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September/October 2010

features

Culinary Design 16 Gourmet-at-home chefs share their kitchens, recipes Story by Maria Sonnenberg

Unexpected Arrangements 28 Artist’s clever compositions surprise on many levels

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Story by Maria Sonnenberg

The Perfect Plan 36 Lot limitations inspire architect’s vision Story by Rolanda Hatcher-Gallop

Enlightening Solutions 50 Lighting systems conserve energy, automate usage Story by Jimi Gonzalez

Building Green on Lansing Island 60 Luxury home leaves small ecological footprint

departments

Story by Betsy S. Franz

First Impressions 72 Inspired design in local business lobbies

Color trends 12 Exotic purples

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Stuff We Love! 14 Chef ’s Best gadgets & tools 5 Fabulous Finds 59 Tales of the Cocktail

Houseplants 71

Story by Anne Straub

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Design Hotline 80 Reader requested advice

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Design Solutions Color Coordinated 82 Story by Anne Straub

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Kitchen Demolition

Story by Maria Sonnenberg

in every issue

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Editors note

Yourspace Reader photos Events calendar

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editor’s note

Art & Science inside Spaces As I review the interesting features in this fall issue of Spaces, I am struck by how each one has its own blend of art and science. Perhaps my mind is focused on academics and getting the kids back to school, but consider the following stories. Our cover story follows a local architect who crafted a beautiful family home on a unique-shaped corner lot that had long been ignored; likely because nobody knew how to build on it. Without a doubt, it took creativity to conceptualize a plan that would physically fit into the space and provide the design and necessities for a growing family. That idea had to be followed up with precise measurements and calculations to ensure it could translate into a solid foundation with load-bearing walls. See Andrew Kirschner’s initial site plan drawing as the story builds starting on page 36. In another feature, you’ll meet artist David Burton, who surprises with his expressive and sharp analytical mind. One of his most recent interpretations of consumer culture, “Burton’s Reef,” weighs in at 150 pounds and is 7.5 feet long by 4.5 feet wide. The project, which took seven months to compose, was assembled carefully using 600 separate pieces and is mounted to a sheet of plywood. A local builder, Balda Development, is bringing “green” building to Lansing Island. Two young, self-described cutting-edge early adopters wanted to build a sustainable model home bringing new technologies to our community. The pair combines a LEED AP schooled in interior design with an intuitive engineering mind always trying to figure out a better way. You can read about their research and see the creativity of their design beginning on page 60. Even our kitchen feature that takes you inside some gourmet kitchens in Brevard blends the technology of specific appliances with creative design and space planning each at-home chef desired for her cooking space. Each chef leaves us with a favorite recipe. Turn to page 16; which one will you try? Maybe you had the opportunity to see our teaser segment on Today in Brevard’s Lifestyles show in August, which took the viewer inside one of the fabulous kitchens we’re featuring in this issue. If you did see it, let me know if you enjoyed it. Don’t miss our new, Design Hotline, on page 80, where experts respond to readers’ requests for advice. Maybe there’s an idea here you can use in your own home! September, and even October, can be wet and drizzly outdoors. Take the time to support the arts and catch a show at one of our local theaters. Or, better yet, curl up in a comfortable chair with a good magazine; you just might learn something. Thanks for reading.

Spaces is published by Cape Publications, Inc. 1 Gannett Plaza, Melbourne, FL 32940 Tel (321) 242-3930, Fax (321) 242-3809

w w w. s p a c e s o n l i n e . c o m

Publisher Mark S. Mikolajczyk

Editor Janet McCluskey

Advertising Director Christopher Wood

Product Designer Corinne Ishler

Copy Editors Teresa Christopher Cris Davies

Specialty Publications Sales Executive Melissa Riordan

Photographers Rob Downey David Potter

Ad Traffic Coordinator Kathy Rooney

Writers Betsy S. Franz Jimi Gonzalez Rolanda Hatcher-Gallop Maria Sonnenberg Anne Straub Danika Warren

Design & Development Team

Leanna Farrell Jimi Gonzalez Derek Gores Betty Greenway Susan Hall Dave Jackson Andrew Kirschner Sisi Packard Dee Patnoe Terri Pentz Linda Tamasy Riitta Ylonen

For advertising inquiries contact Melissa Riordan at 321.242.3975 or mriordan@floridatoday.com Ann Greenwell at 321.242.3855

Janet McCluskey Editor, Spaces magazine spacesonline.com

Spaces assumes no liability for the contents, including any credentials stated or claims made by persons or establishments included herein. All rights reserved. Any reproduction, in whole or part, of this publication is prohibited without written permission. © Cape Publications, Inc. 2009

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advisory board

What changes should we consider inside the home and in the yard this fall before the hustle-bustle of the holiday season?

Leanna Farrell

Our experience shows that the early fall is a good time for new flooring, wallcoverings, bed ensembles and window treatments to be installed. Projects started later in the fall season are subject to more delays in delivery and labor availability due to the holidays. Leanna Farrell Senior Designer, Porter Baxter Interiors

Jimi Gonzalez

Here’s a short checklist of items that should be addressed before getting into our busy holiday season: Irrigation System: Cycle through to be sure all spray heads are working properly and timers are set in accordance with St. John’s Water Management requirements. ■

Derek Gores

Betty Greenway

■ Landscape Lighting: With the cooler months, entertaining increases, and daylight hours are shorter. Have the lighting system checked and bulbs replaced and adjusted for maximum effect.

Urns & pots as accents for color: October and November bring in a new assortment of cool-weather flowers for the fall and winter months.

Susan Hall

Vegetable Gardens: October is the month to get many of our herbs and vegetables started so they will produce throughout the first six months of the New Year.

October fertilization for our landscapes. September and October tend to be our wettest months, and a good time to fertilize as well. ■

Pressure cleaning: Following our wet and humid months, providing a light pressure cleaning to outdoor terraces and drives will clean up mold and mildew brought on by our humid summer weather. It can make a big difference in the appearance of your outdoor spaces.

Susan Hall, ASLA Owner, Susan Hall Landscape Architecture

A kitchen update/remodel would be first on my list and September is a great time for a DIY project! If the budget doesn’t allow for a complete kitchen redo, replacing countertops and hardware as well as refinishing cabinets, new paint on the walls and a few new accessories is a fantastic, cost eff ective way to change the look of the space most used during the holidays! Sisi Packard Director of Client Relations, Christopher Burton Homes

Dave Jackson

The heat is still on in Florida, this is a great time to de-clutter and deep clean your home inside. This way you are ready for all the holiday season will bring. Also, painting a room or two (or

Andrew Kirschner

even just a wall) will freshen your look. Don’t forget the front door, maybe a new doormat, wreath, or paint. First impressions are everything! Dee Patnoe Owner, Dee.Cor

This is a wonderful time to de-clutter and organize. Take inventory of supplies needed for entertaining well in advance. Consider updating accessories for a fresh look or adding necessary items that may be lacking. Re-stock the pantry. Discard anything that has exceeded its shelf life. Donate items you will never use. Now is not the time to try to accomplish major remodeling projects. Why add stress to the holidays? Linda Tamasy, ASID Owner, Linda Tamasy Designs Inc.

Have a question for an interior designer? Audio/ video specialist? A remodel or construction-related query? Space-planning or artrelated inquiry? Email your Ask the Board questions to jmccluskey@ floridatoday.com. Note Ask the Board in the subject line. We may

Sisi Packard spaces

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Dee Patnoe

Terri Pentz

Linda Tamasy

Riitta Ylonen

address your question in a future issue!




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color trends

Purple

EXOTIC purples in hues ranging from a demure lilac to a rich spiced plum offer many options for décor and fashion this fall. Use it as a vibrant accent or choose a more subtle grey-purple for a sophisticated neutral.

WHERE: A signature velvet sofa, striking drapery panels, or embroidered pillows. HOW: Colors range from a hint of lavender to a deep, ripe eggplant. WHY: Provides a global vibe and will spice-up your space. GOES WITH: Jewel tones and darker neutrals. PITFALLS: Select items easy to re-paint or slipcover should your fancy for purple wane by spring. spaces

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PRODUCTS: 1 – Majestic Glassware in Orchid. Martini, wine and flute glasses delicately tinged with a regal shade of purple. A purple gem-like finial with platinum detailing decks the stem. Sold separately in sets of four. $51.80. zgallerie.com 2 – Pin Shield #6 by Rishar Miranda. 14K gold and sterling silver set with amethyst, garnet, tourmaline, iolite, citrine and blue topaz. Size 2½” x 1¾”. $2300.00. Rishar.com 3 – Kate Spade New York “Chrisette” D’Orsay Pumps. Elegant, open-toe d’orsay satin pumps with a ruched fan detail at toe are the perfect evening shoe. Imported from Italy. $298.00. Bloomingdales Orlando. 4 – Kosta Boda Orchid Vase. This handmade glass art vase, designed by Göran Wärff, blends warm amber and lilac hues in a one-of-akind, functional piece. Large vase $525. kostaboda.us 5 – The Purple Passionflower grows on an evergreen vine. It enjoys full to partial sunlight, is a U.S. native, drought tolerant and butterflies love them! Available at your local nursery.


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“I wanted a kitchen that includes people and draws them in, where those who like to cook have room to play, and those who just like to eat still have a place to interact.” – Chryseia Brennan spaces

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cooking spaces

Culinary Design Gourmet-at-home chefs share their kitchens, recipes

Story by Maria Sonnenberg Photography by Rob Downey e tell ourselves that great rooms help us entertain friends, that bed­ rooms are for much-needed rest and that bathrooms should be our palaces for self-pampering, but we know the kitchen is the room that matters most, for here is where the heart of the home beats. Julia Child got it absolutely right when she said that “Dining with one’s friends and beloved family is certainly one of life’s primal and most innocent delights, one that is both soul-satisfying and eternal.” Three Brevard chefs opened their kitchens to us, sharing spaces that, although as different as these foodies’ favorite recipes, remain their homes’ most precious asset. Grandma’s kitchen, that spring of delicious childhood memories, overflows with grace and function, thanks to the design team of Concepts & Dimensions and RoomScapes of Brevard. The grandma here is Betty Cobb, wife of Tom, he of Makoto’s fame. An accomplished cook and matriarch to a large family, Betty desired a kitchen that could appropriately cater to her skills, yet remain a comfortable gathering place for her loved ones. Christine Whiteley, owner of Concepts & Dimensions and Jim Correa, senior designer and certified kitchen designer with RoomScapes, obliged with a design that ran off with a silver National Dream Home Award, which recognizes outstanding designs that provide livability, sustainability and healthy and nurturing environments. Christine and Jim’s original canvas was a typical 1980s kitchen, washed oak cabinetry and all. Although somewhat open, it was too enclosed for Betty’s taste. Left: Bright, convenient and central kitchen space was the starting point for this dedicated foodie who just finished a degree in nutrition and dietetics. 17 spaces


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“She wanted an atypical Florida home that would accommodate her large extended family,” says Christine. The generous 100-year-old home has good bones, and although remodeling had kept the lady looking classy, she needed a seri-

Opposite page: At the end of the island, ous makeover in the kitchen area. With Christine and Jim’s expertise, Betty a desk beckons grandchildren to sit a spell and watch grandma cook. “Betty got the homey kitchen she desired, but with wanted a desk area so the kids could sit new technology seamlessly incorporated. here and draw,” says Christine. “It’s all Christine stole three feet from the home’s about balance and rhythm.” Left: The Sharp brand microwave accessible from living room to open up the kitchen and added the large island frees up counter space. tongue-in-groove to the 13-foot ceilings to Touch one button and the microwave emphasize the country feel Betty craved. drawer opens and closes with fluid The richness of RoomScapes’ Wood-Mode efficiency. Above: Betty’s requests for the kitchen included two ovens, but not custom cabinetry with a cream and hand the typical stacked double ovens. Kitchen distressed umber wash, appears both home- designer, Jim Correa obliged with two spun and elegant. Matching panels hide the that flank the range area. state-of-the-art appliances to minimize 21st century intrusion into the space. “Although I had worked closely with Christine and RoomScapes on the project, the final results were even more beautiful than I had imagined,” says Betty. “The very best part of the design was how even the smallest detail blended with, and enhanced the overall effect. I am very

An accomplished cook and matriarch to a large family, Betty desired a kitchen that could appropriately cater to her skills, yet remain a comfortable gathering place for her loved ones. 1

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Right: Wood-Mode custom cabinetry with a cream and hand distressed umber wash, appears both home-spun and elegant. Matching panels hide the state-ofthe art appliances.

conscious of even little flaws, but I would not change one detail. I wanted a totally “finished” look, and this room is exactly what my family and I had hoped for.” The avid chef loves the three Wolf stovetop modules RoomScapes installed. “It’s a great way to add flexibility to your surface cooking,” says Joe Goldblatt, owner of RoomScapes. The modules can be mixed and matched, and are available in electric, gas, electric grill and induction, and these are just some of the options. Another Betty favorite is the Sharp microwave,

“This recipe makes a some-what unusual, but delicious, side dish with beef or pork.” – Betty COBB apple Casserole

