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OPENING CEREMONIES EDITION 21 FEBRUARY 2013

Youth Governor Encourages Growth BY CHRISTINA WILEY Youth Governor WEST CENTRAL FLORIDA Welcome to Opening Ceremonies! On behalf of my fellow Presiding Officers, I would like to thank you for attending the 56th Annual Florida YMCA Youth In Government State Assembly. It is the delegates that make this event possible, through hard work year-round, from Servant Leadership Conference to this moment. It has been our honor to serve you over the last year and we are

thrilled to see the culmination of our collective efforts. The leadership and civic knowledge you have all displayed throughout the course of this program year exceeds precedents set in years past, but this program is about more than modeling the process. Personalize this assembly; make it yours. Step outside of your comfort zone and embrace the opportunity to be the best version of yourself. Take a moment to reflect upon what you

Youth Governor, Christina Wiley. Courtesy of Florida YMCA Youth In Government.

want to gain from this experience. What are your goals? Your dreams? Develop your plan of attack and act on it. Many have worked hard to present you with this

opportunity, but it is your responsibility to take advantage of it. Make your mark on this program and leave without regret. Have a great State Assembly!

An Unforgettable Week on the Mountain BY ALI RENCKENS Asst. Editor TAMPA DELEGATION Whenever someone asks me about the Conference On National Affairs (CONA), I am speechless. How

does one describe a week of life-changing experiences? Every year, 25 Florida delegates are chosen to attend the conference. These delegates excel in their respective programs,

The 2012 CONA Florida Delegation. Courtesy of Florida YMCA Youth In Government.

demonstrate leadership, and model the YMCA’s core values: caring, honesty, respect, and responsibility. This unforgettable week begins on the white porch and green rocking chairs of Lee Hall, where strangers connect through the “Blue Ridge Spirit”. CONA drives delegates to their fullest potential. Delegates experience deeper dimensions of YIG culture. They are personally impacted through meeting students with different political views, but

with same enthusiasm for this program and commitment to bettering our country. There is still time to apply! The Billbook includes a CONA alternate form. The application is due at the end of session on Friday. The Florida CONA Delegation will be announced during Closing Ceremonies. I found my “Florida family” and the best part of myself on the Mountain. You can do the same.


2 CAPITOL BRIEFINGS OPENING CEREMONIES EDITION

LEARN LEAD SERVE YMCA USA , AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION NATIONAL JUDICIAL COMPETITION CHICAGO, IL

JULY 31ST- AUGUST 3RD 2013 The National Judicial Competition (NJC) brings together Youth in Government participants from around the country to face off in mock trial and appellate competitions. Turn in the application (found in your Billbook) by end of session on Friday to be considered!

21 FEBRUARY 2013

League of Justices BY CAT SMITH Asst. Editor SOUTH COUNTY

This year, the Capitol is welcoming nearly seven hundred Youth In Government delegates for the 56th State Assembly. The program is growing quickly, and with that, all of the branches are expanding as well. The judicial branch has felt the results of this growth heavily. They have received applications for more firms than they are able to accept, capping off the Supreme Court at 16 firms. The justices have high expectations for

the firms that have made it. Senior Justice Courtney Scoufis of South County asks that “...everyone will try their best and have good sportsmanship.” “We want them to be competitive, but have fun,” says Senior Justice Niraj Vyas of West Central Florida. To get the District and Supreme Court attorneys into the argumentative mindset, the justices have planned “Cooky C a s e s , ” l i k e legislative’s silly bills, t o p r a c t i c e . All of the justices are excited for the possible signing of a joint resolution, or an

amendment to the Florida constitution that would change the r e qu ir e d a ge of candidacy. Because joint resolutions must be passed in chambers and then the Cabinet, but enforced by the Supreme Court, they have the rare power to unite the legislative and judicial branches. This week will be hectic and demanding for both the justices and attorneys. However, Chief Justice Thomas Seidler demands that attorneys “come prepared.” He is excited for the week and looking forward to passing judgments.

