and merging lanes.

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision • Reduce vehicular congestion by providing other transportation options. • Multi-Modal Corridor. Trolley • Proposed route runs north and south along Wadsworth Blvd. from Olde Town to 88th Ave. • Convenient for shoppers, and visitors to the Art Center. • • • •

Stops at almost every block with a 10 minute frequency. Rides with traffic on first implementation and stops are designated curb cuts. Trolleys will be outfitted with “yield to trolley” light for ease when entering the traffic flow after a stop. More environmentally friendly

Bike • Enhanced bike paths directly along Wadsworth either in a separate lane along the ped path or running behind establishments. • Improved connections on existing bike routes. • Available, safe bike racks along the corridor. • Promotes and encourages bike use. • Better for the health of the community as well as the health of the environment (reduces carbon emissions). Pedestrian • A pedestrian friendly corridor including not only sidewalks and pathways but safe crossings. • Improve the sidewalks along Wadsworth so that there are uninterrupted 5 mile pedestrian paths from one end of the corridor to the other on the east and west side of the street. • Visually engaging walkways (art installments; history installments). • Pathways promote a healthier community. Safer crossings

Above: Proposed Trolley Route, University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision • Pedestrian treatments applied to crosswalks for safety also help to serve as a brand for the corridor. • Pending the development around the Arvada Center a pedestrian bridge like the Grandview Ave. Bridge will be constructed and again help with branding and cohesiveness along the Corridor. Landscaping Landscaping is an important factor to consider when planning for a cohesive and esthetically pleasing corridor. Trees along sidewalks can not only give the corridor a sense of beauty, but also act as a screen and buffer for Pedestrians and cyclists using the sidewalks. We also propose native landscaping along medians. Landscaping along medians acts as a buffer between North and South bound lanes while providing some cohesiveness and sense of place while in the corridor. Also, using native landscaping is more environmentally friendly. Branding/Signage The pedestrian treatments applied to sidewalks and crosswalks will also serve as branding techniques for the corridor. New branding of the Wadsworth Corridor hopes to achieve a cohesive feel while providing clear way-finding and identifiable street elements that will inform the public they are in Arvada. Branding is an important component to the overall vision. Successful branding requires the implementation of outdoor furniture, lighting, signage, way-finding elements, and promotional banners. These elements will be designed simultaneously so that they provide a visual cohesiveness along the corridor. Users will realize that Wadsworth is more than just State Highway 121. With creative branding strategies we can transform Wadsworth into a street that people will remember and want to visit again and again. Zoning Although much of the zoning along the Wadsworth Corridor will not change, we have identified six key nodes of redevelopment that may change two zoning designations. Below is a description of each zoning district: Residential: Low Density Intent: To preserve and encourage relatively standard density single-family residential development, (min. lot are of 7,500 square feet). Complementary uses customarily found in residential zoning districts, such as community recreational facilities, places of worship, and schools are allowed.

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision Residential: Small Lot District Intent: To preserve the size, scale, density, and character of single-family residential development existing in the older, established neighborhoods of Arvada. Much of the future new residential development in this District is expected to be infill development or redevelopment. Accordingly, this district allows as small as 4,500 square feet residential lots, consistent with longestablished lot sizes and patterns. Complementary uses customarily found in residential zoning districts, such as community recreation facilities, places of worship, and schools, are also allowed. Limited, neighborhood-serving commercial uses are allowed as conditional uses. Residential: One and Two Family District Intent: To encourage relatively higherdensity, small-lot residential development of both single family and two-family dwellings. Minimum lot sizes for single-family dwellings will be 6,000 square feet, and for two-family dwellings (duplexes) will be 9,000 square feet. Complementary uses customarily found in residential zoning districts, such as community recreation facilities, places of worship, and schools, are also allowed. Residential: Multifamily District Intent: The R-M District is intended to encourage a wide range of housing types and costs, especially multi-family dwellings, to meet the diverse needs of the Arvada housing market. Complementary uses customarily found in residential zoning districts, such as community recreation facilities, places of worship, and schools, are also allowed. Limited, neighborhood-serving commercial uses are allowed as conditional uses. Business: General District Intent. The B-2 District is intended to provide a wide variety of general retail, business, and service uses, as well as professional and business offices, but not intensive business or industrial activities. This District is typically located at the intersection of two arterial streets or where other regional access is provided.

District-Specific Standards : 1. Minimum District Size. The minimum size for any new B-2 District shall be five (5) acres in one parcel, not divided by streets. This district-specific standard may be modified by the Decision-Making Body upon its

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision approval of a site plan in which the applicant demonstrates an excellent site design. 2. Development Intensity Limits. The number of buildings or structures allowed on an individual development parcel within the B-2 zoning district shall be as follows, unless modified by the Decision-Making Body due to a plan that demonstrates improved site design: Business: Central Business District Intent: The B-3 District, mapped to encompass “Olde Town” Arvada, is intended to promote a mix of commercial and residential uses. The purpose is to provide a full range of professional and business offices, retail sales, and services, plus a variety of residential uses in a more urban, 24-hourdowntown environment.

District-Specific Standards: 1. No manufacturing is permitted in conjunction with sales, except for works produced by crafts persons or artisans. 2. There shall be no permanent outdoor storage; however, accessory outside display during normal working hours is permitted. Seasonal outdoor storage such as garden supplies and Christmas tree sales are permitted.

Industrial: Light Intent: The I-1 District is intended to encourage development of industrial and office uses with minimal adverse impact on surrounding properties. Accordingly, District setbacks and landscaping requirements ensure compatibility with abutting districts. In addition, low-intensity development is required, external effects are limited, accessory outdoor storage is limited to 10% of the parcel’s land area for most uses, and permitted uses are limited to manufacturing, wholesaling, and office activities that can be operated in a clean and quiet manner. Certain public facilities needed to serve the occupants of the District and residents of adjoining residential districts are also allowed.

District-Specific Standards: 1. No curb cuts shall be permitted within 50 feet of any residential zoning district. 2. All loading areas and loading docks must be placed on the site so as to be screened from view from Arterial or Collector streets or residentially zoned property. 3. Outdoor storage areas may not occupy more than ten (10) percent of the parcel’s total gross land area.

Industrial: Heavy Intent: The I-2 District is intended to provide for a less restrictive type of industrial development than in the I-1 District. The I-2 District encourages normal operation of almost all industries, subject to those regulations necessary for the mutual protection of nearby property owners in the lawful use of their respective properties. Outdoor storage in this district can be allowed up to 100% of the property excluding the required front setback.

District-Specific Standards: 1. No curb cuts shall be permitted within 50 feet of any residential district. 2. All loading areas and loading docks shall be sited so as to be screened from view from arterial or collector streets or residentially zoned property. 3. Outdoor storage areas may occupy up to 100 percent of the total lot gross acreage, not including the front setback area.