Betty Cobb’s Pine

Ingred ients lenda , etc) 1 cup su ga r (or Sp e flour 6 tbsps. all-pu rpos juice p chedda r tbsps. pineapple 2 cups grated shar , drained, and 6 ks un ch le pp ea 2 20-oz. ca ns pin ) e = 2 cups of cr umbs reserved d: Ritz - 1 1/3 sleev de en mm co (re bs n 1 cup cracker cr um tra for greasin g pa tter, melted, plus ex bu ) ck sti (1 s. sp tb 8 Di rections 350 degrees F. Preheat the oven to th butter. e casserole dish wi r in the cheese. Grease a mediu m-siz d flour. Gradua lly sti an r ga su e th er th ge r to ients are well comIn a large bowl, sti d sti r until in gred an , ks un ch le pp ea Add the drained pin casserole dish. e into the prepared ur xt mi e th melted butter, and ur Po . bined e cracker cr umbs, th e in mb co , wl bo m til even ly blended. In another mediu a rubber spatula un th wi g in rr sti , ce jui for 45 to 60 mi nreserved pineapple pple mi xture. Ba ke ea pin of top on e ur Spread cr umb mi xt brow n. n lde go til un or , utes Serves 8. spaces

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Above: At-home-chef Chrys Brennan begins preparing her Fresh Basil Tomato Pasta. She said she loves her Wolf range for responsive, intense, even heat. For more of her interview go to www.brevardcountymoms.com, click on Entertainment, and select Lifestyles Today in Brevard. Choose the August 9 show and scroll almost to the end for the kitchen segment.

unobtrusive yet easily accessible under the large island. “It’s not in your face and also frees up the counter,” says Joe. Touch one button and the microwave drawer opens and closes with fluid efficiency, negating any possible spills. Betty wanted two ovens, and Correa obliged with two that flank the range area. “She wanted symmetry, not the typical stacked double ovens,” says Joe. At the end of the island, a desk beckons grandchildren to sit a spell and watch Grandma cook. “Betty wanted a desk area so the kids could sit here and draw,” says Christine. “It’s all about balance and rhythm.” oncepts & Dimensions and RoomScapes collaborated again in another stunningly well-balanced kitchen design, this one for Chryseia Brennan’s enclave just a few steps from the Indian River in Cocoa. Bright, convenient and central kitchen space was the starting point for this dedicated foodie who just finished a degree in nutrition and dietetics. “No matter where I’ve lived, people congregate around the kitchen,” says Chrys. “Maybe they follow their nose. I wanted a kitchen that includes people and draws them in, where those who like to cook have room to play, and those who just like to eat still have a place to interact. I love to cook. It’s a vanishing art in our busy lives. The better the kitchen design, the easier and more fun to prepare healthy meals.”

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Right: Brennan selected Sub Zero freezer drawers one stacked on top of the other to accommodate ease-of-reach. They’re at arms- length from her cooking space behind the long island. Neighboring appliances include a wine refrigerator with settings to accommodate red and white varietals, an ice-maker and a microwave drawer.

“I love to cook. It’s a vanishing art in our busy lives. The better the kitchen design, the easier and more fun to prepare healthy meals.” – ChrySeIA BrennAn

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The Brennan kitchen is the focal point in the main floor of the three-story home. Even though ceiling heights soar to 33 feet, the eyes are still riveted on the kitchen. “The kitchen spilled out into the first floor,” says Chrys. “It started out as an important room, but became a focal point. It had a mind of its own. The plans were drawn and redrawn until the kitchen found the space and the design that it needed. Planning was the most challenging aspect. I did not trust that my ideas would work. I could look at a


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Fresh Basil/Tomato Pasta

Above: The finished dish. Can’t you just smell the sautéed garlic in the air?

“It’s a great way to use a bumper crop of garden tomatoes to take advantage of good seasonal produce prices.” – Chrys Brennan plan and see that it should work on paper, but Christine looks at a plan and visualizes the finished product and then she improves it 100%!” Whiteley introduced Brennan to Joe Goldblatt of RoomScapes, who unleashed an almost magical array of appliance options. “I did not know some of these things even existed,” says Chrys. The long kitchen island, flanked on one side by the unique log dining table Chrys discovered in Savannah, with its Sharp under counter microwave, Sub-Zero freezer drawers, self-draining icemaker, wine refrigerator and veggie sink with Franke faucets, is a foodie’s idea of heaven. “I’m a little territorial in the kitchen, so the real challenge for Christine and Joe was to give me access and control, and still allow room for socializing and additional cooks,” says Chrys. “I think the placement of the island; veggie sink and appliances do that perfectly.” Across from the island is the Wolf 48” pro-style

Ingredients/Equipment 5 medium (or three large) vine-ripened tomatoes 3 medium-large cloves of garlic 1 to 2 tbsps. olive oil, canola or safflower oil 8 oz. thin, whole wheat linguini or spaghetti 1 small fresh basil plant Freshly cracked black pepper (to taste) Use large colander and heavy skillet, but not iron, due to interaction of acid in tomatoes, and a 10quart pot. Preparation (10 - 15 minutes) Peel and seed tomatoes, chop coarsely into 1/4 to ½” cubes and allow to drain in colander (Tomatoes are easily peeled by dropping them into boiling water for about 30 seconds, removing from water with slotted spoon and peeling immediately). Fill pot half full with water and heat to boiling. Warm skillet on very low heat. Peel and slice garlic thinly, across the grain. Wash basil leaves; shake off excess water and cut into thin strips. Cooking (10 – 15 minutes) Bring skillet temperature to low, add enough oil to lightly coat bottom of pan. When oil is warm, add garlic slices. Sauté gently, until just beginning to brown (If sticking occurs add a bit more oil). Add tomatoes from colander to skillet, pepper and increase heat to medium high. Add pasta to boiling water, stirring frequently to prevent clumping. Agitate the skillet containing tomatoes and turn tomatoes frequently, allowing excess liquid to evaporate. As pasta becomes al dente, add basil strips to tomatoes in skillet. Pour pasta into colander to drain, turn heat off under skillet and gently stir basil into tomatoes. Divide pasta into four equal servings and top with the tomato mix. Serve with aged parmesan or Romano cheese shavings, chili pepper flakes or a dash of salt and garnish with basil tops. Enjoy! 23

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Above: Function was foremost for at-home-chef Toni Lowe, but only when wrapped in a beautiful setting. She found both in the kitchen of her new Christopher Burton home in Fairway Lakes. Right: A 48” wide peninsula arcs around the kitchen, where Bordeaux granite, with cream and burgundy veins, reigns.

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range. Six gas burners and a griddle on top and two ovens – 30” and 18” – cover all cooking needs. Since the house has such an open layout and proper ventilation was critical, RoomScapes installed an oversized hood that whisks out any lingering odors. All counters, plus backsplash, glow with Delicatus granite with flecks of quartz that shine with an almost three-dimensional quality. Tiny “purple freckles” in the stone recall the Bordeaux color of the sofa nearby. Art glass with an organic motif floats as the light fixture over the sink, leavening the kitchen’s supreme functionality with a soft natural edge. “Chrys is one of those clients with a fine sensitivity to beauty as well as function,” says Christine Whiteley. 24


Above: Toni didn’t want electrical outlets to mar the sculptural quality of the surface, so all electricity is accessed from the underside of the buttery cherry cabinetry custom- made by Melbourne Architectural Millwork Company.

or Cordon Bleu graduate Toni Lowe, who is luxuriating in the wonders of her own new kitchen, function is foremost, but only if wrapped in a beautiful setting. Does Begheera the cat, who enjoys snacking on spinach, realize the effort her owner went through to create the new kitty hangout? Probably not, but Toni’s kitchen, in her new Christopher Burton home in Viera’s Fairway Lakes, was the result of highly detailed planning. “I started doing research on appliances 10 years ago while we were living in Portland,” says Toni. “We really tried to think this out.” A 48” wide peninsula arcs around the kitchen, where Bordeaux granite, with cream and burgundy veins, reigns. “When I saw the granite, I ran to it and hugged it,” says Toni, who claims she has a picture to prove it. The granite is used in the backsplash, too, but Toni wanted no outlets to mar the sculptural quality of the surface, so all electricity is accessed from the underside of the buttery cherry cabinetry custom made by Melbourne Architectural Millwork Company. Designer Melinda Palmese helped Toni and Ken Lowe not to stray away from consistency and coordination, and offered unique problem-solving ideas, such as the immense cherry door that hides the corner pantry.

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Above: Toni is particularly thrilled with the Electrolux speed cooker, a grillconvection-bake-microwave combination with an instrument panel reminiscent of an airplane’s. Right: Toni always pre-measures her ingredients out in small clear glass bowls. She said it’s much easier when you start actually cooking your dish to just add your pre-portioned ingredients.

Toni Lowe’s Putanesca Ingredients atoes 4 14.5 oz. cans diced tom oil ve oli ¼ cup ex tra virgin 1 tsp. oregano es, or to taste 1/8 tsp. red pepper flak , sliced ½ cup Kalamata olives pped cho ey, ½ cup Italia n parsl d ine ¼ cup capers, dra d 6 cloves garlic, crushe paste ined and chopped into dra s, 1 can flat anchovie 12 oz. pen ne pasta Directions l. atoes and bri ng to a boi Combine olive oil and tom frequently. ng rri sti e, tim ts, one at a Add remain ing ing red ien d and flavors have and stir until thickene Reduce heat to sim mer mi nutes. melded, about 30 to 45 chicken or fish. ne, or as a rel ish over pen te Serve over al den

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Toni’s pride-and-joy is the six-burner DCS stove that sits under the imposing cherry hood. The stove, together with the Sub-Zero refrigerator, were nonnegotiable components. “If I couldn’t get my DCS or my 48” Sub-Zero, everything else would have to change,” says Toni. Bells and whistles, such as the whisper-quiet operation of the Asko dishwasher, were very important. A KitchenAid warming drawer slides out from one of the cherry drawers, ready to tackle any slow cooking projects Toni may encounter. The Sub-Zero’s ethylene filter keeps produce fresh. Touch-control Delta faucets turn on and off


effortlessly over both the kidney-shaped main sink and the tiny oblong prep sink in the island. Toni is particularly thrilled with the Electrolux speed cooker, a grill-convection-bake-microwave combination with an instrument panel reminiscent of an airplane’s. “This will do everything,” she says. For flooring, the Lowes opted for wide planks of tiger wood, an appropriate choice, since their home sits next to one of the holes at Duran Golf Club. Twelve-foot ceilings provide the scale necessary for massive appliances such as the Sub-Zero fridge that is dear to Toni’s heart. “I wanted to build an open, beautiful, warm kitchen that could support all the appliances I wanted,” explains Toni. “I think we did it.” n

Above: Our Cordon Bleu trained chef’s finished dish, Putanesca. And, it was mighty tasty too!

“I wanted to build an open, beautiful, warm kitchen that could support all the appliances I wanted.” – TOnI LOWe



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Artist’s clever compositions surprise on many levels

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Story by Maria Sonnenberg

Photography by Dave Potter


rtist David Burton’s mind must be an amazing thing, a conglomerate of the eclectic, a depository of the unique. His Indialantic home reflects the feverish goings-on inside Burton’s talented little gray cells. This is an artist’s house, no doubt about it. Creativity erupts here, gathering

momentum along the home’s walls, bombarding the visitor with a frenzy of images. Every square inch of wall and table space seems so packed with paintings, assemblages and sculptures that the house seems ready to explode onto neighboring A1A. 29

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Above: This family photo taken in Pittsburgh shows David and his siblings with his dear mother. David is 2nd in from the right. In this photo he’s 13 years old. Right: One of Burton’s recent works, “Burton’s Reef” is headed for Michigan soon as an entry in the ARTPRIZE 2010 show. The recently re-framed piece is approximately 4.5 X 7.5 feet long, weighs about 150 pounds, and took seven months to create. Photo at right by Ron Constantino.

Burton’s story began in Hartford, Connecticut, but quickly shifted to Indialantic, where his family moved in 1967 and where he has stayed put, a succession of quirky dachshunds in tow. “We moved to Palm’s Ocean Inn, literally across the street,” says the artist. “I’ve lived within three square miles since.” While his dad pursued a career with NASA, Burton chased the perfect wave. “We’d get up at 3 a.m. and go to Sebastian Inlet to be there at first light, and if the waves were good, we’d be there until dark,” says Burton. His earlier works evoke the many days he spent surfing. Although he abandoned the sport years ago because of sun damage to his eyes, surfing, fortunately, never left him. Burton’s hair is no longer shoulder-length and bleached blond by the sun and the sea, but he retains that dude-like affinity to slice through pretensions as easily as cutting across the perfect wave. If Picasso had ridden the waves with Calder, the resulting works could be early David Burtons. Bright, colorful abstracts on watercolor paper featured ocean motifs such as boats and waves, as well as Picasso-like faces, and a couple of quick sketches of Max, the first doxie in a long line of Burton’s weenie dogs. As his style matured, his paintings gained Chagalllike convolution, but Burton credits abstract expressionist Louise Nevelson for truly sparking his inspiration. The 20th century artist, famous for her “crates” or assemblages, grouped everyday objects together with results that confronted viewers with totally unexpected compositions. spaces

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“When you put together things that other people have thrown out, you’re really bringing them to life, a spiritual life that surpasses the life for which they were originally created,” said Nevelson. Like Nevelson, Burton is a “spiritual forager” whose works redefine the meaning of images ingrained into our subconscious. “David Burton’s artistic review of popular culture resonates instantly with people,” says Claudia Pastorius of the Gallery Club in downtown Melbourne. “David takes images ingrained in our minds from the visual bombardment of mass consumer culture and redefines their meaning in mesmerizing compositions that are alive, hilarious and innovative.” “Burton’s Reef,” for example, a huge three-dimensional mixed media assemblage, presents pop culture icons such as Bart Simpson and the Beatles’ Yellow Submarine


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Above top: Toys and action figures, quintessential consumer culture pieces, are primo fodder for a Burton. Above: “Robots Rule” by Burton.