Legislative Expectations

BY HALEY OBERHOFER have to work even statements in commit- the time of first comEditor-in-Chief harder in order to get tees, the officers en- mittee to your beneWEST CENTRAL FL

With six chambers this year, the legislative presiding officers are ready to get the tradition restarted. Legislative Presiding Officers Alec Polansky, John Beatty, Jackson Armstrong, and Seth Reid have been working feverishly to add two additional chambers to the legislative program area. Because of the expansion, delegates will

their bills to the governor’s desk. Williams Senate President Alec Polansky says, “Creativity is key. We want delegates to take normal ideas and apply them in creative ways. That is really what we are looking for.” Polansky believes that creativity is what sets apart good bills from great bills. When giving speeches and opening

courage delegates to be passionate and prepared. Showing your passion is a perfect way to express your enthusiasm and eagerness to your aud i e n c e . A suggestion from the officers is to use NDTQ’s to your advantage. “Instead of stating your stats in your opening, plant NDTQ’s to make sure that your stats are heard and you use all

fit,” said Polansky. Finally, remember to be clear and concise. “I’m also excited to see how our delegates will raise their level of debate as they are given more opportunities to speak. I know they will surpass expectations,” said Polansky. Capitol Briefings and The Page Note will be reporting on the legislative branch throughout the weekend.


21 FEBRUARY 2013

CAPITOL BRIEFINGS OPENING CEREMONIES EDITION

3

The Bridge to the Cabinet BY ALI RENCKENS Asst. Editor TAMPA Glaring lights shadow, rather than reveal, their faces. Standing before this ominous semicircle of silhouettes is the climax of a legislator’s greatest fear and highest honor: passing his/her bill before the House, Senate, and, finally, the Executive Cabinet. Natalie Tuttle, the Chief of Staff, is looking forward to more connection between the cabinet and delegates this year. She feels there has been a lack of connection between the two branches in the past, but now,

“We’re conscious of that.” She predicts, “The first night will be mass chaos and after that [it will be] one of the best State Assemblies we’ve ever seen…The Presiding Officers this year are extremely friendly and working extremely hard…we’re looking forward to our future and legacy.” The Cabinet is a s s is t e d by the Directors of Legislative Affairs, who have replaced lobbyists “to teach [delegates] more how government works,” explains Leah Colucci, one of the three Directors of Legislative Affairs assisting the Office of the Governor. She is anticipating “a lot of

great bills being debated and some wonderful legislation passed…I hope everyone has a wonderful time and that the cabinet can help everyone do that.” Tuttle offers this advice for delegates: “Don’t hesitate to ask questions or make mistakes…we’ve all been there a n d 4TH FLOOR OF THE CAPITOL everyone is looking out FRIDAY & SATURDAY for everyone else.” L i e u t e n a n t Governor Nishani Karunamuni adds, “Don’t be afraid to speak, meet new people, and do things you usually wouldn’t. Sometimes these new experiences are what you remember most.”

STOP BY THE YIG STORE

Electing New Servant Leaders BY ALI RENCKENS CAT SMITH Asst. Editors TAMPA & SOUTH COUNTY Presiding Officer elections are one of the most important events of the Youth In Government year. However, this opportunity is just as vital for regular delegates as it is for candidates. Not only do delegates have the responsibility to select the best candidate for

the position, but candidates must also perform their PO duties with dedication, enthusiasm, and integrity. Understandably, many delegates base their decisions on friendship, rather than pure capability. Unfortunately, these choices can cause problems in the program as a whole. “We have to be choosing people who have the best skill sets to continue to take our program to the next

level year after year. And sometimes that can be your best friend, and sometimes it’s not,” says Youth In Government Executive Director Samantha Lane. YIG has an opportunity to grow and positively influence not only its delegates, but also the community. The POs are the ones leading everyone into a brighter future, but it is up to the delegates to decide who these important leaders will be.


4 CAPITOL BRIEFINGS OPENING CEREMONIES EDITION

21 FEBRUARY 2013

Letter from the Editor SOs have exceeded BY HALEY OBERHOFER weekend. This weekend, be expectations during Editor-in-Chief WEST CENTRAL FLORIDA sure to pick up all of the program year and