The Arvada Art Center and Fairland Shopping Center are the only nodes which will have proposed zoning changes. The proposed changes to the zoning code in the Arvada Center and Fairlane Shopping Center is site specific and will be put into the document with the small area plans as they are available. University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision 4.0

Nodes

4.1

Gateway North Vision Statements

Sub Area Focus The area will become a clear gateway for the city of Arvada through a use of wayfinding elements like signage and public art as well as signature buildings that reflect the character of Arvada. The area has the potential for compact development offering a mix of commercial and residential properties but with a human scale at street level. Public green space will be integrated into the development and connect to existing trails, providing northern Arvada residents an active pedestrian oriented space. Street and Block Pattern • Reduce the large, auto-centric scale of the site by creating smaller blocks enhanced with multiple, compact buildings. Provide new interior drives and/or roads to allow multi-modal access through the area and reduce the scale of the development. Area Circulation • Provide strong pedestrian connections and active pedestrian uses at the southeast corner of Wadsworth and 88th Avenue. • Limit automobile access to the site to one or two interior drives or roads that connect to parking in the rear of the buildings. • Provide for a transit hub that will serve as the terminus of the Wadsworth Trolley Line and will connect to regional bus routes. Streetscape and Wayfinding • Improve streetscape with wide, landscaped sidewalks, street lighting, street furniture, tree canopy, and public art installations. • Create Arvada specific wayfinding elements to give a sense of place and serve as a gateway to the city. Building Height and Massing • Develop 2 to 3 story mixed use gateway buildings with greater heights towards the north on 88th Avenue. Gateway North Node

Map of all the corridor nodes University of Colorado Denver

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision • Arrange the massing into multiple structures and use horizontal differentiation to break up the street wall. Orientation • Front most buildings on Wadsworth Boulevard and emphasize a gateway to the city at the southeast corner of the intersection. • Orient new interior buildings to front on new driveways or streets. Views and Topography • Position and space buildings to preserve the key site lines and views of the golf course to the southeast and the mountains to the west.

4.2

80th Avenue and Wadsworth Vision Statements

Sub Area Focus 80th Avenue and Wadsworth Boulevard will continue to be an auto-oriented intersection, but will be enhanced to better accommodate pedestrian traffic from adjacent neighborhoods and multi-modal traffic from the region. The area will be the primarily retail and service commercial development in Arvada, serving the surrounding neighborhoods as well as citywide and regional clientele. Smaller, mixed use buildings will be encouraged to control the scale of the site while offering new opportunity for residential living. Street and Block Pattern • Retain large, auto-centric scale of the site but ease traffic by limiting shopping center access to a few signalized interior drives or roads. • Enhance block pattern with additional, smaller scaled buildings. Area Circulation • Provide defined, safe pedestrian and bicycle connections to and through the site from residential neighbor hoods that avoid automobile traffic and unactivated building facades like loading docks. • Limit automobile access to each shopping center to one or two interior drives or roads that connect to masked parking in between developments or structured parking lots. 80th and Wadsworth Node Streetscape and Wayfinding • Improve streetscape with wide, landscaped sidewalks that provide safe access from Wadsworth Boulevard through parking lots to the building entrances. • Enhance street lighting, street furniture, tree canopy, and public art installations. Building Height and Massing • Promote 1to 3 story pad sites along Wadsworth Boulevard and 88th Avenue that offer a mix of uses. • Arrange the massing of the pad sites to mask the interior parking lots or parking structure while still providing some visibility of anchor stores and retail destinations like Target and King Soopers. Orientation University of Colorado Denver

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision • Front most buildings on Wadsworth Boulevard and 80th Avenue with surface or structured parking lots located between existing big box and pad lots. • Orient new interior buildings to front of interior driveways or streets. Views and Topography • New developments should embrace the views of the golf course to the southwest and the mountains to the west.

4.3

Arvada Arts Center Vision Statement

Sub Area Focus The Arvada Arts center will be a vibrant place that is the cultural heart of the Wadsworth corridor and the city of Arvada. It will be a destination node where people from all over the metro area can come to enjoy a complete cultural experience which includes multi-media arts, dining, socializing, learning and living. The mix of new commercial development and residential properties, including live-work units, will compliment the Arts Center and blend into the existing fabric of the neighborhood. The area will be walkable as well as accessible by many transportation modes including a trolley connecting the Arts Center to Olde Town and points to the north. Street and Block Pattern • Reduce the large, auto-centric scale of the site by creating smaller blocks enhanced with multiple buildings. • Provide new interior drives and/or roads to allow multi-modal access through the area and reduce the scale of the development. Residential components could incorporate alleyways. Area Circulation • Provide defined, safe pedestrian and bicycle connections to and through the site from surrounding residential neighborhoods. • Explore ways to make a complete pedestrian & bicycle east/west connection. • Create a parking district with a structured lot to accommodate traffic and allow all tenants to share the burden of providing parking. Streetscape and Wayfinding • Improve streetscape with wide, landscaped sidewalks that provide safe access from Wadsworth Boulevard through parking lots to the building entrances. • Enhance street lighting, street furniture, tree canopy, and public art installations The Arvada Center Node Building Height and Massing • Promote 2 to 3 story mixed use and commercial developments with higher densities in the south; configure height, scale, and massing to effectively transition into stable, single family residential neighborhoods north of the site and to the east. • Building massing of smaller mixed use can be broken up into multiple structures to allow breaks for light, air, and views. Larger commercial properties can be accommodated to attract mid-sized national retailers. Orientation • Front most buildings on Wadsworth Boulevard close to University of Colorado Denver

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision the street allowing for high window to wall ratios, outdoor seating and retail display area. Views and Topography • New developments should embrace the views of the proposed improvements to the Art Center’s grounds and mountain views.

4.4

64th and Wadsworth Vision Statements

Sub Area Focus Due to its visibility along Wadsworth and its proximity to the adjacent Arts Center and Olde Town, the area around 64th and Wadsworth will become an active neighborhood center. Local retailers meeting the needs of the neighboring citizens and small boutique and local businesses spilling over of from adjacent nodes will find this area attractive. New residential units will be located behind the commercial, away from busy Wadsworth Boulevard but easily assessable with enhanced pedestrian features. Open space and pedestrian plazas will provide a transition from active commercial strips to the residential components of the site. Street and Block Pattern • Reduce the large, auto-centric scale of the area by creating smaller blocks enhanced with multiple buildings. • Provide new interior drives and/or roads to allow multi-modal access through the area and reduce the scale of the development. Residential components could incorporate alleyways. Area Circulation • Provide defined, safe pedestrian and bicycle connections to and through the site from surrounding residential neighborhoods. • Enhanced signalized intersections at 64th Avenue and 65th Avenue that allow for safer pedestrian crossings and direct traffic into the site towards structured parking. Streetscape and Wayfinding • Improve streetscape with wide, landscaped sidewalks, street lighting, street furniture, tree canopy, and public art installations. • Provide wayfinding elements to attract pedestrians to active plazas and passive open space. Building Height and Massing • Promote 2 to 3 story commercial developments along Wadsworth. Utilize the sunken topography of the Fairlanes site to allow for 4 to 6 story mixed use commercial and residential buildings at the back of lot. • Configure height, scale, and massing to effectively transition into stable, single family residential neighborhoods adjacent to the site. • Building massing of smaller mixed use can be broken up into multiple structures to allow breaks for light, air, and views. Larger commercial properties can be accommodated to attract mid-sized national retailers.