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within a maelstrom of imagery. The work is a favorite, earning one of the highest ratings in Ovation’s TV “Art or Not” online program. Virginia art collector Rob Rothstein lusts after it. Rothstein, who owns more than a dozen Burtons, loves the artist’s attitude. “Dave exceeds Andy Warhol by a quantum leap,” he says. “I call it ‘stealth art’ for lack of a different word. He has a vivid imagination with no boundaries. His art is not for everybody, but it definitely tickles my fancy.” Burton lately has opted to finish his assemblages using a satin black that adds a sober mysteriousness to the pieces. Individually primed, textured and painted, the pieces are head-turners, never boring. Elvis fan Bob Fleury fell for Burton’s “Elvis,” the three-dimensional piece that pays homage to all facets of The King. “The night I saw that piece, I blocked out everything else,” says the Indialantic resident. Fleury remains in awe of Burton’s powers of observation. “I first met Dave at a downtown Melbourne gallery, and he immediately told me that he had seen me at the Blueberry Muffin earlier that morning,” says Fleury. “That restaurant was super busy and loaded with people and I looked totally different from the morning, yet here was this guy who remembered me. His powers of observation have to be absolutely amazing.” Collectors like Fleury enjoy Burton’s penchant for good naturedly carousing with viewers’ minds. During the Indialantic Art Shows in the 70s, Burton, tongue decidedly in cheek, placed a $1 million price tag on one of his paintings. His playful titles are another venue for not taking himself too seriously. “Deer Mother,” for example, is a wall-sized enlargement of the artist’s


Above left: Local collector and Elvis fan, Bob Fleury purchased Burton’s three-dimensional piece titled “Elvis,” and proudly displays it in his home. Burton lately has opted to finish his assemblages using a satin black that adds a sober mysteriousness to the pieces. Above: Burton’s work, “Deer Mother,” is a wall-sized enlargement of the artist’s mother as a teen with a deer skull over her smiling face.

“Dave’s work is so whimsical, that at first glance, you don’t know whether to take it seriously or not.” – Local collector, Nelson Green mother as a teen. Over her smiling face, Burton planted a deer skull a friend gave him. “It’s sort of Gary Larsen, and I think my mother would have loved it,” he says. He’ll never run out of subject matter, for it is all around him, at thrift stores, garage sales, dollar stores and in friends’ homes. “I use the things most available to me,” he says. When a surfboard shaping buddy gave him 300 used brushes, the loot became the basis for his Brush Series. Toys and action figures, quintessential consumer culture pieces, are primo fodder for a Burton. “I raid my friends’ kids’ rooms,” he says. “They panic when I come over.” With a spaceman action figure and a sculpture of a Moon Pie, Burton’s “Man on the Moon Pie” pasteurizes his space rat roots with his favorite childhood treat. “The Last Cookie,” a piece that either delights or offends, features 33

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From the top descending: “Man on the Moon Pie,” the original sculpture and a color print on the right hanging above the mantel in local collector Nelson Green’s home. “Twilight” from his Brush series also in the Green’s home and “The Pearl,” from the estate of collector Rob Rothstein. spaces

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a gobbling Cookie Monster in the midst of a kitschy dime store diorama of the 12 Apostles. “Dave’s work is so whimsical, that at first glance, you don’t know whether to take it seriously or not,” says Nelson Green, owner of South East Flooring America and a Burton collector. “When you look closer and see the clever attention to detail, you start to see the true artistry that he puts into it. But when all is said and done...they are really just fun to look at.” To supplement his art, Burton has been a waiter, a pool builder and even an appliance salesman (at Al Booth’s), as well as a gallery owner (two in downtown Melbourne). For several years, he rattled around Brevard Community College, and although he cut his education just a credit or so short of a degree, he did manage to drive BCC Art Chair Nancy Dillen to distraction with his penchant for following different drummers. “Nancy was one of my favorite teachers, but I always gave her a hard time,” says Burton. “I was always doing my own thing.” Doing his thing these days entails a 24-foot Mercedes commercial van, which Burton uses as his house on wheels to hit the art show circuit. A 24-foot


trailer houses his works and completes the picture. He schedules about ten art festivals annually, hitting the big ones in St. Louis, Chicago, Louisville and points north. He’s thinking of going Hollywood later this year, with a show at Beverly Hills’ Rodeo Drive. David’s works have earned him numerous awards, including Best in Show at the 2009 Winter Springs Art Show and first prize at the 2007 Brevard Museum of Art juried show. To retain artistic control – and to make his art affordable to all – Burton makes limited edition prints of all his works. While some of his pieces range into the thousands, his prints sell for $39. “It makes them very affordable for someone who can’t afford to buy a larger piece,” he says. Everything, from printing to framing, is done at home. “I don’t think it’s going to be done right unless I do it,” he says. “Very few things I outsource. I like to do whatever I feel like doing.” n You can view more pieces of David Burton’s artwork at www.davidburtonartwork.com and reach him directly at 321-693-9876 or dburton101@cfl.rr.com.

Above: Karen Green stands next to one of Burton’s sculptures in her own home.

“When you look closer and see the clever attention to detail, you start to see the true artistry that he puts into it. But when all is said and done…they are really just fun to look at.” – Nelson Green

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Lot limitations inspire architect’s vision Story by Rolanda Hatcher-Gallop Photography by Dave Potter

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at home with

Some architects would have a hard time designing a multi-level home on a rather tight, cone-shaped grassy corner lot along a canal. But Andrew Scott Kirschner saw it as the perfect place to design and build his family home. 37

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Above: Andrew’s original drawing captures the shape of the lot he had to work with. Right: A cross-cut travertine walkway, with a large outdoor garden fountain near the entryway, leads up to double mahogany front doors.

“I definitely look forward to coming back here every day after work.” – Andrew Kirschner

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“This was one of the last lots sold in the community, probably because it was really hard to plan, but I thought that I could do something awesome here,” Kirschner says of the area where his 4,000-square-foot home now resides. “I think it really turned out well. We have views on each side of the home,” he says. The home is located in a cozy cul-de-sac in Indian Harbour Beach. It’s a family-friendly neighborhood of about 18 houses, all just minutes from the Indian River. But what sets the Kirschner home apart is its unique design, planned so that it takes advantage of the lot’s size and angles while


Left: From the foyer, warm Brazilian Cherry hardwood floors lead guests through an elliptical arch flanked by Tuscan columns into the family’s great room.

providing the family with a private resort-like lifestyle. “I definitely look forward to coming back here every day after work,” says Kirschner, an award-winning architect whose Melbourne-based firm, Jackson Kirschner Architects and Associates, specializes in residential architecture. Kirschner and his partner, David Boyd Jackson, have designed custom homes ranging from 2,000 to 30,000 square feet. Their craftsmanship can be seen in projects from New York to Florida. 39

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Above: The dining room is anchored by a rich mahogany dining table. The head chairs are covered in a Brunschwig & Fils toile fabric depicting an Asian scene. An iron chandelier with natural woven accents emits a soft glow in the room and blends nicely with the wooden shades on the windows.

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Above: The study is covered with grass cloth wallpaper and plenty of wood accents. The bookcase is made of African sapele, a reddish- brown wood with rich graining that is very similar to mahogany, but not as expensive.

In addition, both men are LEED-accredited professionals with advanced knowledge in green building practices. Known for his attention to detail, Kirschner’s home designs have been featured in several magazines, including Florida Design and Florida Architecture. Just four years after graduating from the University of Auburn’s College of Architecture, he won Builder Magazine’s 1995 Aurora Award for Best Custom Home in the Southeastern United States. When it came time to design his own home, he poured all of his skills and expertise into the project, as well as his heart, providing loving touches for his wife, Tracy, and their three children. A cross-cut travertine walkway, with a large outdoor garden fountain near the entryway, leads up to double mahogany front doors. They open to an airy foyer anchored by Brazilian Cherry hardwood flooring. “There are hardly any halls in the house but the rooms kind of adjoin to the other rooms, which I think adds character,” Kirschner says. The interior evokes a British-West Indies feel that gives

The interior evokes a British-West Indies feel that gives the home warmth and continuity.

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Above: In order to optimize space Kirschner centered the kitchen so that it could be accessed from the foyer as well as the living quarters. Shaker-inspired white inlaid cabinetry provides ample storage and Gallo light granite covers the countertops.

“We’re also seeing where people are opting for smaller, more efficient spaces.” – Andrew Kirschner

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the home warmth and continuity. To the left of the foyer is the dining room, complete with a mahogany dining table. The head chairs on either end of the table are covered with a Brunschwig & Fils toile fabric depicting an Asian scene. The fabric came from draperies in the Winter Park showroom of the Lawler-Cherry Interior Design firm. Erika Cherry, senior project manager and director of operations, explains that the firm, which she runs with principal designer Suzanna Lawler, was located below Kirschner’s office for several years. “He would see the draperies and inquire about the fabric, so we used them on the chairs,” she says. An iron chandelier with natural woven accents on the base and shades is another focal point. Married with the


Above right: The breakfast nook is Tracy’s favorite space because the family spends a lot of time together there.

window treatments of woven shades and a large, wooden buffet, the room is understated and beautiful. To the right of the foyer is the study, covered with grass cloth wallpaper and plenty of wood accents. “This adds a lot of texture to the room,” Cherry says. The bookcase is made of African sapelé, a reddishbrown wood with rich graining that is very similar to mahogany, but not as expensive. Kirshner says the current trend in custom spaces is to look for quality materials that add luxury to the home without exorbitant prices. “We’re also seeing where people are opting for smaller, more efficient spaces,” he says. In optimizing the space within his own home, Kirschner centered the kitchen so that it could be accessed from

Above: A true butler’s pantry keeps dry goods and glassware organized and wine chilled appropriately. 43

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Above: From the cover, photo by Dave Potter.

Above: Double doors from the veranda open into the great room which was inspired by the look of a Caribbean resort lounge. The space is framed with large windows and beautiful paneling, and surrounded by soft sage walls. A 15-foot coffered ceiling with recessed lighting illuminates the room.

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the foyer as well as the living quarters. “Even though I wanted them to be angled, most of the rooms are squared. The kitchen is sort of the pivot-point,” he says. The space features Shaker-inspired white, inlaid cabinetry and Gallo light granite countertops. Adjacent to the kitchen is the family breakfast nook, which was designed by Tracy Kirschner. “The breakfast nook is really my favorite room because we are together more as a family in there than anywhere else in the house,” says Tracy, who does book-


keeping for her husband’s firm and is also a stay-at-home mom for Above left: The stairway that leads to the second floor was designed with mahogany steps and painted risers Avery, 8, Amanda, 6, and Anderson, 3. to delineate the ascent. The mahogany hand railing The room’s large windows provide an excellent view of the canal, climbs upward across the white pickets. Above top: where Tracy can watch practice runs of the Olympic row teams staying The fireplace in the great room is based on a traditional design made of mahogany with a green marble at The Pines in the winter. For a closer look, the family can sit outside on the wrap-around surround. Above: Custom catch-all cabinetry located just inside the garage door was designed to manage veranda, accented with Bahamian shutters – an architectural element mail and provide a recharging station for phones and Andrew Kirschner borrowed from New Orleans. In addition to a iPods. The laundry room is to the right. lounge area, the space also has an outdoor grill, and a dining area near the pool. His wife believes the home is in a great location along the canal to see manatees and other wildlife. “In the spring, dolphins will bring their babies to this part of the canal and teach them how to feed. It’s really cool to watch,” she says. 45

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3 1,3) The back of the lot is on a canal and Kirschner’s design maximizes the use of this expansive space. The family spends lots of time outside enjoying the wrap-around veranda, outdoor grill and dining areas near the pool. 2) Avery and Anderson play in the pool. 4) The kids play area outdoors includes a swing set and a climb-on pirate ship moored in their backyard-also designed by Dad. 5) Kirschner manages to grab a fishing pole in between takes. 6) The exterior accent of aluminum shutters in arches across the back of the home is a style Kirschner picked up on a visit to New Orleans. It provides a finishing detail while helping to protect the home from afternoon sun. spaces

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Above top: A is for Avery and this is his bedroom space on the second floor. Crown molding accents the height of the 10-foot ceilings. Above: A compact yet well-planned play area on the second floor also provides extra storage for toys.