HALEY

ALI

CAT

Fifty-six years ago, Youth In Government was just an idea. Today, the program h a s o v e r 700 delegates, six legislative chambers, over 70 supporting officers, and 13 presiding officers. This simple idea inspired, and continues to inspire, thousands of students to pursue their passions and ignite change. It only takes one person, one idea, one mark to make a difference. Befriend someone outside of your delegation; debate a bill; step out of your comfort zone. Take your leadership to the next level. State Assembly will be over before you know it. Whether you are in Judicial, Page Corps., or Legislative, I encourage you to write for our publications and speak out this weekend. We welcome comics, funny page notes, and articles for our blog, The Page N o t e (www.thepagenote.blo gspot.com). Our Press Corps will also publish 5 issues of Capitol Briefings for your enjoyment this

the issues of Capitol Briefings to stay up to date with all things YIG. For 2013-2014 presiding officer candidate information, check out the blog to make an informed decision. In addition to candidate information, we will be reporting on all program areas. The members of the press corps. are the eyes and ears of this assembly and we need your help to keep the delegates informed. If you have any article ideas or events you would like to be covered, please contact a member of the press corps. and we will consider your article proposal. Our assistant editors , Ali Renckens and Cat Smith will be working hard this week to bring you issues of Capitol Briefings and posts on The Page Note. These

have helped expand their press programs and have worked on publications on a local and state level. All press corps members have worked extremely hard during their FDCs and meetings to bring you this publication. This weekend, I encourage you to push boundaries and make your mark on this program. Whether you are a sixth-year senior delegate, like me, or a first year page, there is always a place in this program to inspire and be inspired. I wish you all the best of luck in your program areas, and welcome to the 56th State Assembly. In the Spirit Democracy, Haley Oberhofer Editor-in-Chief 2011-2013

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF HALEY OBERHOFER

ASSISTANT EDITORS

ALI RENCKENS CAT SMITH STAFF ANDRIA BARRIOS JOANNA BEAZLEY  LANCE HAMIC KAYLIE HOROWITZ DEVIN PATEL SOPHIA UNSON KRISTA REINHARDT

of


4 CAPITOL BRIEFINGS FRIDAY EARLY EDITION

22 FEBRUARY 2013

Cooky Cases crack the code “For Bogey to have BY KRISTA REINHARDT formal than ordinary instead of walking. Agranove was on the a cart would be to cases as well as STAFF TAMPA DELEGATION fun and instructive for side of the disabled make the playing field Although their env i ro n men t may sometimes suggest otherwise, attorneys from judicial know how to have fun. They may seem serious, but during the first night of State Assembly, they debate what they call “cooky cases.” Similar to legislative silly bills, these judicial mock cases are less

f irst-year jud ic i al delegates. Julia Agranove, a first-year attorney from Ft. Myers delegation, enjoys the relaxed version of judicial. The cooky case Agranove was involved in at that time was about a disabled man named Charles Bogey. He was suing for the right to ride in a golf cart for a tournament,

man. “They should not discriminate against him.” She noted that the disability was not his fault and that riding in the cart was a privilege that should be given to him. Sydney Eskin, a second year attorney from Ft. Myers delegation, was on the opposing side.

uneven.” These judicial attorneys have serious procedures while maintaining a sense of lesser formality than usual for these cases. Eskin reflects: “It is a great introduction to first year attorneys in the District Court, while still a refresher for the older attorneys in the Supreme Court.”

We are the forty-nine percent BY SOPHIA UNSON STAFF SOUTH COUNTY DELEGATION With another exciting State Assembly comes a vivacious wave of new delegates, this year m a k i n g u p approximately 49% of the delegates present at this February 2013 State Assembly. The majority of us can recall memories of our

WEATHER HIGH 78° LOW 68°

first Youth in Government State Assembly, but can you recall your expectations? Your aspirations? The P r e s s C o r p s investigated a few YIG newbies on their past day’s experiences. “For Judicial, I thought that the whole process would resemble more of a regular trial, rather than a custom one. I

still enjoyed, it but it was different from what I expected, “says Delegate Payal Majmundar of Fort Myers High School. This was a common response among most District Court attorneys in their first year of Youth in Government. McKeel Academy Delegate, Ruchi Patel, explained that aside from the club having a

great reputation, she joined because of the encouragement of her peers that were already in the program. “I’m happy my friends encouraged me to; I love the club!” Without a doubt, YIG can look forward to more prosperous years to come with these wonderful new delegates!

