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FRL A CHAPTER PROFILES INSIDE

O F F I C I A L P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E F LO R I DA R E S TA U R A N T & LO D G I N G A S S O C I AT I O N O F F I C I A L P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E F LO R I DA R E S TA U R A N T & LO D G I N G A S S O C I AT I O N

LODGING SPECIAL EDITION

WOMEN IN LODGING

Some of Florida’s leading women in lodging reflect on their careers, industry challenges and offer advice for the future

SPRING 2018 | FRLA.ORG


contents S P R I N G 2 0 18 | F R L A .O R G

DEPARTMENTS

4  Leadership Report Path to Power Bharat Patel, Florida Regional Director of Asian American 12  Hotel Owners Association (AAHOA)

Chefs That Sizzle Dustin Hilinski, Director of Culinary, Red Lobster Seafood Co. 14  27  Tourism Day FRLA members met with their local legislators to discuss the

19

importance of protecting the industry

29 Young Operator Chris Gannon, Bolay 40  ProStart Florida's High School Lodging Training Program 43  Harrassment Prevention Important Information from RCS Training 44  Business Matters First “Gig Economy” Trial Decision 47  Sexual Harrassment Harassment Claims Take Center Stage 48  Hospitality Happenings Glance at the Happenings Around the State 50  Engage Tourism Day Shows the Importance of Grassroots 51  UnitedHealthcare Addressing the Diverse Health Care Needs of the Hospitality Industry

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Secrets of Success Sharky’s on the Pier 54  Movers and Shakers 56  Support CORE 57 

SPECIAL FEATURES

8

In Memoriam 9 

10

VISIT FLORIDA — FRLA’s Tourism Partner

VISIT FLORIDA Get to know Florida's Welcome Centers

Remembering Young Lives and Promising Futures Lost Legislative Report

FRLA is Advocating for Fair, Reasonable and Balanced Legislation

19  FRLA Chapter Profiles

50 FRL A .org

Find out more about FRLA's organizatons around the State

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A La Carte 46 

FRLA’s Special Lodging Section

Focuses on the Developments in the Lodging Industry and Highlights Women in Lodging

Industry Information You Need to Know

Correction: The article, “iPads for Florida’s Inspection Team” on page 38 of the Winter issue of FR&L Magazine attributed the article to Michelle Haynes as the author. However, the author for this article was Brenden Doherty, District 5 Manager for the Division of Hotels and Restaurants.

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LEADERSHIP REPORT

Be Our Guest

Hospitality is Stronger Than Ever What an incredible start to 2018 we’ve had! Our industry announced 116.5 million visitors came to our state in 2017. The recent economic impact figures revealed record visitor spending of $112 billion. It is truly amazing the impact tourism has on our state, with these visitors generating $88 billion in visitor spending of Florida’s total GDP (roughly 10 percent) and $11.6 billion in state and local taxes. Since Florida’s legislative session kicked off in January, FRLA has been working with elected leaders to protect the hospitality industry from harmful regulations. One of the toughest battles we fought this year was the issue of the state’s regulation of the hospitality industry and short-term rentals. FRLA was proud to play an instrumental role in negotiations with lawmakers and industry stakeholders. Once again, with active participation from our members, we defeated harmful legislation that would have severely regulated the franchisee and franchisor relationship. Several restrictions to limit the amount of tourist development taxes allowed

for use towards infrastructure projects were also included in this year’s tax package. Learn more about FRLA’s legislative session beginning on page 10. On Tourism Day, the industry put its best forward with 500 hundred attendees invading the Capitol to advocate on behalf of our industry. Learn about your impact on page 50 and find a recap of the day’s events on page 27. FRLA’s influence extends from the collective work of more than 10,000 members across the state. Our local chapters are stronger than ever and are engaging their elected leaders to advance tourism priorities and inspiring grassroots efforts. Check out how our members are getting involved and improving their communities on pages 19–26. This special edition of FR&L Magazine also focuses on our world-class lodging industry. We’re excited to feature some of the most influential women in Florida’s hospitality industry. Learn about their secrets to success and professional experiences on page 30.

On the national stage, sexual harassment, ‘gig workers’ and human trafficking continue to dominate public discussion. Learn how to address these important issues in the workplace and at your business on pages 42-44 and 47. In the upcoming months, I encourage you to use FRLA as your resource. Our staff stands ready to serve you. Cheers!