An extra bonus for the children is the swing set and play area in what resembles a pirate ship moored in the back yard. “Anderson spends hours in here, playing in the sandbox,” Kirschner says as he pushes his young son on the swing. The double doors from the veranda open into a great room, framed with large windows and beautiful paneling, surrounded by soft sage walls. The look was inspired by a Caribbean resort lounge. A 15-foot cofferred ceiling with recessed lighting illuminates the space. A hidden panel above the marble fireplace reveals a television. “We were going for a resort/clubhouse feel,” Kirschner says of the space. Cherry says the paisley pillows, with accents of paprika mixed with neutral tones, were used as the lead fabric to pull the accessories together for the room. A rich, brown leather

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Above top: A is also for Amanda and she loves her rabbit, Snowball. Above top inset: Kirschner designed a pull-out step in the bathroom for Amanda to use to easily reach the sink, and then push back in when not in use. When Amanda outgrows the extra step, it can be turned over and put to use as a drawer, providing extra storage. Above: The guest bedroom on the main level is painted a soothing ocean blue. 48


ottoman also adds a layer of warmth. The children’s bedrooms and indoor play area are located upstairs, along with a soundproof media room that can comfortably seat 10 people. The large projector screen, which can be used as a television and for watching movies, is connected to a SMART system that can be accessed throughout the home. Kirschner says his wife sometimes uses the system to turn off the TV in the media room in order to get his attention. “It works,” he laughs. Back on the first level, off of the kitchen, is the guest bedroom and bath that serves three functions: guest bath, pool bath, and powder room. Off of the foyer, past the study, is the master bedroom, which the Kirschners are in the process of remodeling with a more coastal décor. The finished room, which will be featured in a future issue of Spaces. Tracy Kirschner says the home already feels like paradise, from the décor and layout to its very location. “We not only like the house, but also like the neighborhood and our neighbors. This house has everything we need,” she says. “Andrew and I can see ourselves growing old here.” n

Above: The unique design of the architect’s house takes advantage of the lot’s size and angles, but most importantly it has become a family home all the Kirschners enjoy, even their dog, Lucky.

“Andrew and I can see ourselves growing old here.” – Tracy Kirschner SOURCES: Architect: Andrew Kirschner, Jackson Kirschner Architects and Associates, P.A. Builder: Greg Kirschner Landscape Architect: Susan Hall, Susan Hall Landscape Architecture Audio-Video: AVA Design Group Doors, Cabinets, Trim: Melbourne Architectural Trim Carpentry: Dick Sias Painter: Evans Painting Pool: Watershapes by Greg Ginstrom Inc. Interior Design Consultants: Lawler Cherry Interior Design Window Treatments: Draperies Etc. 49

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tech check!

Enlightening solutions Lighting systems conserve energy, automate usage Story by Jimi Gonzalez Photography by Dave Potter imilar to music, fragrances, and color, light impacts the way you feel as well as the mood of your home. Proper lighting has the ability to transform a room, creating the perfect atmosphere whether you are entertaining or relaxing. As your needs change throughout the day, your lighting should adapt as well. In your home offi ce, it should be bright when you are reading a book, but dim for computer use. During the daytime, you should take advantage of natural sunlight to conserve energy, but in the evening, a well lit home is important to your safety. Th ere is an easy way to personalize, automate, and simplify how you interact with the illumination in your home, through a lighting control system. A lighting control system delivers the correct amount of light, where you want it, and when you want it. It can recall favorite settings and eff ortlessly transform the light that surrounds you. As Mike Cornelius, President of Cornelius Electric explains, “It allows you to create another level of design in your home, adding drama or purpose to architecture, art or furniture.� A variety of solutions are available, whether you are building a new home or updating your current residence. Left: Light impacts the mood of your home. In one room we see a variety of lighting solutions: A sparkling chandelier cascades from the ceiling, recessed lighting illuminates artwork on the walls, a lamp casts a glow, and natural daylight shines through a nearby window. Indoor lighting by House of Lights. 51

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Above: Using a lighting control system, lights can be controlled individually or as part of a group. Lighting control is personalized to your lifestyle through the creation of lighting scenes.

Lighting control consists of a centralized control system that can be connected to a variety of components including on/off and dimming controls, timers, occupancy sensors, and photo sensors. Th e control system is connected to these components through network cabling or wirelessly over Radio Frequencies (RF). Using the control system, lights can be controlled individually or as part of a group. Individual lights can belong to multiple groups in order to provide ultimate fl exibility, allowing presets or “scenes” of illumination that can be recalled with the press of a button. Lighting control is personalized to your lifestyle through the creation of lighting scenes. Practical uses for lighting scenes exist in every room of the home. For example, in the kitchen, you can instantly adjust overhead, under cabinet, and sink lights with the touch of a button for food preparation, dining or clean up. Here’s a quick example of how scenes can simplify the lighting in your dining room. A typical dining room may contain four diff erent light switches for each of the following: artwork lighting, cabinet lighting, recessed lighting, and the chandelier. With a lighting control system, these four lights could be incorporated into three basic scenes: Day Dining with all the lights dimmed signifi cantly due to the high amount of sunlight from the windows. Night Dining with the chandelier and recessed spaces

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Above: Keypads are available in a variety of colors, finishes, shapes and sizes, allowing you to control multiple lights and scenes from a single location.

“[lighting] allows you to create another level of design in your home, adding drama or purpose to architecture, art or furniture.” – mIKe cornelIus, PresIdenT oF cornelIus elecTrIc lighting dimmed to a comfortable level but with a dramatic emphasis on the artwork and cabinet lighting. Cleanup with all lights at full illumination for picking up dishes, dusting or cleaning. Th ese scenes can be controlled by a single keypad. Traditionally, these four switches would have taken approximately 4” (h) by 8.5” (w) in wall space, but with a keypad they now only occupy 4” x 2”. Not only is your dining room more functional and attractive from a lighting perspective, but it also features an increased elegance, with more wall space for decorative touches.

Left: A single keypad can replace a bank of traditional wall switches. Wall switches with dimmers also come in custom colors to coordinate with any décor.

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Keypads are available in a variety of colors, finishes, shapes and sizes, allowing you to control multiple lights and scenes from a single location. They can be custom engraved with the names of your scenes and most feature illumination to let you know the current status of the lighting. Control isn’t limited to just the wall. Wireless remotes communicate with the control system using RF and are ideal for a nightstand, couch, or the kitchen counter. These wireless remotes can also be used from your car, allowing you to turn on or off your lights as you approach or leave your home. Some lighting con54


trol systems can seamlessly integrate with the universal remote controls used with your audio, video, security, and HVAC equipment. Others can be controlled over the internet through a secure webpage and some systems even feature compatibility with Apple iPhones or iPads. All of this secure and reliable integration gives you the power to monitor the lighting in your home from virtually anywhere in the world. According to Lutron, a control system manufacturer, lighting can account for up to 20% of a household’s yearly electricity usage. Dimmers not only save electricity, but dimming a bulb also extends its life. For exam-

Above: practical uses for lighting scenes exist in every room of the home. In the kitchen you can instantly adjust overhead, under cabinet, and sink lights with the touch of a button for food preparation, dining or clean up.

Dimmers not only save electricity, but dimming a bulb also extends its life. 55

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Right: Some lighting control systems feature compatibility with Apple iPhones or iPads. All of this secure and reliable integration gives you the power to monitor the lighting in your home from virtually anywhere.

ple, if lighting is dimmed by just 25%, this will result in energy savings of 20% and extend the life of the bulb by four times. Dimming your lights also creates an impact in the cooling loads for your home. Because many light bulbs emit heat, reducing your lighting power also reduces the demand on your air conditioning system. Jim Morrison, Sales Manager for House of Lights in Melbourne, explains that there are “a number of simple systems that allow control of multiple lights from a single location.� Many of these systems are installed in existing homes where the current light switches are being replaced with dimmers that are connected wirelessly to the control system. This solution allows homeowners to add the functionality of lighting control without the need to install any additional wiring. Using this wireless RF technology, lighting control can now be added to multi-story homes or condominiums where it previously may not have been physically possible

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An Overview of Modern Light Bulbs Shopping for light bulbs at the store is no longer the simple task it used to be. Consumers are faced with a variety of choices related to compatibility with their existing fixtures, bulb life, brightness, environmental impact, and price. In the showroom at House of Lights in Melbourne, Jim Morrison takes time to demonstrate how the differences between light output, quality, and color temperature are factors in choosing the correct bulbs for your home. Here’s a quick explanation of the different light bulbs that are currently on the market: Incandescent – The traditional incandescent bulb is the lowest cost but is also the least efficient. The bulb provides rich and warm light, but its average lifespan is only 1,000 hours. Halogen – Halogen bulbs are similar in construction to an incandescent, but they are more efficient through the introduction of halogen gas. The life of a halogen bulb can be shortened by contaminants on the bulb surface, specifically fingerprints. The lifespan of a halogen bulb is approximately 8,000 hours. CFL - A Compact Florescent Lamp (CFL) consists of an electronic ballast and a tube filled with mercury gas. It is important to note that not all CFLs are compatible with dimmers. CFLs cost about twice as much as incandescent bulbs, but their lifespan is approximately 10,000 hours. LED – Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) do not radiate heat like incandescent bulbs and they are extremely efficient and durable. Although they cost considerably more than all other bulbs, the average lifespan of an LED is 60,000 hours.

Adding a lighting control system to your home is something that can be done in stages, starting with a single room and expanding to other areas over time. 57

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Above: LED bulbs may still cost more than other bulbs, but the average lifespan of an LED is 60,000 hours.

If lighting is dimmed by just 25%, this will result in energy savings of 20% and extend the life of the bulb by four times.

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to run network cabling to the switches. Adding a lighting control system to your home is something that can be done in stages, starting with a single room and expanding to other areas over time. Mike Cornelius points out that many homeowners start with a bedroom or kitchen as part of a remodel, and as they experience the benefits and convenience of lighting control, other areas are added. In the family room of many homes, it is not uncommon to see a bank of 4, 5, or 6 light switches on the wall. Ask the homeowner what each of these switches control and they may be able to identify most of them, perhaps after a little trial and error. But there are usually one or two switches that they won’t be able to identify. These “mystery switches” may control an outlet somewhere or an exterior light that was never installed. Unfortunately, the homeowner may never know. Apart from being effectively useless, these “mystery switches” contribute to wall clutter and negatively impacting the design of your home. A lighting control system is the perfect way to literally take control of your home’s illumination, by saving money and adding design and elegance to your interior and exterior. n


TALES OF THE COCKTAIL is an annual festival of cocktails, cuisine and culture held in New Orleans. The event brings together mixologists, authors, bartenders, chefs and enthusiasts into the French Quarter in late July for a fi ve-day celebration featuring tastings, seminars, dinners, tours, and parties.

Coole Swan Ice Coole Swan is a relatively new Dairy Cream Liqueur from Ireland that will be a welcome addition to your after-dinner coffee. It’s a creamy treat of double cream combined with single malt Irish whiskey along with chocolate, cocoa, and an infusion of Madagascan bourbon vanilla.

Ice carving is a common ritual in Japanese bars that is starting to become popular around the world. At the Suntory tasting room, Master Blender Shinji Fukuyo discussed Yamazaki whisky while American bartenders carved ice into beautiful spheres and diamond shapes.

Root Casa Noble Casa Noble had a tasting of their premium tequilas where participants experienced their Crystal, Reposado, and Anejo tequilas. Bartenders mixed up cocktails featuring the USDA certifi ed organic tequila. Here’s a particularly great drink from Abigail Gullo: recipe above.

One of the surprising oddities at Tales this year was Root, an 80-proof spirit based on the potent Root Tea that American settlers acquired from Native Americans. The taste is instantly familiar, but that’s because during the Temperance Movement at the close of the 19th century, Root Tea evolved into non-alcoholic Birch or Root Beer. Extremely aromatic and full-bodied, creative bartenders will certainly fi nd exciting uses for this new USDA certifi ed organic spirit.

New Amsterdam Next Gineration Cocktail Challenge Yours truly was invited to compete in New Amsterdam Gin’s cocktail challenge. Eleven participants were given 10 minutes to create and name a new cocktail that used New Amsterdam’s gin and was inspired by the Cajun fl avors of New Orleans. Although I didn’t win, here’s the recipe I made for the judges, named “Everything She Touches.”

Jimi Gonzalez LEED A.P. and at-home mixologist on location in new Orleans

Everything She Touches ½ oz honey syrup ½ oz fresh lemon juice 1 spring of Basil

Pinch of nutmeg Pinch of Coriander 2 oz New Amsterdam Gin

Muddle a couple leaves of basil in glass with Honey Syrup, lemon, nutmeg and coriander. Add ice, gin and shake. Strain into a cocktail glass and garnish with a lemon peel and basil leaf. Cheers! 59

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Luxury home leaves small ecological footprint

hen you mention Lansing Island, the prestigious gated community overlooking the water along Indian Harbour and Satellite Beach, terms like exquisite, elegant, and extraordinary come to mind. But thanks to Rick and Aimee Balda, owners of Balda Development, you can also add energy efficient and eco-friendly when you describe the newest home in the neighborhood. Story by Betsy S. Franz • Photography by Dave Potter spaces

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Florida Green Building Coalition Green Home Standard: PLATINUM certification qualified.