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF HALEY OBERHOFER ASSISTANT EDITORS ALI RENCKENS CAT SMITH STAFF ANDRIA BARRIOS •JOANNA BEAZLEY LANCE HAMIC •KAYLIE HOROWITZ •DEVIN PATEL SOPHIA UNSON •KRISTA REINHARDT

FRIDAY EARLY EDITION · 22 FEBRUARY 2013

The next generation of servant leaders BY ALI RENCKENS ASSISTANT EDITOR TAMPA DELEGATION Strong student leadership is what has made and kept Youth In Government a lifechanging program for 56 years. Seven delegates are willing challenge themselves by meeting the challenges of a Presiding Officer. Katie Pacheco, Ranjika Pingale, and Liam Tirney are running for Commissioner of Agriculture. Paula Brito and Ranjika Pingale

are candidates for Chief Financial Officer, while Natalia Diaz and Bhuvnaa Mahajan seek election as Attorney General. Although each individual brings his/ her own flavor to the Executive Cabinet, they have all felt the powerful, personal impact of this program. Electing candidates that model servant leadership is essential for future delegates to have this same unforgettable experience, while officers still add spice to the program.

2013-2014 Presiding Officer candidates give their speeches. Photo courtesy of Alex Whiteside.

Meet the candidates; ask what they hope to accomplish as a Presiding Officer. As Editor-in-Chief Haley Oberhofer reminded delegates, “Take accountability

for your vote…this is your program.” For quotes from last night’s speeches, check out our blog The Page Note at thepagenote.blogspot. com.

New lobbyists support cabinet’s agenda Thursday night running races around the church to different committees, observing debates and encouragExecutive officers ing legislators to vote and Directors of Legis- for bills that fit their lative Affairs spent agenda.

BY CAT SMITH ASSISTANT EDITOR SOUTH COUNTY DELEGEATION

Surgeon General Anupa Kotipoyina encourages delegates in 2nd Committee to vote for a bill. Photo courtesy of Cat Smith.

Even before State Assembly began, they were researching bills and preparing their committee speeches. One of the Directors of Legislative Affairs for the Governor, Leah Colucci, had 15 bills pass to Second Committee. Commissioner of Education Audrey Guerra had five pass. However, Secretary of the Environmental Protection Cayla Newman says that there “weren’t many environment bills to

choose from,” but, “anything that helps the environment, I’m up for.” Regardless of whether or not the Cabinet has bills, the DLAs will still be busy this weekend. “I can still pick up bills to support so I’m still excited to be in the program,” states Abby Bernaldo, the DLA for the Office of Environmental Protection.

DOCKET INSIDE




 Last Name Loya Lozandier Lujan MacDonald Madden Mann Marnotes Martin Masjuan Maurer McBride McCauley McDaniel McFall McGinnis McKalip McKeage McMillin McNeill McPadden McQuilkin McWhirter Mellinger Menton Metcalf Mewborn Meyer Meyerson Milberg Millard Millay Miranda, C. Miranda, G. Modi Mogollon Molina Montoya



BH SS SH BH BS WH BH BS SH WS SS BS WH WS BS SH BH BS SH SS BS BS WH SH BH BS BH BS SS SS WS SS SH BH WH SH BH

Bill NB 2112 2075 1065 1074 3061 NB NB 2015 3038 2074 NB 3063 3040 1068 2077 1069 1070 2079 2076 1044 1072 3065 2081 1071 1074 1073 1076 2078 2136 3042 2080 2083 1075 3067 2009 1077

Seat 39 43 76 16 58 11 17 5 50 33 6 56 27 9 54 24 72 65 77 5 38 75 58 13 22 45 67 37 38 34 17 64 57 23 46 56 69

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Last Name Moorhead Moreno Morris Morse, C. Morse, K. Morzaniga Moskov Moxam Muldoon Mungall Murray Myers, D. Myers, M. Needles Neel Neville Nunner Nussbaumer Nussbaumer, D. O'Connel Oehler O'Halloran Leach Oliver Orinvil Ossa Oum Pacheco, D. Pacheco, K. Parady Parker Parrish Paschal Patel, A. Patel, D. Patel, J.