64th and Wadsworth Node

Orientation • Front most buildings on Wadsworth Boulevard close to the street allowing for visibility. University of Colorado Denver

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision • Orient new interior buildings to front of interior driveways or new streets.

4.5

Olde Town Vision Statement

Sub Area Focus Olde Town Arvada is an established destination with a unique sense of place, history, and activity. The city has established many guidelines and plans to retain the character of this area, but a successful corridor vision will successfully integrate the node onto Wadsworth Boulevard. Street and Block Pattern • Retain the small, urban block scale of the node and create a coherent urban fabric that extends to Wadsworth Bypass. Area Circulation • Allow for small, walkable blocks and an active pedestrian realm that stretches to Wadsworth Bypass • Activate key entry points to Olde Town by creating gateway intersections along Old Wadsworth Boulevard, Ralston Road, 62nd Avenue, and 53rd Avenue. Create new secondary entry points at Wadsworth Bypass and 55th Avenue and 61st Avenue. • Provide defined, safe pedestrian and bicycle connections to and through the area from Wadsworth Bypass • Explore ways to make the trail at 60th Avenue a multi-modal entry point into Olde Town Streetscape and Wayfinding • Retain urban streetscape with wide, landscaped sidewalks, street lighting, street furniture, tree canopy, and public art installations. • Develop clear wayfinding elements from the corridor and establish memorable gateways, landmarks, and public art at key intersections. Building Height and Massing • Allow for urban infill development using Olde Town Design Guidelines up to Wadsworth and across the bypass in appropriate places Olde Town Node • Promote 2 to 4 story mixed use and commercial developments with appropriate setbacks on higher floors. Position these developments on active intersections to create a wayfinding element from Wadsworth Bypass. • Increase densities closer to the bypass from 55th to 59th Avenues, but configure height, scale, and massing to effectively transition into stable, single family residential neighborhoods north of the site and to the east and west. • Encourage a single street wall in the core of the node, but building massing along the bypass can be broken up into multiple structures to allow breaks for light, air, and views from Wadsworth Bypass. Orientation University of Colorado Denver

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision • Front most buildings on the local street (not the bypass), but create attractive side facades that can visible from Wadsworth Bypass. Views and Topography • Preserve the “Grand View” from Olde Town • Allow for views of Olde Town to be seen from Wadsworth Bypass

4.7

Small Area Examples

The Arvada Center for the Arts

The Arvada Art District Plan was created as a part of, and is consistent with, the Wadsworth Corridor Vision Plan. The Arvada Art District Plan was informed by the Master Plan for the Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities, two public meeting (outlined in the Wadsworth Corridor Vision Plan), and the current existing conditions of the area which include land use, zoning, urban form and circulation patterns. In addition this report includes an overview of the analysis process and rationale used to create the plan’s overall vision. Two Arvada Art District Plan alternatives are then presented which include land use, urban design, circulation and phasing elements. The plan concludes with implementation strategy recommendations. Vision Statement The Arvada Arts Center District will be a vibrant place that is the cultural heart of the Wadsworth corridor and the City of Arvada. It will be a destination node where locals and visitors from all over come to enjoy a complete cultural experience which includes multi-media arts, dining, socializing, learning and living. The Arvada Arts Center District will include not only the Arvada Art Center but vicinities to the east and to the south. It will be a place that is walkable and accessible by foot, by bike, by car and by public transportation. It will act as a central link to corridor nodes to the north and south while blending into the existing fabric of the neighborhood. Small Area Plan Background The City of Arvada plans to redevelop the portion of the Wadsworth Corridor that passes through its city boundary. This part of Wadsworth Boulevard is approximately 4.5 miles long and begins at 88th Avenue on the north and ends at I70 on the south. The development of the Wadsworth Corridor will focus on developing specific nodes along the corridor that have been identified by the Wadsworth Corridor Vision Plan as areas of opportunity to create unique areas with their own sense of place. The Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities and its vicinities have been identified as one of these areas of opportunity. The Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities Background The Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities is a multi-use cultural facility operated by the City of Arvada and is located at the intersection of Wadsworth Boulevard and 69th Avenue. It serves local residents and regional patrons providing diverse opportunities to enjoy multi-media art, including first class theater productions and a variety of educational programs. The Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities is comprised of the Arvada History Museum, three theater galleries, rehearsal rooms for music, dance and theater productions, class rooms and a conference center. It is one of the most significant areas along the Wadsworth Corridor as it functions to enhance the social cohesiveness of the community. The Arvada Center attracts over 350,000 visitors every year which includes adults and children. Purpose of the plan The purpose of this small area plan is to support the Wadsworth Corridor Vision Plan in its effort to create unique and defining nodes along the corridor that will promote the balance of vibrant and interconnected land uses along the corridor. The pursuit of this particular small area plan was chosen because of the Arvada Center for the University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision Arts and Humanities’ potential to act as a catalyst for this area and for future areas along the corridor The Study area has been defined as a one-quarter mile radius from the intersection of Wadsworth Boulevard and 69th Avenue. This center point represents the new planned entrance of the Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities. The study area will encompass the Arvada Art Center as well as commercial and residential vicinities to the east and south of the Arvada Art Center.

Existing Conditions The Arvada Center for the Arts Master Plan Highlights

Building Expansion The plan recommends the building of 130,000 square feet of additional space for the Banquet-Conferencing program, in order to compete effectively in the regional market place, and for the art and humanities programs, in order to expand upon its operating capacity, which is currently operating at its full capacity.

Parking Improvement in parking will consists of creating two distinct types of free parking areas. Structured parking will be located to the southwest of a new pedestrian plaza and will accommodate 632 cars and surface parking will be located both north and south of the parking structure and will provide space for 270 cars.

Landscaping Landscape improvements have been proposed to create a park-like atmosphere throughout the entire Arvada Art Center site. The plan maintains most of the existing trees and pond. A landscape buffer is proposed for the entire Wadsworth frontage to reduce noise impacts from expected increases in street traffic. It is proposed that

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision the south end of the site be developed as a park-like setting with shade trees and open lawn areas that can serve large group outdoor gathering areas, venues for fairs and other exhibitions and non-programmed open lawn use.

Landscape Sculptures The Master Plan proposes three landscape sculptures for the Art Center site. The first is that of the main entry plaza or courtyard as the premier display area. The second is a waterside terrace and walk outside of the new Banquet and Conference building that loops around the upper pond. The third is the greater trail loop around the entire site and vehicular access drives, which includes a roundabout.

New Pedestrian Plaza The Master Plan proposes an expanded pedestrian plaza located just outside the building’s main entrance. The Plaza connects to smaller gathering areas outside the entrance of the parking structure. It creates attractive and functional outdoor spaces that can be used for outdoor recreation. Pedestrian Circulation The Master Plan proposes an expansion of the area trail system to incorporate a variety of pathways. The system includes regional trails, internal trails and recreational trails. The regional trails run north-south along Wadsworth Boulevard and east-west along West 68th Ave. The internal circulation paths will run parallel to the main roads within the Art Center and connect the parking lots to the complex. These paths will also connect the adjacent neighborhoods to the Arvada Art Center by extending walkways from the building complex to the intersection of 69th Ave and Wadsworth Blvd.