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Seeming to contradict the typical “green,� image it is a large luxury home with a small ecological footprint. 62


Opposite page: The view as you step inside the front doors follows the 300-yearold reclaimed elm floor straight through the living room to take in the view provided by the waterfront site. Left and below: A one-of-a-kind antique hutch anchors the entry space. Aimee likes to mix old pieces with modern accessories. A wet bar positioned just off the main kitchen area has White Quartzite countertops and houses a built-in wine cooler and beverage refrigerator.

The 4100+ square foot waterfront home, which Rick and Aimee designed and built, contains so many elements that meet the guidelines for “green” certification that the home qualifies for the Platinum rating – the highest rating obtainable in the Florida Green Building Coalition Green Home Standard. The home, which the Baldas will live in with their two young daughters, is certainly as upscale and elegant as its neighbors but it contains many innovative features that make it stand apart from its peers. Seeming to contradict the typical “green,” image it is a large luxury home with a small ecological footprint. The secret to the success of this project lies with the owners. Rick and Aimee purchased the lot in Lansing Island before they moved to the area, with the goal of raising their children near Rick’s family. When they learned what other residents in the neighborhood were paying for monthly electric bills, they began to brainstorm ways they could still build a family-friendly space while saving energy and conserving natural resources. Since they both have engineering 63

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Above: The expansive kitchen design includes plenty of space for large family dinners, and features commercial grade appliances. Countertops were designed using Black Titanium granite with a brushed finish on the island and White Quartzite on the peripheral surfaces. The large picture window in the gourmet kitchen as well as those positioned between the upper and lower cabinets allow more natural light into the space which limits the need for electric light during the day.

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Above top: A side door and garage entrance includes a busy family’s stop-and-stow area for shoes, backpacks and other gear. Above: This first floor room could be used as either an office or a guest bedroom.

backgrounds, they started looking into the various elements of energy efficient construction. “Once we began doing research, it just made sense to implement alternatives to lower the energy costs while being environmentally responsible,” Aimee said. “As engineers, we always look at something and say ‘how could we do this different and better’ and we like a challenge. It made sense to bring that knowledge into building our home.” Their research led them to discover some innovative technologies that should have a dramatic effect on the energy efficiency and sustainability of their home. “A majority of the items we incorporated

are leading edge,” Rick explained. “The solar panels that we used are very new to Florida. We even had to wait for them to get hurricane approval for Florida building standards before we could use them. But we wanted those specific panels because they blend right in with the look of the roof. We can customize any size system and we can monitor system performance over the internet. We also used ICF (Insulated Concrete Form) for the walls rather than concrete block. ICF provides an insulation value of R-30 + while the maximum you are going to get with concrete block is about R-8. The insulation of a home is what keeps the cool air in. With the ICF and the other efficient forms of insulation that we used, along

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Above: “Wallpaper isn’t coming back, it is back,” shares Aimee. And she selected a pattern by Cole & Son for a feature wall in her master bedroom. “The designs add a tremendous amount of depth and unique character to a space that is difficult to achieve with paint alone.”

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Above: Windows were also planned above the vanities in the master bath to allow more daylight to enter the space reducing the need for electric light in the daytime. The wallpaper from the master bedroom continues into this space highlighted with marble floors and his and hers vanities.

with the 5 kilowatt solar system, our electric bills will be substantially lower than those of comparable sized homes.” “Our solar power system is tied into FPL so all AC electricity not used by the house is fed into the FPL grid. We are able to earn credit for the excess power that we produce but don’t use in our home,” Rick explained. “We have “banked” over 1000 kilowatts in the last few months during construction so we have only had to pay a minimal charge for our electricity usage. When we move in and start running the refrigerator and the washing machine, we will have that “banked” power ahead of time. In the wintertime, when we aren’t running the air conditioner as much, the solar system will still be generating electricity and adding credit to our account. Our electricity bills by next summer should be extremely inexpensive.” Other techniques they learned that make the home “green” are pretty low-tech. “If you look back at the history of Florida architecture, there were roof eaves that came far off the house for sun protection and rain protection,” Aimee said. “So we extended our eaves out further and used other proven methods of interior climate control that were used prior to the creation of air conditioning.” These include positioning plants to provide shade that reduces heat inside the home. The landscaping, which was created by Linda Gombert of Tulinda’s Garden, is another element of the home that earned them points for certification. Many of the principles of the Florida Friendly Yards program, such as right plant right place, water conservation, grouping plants with similar water and cultural needs, etc. were utilized in the creation of the landscape. Although a new law states that HOAs may not prohibit property owners from creating Florida Friendly landscapes, Gombert was still careful to

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get approval from the Lansing Island Architectural Review Board for her plans. “The trick was to use plants that are generally low maintenance, will thrive in the location, are not invasive, are interesting enough to be distinctive, and yet still look like they fit in with the overall Lansing Island look,� Gombert said. But it wasn’t just their analytical, engineering minds that made the project such a success. Add to that the creative spark of a talented interior design student, and the ecological concern of two outdoorsy young parents who wanted to create a home that was both kid friendly and environmentally friendly. 68


Left: Aimee selected wallpaper again in one of her daughter’s rooms. The modern graphic print creates a true focal point in this space. The window seating opens providing extra storage. Below: A Jack and Jill bathroom connects the kid’s bedrooms upstairs. Below left: A generous travertine-covered patio provides outdoor living space equipped with a gas fireplace.

“During the whole process, I was taking classes down at the art institute of Ft. Lauderdale for interior design,” said Aimee, who would love to someday reach her goal of being an architect. “We designed the home as a truly flexible space. We wanted a home that will easily adapt to our growing family and be comfortable for future homeowners. We have roughly 800 square feet that is currently unfinished. I really like the idea of having the extra storage as well as the option to finish the attic in the future and add on to our home.” A planned entrance was also included with a ramp so no stairs are necessary to enter the home. There is also a closet that is designed to be converted to an elevator to meet the needs of older relatives. “All these designs ensure that the home can grow with us with minimal changes,” said Aimee. A large picture window in the gourmet kitchen and others throughout the home, provide tremendous aesthetic appeal but also allowed the Baldas to earn points for certification. For example, they incorporated windows in unique locations such as between the upper and lower cabinets in the kitchen and over the vanities in the bathrooms. These strategically placed windows add natural light that help eliminate the need for electric light during the day. Other features that added points towards certification include light colored paint and cabinets which help reflect light, natural stone used in the bathrooms and flooring which is 300-year-old reclaimed elm. As soon as the Baldas discovered a new product or new technology, they began passing along the information to their customers in their construction business.

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“People have an image of ‘green’ but they aren’t sure what it is. We teach them that it is about sustainability and efficiency.” – Rick Balda, President, Balda Development & Construction

Right: The pool uses an ozone system to reduce the use of chemicals in the water, and an energy-efficient pump requires less maintenance. A large dock at the water’s edge provides easy access to the intercoastal waterway. Pro-Tech roofing supplied and installed the solar panels for the Balda project.

SOURCES Builder: Balda Development & Construction Landscape Design: Linda Gombert, Tulinda’s Garden

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“When we build a home for our customers, we like to be involved with the whole process, from the beginning of the design,” Rick said. “Aimee is a certified LEED AP, which means she has an extensive knowledge of ‘green’ principles. But she also has that designer’s eye. I have more of the engineering mindset. I go into a home and I explain that better insulation is more important than a large AC. Aimee can go in and see the perfect places to add windows for natural light. Together we are able to create luxury homes that are built smart and match functionality with good design.” “There are still so many misconceptions about what makes a home ‘green,’” Rick said. “Buyers are concerned about the initial costs being higher, which is not necessarily true, and they don’t look at the whole picture; such as what they are going to save monthly. “When buying or building a home, it’s not just the purchase price that you have to consider. It’s the maintenance that it requires or its sustainability. Take our pool for example, it has an ozone system and energy efficient pump, which use fewer chemicals and less overall maintenance is required. The water is more enjoyable and the filters last longer.” “We are always pushing the envelope and doing something different,” Rick said. “We are always working on something that nobody else is working on. Ours was the first home in Lansing Island to have solar panels. And probably the first one with a Florida Friendly landscape. But the home fits in beautifully and will cost a lot less to maintain and run.” “People have an image of ‘green’ but they aren’t sure what it is. We teach them that it is about sustainability and efficiency.” n For more information on Balda Development & Construction contact Rick or Aimee Balda at 321-777-4026. Visit them online at www.baldadevelopment.com.

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Bromeliad Vibrant color – long life

Just the facts: Scientific name: Guzmania Luna Common name: Bromeliad Origin: South America Best known for: Long-lasting exotic brilliant color for interiors Expertise needed:

Minimal care.

Pest control: No particular pest problems for interior bromeliads. Exterior use could attract snails which like to live at the base of the leaves. A little snail-bait will control them. Where to buy: your local nursery What to watch for: After blooming, the mother plant is discarded but the new “pups” at the base divided and replanted. These will grow to a mature plant which will then bloom. Place these young “pups” outside in the shade garden while they grow. Bring them in once they start to bloom. Trivia: The Guzmania bromeliads were named in honor of Anastasio Guzman, an 18th century Spanish naturalist. The

here are about 2,000 types of bromeliads. Th ey vary greatly in size, color and ease of growth. Some varieties may be small enough to sit on a window sill, while others grow as long or as tall as 30 feet. Not all bromeliads grow well indoors, but many do. Bromeliads commonly grow in the American tropics, and as houseplants are hardy and enjoy a long-life. Good air circulation and excellent drainage are important for Bromeliads. Th e Guzmania plant is from the epiphytes family of the bromeliads; and these bromeliads are light attaching plants, which grow wherever the sunlight is. Indoors a window with a southern, eastern or western exposure should provide satisfactory light for a Bromeliad, but be careful; most varieties used as houseplants don’t like direct sunlight. Your Bromeliad will communicate to you about its health. If the plant leaves carry a yellowish or pale green look, the light level is most likely too high, and darker than normal green leaves may mean its not getting enough light. Th e specifi c light needs depend on variety of Bromeliad. Th ick, hard leaves will handle more light than soft dark green varieties. n

most popular of all Bromeliads would probably be the tasty fruit, pineapple!

I rate this plant as a #1 choice for ease of care. – susAn hAll

Green Thumb Rating: Rated 2 Thumbs: Easy to care for but requires some basic knowledge of how the plant eats and grows in order to care for it properly. Simply keep a little water in the bases of the leaves where they come out of the main body of the plant. The bloom will last beautifully providing color for 3 to 4 months.

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First Impressions Inspired design in local business lobbies

Story by Anne Straub Photography by Rob Downey

very professional knows the importance of a good first impression. A polished appearance and firm handshake set the tone for future interactions. An organization can add another factor to the equation: the lobby.

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Above: City manager, Ric Holt speaks with staff in the lobby of the new Cocoa City Hall. He stands in front of the historic double glass doors that inspired the design. spaces

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Above: The lobby emphasizes customer convenience, with clearly defined areas offering easy access to the public.

nlike inner offices that can be personaized at will, the lobby represents the image of the company as a whole. It also reflects on the organization’s culture. If it’s cluttered, the business might appear disorganized. If the décor is a slapdash mix of handme-downs, the lobby could send a message that the organization hasn’t achieved success. A lot of demands are placed on the small space. There’s often an employee or two greeting visitors and fielding phone calls. Clients need room to wait while their contact is being called. Sometimes they’ll even conduct their business there. Here’s a look at three Space Coast businesses that put thoughtful planning into this welcoming space.

AuthenTec The high-tech company consolidated two locations into one a couple years ago, taking two and a half floors of the 10-story Rialto Place building in Melbourne. “We really wanted to make a statement that we had a presence in the building,” said Wayne Sanford, director of information technology and facilities for the company. The company brought in Deborah Sands of Interior Design Associates Inc. in Melbourne Beach to come up with the look. She took her cue from the company’s product line. AuthenTec makes sensors that use patented technology to read fingerprints and provide security for electronic devices. Sands used that product line as a spring-

Above: The doors of the council chambers were designed to mimic the look of the historic restored doors. Local artists’ work covers the walls of the lobby where chosen colors are creamy neutrals to keep the area light and spacious.

early in the process, Cocoa officials had one item picked out already: restored double glass doors from the 1926 Brevard Hotel, formerly a Cocoa Village landmark.

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Above: The Space Coast Association of Realtors doubled its lobby space during renovations to about 1000 square feet. Columns, arches and architectural appliqués create an elegant atmosphere.

board for a design that would express the company’s high-

Sands took the color from the company’s logo.

tech, modern and cutting-edge nature.

Centerpiece to the design is the 10½-by-12-foot piece

cocktail table and a reception desk in wood and solid-

behind the reception desk. The artwork depicts a giant fin-

core laminate. The solid-core feature eliminates the dark

gerprint in plasma-cut aluminum, fabricated by Rockledge

lines that otherwise would show where the edges of the top

Designs. The AuthenTec sign and logo is integrated into

meet. A stainless steel shelf on top of the reception desk

the sculpture, a feat that took some trial and error. “We

repeats the clean metal statement.

wanted people to realize it was a fingerprint,” Sanford said.

Place the AuthenTec logo too low, and the classic finger-

an option Sands finds to be competitive with the cost of

print whorl would be covered.

finding, buying and shipping a ready-made product.