Bulkowski Burr Butler, M. Butler, S. Cahill-Patray Callahan Cameron Campbell, C. Campbell, I. Caron Castillo Catlin Ceilley Chaker Chang Chen Christy Cilenti Citty Clayton Colquitt Commock Commons Conte Contreras ContrerasSuarez Coristine Cortese Cosgrove Cosme Cosola Costlow Cott Craig

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Last Name Broyles

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1019

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Bill 2039 3009 2016 1010 2043 1012 2018 1011 3011 2020 2013 NB 3013 3006 NB 1014 1015 1017 2015 1016 1018 NB 2024 1115 3015 3017 2017

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Last Name Patel, M. Patel, Ne. Patel, Ni. Patel, Ru. Patel, Rya. Paul Payne, C. Payne, M. Pearson Pelitera Peng Peppler, Re. Peppler, Ry. Perez Phelps Pittman Pizzo Pliscott Ponader Ponzio Pool Pope, J. Pope, K. Potapow Powell Powers, L. Powers, M. Prescher Price Proctor Pszota Quaker Rachman Ralicki, I. Ravinder Reddick Reddy

Last Name Criss Curran Currie Daferede, C. Daferede, S. D'Amelio Daniele DeHay Derilus Deuell Diamond Diaz Dibble DiMenno Dodge Dolatowski Donofrio Doshi Dougherty Douglas Dreiser Dresier Driver, Je. Driver, Jo. Dunham, A. Dunham, M. Dunson Eliam Eliseo Elkin, C. Elkin, E. Elmarsi Evans Fairtrace Farneti Fay Feldhouse

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Bill 1093 2091 1088 2093 2094 2095 1090 2096 3081 2098 3083 NB 2097 3085 2099 1018 3050 1095 2100 1113 1092 3052 3054 3087 2102 2104 3056 NB 1094 3089 2101 2053 2103 3091 1097 1099 1096

Bill 1023 1024 2028 1027 3008 1025 2023 NB 2130 1080 2030 1026 3021 1028 3023 2055 2025 1029 2032 1030 3010 2027 3012 1031 2029 1032 2031 1034 NB 3025 NB 2033 3027 2035 1033 1035 2034

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 Last Name Renckens, M. Reynolds, N. Reynolds, P. Richards Rivera Robare Rodrigue Rodriguez, Al. Rodriguez, An. Rodriguez, C. Rogers Rohm Roorda Ross Roth Ruggeri Ryan, A. Ryan, H. Ryan, J. Sabatino, J. Sabatino, L. Sachs Saintil Santos Savage Schrimsher Seide Sepulveda Shaffer Shah Sharkey Shatkun Shaw Shir Shirey



 Last Name Ferguson Fezzie Flasterstein Fluellen Flynn Ford, D. Ford, J. Ford, W. Fordham Francis Fredrickson Freeman Fucigna Garcia Geiger George Gillen Gillespie Gipe Gittner Glogowski Glorie Godwin Goldstein Gonzalez Gordon Gotsch, V. Green Gregory, A. Gregory, Na. Gregory, Ni. Gregory, No. Griffin Grimaldo Groves Guccione Guerra

Following lunch, please proceed back to your Chamber with your program area.

Seat 1 53 78 22 1 12 40 25 4 52 2 54 61 55 77 37 72 8 58 75 80 8 4 9 5 46 37 55 55 81 34 22 34 59 49 4 71

1101 2108 1101 1103 1100 2110 2105 NB 3060 1105 3062 3064 NB NB 3066 2112 3097 3099 3068 2114 1102 2116 1107 1123 3070 2135 1104 3101

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When you arrive, please choose a vendor, grab your grub and enjoy the view!

Bill 1001 2000 1018 2001 2002 2003 2095 3000 NB 1000 2002 1005 2006 1002 1004 2005 2114 2007 2094 2008 2010 1007 3002 NB 3001 1008 3004 2009 1009 NB 2101 3003 3005 3007 2012 2014 NB

Last Name Shoucair, A. Shoucair, D. Shugars Shurr, T. Siegel Sigalow Sims, A. Sims, G. Skinner Smallwood Smith Snodgrass Soto Spina Stargel Stenger Stiekman, A. Stiekman, J. Suddeth, B. Suddeth, T. Sujdak Suresh Sutherland Swaans Tarolla Taylor, A. Taylor, J. Theurer Thomas Tirney Towe, M. Towe, R. Trainer Trenski Tropea Viravong Vithayathil

Last Name Guerrier Gulotta Haber Haines Hamaker Hammonds, S. Hammonds, T. Harrell, B. Harrell, L. Harris, A. Harris, M. Harrison Hart Hartman Hatton Havraniak Heink Henderson Herold Hessing Hoadley Hobbs Holland Hooker Hoza Ines Isaacson Jackson Jacobs Jacobson Jamal Jamerson Jason Jean Jernstrom