Site Lighting and Site Signage The Master Plan proposesa site lighting program that will provide safe lighting levels for visitors while minimizing visual intrusion, glare and fugitive ambient light to neighboring properties. Street lighting will illuminate internal streets and driveways throughout the site and pedestrian lighting will be provided in the main entry court, drop-off areas and other pedestrian gathering areas near the main building complex and upper pond. Parking lots lighting will also be provided.

Existing Land Use University of Colorado Denver

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision The study area contains four land use classifications. These land use classifications are identified by the City of Arvada as Open Space & Parks, Neighborhood Community Commercial, High Density Residential and Suburban Residential. The Open Space & Parks land use resides primarily in the western half of the study area and borders both Wadsworth Boulevard and 68th Avenue. This land use contains the Arvada Art Center’s buildings and grounds. Neighborhood Community Commercial land uses reside in both the northeast and southwest corners of the Wadsworth Boulevard and 68th Avenue intersection while High Density Residential land uses reside only south of 68th Avenue and surround the Commercial land uses located in this area. Lastly, the Suburban Residential land uses make up the remainder of the study area and encompass the three other land uses.

Existing Zoning Six zoning district classifications can be found within the Arvada Art Center study area. These zoning districts have been chosen and defined by the City of Arvada and include intents for land uses, for compatibility, and for automobile accommodation. The PUD-BP district is located primarily in the northwest quadrant of the study area and borders Wadsworth Boulevard. This zoning district contains the Arvada Art Center’s core buildings and parking lot. The PUD-BPR district is located at the southern edge of the study area and borders Wadsworth Boulevard on the west. The B-2 district, the R-M district, and the R-I districts run along Wadsworth Boulevard and 68th Avenue in a patchwork pattern. Lastly, the R-L district makes up the majority of the zoning in the study area and surrounds all the other zoning districts. These zoning districts are described in more detail as follows: 1. PUD-BP planned unit development (business/professional) district. Intent. The PUD-BP District is created to provide for construction of planned business and professional centers, or mixtures thereof. It is intended to promote the grouping of professional and business uses and provide area large enough to establish harmonious relationships between structures, people, and the University of Colorado Denver

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision automobile. A PUD-BP District should be designed using well-planned parking access, pedestrian walkways, courtyards, malls, and open space to accomplish this intent. This

district should offer a wide variety of goods and services and cater to both the pedestrian and the auto-oriented shopper. 2. PUD-BPR planned unit development (business/professional/residential) district. Intent. The PUD-BPR District is intended to fulfill the general purpose of PUDs by encouraging alternative developments containing a creative mix of business, professional, and/or residential uses. This District is intended to promote the grouping of professional and business uses, together with optional residential uses, in an area large enough to establish harmonious relationships between structures, people, and the automobile. These Districts should be sited and designed using parking access, pedestrian walkways, courtyards, malls, and open space to connect the various uses and users. This district should offer a wide variety of goods and services and cater to employees, pedestrians, shoppers, and residents. 3. B-2 general business district Intent. This district is intended to allow for a broad range of commercial activities that may often be oriented toward automobile access and visibility. 4. R-M residential multi-family district Intent. To provide a district that is centered around the multifamily/apartment neighborhood. The regulations required are established to enhance the multifamily residential character that is typical to a high density nonbusiness zone district. 5. R-I residential one- and two-family district Intent. Provides for a neighborhood development of medium density. The primary land use allows for single-family dwellings, along with two family dwelling units. Recreational, religious, and educational uses normally appropriate to such a residential neighborhood are also permitted to contribute to the natural elements of a convenient, balanced, and attractive neighborhood. Development within this district is intended to be separate from and protected from the encroachment of land activities that do not contribute University of Colorado Denver

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision to the esthetic and functional well being of the intended district environment. 6. R-L residential low density district Intent. The purpose of the Residential-Low Density District is to allow residential development and limited additional uses in areas adjacent to conservation areas. The priority of this district is to provide a buffer between agricultural and conservation areas and suburban growth areas, and also be compatible with adjacent residential development. Existing Urban Form Street and Block Patterns For the most part, the study area contains a traditional grid system street layout with block and lot layout patterns which intersect perpendicularly. However, there are small areas located along the perimeter of the study area that are characterized by longer and windier streets that branch off into cul-de-sacs. All streets within the study area accommodate two-way traffic. Streetscape and Wayfinding The study area generally lacks streetscape amenities such as landscaping, complete pedestrian and bike paths and signage for the Arvada Art Center. Along Wadsworth Blvd. there are no street trees and very little buffer vegetation. The pedestrian and bike paths are non uniform and unpaved in sections. Sidewalk widths vary from five feet to eight feet. Furthermore, there are insufficient wayfinding elements pointing to the Arvada Art Center. Approaching the art center from the south, there are no signs or visual cues that you are nearing the Arvada Art Center. Approaching from the north, there is one sign located at the official entrance of the Arvada Art Center but it is not visible until you get right upon the entrance. Building Heights and Massing The study area primarily consists of commercial and residential buildings that are one story high. The Arvada Art Center complex contains the largest commercial buildings that are approximately 45 feet high with large building footprints. The remaining commercial buildings, located along Wadsworth Blvd, are approximately 15 feet high with smaller building footprints. The single-family residential buildings are all one-story. The ones located on the east side of Wadsworth have smaller building footprints with square footages, of 1,200 to 1,400 square feet according to Zillow.com. The single-family residential buildings located to the west and north of the Arvada Art Center have larger building footprints with square footages of 1,800 to 3,000 square feet according to Zillow.com. Multi-family residential building are located south of and along 68th avenue. These buildings are two to three stories high with larger building footprints. Building Orientation The smaller commercial buildings, which are located along Wadsworth Blvd., orient toward Wadsworth Blvd. whereas the residential building which are adjacent to Wadsworth Blvd. are oriented toward internal streets and away from Wadsworth Blvd. The multi-family buildings along 68th Avenue orient toward 68th Avenue on the west side of Wadsworth Blvd. and toward internal streets on the east side of Wadsworth Blvd. The Arvada Art Center Complex is set far back, approximately 400 feet, from Wadsworth Blvd. and faces southeast toward its access road and views of Downtown Denver’s skyline. Topography and Views The topographic high points of the study area run along the northern boundary of the study area as well as the north east corner of the study area where the Arvada Art Center complex is located. From these points the University of Colorado Denver

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision land gradually slopes down to become relatively flat where Wadsworth Blvd. meets 69th and 68th Avenues and beyond. The view sheds of the study area include mountain views to the west and views of Downtown Denver’s skyline to the southeast. However, these views are only visible from strategic points of the study area such as the Arvada Art Center complex, the intersection of 72nd and Wadsworth Blvd. and at the street level looking south down Wadsworth Blvd. and looking east down 68th Avenue. Existing Circulation