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The modern look continues with a granite-topped

The brushed metal is repeated on pedestals showcasing

Both tables were custom made by Designs Unlimited,

In addition to the green wall, black tile floors and

products that use AuthenTec sensors. Banners add color

white furniture complete the color scheme presented by the

strong enough to stand up to the accent color used in the

company’s business card. “It’s a very crisp, modern look,”

lobby, a custom-made shade known as AuthenTec green.

Sands said.


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Cocoa City Hall   Early in the process of designing the new Cocoa City Hall, Cocoa officials had one item picked out already: restored double glass doors from the 1926 Brevard Hotel, formerly a Cocoa Village landmark.   “It was the doors that drove the entire design,” said Susan Miller, the BRPH designer who worked on the interiors for the project. The building was completed last summer.   “They wanted a very traditional look,” she said of the city. The building was new construction, but it was going into historical Cocoa Village. “It needed to fit in well and look as if it had been there forever,” she said.   They tried several locations for the doors and hoped to use them as functioning doors, but they weren’t fire-rated. So they became a decorative accent behind the reception desk. The style is repeated in the doors to the council chambers, down the same hall, which were designed to mimic

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Above: Waiting areas on either side of the desk use floral patterns and different fabrics. Plantation shutters, wallpaper and granite are among the materials.

them. Pendant lights line the hall. A mural hand-painted by a local artist depicts a Mediterranean-style home on the river. Other local artwork covers the walls of the first floor lobby. The second and third floors also feature lobbies, each with conference rooms and balconies at either end. These floors are decorated with historical photos showing scenes of Cocoa life: the 1923 Cocoa Volunteer Fire Department, Delannoy Avenue in the 1890s, the Monroe High School chorus, and the old wooden bridge to Merritt Island are just a few of the images. Photos are displayed on canvas, stretched over frames, throughout the lobbies and conference rooms.   The new design focuses on energy efficiency and was built with room to grow – something sorely lacking in previous facilities. “I was putting up walls every other week,” said Gary Palmer, city facilities manager.   The first-floor lobby also emphasizes customer convenience, with clearly defined areas offering easy access to the public. Council chambers are on the first floor, as are the cashier counters. Colors are creamy neutrals to keep the look light and spacious.   “There needs to be some dialogue between the interior and exterior. We kept the flow through the entire building,” Miller said.

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Space Coast Association of Realtors® For a design theme for the Space Coast Association of Realtors® (SCAR) lobby, interior designer Paige Harr looked to the association’s members. Most are residential Realtors®, so she aimed for a home-like feel. At the same time, the space had to convey a professional appearance. 78


The lobby features a tile floor with medallion detail in front of the large reception desk. Columns, arches and architectural appliqués create an elegant atmosphere. Waiting areas on either side of the desk use floral patterns and different fabrics. Plantation shutters, wallpaper and granite are among the materials. “We wanted it to look like something you would find in someone’s home,” said Harr, of Interior Space Concepts. Through the Merritt Island building’s renovation and expansion, the association doubled its square footage to 8,000. The top 4,000 square feet is available for weddings, banquets and conferences, while the bottom floor contains the association’s offices. During construction, employees worked downstairs while the second floor was added, then moved upstairs while the bottom floor was renovated. The resulting excitement and added space has generated new members, said SCAR past president Jim Johnston of Trafford Realty Co.   The lobby doubled its space also, to about 1,000 square feet. The added room allows a second person to work at the reception desk during busy periods, such as during training. Seating areas are in one large space, though separated to allow for individual conversations.   Office staff moved into the finished space in January. “I’m very proud of it,” said Cyndi Honkonen, events coordinator. n

Above: The lobby features a tile floor with medallion detail in front of the large reception desk.

Most members are residential Realtors®, so interior designer Paige Harr aimed for a home-like feel. At the same time, the space had to convey a professional appearance.

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design hotline

Spaces readers write in for ideas, suggestions and professional recommendations out the heat. For this situathink a sheer weave tion, I thin motorized roller shade would be ideal. They come in many degrees of “openness” so you can choose your level of light and UV filtration, and the motorization allows you to take full advantage of the view when you so desire, even at such heights. The curReader: We have high ceilings with 2 banks of rent choice of patterns means windows in our oceanfront penthouse. Cur- you no longer have to settle for tains and verticals are old and outdated and something industrial looking. I need ideas for window treatments that will A valance near the ceiling let light in but keep the heat out. The living and drapery panels that flow area is also very long and awkward. It’s curfrom the valance to the floor rently divided into 2 separate spaces – 1 with would help anchor the entire 4 chairs by fireplace and 1 adjacent to it with TV/sofa/loveseat/cocktail tables. I want to room. Taking full advantage marry the 2 separate areas together with one of the height of the ceilings, a long area rug. The fireplace and tables are valance gives you many style blue slate. The mantle is blue/green enamel- options as well. They can range painted wood. I would like to keep the slate from loose and casual, to tailored tables, mantle and fireplace. I would appre- and formal depending on the ciate any suggestions you can off er. material choice and construction. Rebecca Wagaman, MD As for the furniture arrangement – Swapping out one large rug for the two smaller can create problems, and sometimes even a more awkward flow of traffic and conversation. It seems this living area has two focal points: the fireplace, and the view. I think it is best to keep these separate, but perhaps a simple rearrangement of existing pieces Dear Rebecca, would create more There are many options for continuity. windows that allow the view and different degrees of light Betty Greenway to come in, while still blocking Owner, Island Paint & Decorating Center spaces

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Reader: We recently bought a house and in

the attached photo you can see the windows in our bedroom. While I love the architectural detail of the upper windows, I am also concerned that the light filtering through will wake me up earlier than I would like. The other windows have blinds, but I would welcome suggestions to tie the whole room together. Any suggestions would be most welcome. Thank-you very much! Alane Cunningham

Dear Alane, Adding white 3½-4” shutters with frames to all windows will create uniformity and architectural detail. This will provide privacy and light control without blocking the view from the bay window. Moving drapery hardware up to same level as small windows will add height and soften the sitting area. Semisheer side panels would keep the overall look light and airy.


If cost is a concern, blinds to both shades and would like to do the same match existing could be added to thing for the sliding glass door upstairs. The existing pleated shade is mounted on small windows and ready-made the wall on top of the sliding glass door opening side panels to bay and there is not enough room behind to install windows. Dee Patnoe Owner, Dee.Cor

the Mylar solar shade because the sliding glass door is flush with the wall (there is no casing). We are stuck on what to do and need help. By-the-way: I love your magazine and collect all the issues. Thank you, Luz Marina Calle

shade and opt for a drapery with 6” return that would completely close. They both would be an outside mount with a 6” return. The pleated shade would not be used. There are limitations to every product, that’s where the designer comes into place. We have to analyze the window and determine how to fulfill the criteria of the clients. Sometimes we cannot use a specific product due to the limitations of that window. Leanna Farrell Senior Designer, Porter Baxter Interiors

Reader: We have sliding glass doors facing the

Indian River and need solar shades for heat mitigation of the afternoon sun without blocking the view. We installed a Mylar solar shade behind the pleated shade in the first floor sliding glass door. We love the versatility of having

Dear Luz, For the upstairs, you could install the outside mount mylar

Have a question for an interior designer? Audio/video specialist? A remodel or construction-related query? Space-planning or art-related inquiry? Email your Design Hotline questions to jmccluskey@floridatoday.com. Note Design Hotline in the subject line. We may address your question in a future issue!

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design solutions

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Color Coordinated Paint, glazes change the feel of a room

Story by Anne Straub Photography by Rob Downey     ike many makeover projects, the remodel ing of Roseann and Joe Flora’s home took on a life of its own.   What started as a master bath remodel soon crept throughout the Indialantic home, inspiring an update of the main living areas. The result is a whole new look based on primarily surface changes, such as paint color and glazed cabinetry.   But the simplicity of the makeover doesn’t detract from the impact.   “I just love it here,” Roseann Flora said. “Everyone compliments how great it looks.”   The home’s “before” didn’t cry out for drastic changes. But the look was dated and largely uninspiring. Neutral taupe wall color bled into the pickled oak cabinetry with little definition. The dinette table was glass, the chairs white, and stools at the bar again were white with beige padding.   The dramatic black and gold granite offered a natural richness that was getting lost amid the sea of neutrals. “It really wasn’t doing anything for the counters they had put in,” interior designer Leanna Farrell said of the color scheme. “The wall and cabinets looked like they were just floating away.”   For a color palette, Farrell simply took a walk to the dining and living rooms, each with one wall painted a deep plum color. “I just love that color,” Roseann Flora said. But as right as the color was, it was in the wrong rooms. The color made the living and dining rooms seem small and dark, said Farrell, an interior designer at Porter Baxter Interiors in Melbourne.   She took the plum and used it as an accent 83

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Previous page: Interior designer, Leanna Farrell took the plum color from the dining room and brought it into the kitchen as a backdrop for the light-colored cabinetry. Above: Cabinetry was glazed and new hardware on the cabinet doors and drawers updated the space.

A faux finisher applied a glaze that eliminated the pink tones in the wood and accented the architectural detail and grooves in the doors. spaces

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color in the kitchen, as a backdrop for the cabinets. The cabinets were high quality and in good condition, so rather than replace the fronts, they got their own makeover. A faux finisher applied a glaze that eliminated the pink tones in the wood and accented the architectural detail and grooves in the doors. “It was amazing,� Farrell said of the difference the glaze made. The color made the cabinets look chunkier, better able to stand up to the dramatic granite counters. New cabinet pulls completed the fresh look.  Part of the family room remained taupe, and the rest was painted aqua. Using the aqua and adding various neutrals resulted in a more spacious look in both the living and dining rooms. Area rugs, throw pillows and window


Above top: Farrell’s project board details paint chips, fabric swatches and original drawings she envisioned for the Flora makeover. Above: The dining room window treatments use a sheer fabric with embroidered flowers, a more substantial fabric with a floral design, and side panels that also highlight the embroidery. The layered fabrics create a luxurious window covering. 85

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Above: In the kitchen, Farrell selected a cotton-blend print over the windows using similar colors to tie the rooms together. A new kitchen table and chairs include wrought iron frames to add some weight to the space. “Visually it’s more in balance; it’s more in scale,” Farrell said.

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The language of color

Color wheel: Colors opposite each other are called complementary colors. In combination, these create striking contrasts. For less contrast, choose colors next to each other, which are called analogous colors. Hue: Hue identifies the general family of a color, such as blue, red and yellow. The traditional color wheel is made up of twelve color families: red,

red-orange, orange, yellow-orange, yellow, yellow-green, green, bluegreen, blue, red-violet, violet and blue-violet. Warm or Cool: Colors with yellow undertones seem warmer, while the same color with blue or red undertones appears cool. Cool colors – blue, green, violet – invite relaxation and thought. Warm colors – red, orange, yellow – encourage conversation and play. Value: Value describes how light or dark a specific color may be. When you combine colors from a single color strip, you’re creating a monochromatic color scheme – perfect for creating a sophisticated, spacious look in a single room. Source: Sherwin-Williams

“When you have a lot of heavy granite, you can’t have light furniture in the nook. You need something substantial.” – Leanna Farrell treatments, along with the wood floor and furniture, add the interest needed. Taupe continues into the kitchen, tying the spaces together, and the added plum makes the newly glazed cabinets pop.   Materials fit the mood of each room. The dining room window treatments use a sheer fabric with embroidered flowers, a more substantial fabric with a floral design, and side panels that highlight the embroidery. In the kitchen, Farrell used a cotton blend print. She found an area rug for under the dinette table that delighted Flora. It’s not the same pattern as the window covering, but only a close examination would reveal it.   The re-do included new blinds, a chandelier, and a more elegant table and chair set in the kitchen. “When you have a lot of heavy granite, you can’t have light furniture in the nook. You need something

substantial,” Farrell said. The furniture uses wrought iron to add another dimension to the kitchen. New bar stools also use iron, and add backs and a swivel feature to accommodate lingering at the bar. “Visually, it’s more in balance; it’s more in scale,” Farrell said.   She eliminated a tile pathway that made the living space appear chopped up; now, wood covers the entire living and dining area for a more spacious look. The Floras kept ceramic tile in the kitchen.   Compared with the total remodel, the kitchen was just a blip. Coming at the tail end of the nine-month project, the kitchen work took just a few weeks. What was mostly a change of color ended up offering a major return. “This is the room where we all stay,” said Roseann Flora, who enjoys entertaining and cooking for friends and family. “It feels like a new space.” n

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One determined couple, professional design direction and a DIY attitude Story by Maria Sonnenberg Photography by Rob Downey

ne fine day a few months back, Kristi Dupre decided to skip town for a couple of days of rest and relaxation. She didn’t know what would be waiting for her upon her return. Husband Paul had taken it upon himself to start a major kitchen remodel in their Lake Washington home. Great idea, but the only trouble was that while Paul had the demolition all mapped out, he did not have a plan for the new space. “When I came back, I had no carpets, no tile and half of my kitchen was gone,” says Kristi. “You can imagine my surprise.” For months, the couple had been considering the idea of a kitchen makeover that would seamlessly blend the space with the home’s languishing dining room. “We had been talking for weeks and

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Previous page: With guidance from professionals, plus a lot of elbow grease, Kristi and Paul Dupre created an impressive flowing space perfect for the parties they enjoy. Above: An espresso-colored sliding cabinetry door organizes easy-to-reach spices on stacked shelves to the side of the range.