2053 2050 1052 1125 3020 3037 3039 1054 3041 1056 1051 2055 1058 NB NB 2052 3024 2057 2059 3043 1053 2054 1055 1060 2061 3026 2063 2056 2065

SH SS BS BH WS WH WH BS WH BS BH SH BS WH BH SS WS SH SH SS BH SS BH BS SH WS SH SS SH

Bill 3103 2107 3105 2109 1109 2118 1106 2111 1041 1010 1111 2120 3072 3107 2122 2113 3074 2124 1108 2126 1113 1110 3109 2128 2115 2117 2038 3111 2130 3076 NB 2119 3113 2121 3115 2132 2134

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Bill 2086 1047 3035 2049 2051 SS BH WH SH SH

Please have your orange lunch ticket out when you arrive at the 4th floor elevators.

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Last Name Vollmer Von Harten Von Stralendorff VonHolten Vyas Ware Watson Wertz, C. Wertz, H. West Whitefield Widrig Wilhelm Willis, A. Willis, J. Wilson, J. Wilson, K. Winfrey, C. Winfrey, P. Wisehaupt Wohl Wong Yancey, R. Yancey, S. Young, Eri. Young, Joe. Young, Ken. Yu Zador Zamborsky Zamora ZendejasPortugal

Last Name Jones, D. Jones, M. Jones, P. Joseph Joyce Joyner, B. Joyner, M. Junco Kabeer, A. Kabeer, Z. Kahn Keen Kessler Kimbrough King Knight Korah Kress Laatsch LaRochelle Lauretta Law Le Legel Legentus, F. Legentus, M LeMoyne Levengood Lewis Little Lizwelicha Locke Logan London Lopez, A. Lopez, M. Lopez, V.

1112 NB 1115 1117 3117 1119 3119 2082 3121 2127 1116 3123 1121 3125 2129 3078 3127 1118 1120 1027 1123 2131 3129 3080 3131 3082 2133 3133 3135 3137

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Friday lunch will be hosted on the 22nd Floor of the Capitol. Delegates will be released with their program area.

 Last Name Afsahi Agrios, A. Agrios, M. Al-Bahou Alvarez Amon Antoine Ausmus Ball Baron Barrera Barrios Bass Bates Beach Belal Bell Belyeu Bennett Berghash Beriswill, C. Beriswill, J. Betancourt Bisbee Blackband Bland Bonaro Boyes Bozor Bramley Brenestuhl Briscoe Brito Brockway Brown, J. Brown, L. Brown, M.

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FRIDAY LATE EDITION  22 FEBRUARY 2013

Press Corps opens up the Cabinet BY KRISTA REINHARDT TAMPA DELEGATION & KAYLIE HOROWITZ WEST CENTRAL FLORIDA DELEGATION

The specific responsibilities and workings of the Executive Cabinet have been kept in the dark for most delegates. The Press Corps had the opportunity to learn more about what happens in this branch during their conference with the Cabinet. Most delegates do not know how the

Cabinet decides what topics will be on the Legislative Agenda. The agenda depends on what each of the departments wants to focus on, and they build it from there. Directors of Legislative Affairs are a new branch this year and were a popular discussion topic. “They are really promoting a step in the right direction,” Lt. Governor Nishani

Attorney General Chelsea Probus answers a question during the Press Conference held on the 22nd Floor. Photo courtesy of Joanna Beazley.

Karunamuni said about the DLA’s. The cabinet also mentioned their interest in West Central Florida delegate, Chris

Campbell’s and Tampa delegate, Savannah Fredrickson’s joint resolutions and they cannot wait for more bills to reach their desk.