Automobile One major arterial, two collector streets, and many local streets reside within the study area. Wadsworth Boulevard, which runs north-south, is a six lane major arterial street. It bisects the study area straight down the middle. Wadsworth Blvd. is also known as State Highway 110, and serves as a major regional arterial for the Denver Metro area. The Arvada Art Center is located on the west side of Wadsworth Blvd. while small commercial areas and residential neighborhoods reside to the east. Wadsworth Blvd has an average daily traffic (ADT) count of 51,600 and a posted speed limit of 45 miles per hour however traffic speeds at times can exceed the posted speed limit on Wadsworth Blvd. by five to ten mph. 72nd Ave., which represents the site’s northern boundary, runs west-east and is a two lane major collector street which is controlled by a signal light. This street has an ADT count of 13,600 and a posted speed limit of 30 mph. 68th Avenue also travels west-east across the southern half of the study area and is a two lane minor collector street. This street has an ADT of 3,600 and a posted speed limit of 30 mph. 68th Ave. borders the Arvada Art Center’s property to the south and is the only street that intersects with Arvada Art Center property with a signal light. Traffic, entering the Arvada Art Center from the south, use this intersection to access the Arvada Art Center. From the north, the Arvada Art Center is accessed directly from Wadsworth Blvd.. The remaining streets within the study area are local roads with intersections that are serviced by stop signs or no stop signs.

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision Parking Because the Wadsworth Corridor is defined as a major regional highway, on- street parking is not allowed along the Wadsworth Corridor. However, on street parking is allowed along the collector and local streets. Surface parking lots are located in the commercial areas along Wadsworth Blvd and within the Arvada Center for the Art and Humanities property. Surface parking is free of charge. There is no structured parking in the study area. Pedestrian and Bicycle Generally pedestrians and bicyclist share the same paths. Sidewalks for the most part are present within the study area along the local streets and along Wadsworth Blvd. In addition, there is a designated bike path located off the street on the west side of Wadsworth Blvd. However, the bike path runs only between 68th Ave. and 72nd. Ave and then breaks off and merges into the street with vehicular traffic. Analysis and Rationale

Examination of the study area’s existing conditions which include the Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities Master Plan, land use, zoning, urban form and circulation patterns as well as input from the two community meetings, led to the following conclusions regarding the assets, issues, and opportunities of the study area and subsequently has informed the vision and goals of the Arvada Art District small area plan. The Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities, even without its proposed upgrades, represents a great catalyst for developing the surrounding area with an “Art� theme. The Arvada Art Center is a beloved community asset. The proposed new entrance, circulation paths and landscape changes for the Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities provide an opportunity to create an east-west connection at Wadsworth Blvd. and 69th Ave. and extend the Arvada Art Center influence across the street. Commercial developments to the east and south of the Arvada Art Center have already been established and represent an opportunity to geographically expand upon, however, the existing and prominent residential developments may resist additional commercial land expansion. Wadsworth Boulevard because of its high traffic represents both an opportunity and an issue. The high commuter traffic, if exploited correctly, can turn commuters into new customers for both the Arvada Art Center and new commercial developments in the area. On the other hand, the high traffic acts as a barrier to automobile, bicycle, and pedestrian connectivity between the Arvada Art Center and vicinities to the east.

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision The flat topography between the Arvada Art Center and the neighborhoods to the east make for an easy walk for pedestrian while the down slope from the Arvada Art Center and the vicinities to the south make for a more labored walking experience. Key views at the street level are an asset. The area is very automobile oriented. There are many curb cuts on Wadsworth that slow traffic and have the potential to cause automobile, bicycle, and pedestrian conflicts along Wadsworth Blvd. Also, buildings are set far back from the street, apart from each other, and have parking between them and the street creating an environment that is not conducive to walking. The study area generally lacks aesthetic appeal due to limited landscaping. Additionally, traffic along Wadsworth Blvd. creates noise and air pollution concerns for visitors and residents living within the study area There are incomplete pedestrian and bike paths which deter walking, biking, and connectivity between the Arvada Art Center and surrounding neighborhoods as well as points to the north and south. Initial research indicates there to be plenty of right-of-way land available along Wadsworth Blvd which can be improved upon. Vision The Arvada Arts Center District will be a vibrant place that is the cultural heart of the Wadsworth corridor and the City of Arvada. It will be a destination node where locals and visitors from all over come to enjoy a complete cultural experience which includes multi-media arts, dining, socializing, learning and living. The Arvada Arts Center District will include not only the Arvada Art Center but vicinities to the east and to the south. It will be a place that is walkable and accessible by foot, by bike, by car and by public transportation. It will act as a central link to corridor nodes to the north and south while blending into the existing fabric of the neighborhood. Goals Street and Block Pattern • Reduce the auto-centric design of the site by reconfiguring streets and blocks to connect and accommodate multiple buildings. • Provide new interior drives and/or roads to allow interior access through the area. Residential components could incorporate alleyways. Area Circulation • Provide defined, safe pedestrian and bicycle connections to and through the site from surrounding residential neighborhoods. • Provide a complete pedestrian & bicycle east/west connection • Accommodate public transportation to and through the site from the north and south. • Create a parking district with structured lot to accommodate traffic Streetscape and Wayfinding • Improve the streetscape functionally and aesthetically along Wadsworth and within the site. • Develop special crosswalk treatments to provide safe crossing and wayfinding through the site and to the Arvada Art Center. Building Height and Massing • Promote 2 to 3 story mixed use and commercial developments. Configure height, scale, and massing to effectively transition into stable, single family residential neighborhoods north of the site and to the east. • Encourage smaller building masses for mixed use developments to allow breaks for light, air, and views. Accommodate larger building masses for commercial properties to attract mid-sized national retailers.

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision Orientation • Front buildings onto Wadsworth Boulevard and key internal streets. • Set buildings close to the street allowing for high window to wall ratios, outdoor seating and retail display area. Views and Topography • New developments should embrace the views of the proposed improvements to the Arvada Art Center’s grounds and mountain views. • The topographic diversity of the Arvada Art Center’s grounds should be incorporated into any new development plans. Alternative #1 Land Use Alternative 1 calls for a land use scheme that includes mixed use and commercial land uses for the area. Mixed use is proposed for the area east of the Arvada Art Center which is no further than ¼ mile away from the new Arvada Art Center’s entrance which will be located at Wadsworth Blvd. and 69th Ave. This land use will compliment and support both the Arvada Art Center and surrounding neighborhoods and promote the development of duplexes, townhomes, live-work space, restaurants, art galleries, as well as boutique style businesses such as retail shops, salons and hotels. The ¼ mile distance criteria will keep the mixed use area within walking distance of the Arvada Center for the Arts and Humananities and constrain new development from encroaching too much on the residential land uses surrounding the area. A parking structure is being proposed for this area in order to accommodate visitors who must travel by automobile to the area but then prefer to walk around.

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision Commercial use is proposed for the area south of the Arvada Art Center. This land use will also compliment and support both the Arvada Art Center and surrounding neighborhoods. This area will balance the need to continue to accommodate an existing automobile-oriented corridor with the need to provide for pedestrian accommodations. It will promote the development of commercial uses only such as offices, and larger scale retail and restaurant businesses. This land use plan proposes removing the existing high density residential land use in order to provide for surface parking which automobile travelers and larger scale retailers and restaurants prefer. Urban Design The design of the Arvada Art District will encourage an “Art� theme that is pedestrian and neighborhood friendly. It will provide a place for people to live, for local artists to display their art and for a place for visiting artists and patrons of the Arvada Art Center to enjoy. The streetscape will be designed to be functional and aesthetically pleasing to both automobiles and pedestrians with the addition of special crosswalk treatments, street trees, street lighting and wayfinding elements.