“My goal when I propose a cabinetry design is to look at cabinetry as a blended extension of the architecture. When architectural interest and details are lacking in some newer homes, I try to achieve some of the detailing found in older homes, such as wainscote paneling and barrel vault arches, as demonstrated in the Dupre’s kitchen.” – LInDA TAMASY, ASID LInDA TAMASY DeSIGnS

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even considered refinishing the original pickled maple cabinets,” says Paul. Kristi and Paul had spent hundreds of dollars on kitchen remodeling magazines and books, but the couple had not been able to come to a decision about the design. Enter designing ladies Linda Tamasy, of Linda Tamasy Designs, and Liz Harris of Designers West Interiors, who helped the Dupres define and realize the kitchen of their dreams. With the guidance of the two pros – plus a lot of elbow grease – the couple created an impressive, flowing space perfect for the large parties they enjoy. Tamasy’s cabinet design is crisp, yet makes full use of all available space. “Linda’s design was pretty ingenious,” says Harris. “She did an awesome job.” By relocating an outside door, Tamasy’s concept found plenty of additional square footage for the space and the perfect location for the Wolf convection microwave and single ovens, as well as the Miele coffeemaker that was a must-have for Kristi. Cabinetry colors appeal to coffee fan Kristi. The Shiloh cherry cabinets have a coffee finish with mocha glaze, and espresso-colored cabinetry under the range for an added visual


treat. A barrel vault arch graciously and unobtrusively leads from the kitchen to a bedroom wing, replacing an unwieldy hallway that provided no privacy. Paul and Kristi added their own touch to the project, saving a bundle in the process. Tile work, lighting and backsplash, among other touches, were their handiwork, as was the massive faux copper hood. When Tamasy recommended a large copper hood above the range, the couple, loving the idea but not the price tag of $8,000, opted for a hard foam “hood” faux- finished in copper tones. Paul added the copper rivets and the decorative metal work around the hood. The result cleverly mimics the real thing at a fraction of the cost. Harris’ keen eye coordinated the many color elements, including the huge granite slab on the made-for-entertaining kitchen island that winds its way across the large space. “It was a very unusual run,” says Harris of the granite. To anchor the island visually without creating actual boundaries, Harris suggested a metallic copper ceiling that delineates the shape of the island and the colors found on the granite countertop. Here, too, the Dupres saved money by tackling the job on their own. “We found the copper at Lowe’s and installed it ourselves,” says Kristi. A pleasant bonus from the remodel came in the form of the formerly neglected formal dining room, now open to the kitchen and very much a center of activity. “We didn’t use the dining room at all before, but now we use it all the time,” says Kristi. The remodel constituted months of hard work and plenty of inconveniences, including makeshift metal pantry shelving in their family room. Would Paul and Kristi do it again? “No, but we did it right, so we don’t have to do it again,” explains Kristi. n

Left: Tamasy’s design incorporated a new doorway that leads to a bedroom wing. The pocket door provides privacy and separates the kitchen from the living area. Granite countertops by Brevard Stone. Above: By relocating an outside door Tamasy’s design found space to accommodate the Wolf convection microwave and single ovens, as well as the Miele coffeemaker that was important to Kristi.

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A look ahead: Cultural, design and entertainment events on the Space Coast ENTERTAINMENT September 17

Adam Lambert Glam Nation Tour with Allison Iraheta The King Center presents one of the most exciting artists ever to appear on American Idol. Adam Lambert’s stunning performances on the 2009 season of ‘Idol’ captivated audiences and impressed judges with songs like “Mad World,” “Ring of Fire” and “I Can’t Get No Satisfaction.” He has since conquered the Billboard charts with his debut album, “For Your Entertainment.” Opening for Lambert is fellow ‘Idol’ alumni Allison Iraheta, who recently released her debut album, “Just Like You.” For tickets and information call 242-2219 or visit kingcenter.com.

Celebrate the opening of the Space Coast Symphony Orchestra’s Second Season on September 18 at the First Baptist Church of Merritt Island.

Roll played with the precision and fine detail

September 18

of a philharmonic orchestra. Arrive early for

Classic Albums Live 40 Years of Woodstock

our 6:00 p.m. Picnic on the Patio (weather

The King Center presents Classic Rock. There’s nothing like it. Classic Albums Live is an ensemble of world-class musicians recreating the greatest Rock albums ever recorded live on stage. Note for note, cut for cut using every instrument that it took to record that album exactly as you remember it. It’s Rock n’

permitting.) The musical program begins at 8:00 p.m. For more information call 242-2219 or visit kingcenter.com.

September 18

Space Coast Symphony Orchestra Season Opening Performance Celebrate the opening of the Space Coast Symphony Orchestra’s Second Season with Music Director Aaron Collins in an all Dvorák program. The concert opens with the complete Slavonic Dances, Op. 72 and concludes with “From the New World.” Written after Dvorák’s visit to America, his Symphony No. 9 is a captivating fusion of Czech and Austrian symphonic mastery combined with American-inspired visions of Hiawatha and the African-American Spiritual. For tickets and information call the First Baptist Church

Adam Lambert performs with Allison Iraheta at the King Center on September 17th. spaces 92

September 24 – October 9

Barefoot in the Park

The Titusville Playhouse presents this light domestic comedy based on Neil Simon’s hit Broadway play. Barefoot in the Park follows the lives of newlyweds Paul and Corie Bratter as they adjust to married life in a tiny Greenwich Village apartment. For more information call 268-3711 or visit nbbd.com/godo/tpi.

October 2

A Russian Festival The Space Coast Symphony Orchestra celebrates Tchaikovsky’s genius for melody and drama. A Russian Festival soars with the infectious themes of the Slavonic March as well as music from The Sleeping Beauty. This powerhouse symphony communicates the emotional tensions of wartime Russia. For tickets and information call the First Baptist Church of Merritt Island at 536-8580 or visit SpaceCoastSymphony.org.

October 8-24

of Merritt Island at 536-8580 or visit Space-

I’ll Be Back Before Midnight

CoastSymphony.org.

The Henegar Center presents this classic spine-


tingling thriller by author Peter Colley. Jan, who’s recovering from a nervous disorder, and her husband rent a remote cabin from an odd farmer who tells gruesome ghost tales. When the husband’s lustful sister arrives, frightening events transpire. Wonderfully spooky – somewhere between an Agatha Christie mystery and a Hitchcock thriller. For more information call 723-8698 or visit henegar.org.

October 8 – November 21

The Secret Garden The Melbourne Civic Theatre presents this enchanting musical based on Frances Hodgson Burnett’s classic children’s novel. Archibald Craven lives in a lonely English manor and mourns the loss of Lily, his beautiful wife. Mary Lennox, a rich, spoiled child is sent to live with Craven and his son, Colin following the death of her parents. At the manor, Mary discovers Lily’s secret garden hidden on the grounds and releases the magic and adventure locked within. For information call 723-6935 or visit mymct.org.

October 9

The Melbourne Civic Theatre presents The Secret Garden musical October 8 – November 21.

modern jazz by successfully managing several feats of creative dexterity including improvisation. According to band members, improvising in front of a crowd is much like walking down a wire. Their latest album, duly named ‘Down the Wire’ includes semi-funky tracks, more laid back numbers and a few surprises from guest musicians. Enjoy this evening of jazz, featuring songs from the album as well as others from the group’s long and prolific career. For tickets and information call 242-2219 or visit kingcenter.com.

Classic Albums Live The Beatles: White Album

October 21

The King Center presents Classic Rock. There’s nothing like it. Classic Albums Live returns to rock The Beatles. It’s rock n’ roll played with the precision and fine detail of a philharmonic orchestra. The program begins at 8:00 p.m. For more information call 2422219 or visit kingcenter.com.

The King Center presents the tour STYX fans have been waiting for. Tommy Shaw, James “JY” Young, Lawrence Gowan, Todd Sucherman and Ricky Phillips are out on the U.S. concert trail again. Along with their classic hits, the band will be performing The Grand Illusion and Pieces of Eight in their entirety. Both albums spawned such hit singles and Classic Rock standards as “Come Sail Away,” “Renegade,” “Blue Collar Man” and “Fooling Yourself.” For tickets and information call 242-2219 or visit kingcenter.com.

October 14

Charlie Daniels Band Charlie Daniels, best known for his 1979 Grammy-winning hit “The Devil Went Down To Georgia,” is an American music legend. A renowned singer, guitarist and fiddler, Daniels’ many accolades include gold, platinum and multi-platinum albums. For tickets and information call 242-2219 or visit kingcenter.com.

October 20

Spyro Gyra For more than three decades, Spyro Gyra has maintained a presence at the forefront of

An Evening with STYX

October 28 – November 14

Cagney The Riverside Theatre in Vero Beach presents Cagney – the high-stepping, explosive new musical about the legendary star and screen’s greatest tough-guy, James Cagney. The story – based on Peter Colley’s book – follows the actor from his humble beginnings in New York City’s Lower East Side through his rise as a vaudeville song-and-dance man, to his

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Through September 30

100% Pure Florida

Orange Spotted Basket with Black Wrap Lip by Dale Chihuly. Blown glass, 1993. From the exhibit Clearly Color: Glass from the Permanent Colllection on view at the Vero Beach Museum of Art through January 2. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. James W. Titelman.

superstardom in Hollywood. For more information call 800-445-6745 or visit riversidetheatre.com.

October 31

Space Coast Flute Orchestra Fall Concert

Fifth Avenue Art Gallery presents the 5th annual 100% Pure Florida juried art exhibition. Featured artwork varies in subject matter and mediums – the only thing that is “purely Floridian” are the artists. The show opens on Friday, September 3rd with awards presented and refreshments served between 5:30-9:00 p.m. For more information call 259-8261 or visit 100percentpureflorida.com.

Through December 31

Of Cloth and Culture The Orlando Museum of Art presents the ninth in a series of exhibitions drawn from the Norma Canelas and William D. Roth Collection of African Art. This exhibit features 45 extraordinary examples of textiles and beadwork from a number of regions of the African continent. Highlights include a colorful Kente cloth of West Africa, beautifully beaded aprons of the Kirdi in Cameroon, a

The Space Coast Flute Orchestra is one of the largest flute orchestras in the world. It is comprised of musicians from all walks of life and provides adult flutists with educational and performance opportunities, while supporting local young flutists and enriching cultural arts in the community. The Fall Concert is presented at the Suntree United Methodist Church at 3:00 p.m. Admission is free. For more information visit scfo.org.

EXHIBITIONS Through September 19

From the Mind of Robert H. Clarke

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Robert H. Clarke uses rhythmic lines and a palette inspired by the masters to reconfigure this world into his uniquely personal vision. Using composition and scale to make the ordinary memorable, Clarke energetically recorded his inner and outer world, often simultaneously. Clarke passed away in 2005, rarely showing his work during his lifetime. This discovery will be the first comprehensive showing of his artwork. For more information call 242-0737 or visit brevardartmuseum.org.

Mid-20th century backstrap loom from Sololá, Guatemala. On display at the Fabric of Life: Textiles of Latin America exhibit, Florida Institute of Technology Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts. Gift of Zipporah Schefrin.


Zulu wedding cape and embellished animal skins of the San people of South Africa, as well as a number of stunning beaded crowns and headdresses of the Yoruba people of Nigeria. For more information call (407) 896-4231 or visit omart.org.

Through December 31

The American Collection The Orlando Museum of Art presents this exhibit of more than 40 paintings and sculptures dated from our nation’s early years through the 20th century. These works reflect many important trends in American art and reveal the values and aspirations of the American people over the course of time. The artists represented in this exhibit include Thomas Moran, Georgia O’Keeffe, George Inness, Herman Herzog, Robert Henri and Charles Sheeler, among others. For more information call (407) 896-4231 or visit omart.org.

Through January 2

Clearly Color: Glass from the Permanent Collection The Vero Beach Museum presents a dazzling cross-section of American glass artists whose styles represent a study in contrast. Clearly Color examines glass-forming disciplines through works that celebrate the material, the revival of traditional techniques and modern glass-forming technologies. Included are designs by Dale Chihuly, Benjamin Moore, Dante Marioni, Therman Statom and Marc Petrovic. For more information call (772) 231-0707 or visit vbmuseum.org.

September 11 – December 18

Fabric of Life: Textiles of Latin America Dazzling and colorful textiles have constituted important forms of aesthetic and ethnic expression throughout Latin America’s diverse historic and cultural landscape. Presented by the Florida Institute of Technology Ruth Funk Center for Textile Arts, this exhibition illustrates stunningly complex and colorful textile genres with examples from Brazil to Mexico. Hand-painted Amazonian weavings, Panamanian molas and indigenous costumes from Ecuador and Guatemala illustrate the vibrant traditions that have survived through centuries of modernization. For more information call 674-8313 or visit textiles.fit.edu/.