Inside edition: the Press Corps BY CAT SMITH ASSISTANT EDITOR SOUTH COUNTY DELEGATION The Press Corps has a sworn duty to be the informative and communicative voice of Youth In Government. We have written count les s articles explaining the legislative process, unveiling the mysteries of Judicial, in v e s t ig a t i n g the Office of Legislative Affairs. However, there

have been few that reveal the inner workings of our very own Press Corps. “The Press Corps is unique in comparison to the other program areas because we have the power to link all facets of the program. While our program area is small, our message reaches everyone,” explains Editor-in-Chief Haley O b e r h o f e r . Indeed, being a member of the Press Corps is an experience that will broaden

anyone’s horizons. We are given the unique privilege of venturing throughout the entire Capitol during our State Assembly weekend, exploring the inner workings of whatever branch we c h o o s e . Press delegates investigate stories, write articles, take pictures, and learn about every part of the program that they can. During State Assembly, we divide our time between running around the

Capitol and Supreme Court buildings and typing away furiously in the coveted Press b o x . “I thought it was going to be more hectic, but I like it, though I don’t know what’s coming next,” says first year Press delegate Sophia U n s o n . The Press Corps may not be the largest program branch in size, but the effort put into each and every publication more than makes up for that.


2 CAPITOL BRIEFINGS FRIDAY LATE EDITION

22 FEBRUARY 2013

Sullivan Senate Bill: Blood is blood BY KAYLIE HOROWITZ STAFF WEST CENTRAL FLORIDA DELEGATION

As debate heats up in chambers, plenty of hot topics are being addressed and debated, including Lindsey Brown’s bill about changing blood donation policies to allow men who have sex with men (MSM) to donate blood, which was first presented in the Sullivan Senate. Currently, the FDA does not allow these MSMs to donate blood

due to risk of it being contaminated with HIV. However, when this law was originally put into place, little was known about HIV and AIDs and delegates now feel is the time for that to c h a n g e . “The blood will be just as safe as any other person’s,” said Senator Peighton Jones. And it seems like it will be. All blood that gets donated is tested for HIV twice, so there would be a 1 in 1

billion chance of having a false n e g a t i v e . Senator Colquitt asked “Why should we discriminate against them if they will be tested anyway?” While statistical results show that MSMs are more likely to carry HIV, other groups are just as likely but they are allowed to donate. “These men will still be asked if they’ve travelled or if they’ve recently gotten tattoos or piercings, but they will not be asked on

their application if they have had sex with another man,” said author Lindsey Brown. Not all delegates were on board with this legislation, however. S e n a t o r Flasterstein asked “Do we have the right to tell the Red Cross how to run their program?” Debates in all chambers have gotten off to a fantastic start, and everyone eagerly anticipates what comes next on the docket.

Civil union joint resolution BY ANDRIA BARRIOS STAFF TAMPA DELEGATION A j o i n t resolution is a rare, but intriguing form of passing a law at State Assembly. Instead of including only the legislative branch, joint resolutions engage almost all program areas in the process of its passage. In the history of State Assembly, a joint resolution has never been passed all the way through. However, this year, the chances of this happening are high. In the William’s House

Chamber t h i s not it is constitutional. opposing gende r. afternoon, T h i s Delegates are eager to bill number r e s o l u t i o n hear all supporting or 3029, with p r o p o s e s opposing arguments. a u t h o r recognizing At time of press Savannah civil union, bill 3029 was Fredrickson the marriage passed in the of the Tampa b e t w e e n House. It awaits delegation, s a m e - s e x action by the will be couples, as Senate. debated as receiving the Follow this joint 4th on the same rights resolution’s journey docket. If Photo courtesy of Cat Smith. a n d as Andria Barrios passed, this takes a further look joint resolution will go responsibilities as in the next Capitol on to be debated in married couples of Briefings. the Williams Senate, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF and then proceed to HALEY OBERHOFER the Cabinet. But, ASSISTANTEDITORS unlike a bill, this joint ALI RENCKENS CAT SMITH resolution will then go STAFF to the Supreme Court ANDRIA BARRIOS JOANNA BEAZLEY for review to LANCE HAMIC KAYLIE HOROWITZ DEVIN PATEL determine whether or

SOPHIA UNSON KRISTA REINHARDT


SATURDAY EDITION • 23 FEBRUARY 2013

Campbell’s joint resolution goes to court 21.