Wide sidewalks will accommodate pedestrian amenities such as street furniture, art installations, retail displays and restaurant seating. Buildings will be no higher than three stories and oriented and set close to the street with large windows on the ground floor. Green space will also be incorporated into the design to transition the development into the surrounding residential area and to provide private space for residents and businesses alike.

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision Circulation

Alternative 1 proposes a circulation schematic that will enhance west-east and northsouth circulation within the district and accommodate pedestrian, bicycle, and automobile traffic. First, in order to facilitate west-east circulation a new signaled light should be installed at the proposed new entrance of the Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities located at the intersection of Wadsworth Blvd. and 69th Ave. This will allow pedestrians and bicyclist to easily cross Wadsworth Blvd to access either the Arvada Art Center property or the mixed use area. Secondly, in order to enhance north-south circulation into and within the mixed use area a reconfiguration of the streets in the southeast corner of the Arvada Art District should be considered. For instance, Vance St. should be extended south to intersect with 67th Pl. This will help to connect the southeast corner of the district to both the mixed use area to the north and the commercial area to the west. In addition, a reconfiguration of the intersection of Upham Dr. and 67th Ave which allows traffic to move straight, instead of forking left, to 67th Ave. should be considered. This will facilitate the movement of automobile traffic coming from the south into the mixed use area.

The circulation schematic for Alternative 1 is also cognizant of Wadsworth Boulevard’s role as a major arterial street and also addresses the pedestrian and automobile interface with a parking and automobile access plan. In order for the Arvada Art District to accommodate traffic flow on Wadsworth Blvd. and provide for the access and use of automobiles within the district, this plan proposes that all automobile access points (curb cuts) be located off of Wadsworth Blvd. and onto the internal streets. In addition, this plan provides for structured parking that can be accessed from the north and south by traveling around primary pedestrian circulation areas. Also, strategic onstreet parking will be allowed within the district to accommodate quick trips into the district. The on-street parking schematic will provide a buffer zone between moving traffic and pedestrians and at the same time not intrude on the surrounding residential area. Phasing The Arvada Art District could come to fruition successfully by developing any piece at any time; however, University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision the phasing of the development proposed in Alternative 1 is outlined in three different phases with each phase supporting the development of the next phase. The first phase would occur within 0-5 years. This phase includes the development of the Arvada Art Center Master Plan as well as the proposed commercial property located south of the Arvada Art Center. Because the Arvada Art Center is a priority for the City of Arvada, it follows that this piece would be the most supported by the tax payers and City Council of Arvada. The commercial property was included in this phase because it represents a location that would likely be the easiest to transition because of its current community commercial and multi-family residential zoning designations. Phase two would occur within 6-10 years and includes the mixed use properties located in the southeast corner of the district as well as the properties along Wadsworth Blvd. The development of these properties would have the effect of framing and activating the node as envisioned in the Wadsworth Corridor Vision Plan. The third phase would occur within 11-15 years and complete the build out of the Arvada Art District.

Alternative #2 Land Use The current land use for the Arvada Arts District was not able to accommodate our new vision for the area so, the new land use plan includes Open space, Neighborhood/community commercial, Medium density residential, and Mixed-use residential emphasis. This new land use plan will allow the area east of the Arts Center to evolve into a place where artists can work, live and display their work; where small business owners can start their business; where people can dine before or after an event at the Arts Center; and where people can both live and work. The commercial area to the south of the Arts Center is where we believe larger scale stores such as Barnes & Noble would be most appropriate. Additionally, a parking garage would be necessary in order to accommodate all the customers the commercial use would attract, the residents in the area and people who may be visiting the Arvada Arts Center.

University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision Proposed Land Use

Urban Design We believe that the design of the Arvada Arts District should be unique by embracing the local artists and their work. Sidewalks should be wide (at least 12 feet) so that they can accommodate patio cafĂŠs, street furniture and street trees. Additionally, store fronts should also have large windows to create an interesting and inviting walking environment for pedestrians. The few buildings that are three stories tall should set back the third floor in order to keep the development at a pedestrian scale as well as creating beautiful balconies that will take advantage of the views of Denver and the Rocky Mountains. The medium density residential should be two stories at the tallest when next to single-family residential homes in order to create a seamless transition from the higher density of the Arts District node into the existing low-density neighborhood. We believe that one of the ways to make the Arts District unique is to have creative and distinguishable crosswalks that add to the Arts District atmosphere.

University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision Circulation In this proposed circulation plan there are a couple street closures. We propose to close part of W 67th Avenue to make the southwest corner more attractive for developers. The second street that we propose to close is Vance St so that it can be converted into a pedestrian street and becomes the center of our pedestrian activity. Additionally, we believe that two streets should be extended to improve connectivity. Lastly, it is our belief that the addition of a new traffic light would be necessary to help control vehicular and pedestrian traffic.

Since Wadsworth Blvd. is a state highway we thought it was crucial to have vehicular access to the developments east and south of the Arts Center along Wadsworth. Additionally, the businesses along Wadsworth just east of the Arts Center will have limited parking for people who are running errands. A parking garage will be located south of the Arts Center to accommodate overflow parking for those who are attending an event.

University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision Furthermore, since Wadsworth is a state highway it is not designed to be very pedestrian friendly. Our goal with this plan was to enhance the pedestrian experience throughout the site. Along Wadsworth, we believe that a new traffic light will be needed to control the additional traffic the Arts Center will attract and to create a safe and convenient place for people to cross Wadsworth once the development east of the Arts Center is complete. The center of the pedestrian realm is located east of the Arts Center. Our plan was to pull the pedestrians off of Wadsworth into the center of the site where we propose small scale businesses and retail. Phasing

There are many ways in which this development could occur. Since the new Arvada Arts Center plan has already been approved, it will most likely be redeveloped first in Phase 1. The commercial property south of the Arts Center would be fairly easy to rezone and redevelop because it is only has a few residential units. Phase 2 includes two properties along Wadsworth Blvd., one commercial and one residential, as well as the second property south of the Arts Center. This corner is crucial because it accounts for a large portion of the residential that will support the future retail and business. Phase 3 includes more medium-density residential and the first part of the mixed-use development that will help create the character of this development. Lastly, Phase 4 would complete the development. However, if Phase 4 never happens we believe that the center would still be successful based on what developed at W 68th Ave. and Wadsworth Blvd. While this is our proposal of how development should occur it by no means that it would not be successful if it developed in a different way.