Where you’ll find us! Pick up your complimentary copy of Spaces Magazine at many fine establishments throughout Brevard County, including: Baytree National Golf Links Brevard Art Museum Cocoa Beach Country Club Duran Golf Club Eau Gallie Yacht Club Economic Development Commission Essentials Spa, Melbourne & Viera Health-First Pro-Health Fitness Center (Merritt Island, Viera, Melbourne & Palm Bay) Imperial Spa King Center for the Performing Arts Kiwi Tennis Club La Bella Spa La Cita Country Club Melbourne International Airport Paradise Ford Parrish Medical Center Suntree Country Club YMCA Suntree Wuesthoff Health System – Rockledge & Melbourne Or, visit any of the advertisers in our current issue!

September 25 – January 11

Metamorphosis: Abstract Works by Federico Uribe The Vero Beach Museum of Art presents Metamosphosis: Abstract Works by Federico Uribe. Born in Columbia, Uribe began his art education at the Universidad de los Andes in Bogota and continued his studies in New York, Cuba, Mexico, Russia and England – eventually settling in Miami. In 1996 he began collecting everyday objects such as flip flops, plastic forks, books and colored pencils at local flea markets and street fairs. He reworks these ordinary objects into abstract installations of pattern, color and form, replacing the object’s original function with a new identity and significance. For more information call (772) 231-0707 or visit vbmuseum.org.

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and their many exciting features. These cameras offer a wealth of tools that can lead to wonderful photographs. This course will cover basic menu settings, exposure, depth of field, lens choices, shooting techniques and composition. For more information call 254-4224 or visit southernphotosupply.com.

September 11, October 9, 16 & 23

Early in the Morning from Mark Mittleman’s Reflections on Florida’s Man-Made Wetlands exhibit at the Fifth Avenue Art Gallery, October 1-31.

October 1-31

Reflections on Florida’s Man-Made Wetlands Fifth Avenue Art Gallery presents Mark Mittleman’s photography exhibition that tells the story of Florida’s constructed wetlands. Florida counties have succeeded in creating natural habitat for a wide variety of wildlife. Mittleman’s intrigue with nature’s perfect bounty and hidden surprises are beautiful and captivating. For more information call 259-8261 or visit fifthavenueartgallery.com.

Workshops September 4

Beginner’s Watercolor Workshop Artist Debbie Johnson presents this one-day workshop for beginners at the Courtyard Studio in Eau Gallie. This fast-paced class is packed with important foundational information to learning watercolor and will include discussions, set-up of palettes, tools and materials, as well as basic washes and brushwork. She will demonstrate and paint with students, step-by-step. For more information call Debbie at 474-3449 or visit watercolorworksart.com/ Classes.

Beginner Silk Painting Workshops Silk painter Vicki Damon, is offering handpainted silk workshops at the Art and Antique Studio in downtown Eau Gallie. Silk painting is a very versatile medium in which silk scarves, wearable art, wall hangings, pillows and much more can be created. Attendees will learn the use of resist, French dyes, painting techniques and different types of silks. Materials will be provided. For more information call 253-5553, email Vicki at artworks@vickidamon.com or visit artandantiquestudio.com. culinary classes coming

September 18

Mise en Place Culinary Class RoomScapes of Brevard presents a Low Country Cuisine culinary class. Participants will learn techniques for cleaning, stewing and baking shrimp. Menu items include shrimp and grits, Carolina Pilau, greens, sweet potato biscuits and coconut cake. Classes are held from 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. at RoomScapes of Brevard,

Southern Photo presents this introductory class to Digital Single Lens Reflex (DSLR) cameras spaces

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October 2

Mise en Place Culinary Class RoomScapes of Brevard presents an Octoberfest-themed culinary class. Participants will learn techniques for braising, sausage-making and baking. Menu items include sauerbraten with gingersnaps, weisswurst with red cabbage sauerkraut, German-style potato salad and Bavarian plum cake. Classes are held from 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. at RoomScapes of Brevard, 5555 South U.S. Highway 1, Rockledge, Florida 32955 (1/4 mile north of Viera Boulevard.) For more information call 504-1122, ext. 210.

October 9 & 10

Double Wall Clay Vessels Brevard Art Museum presents this workshop with Jinsong Kim teaching the Korean technique of making double wall clay vessels. The first day involves making appropriate forms for the vessels. On the second day participants will assemble the forms and enrich the clay with piercing and carving. For more information call 254-7782 or visit brevardartmuseum.org.

October 16

HADCO Field Trip RoomScapes of Brevard presents this field trip to Orlando to visit the HADCO showroom and conduct our culinary class in their live kitchen. HADCO is the distributor for Viking and other appliances offered at RoomScapes. Attendees will meet at RoomScapes of Brevard, 5555 South U.S. Highway 1, Rockledge, Florida 32955 (1/4 mile north of Viera Boulevard.) We will provide transportation to and from the event. Times are not yet finalized, so contact us for more information at 504-1122, ext. 210.

September 7, 11

Introduction to Digital SLR Cameras

5555 South U.S. Highway 1, Rockledge, Florida 32955 (1/4 mile north of Viera Boulevard.) For more information call 504-1122, ext. 210.

Brevard Art Museum presents a workshop with Jinsong Kim teaching the Korean technique of making double wall clay vessels on October 9 & 10.

Want your upcoming home, cultural or entertainment listing in our calendar? E-mail Corinne Ishler at cishler@floridatoday.com or call 242-3555.


APPLIANCES RoomScapes of Brevard 321-504-1122 See our display ad on page 21 ARCHITECTS Jackson Kirschner Architects 321-253-1952 Jackson-kirschner.com See our display ad on page 31 Automotive Paradise Ford 321-632-2222 paradiseford.com See our display ad on page 38 Space Coast Honda 321-459-3344 spacecoasthonda.com See our display ad on page 2 BOUTIQUES Neat Feet 321-773-5140 See our display ad on page 48 Sun Rose Collectibles 321-779-1901 See our display ad on page 54 CARPET, TILE & FLOORING Buffkin Tile 321-452-2267 Merritt Island 321-255-9522 Melbourne Buffkintile.com See our display ad on page 66 Great Southeast Flooring America 321-473-3822 flooringamerica.com See our display ad on page 35 CONSTRUCTION Balda Development & Construction 321-777-4026 baldadevelopment.com See our display ad on page 63 Carswell Construction 321-452-9300 Carswellconstruction.com See our display ad on page 75 ENTERTAINMENT The King Center for the Performing Arts 321-242-2219 Kingcenter.com See our display ad on page 7 FINANCIAL Merrill Lynch 321-729-8666 Fa.ml.com See our display ad on page 22 Denwood Parish Insurance 321-259-2200 Denwood.nefrep.com See our display ad on page 68 Viera Financial 321-751-9203 Vierafinancial.com See our display ad on page 54

FOOD & WINE DownTown Produce 321-308-0275 Market 321-254-4048 Wholesale downtownproduce.com See our display ad on page 27 HOME FURNISHINGS AJ’s Unfinished Furniture 321-639-3839 Unfinishedfurnituredirect.com See our display ad on page 33 Ashley Furniture Home Store 321-725-0200 Ashleyfurniture.com See our display ad on page 10 Danish Interiors 321-727-1800 See our display ad on page 20 Home Furniture 321-267-3565 homefurniturefl.com See our display ad on page 64 Indian River Furniture 321-636-4348 Indianriverfurniture.com See our display ad on the back cover Kane’s Furniture 321-674-0881 kanesfurniture.com See our display ad on page 4 La-Z-Boy Furniture Gallery 321-725-5461 / 321-639-3010 lazboy.com/brevard See our display ad on page 3 Scan Design 407-992-7777 Orlando 407-862-9775 Altamonte Springs Scandesign.com See our display ad on page 99 Mattress Barn Mattressbarn.com See our display ad on page 9 HOME & GARDEN Brevard Stone 321-636-9344 Brevardstone.com See our display ad on page 91 Sun Harbor Nursery 321-773-1375 Sunharbornursery.com See our display ad on page 26 Susan Hall Landscape Architect 321-449-0790 Hall-la.com See our display ad on page 48 Waldrop Upholstery & Design 321-779-0084 See our display ad on page 65 HOME SERVICES Affordable Glass Protection 321-722-9996 Affordableshutters.com See our display ad on page 65 Grout Master 321-745-0578 Groutmasterllc.com See our display ad on page 85

JVR Roofing 321-255-7663 Jvrroofing.com See our display ad on page 94 ProTech Roofing 321-773-7995 Protechroofingexperts.com See our display ad on page 93 INTERIOR DESIGNERS Designers West Interiors Liz Harris, A.S.I.D. 321-255-2904 designerswestinteriors.com I specialize in residential new construction finishes and specifications and all interiors furnishing procurement. Island Paint and Decorating 321-452-8981 Islandpaintanddecorating.com See our display ad on page 81 Lawler Cherry Interior Design 407-831-5443 lawlercherry.com High end residential design firm who offers design services to include design specifications and interior detailing as well as furnishings package. JEWELERS Fifth Avenue Jewelers 321-726-9992 See our display ad on page 25 KITCHEN & BAtH DESIGN Aqua- Draulics 321-631-0400 aquadraulicsonine.com See our display ad on page 68 Linda Tamasy Design, Inc. Linda Tamasy, ASID 321-757-8997/480-5276 See our display ad on page 93 Roomscapes of Brevard 321-504-1122 roomscapesofbrevard.com See our display ad on page 21 Superb Kitchens and Baths 321-674-8878 Superbkb.com See our display ad on page 58 LIGHTING Brevard Lighting 321-636-3345 brevardlighting.com See our display ad on page 67 House of Lights 321-723-8921 See our display ad on page 52 LODGING Beach Place Guesthouses 321-783-4045 beachplaceguesthouses.com See our display ad on page 44 Dog Spot Hotel 321-757-7684 Dogspthotel.com See our display ad on page 87

MEDICAL Atlantis Vision Center 321-777-1670 atlantisvisioncenter.com See our display ad on page 26 Central Florida Urogynecology 321-806-3929 CFUroGyn.com See our display ad on page 78 Dr. Danielle Boucher 321-242-8790 Ext. 2459 mima.com See our display ad on page 13 New Vision Eye Center 772-257-8700 minottyeye.com    See our display ad on page 40 Signature Smile Family Dentistry 321-633-4020 signaturesmilesbyhilary.com See our display ad on page 86 Specialty Animal Hospital 321-752-7600 ashemergency.com See our display ad on page 47 World of Vision 321-953-2020 See our display ad on page 85 Wuesthoff 321-253-2222 Wuesthoff.org See our display ad on page 77 POOLS & SPAS water in transit Bach Pool Art 321-752-1992 See our display ad on page 33 Blue Marlin 321-259-1233 Bluemarlinpools.com See our display ad on page 56 REAL ESTATE Kevin Hill Remax Alternative 321-308-2270 relocation-realestate.com See our display ad on page 57 marine docks Land and Sea Marine 321-837-0888 landandseamarine.com See our display ad on page 69 SENIOR LIVING Glenbrooke at Palm Bay 321-952-6900 seniorlifestyle.com see our display ad on page 94 Hibiscus Court 321-951-1050 HibiscusCourtMelbourne.com see our display ad on page 25 SHOPPING CENTERS Merritt Square Mall 321-452-3270 Merrittsquaremall.com See our display ad on page 79 97

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Fabulous Light Fixtures Chandeliers

Pendants lier is made “This Italian chande n roses. I lai rce po up of many ue shop bought it at an antiq lling on our when we were trave d was not sailboat. My husban ught it too happy when I bro use it took onto the boat beca on board. up one of the 2 beds ped each I loved it, and wrap bubble rose individually with on the wrap to transport it sailboat.” – Robin Braswell Satellite Beach

Sconces “I recently remodeled a bathroom using Mackenzie Childs products purchased from Rebecca's in Merritt Island. One of my favorite items is the Torquay sconces.  They are handmade and decorated majolica with ceramic floral transfers and gold luster embellishments.  The shades are beaded with a marbleized signature check pattern.” – Sandra Wagner Merritt Island

NEW SEARCH for November 2010 issue Attention readers-We’re seeking photos of your most treasured holiday decor! Unwrap a cherished collectible, unpack your festive tabletop accessories or a front-door wreath. Let us know in 25 words or less where it came from and how you display it every year.

“This give s me an o pportunit off my wo y to show nderful w if e’s specia Her sister l talent. ‘rescued’ it in NC a Nancy he nd got it to re in Florid a. Applyin and grou g glass t artfully sh e created m favorite sh y ining light. ” – Proud h usband, C urt Botts Satellite B each

Floor Lamps “Our wavy paper lamp from Danish Interiors is a favorite. It gives a beautiful diffused light at night and doubles as an interesting sculpture by day!” – Joyce Wilden Suntree

Photos due Monday October 4, 2010 Email photos to: yourspace@floridatoday.com Please provide your name, address And a phone number.

Thank you to Robin Braswell, Curt Botts, Sandra Wagner and Joyce Wilden for sharing your fabulous light fixtures with us! spaces

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Profile for FLORIDA TODAY

Spaces, September - October  

Welcome to Spaces online! We invite you to take an interactive tour through Spaces, previewing our most recent issue. Spaces online allows y...

Spaces, September - October  

Welcome to Spaces online! We invite you to take an interactive tour through Spaces, previewing our most recent issue. Spaces online allows y...

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