However,

many

BY KAYLIE HOROWITZ delegates are not very STAFF with the WEST CENTRAL FLORIDA familiar DELEGATION process this piece of

The 56th State Assembly made Youth In Government history. For the first time, a joint resolution passed both the House and Senate and went to the Supreme Court for a constitutional ruling. Many of you may have heard the buzz going around about Chris Campbell’s proposal to lower the age of being able to run for governor from 30 to

legislature will have to go through at 2 p.m. After it approached the Cabinet, the Atty. General declared the r e s o l u t i o n unconstitutional, and now it awaits judgment from the Supreme Court. “That’s just the process that it goes through,” said Senator C a m p b e l l . Depending on how the Court decides to rule this constitutional

Chris Campbell . Photo courtesy of Kaylie Horowitz

amendment, the resolution will either move to the governor’s desk for passage or be stopped dead in Court. Campbell feels fairly confident about how this afternoon’s events

will go. “I’m sure it would be constitutional,” he said. “I don’t see why it wouldn’t be.” Check out thepagenote. blogspot.com for more!

Youth Advocates take Capitol by storm BY SOPHIA UNSON STAFF SOUTH COUNTY DELEGATION

Several present and former Florida Y o u t h I n G o v e r n m e n t delegates were given the opportunity to speak on behalf of the YMCA during the 2012 Youth Advocacy Days. Advocates were able to further their experiences in the

program by informing those in attendance - of whom were also Y leaders from around the state about the YMCA’s impact while also getting the word out about Florida YIG. Williams Senate President Alec Polansky explains, “Throughout the Advocacy Days, we were able to spread the idea of Florida

Youth In Government to the Y leaders.” In doing this, the advocates were able to assist the YMCA in their campaign and quest for possible improvements. By speaking for the Y, advocates were able to encounter valuable knowledge. “Because social responsibility is among the lessons the YMCA teaches, I

think that, by advocating for the Y, it allows us to exper ience t ha t lesson and reach out to others as well,” says Former Governor Glory M c C l u r e . Thanks to these Youth Advocates, the YMCA can look f o r w a r d t o encountering an even brighter future!


2 CAPITOL BRIEFINGS CLOSING CEREMONIES EDITION

23 FEBRUARY 2013

Pages anticipate next year BY ANDRIA BARRIOS I’m really excited,” us. Another page, Page Bradley Harwood Colin Pearson, of the STAFF the C a m p o Campo Camp-Cristina TAMPA DELEGATION o f

FOR MORE STORIES: THEPAGENOTE. BLOGSPOT.COM

LOOK OUT FOR THE NEW FLORIDA YIG PIN, COMING SOON!

LIKE US @FLORIDAYIG HELP US GET 1300 LIKES!

While high school delegates make up most of the Youth In Government process, State Assembly is also host to a group of savvy middle schoolers who work behind the s c e ne s to k e ep communication flowing. This is also a way these aspiring students can experience State Assembly early, delivering handwritten notes from one seat in Chambers to another. All six pages will be working in the Williams Chambers, either in House or in Senate. “It’s a new experience for me and

delegation enjoys coming to State Assembly in advance to see what he should be expecting when he comes back later as a high school delegate. “It’s better than getting here in high school and feeling c o m p l e t e l y overwhelmed because it’s your first time,” Page Abigail Harrison of Central Florida Delegation says. Each page looks forward to a rewarding and insightful time at the 56th Annual State Assembly this year, and possibly Years of Service awards in the future.

Directors of Legislative Affairs BY JOANNA BEAZLEY STAFF TREASURE COAST

WHAT’S NEXT? Y ADVOCACY DAYS 3/10-3/13 SERVANT LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE 4/19-4/21

Delegation explains. Being a page has encouraged many who have not experienced YIG to become more active in it. Paging also inspires students to participate in the Senior YIG program, and ultimately makes YIG better as a whole. When asked why they enjoy being pages, the answers came freely. “We’re respected,” Harwood states. “ Y o u f e e l important. You can see how everything works, but don’t have to participate yet,” Carly Thornton of Broward County tells

With a new year comes new changes to Youth In Government. The recently renamed group of lobbyists has now become the Office of Legislative Affairs. This year marked the pilot of this big change, and in Friday afternoon’s press conference, Youth Governor Christina Wiley

stated that for many State Assemblies in the future, she would like to see “further implementation of the Directors of Legislative Affairs system,” starting with this State Ass e m b l y . The new Directors of Legislative Affairs still perform the same duties as lobbyists, but this system is more similar to the lobbying program in the actual govern-

ment . The program has been changed to the Office of Legislative Affairs because it is an even more realistic experience in the political world. By doing this, says Gov. Wiley, it definitely brings “a new lobbying area to legislature.” Interested? Be sure to apply next program year in order to be considered for this program area.


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