Implementation Land Use Revised zoning will allow for the proposed changes in land use to occur. Zoning should be revised immediately to allow for development to occur as market conditions dictate. Additionally public/private partnerships can be utilized to speed the implementation of large projects where a significant number of landowners are involved. A capital improvement plan for the overall area can also be implemented if the city council so desires. University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision Urban Design Urban design changes are by far the easiest of the three to implement. New urban design standards can be written in to new form based zoning codes, and any new development will conform to these new standards. As densities increase virtually the entire district will undergo new development, allowing for the new zoning codes to completely shape the urban form of the area. Circulation Circulation can be improved via the proposed changes in zoning, street treatments and through the changes in street changes proposed. For streets where a large number of land-owners are adjacent, public-private partnerships can be encouraged. Conclusion The ability to effectively benefit from this Arvada Art District Plan is inexorably tied to the ability to implement that plan in a way that is both socially and economically acceptable within a designated time frame. This can be done in a multitude of ways, including through the use of public/private partnerships, Capital Improvement Plans and revised zoning and design guidelines. In order to properly implement this plan it is vital that a working relationship be cultivated and maintained between the City of Arvada, the Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities and the local residents. Through the careful implementation of this plan it will be possible to create a place which fully connects the Arvada Arts Center to the local community and to the corridor as a whole.

64th and Wadsworth Boulevard Option 1 The first proposed option for redevelopment of the Fairlane shopping center is focused on increasing building density along the Wadsworth corridor while maximizing green space on the east of the lot. The development will focus on a sustainable live& work communities to attract young families from throughout the Denver metro. Residential development will be sheltered from Wadsworth by a variety of commercial and retail shops. These buildings will provide a commercial center for Arvada north of historic Olde Towne, and just south of the cultural amenities offered by the Arvada Art Center. The neighborhood based development will become an example of sustainable mixed-use development free of the urban focus found in nearby Denver. Goals: • Introduce light commercial/retail onto Wadsworth • Increase street exposure for businesses in the development • Create exemplarily sustainable buildings , with features like green roofs and solar • Overcome sloping grade by constructing underground parking to “level” property • Improve pedestrian accessibility from Wadsworth and primarily surrounding neighborhoods • Increase green space and family recreational opportunities Site Plan FAR’s: • Total Site Area: 521, 875 sq. ft • Commercial: approx. 140, 000 sq. ft • Mixed Use: approx. 125, 000 sq. ft • Residential: approx. 250,000 sq. ft Option 1 proposes two large buildings built on the west of the site providing a buffer between residential University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision uses on the east of the site. These two buildings will be used for commercial, light industrial business with a focus on live/work arrangements. TO the north, a commercial site will house 2-3 stories of commercial, with retail development at street level. The south of the site will feature a mixed-use development, focused heavily on retail with loft’s available on the upper second and possibly third floor. Large roofs on these buildings will be used to maximize the capacity to generate solar electricity.

Residential buildings will be spread throughout the east of the site, with 6-8 separate buildings likely. A maximum height of 50 ft. will limit these buildings to approximately four stories to minimize the impact to single family homes adjacent the site. The proposed location of these buildings has been prepared to limit shading on these existing homes. By developing green roofs private green space will be increased and the demands on other green space throughout the site will be somewhat limited. This will provide ample opportunity for public green space to be enjoyed by residents of nearby neighborhoods.

University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision Option 2 Option 2 is designed to be a lively mixed-use development that caters to all ages through the offering of retail, office, and residential opportunities. Option 2 is influenced by the historic and cultural areas that surround it. Located north of Arvada’s Olde Town and south of Arvada’s Center for the Arts, Option 2 will increase pedestrian and vehicular connectivity to these areas and will support them as surrounding uses by offering additional housing, entertainment, work and community gathering space. Goals: • • • • • •

Introduce retail onto Wadsworth Mix commercial/retail, office and residential throughout the site Increase pedestrian accessibility from Wadsworth and surrounding neighborhoods Provide ample green space Increase visibility from the street and exposure of interior office and retail buildings Provide a mix of underground parking and surface parking with an emphasis on underground parkin

Option #2

[Plan View]

Residential Office Retail Open Space Parking Sidewalks

Site Plan: The site is developed to accommodate the following Floor to Area Ratio (FAR) percentages of land uses:

• • • • •

Commercial/Retail – 27% Office – 6% Residential – 40% Open Space – 20% Surface Parking – 7 The total FAR of the site is 0.75. The site includes six buildings of which not one will exceed four stories or a

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Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision height of 45’. These percentages were determined based on the desired densities and needs expressed by current population trends and resident feedback. Option 2 is designed to use the existing topography of the area and minimize the need to acquire additional land. In order to bring the development up to street level, we have designed a development that will sit atop a parking garage. The parking garage will be for residents, workers and for the public. Additional surface parking will be available for temporary parking purposes and for residents living in the development area.

Option #2

[Circulation]

Option #2

[Circulation]

In order to introduce the multiple uses of this development, zoning must be revised. The current zoning is intended to provide a wide variety of general retail, business and service uses, as well as professional and business offices, but not intensive business or industrial activities. Development intensity is limited to 5-10 acres of development per parcel area and only four buildings or structures are permitted. 10-15 acre development parcel areas are permitted to have five buildings or structures. Allowed and conditional principal uses currently permitted at 64th and Wadsworth do not include: Farmers Markets, Outdoor Playing Fields, Outdoor Bungee Jumping, Outdoor Retail Displays and Sales, Regional Shopping Center, etc. Option 2 site plan calls for revisions to the zoning that University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision would allow mixed use (retail, office and residential) as well as farmers markets, temporary vendors, small concerts and art displays. It is proposed that retail will be located at street level and will remain one the first floor, except along Wadsworth where we have proposed a four story shopping center that fulfills the holes in retail demand. Shopping could include stores such as mid-priced, trendy clothing shops, furniture stores, coffee shops, cafes, art galleries, children’s apparel, shoe stores and crafts. Additional commercial uses will include restaurants, hair salons, art supplies and more. The development is also designed to welcome street vendors, art displays, food carts and farmers markets in the public open space and along the pathways. This will act as a draw for pedestrian traffic and provide additional amenities to those who live, work and play at this site. Office buildings will be located on the ground level and above the retail space on the eastern side of the development. A variety of office space will be available and will cater to entrepreneurs and other start up or established businesses. Shared office space will available for those who want to share in the cost of operations and space. Residential units will be located on top of the commercial/retail establishments and will occupy the second story and above. Residential elevators will allow residents to access private underground parking. Residential units are designed to be a mix of affordable and luxury with various sized units and amenities. Pedestrian and vehicular connectivity has helped shape this site plan. Because of 64th and Wadsworth’s proximity to Olde Town and the Art Center, it is very important to provide everyone with barrier free connectivity. A new street light is proposed on Wadsworth that would connect the western access point across Wadsworth Blvd, and onto Old Wadsworth. Enhanced street treatments such as painted crossings and a street light are necessary in this location. An enhanced pedestrian crossing is also proposed for the 64th and Wadsworth Blvd intersection. To further improve pedestrian accessibility we have designed five access points, three along Wadsworth at the south, central and northern part of the site, as well as on the southern end off of 64th ave and a neighborhood connection point on the eastern side of the site. Pathways run throughout the site making it easy to access the various buildings and activities that occur on site. Vehicles will have three access points. Because the site is bordered by single family homes on the east, we have made vehicle access points on all but the east side to avoid intruding on the existing housing. Vehicles turning into the central access point off Wadsworth will have the option to enter the underground parking garage or the surface parking lots. Those entering at the western access point on the north side of the site will be able to first access the surface parking then access the parking garage. The eastern entrance on the north side of the site will be dedicated to the residents and office workers. Option 2 is designed to be a mix of age, use and appeal. In order to increase activity in this section of Wadsworth, we have increased connectivity to the surrounding destinations, enhanced the land use capabilities of the site and introduced a new set of commercial/retail that is not found anywhere else in Arvada.

5.0

Wadsworth Corridor Phasing Plan

This section describes a generalized phase implementation plan for the Wadsworth Blvd. Corridor through the year 2030. It identifies a sequence of corridor improvements that could be implemented over the next 20 years depending on the development conditions of the time. There are many ways to approach the various actions outlined for the corridor and this plan represents a single option, which may best reflect the current conditions and assumptions. It is structured in such a way that it responds to elements concerning demand, cost, social impact, safety, and other prioritization factors over a long time span. University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision Methodology Once the vision for the corridor was solidified, the general actions specified to meet the principles outlined in the vision were laid out. These actions were then sorted based on practical construction phasing, probable cost, social impact, economic impact, safety and a generalization of current conditions. The phases area identified as: Phase 1: Initiation to 5 years Phase 2: 3 to 7 years, and Phase 3: 5 years to completion The overlap in consecutive phases allows for concurrent implementation of those actions that are reliant on a previous action or implemented based on desirable market or ecoGateway nomic conditions. 3 Phase 1 These actions speak to the desire to create elements of progress that are visible, universally appreciated, and within the immediate financial capabilities of the city. In other words, they are the projects that offer more “bang for the buck.� These elements send a signal to 80th and Wads. 5 those experiencing the corridor that a change is under way and sets the theme for fututre development along Wadsworth. Wayfinding/Signage: Take immediate action to enhance the presence and appearance of signage along the corridor. This is an inexpensive and very necessary action to promote ease of navigation through the corridor and to promote great local attractions such as Olde Town Arvada and the Arvada Center for the Arts. Entry elements: Containing the benefits of both signage and branding, entry treatments on the North and of the corridor scope at 88th and Wadsworth as well as enhancements at I-70 will announce boundaries of the corridor through Arvada and create a sense of identity for Arvada as a whole. Branding: Branding strategies outlined in the vision plan will be implemented throughout the corridor to begin building an identifiable character for those who travel Wadsworth and the community as a whole.

Arvada Art District

1

64th and Wads.

4

Olde Town Connections

2

Hotel / Ent.

6

Pedestrian/Bike routes along Wadsworth: Identified as one of the primary concerns along the corridor, improving multi-modal transportation the length of Wadsworth for bikes and pedestrians in a safe and attractive manner is essential. This includes shared bike/pedestrian paths, separate bike lanes and sidewalks where indicated in the vision plan. At this time, any Image: the preferred land acquisition required for bike or pedestrian order of node phasing right of way should be acquired. University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision Crosswalks (general): All major intersections along the corridor will have painted crosswalks in this first phase depending on the current development interest along the corridor, particularly at node sites. With initial emphasis placed on the Arvada Center for the Arts node, enhanced crosswalk treatments may be implemented at this time. Landscaping: Coinciding with the bike and pedestrian paths will be street tree installation. This action not only enhances the aesthetic appeal along the corridor but also creates a visual buffer between the traffic along Wadsworth and those traveling the corridor on foot or by bike. In this phase, implementation will occur between the nodes along Wadsworth Blvd. and where necessary along pedestrian/bike paths off of Wadsworth Blvd. Streetlights: The simple addition of streetlights helps resolve safety issues along the corridor along with joining the effort in branding the corridor with a particular character. Re-zoning: Re-zoning of the corridor should begin at this initial phase to ensure that any new growth along the corridor immediately begins to reflect the desired development outlines in the vision plan. Phase 2: Phase 2 begins to support the change in character at each node. This includes medians, street lights, and general street improvements, which again work towards implementing the vision through the identified principles. Some of these items can be comparatively more expensive and waiting until this phase to implement them allows for time to accumulate the appropriate capital. Street improvements: General street improvements include bus and trolley pull-offs, turn lanes, and any other street alignment and safety issues along the corridor. It is important to make these improvements as Phase 2 begins to draw people to the corridor, the corridor must also exhibit excellence in its primary function, as a state highway. Medians: As the street improvements are made, medians should be installed where appropriate not only for visual appeal but to provide safety islands to pedestrians. Pedestrian/Bike routes at nodes (2): This later phasing of pedestrian and bike routes concentrates on enhanced improvements along and in route to identified nodes. These improvements would feature certain elements that allude to a character change by node and designed to accommodate the number of potential users and adjacent functions of the nodes. Crosswalks (inset): These later crosswalk constructions will feature identifiable designs and materials as they indicate a major crossing and certain character of their adjacent node. Phase 3: It is important to note again that Phase 3 includes those projects, which begin at the five-year mark along with items in Phase 2 and may be implemented over a longer period of time. They feature projects that may require University of Colorado Denver

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision significant funding or are perhaps dependent on a “critical mass� of people to function at their full potential. Overpasses: Implementation of any pedestrian overpasses should begin in this final phase as they require financial support, foresight, and become increasingly relevant as the corridor gains popularity. Land acquisition: Land acquisition may be achieved over a longer time allowing for a natural progression of future development to occur as the surrounding development and needs of the public change. Trolley: The trolley system implementation will begin here to coincide with the opening of the Gold Line. Street Improvements (2): Coinciding with the trolley implementation, this final stage of street improvements will focus on any changes needed that relate specifically to the trolley.

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Wadsworth Corridor Vision Nodes The new vision plan also breaks the corridor down into 6 separate nodes. These have also been rated for preferred emphasis in the vision implementation. The rated nodes do not pertain to specific time spans, but simply act as a guide to prioritize implementation of the various actions.

University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


Wadsworth Corridor Vision 6.0 Conclusion

“The Wadsworth Corridor will promote the balance of vibrant and compatible interconnected land uses� Through the balance of interconnected land uses Arvada will be able to maximize the amenities the Wadsworth Corridor and will transform into a vibrant, interconnected place. There will be greater accessibility for residents, which will translate into greater shopping demand along the corridor. Additionally, Wadsworth will become a destination place for art exhibitions, plays, and performances highlighted by the Arvada Center for the Arts. Olde Town will create the character along the corridor, and will provide it’s unique influence to draw in local businesses creating a walkable shopping district. The various nodes along the corridor will target development and allow the corridor to develop in an organic, well thought out manner that maintains the aspects of Arvada that the current residents value. Through out the corridor there will be an emphasis on beautification and green scaping, so that even a drive along the Boulevard will leave a lasting impression in the travellers mind. Arvada will be seen as a destination, and not merely the route to work or elsewhere. Over the next 20 plus years, the Wadsworth Corridor will become a place of vibrant, interconnected land uses.

University of Colorado Denver

Spring 2011


A New Vision for the City of Arvada