Carol B. Dover Carol B. Dover FRLA President & CEO

Educate Your Local Officials About Florida's Hospitality Industry As I reflect upon the past year, I am grateful for the commitment and leadership of you and the entire Florida Restaurant & Lodging team. Thanks to your hospitality, enthusiasm and business rigor, 2017 delivered yet another Florida tourism record — 88.2 million visitors thru the third quarter, a 3.3 percent increase over 2016. Is it any wonder Florida is now the third most populated state in our great nation? Visitors are first drawn to the Sunshine State because of its spectacular beaches, inventive resorts and diverse culinary experiences. But many visitors return as neighbors, fellow colleagues and, hopefully, FRLA members. With amazing success comes a great responsibility. Each new year presents its own unique challenges, and it’s likely that 2018 will be no different. By the time you read this message, FRLA will have completed another crucial session lobbying and educating our elected officials in Tallahassee and working for the best possible outcome from the 2018 Legislative Session for Florida's hospitality industry. Please remember, Tourism Day and other short trips to Tallahassee are not enough! In one chapter, the FRLA board implemented a government 4  S P R I N G

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relations playbook whereby local elected officials were aligned with FRLA members from their respective districts. These pioneering FRLA leaders initiated communication, built lasting relationships and championed a unified message as the voice and faces representing tourism — it was empowering. With this inspiration in mind, I embolden all of you to engage with the elected representatives, commissioners and business influencers within your communities. There remains 40 weeks of opportunity left in 2018 for us to educate these leaders about the tourism industry, and I know we can count on you. Thank you for giving me the great opportunity to serve as your 2018 Chairman, and here’s to another outstanding year for Florida’s hospitality industry. Sincerely,

Kevin Speidel

Kevin Speidel 2018 Chairman of the Board

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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Susie R. McKinley Email: Editor@frla.org PUBLISHED BY

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1932 MICCOSUKEE ROAD, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32308 Phone: 850-878-0554 Fax: 850-807-5037

MAGAZINE Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine is the official publication of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association, Inc. (FRLA). FRLA reserves the right to accept, modify or reject any and all content submitted for publication, whether paid or otherwise, solely at its discretion. Unless otherwise expressly indicated, FRLA does not endorse or warrant any products or services contained herein. In addition, unless otherwise expressly noted, the opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and not necessarily those of FRLA, its directors, officers, members or staff. Content submissions may be made to the Publisher’s Office by regular mail or by email. Please note that submitted materials will not be returned. FRLA Headquarters 230 S. Adams St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 850/224-2250 Fax: 850/224-9213

Printer’s Address 13487 S. Preston Hwy. Lebanon Junction, KY 40150

Ad rates and submission guidelines at www.FRLA.org Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine (USPS 002-629; ISSN 1044-03640) is published bi-monthly. FRLA members receive this publication as part of their membership dues. Non-members receive it as a marketing and promotion effort to inform the Florida foodservice and lodging industry of efforts made on its behalf by FRLA. Printing and mailing services: Publisher’s Press, Inc., Lebanon Junction, KY.

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Address changes may be sent to: FRLA, 230 South Adams St., Tallahassee, FL 32301 or via email to susana@frla.org. Send subscription address changes to susana@frla.org.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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VISIT FLORIDA

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elcome to Florida! The iconic sign greets millions of visitors who travel to the Sunshine State each year, and for those who take the time to stop at one of the five Official Florida Welcome Centers, more than just normal rest area amenities await. Since 1949, the Welcome Centers have served as the first points of contact for travelers entering the state along the major interstates. The Official Florida Welcome Centers operated by VISIT FLORIDA have created a long-standing tradition of complimentary Fresh from Florida citrus juice, friendly, informative staff and a vast array of brochures highlighting all the excitement our great state has to offer. This past year, the Welcome Centers, located at the state entry lines on I-10, U.S. 231, I-75, I-95, and at the State Capitol, greeted more than 2.7 million people, an increase of nearly 71,365 over the previous year. Additionally, they served enough citrus juice to fill 13 tanker trucks, and helped 34 percent of visitors modify, improve and extend their vacation itinerary with information provided at the centers. While their No. 1 goal is to inform guests 8  S P R I N G

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and showcase the great state of Florida, the Welcome Centers serve a more serious role during emergency situations. This past September, in the wake of Hurricane Irma, Florida’s Welcome Centers transitioned to emergency information centers. In addition to providing evacuees with the most up-to-date information, all staff were Red Cross Certified and stood ready to assist at shelters and other areas as needed. Furthermore, wanting to ensure Florida businesses received additional support in the aftermath of the hurricane, VISIT FLORIDA offered complimentary brochure distribution at all five Welcome Centers to those located in impacted areas. Did you know that roughly 30 percent of visitors who stop at the Welcome Centers have not finalized their vacation plans as they begin their travels? This surprising statistic presents an excellent opportunity for Florida businesses to take advantage of Welcome Center capabilities to market their destination to visitors. The brochure rack, for example, is an inexpensive way to get information about your businesses to visitors. For businesses that want a more engaging experience, Welcome Center Takeovers are a great option to make a real impact

on guests. Currently being taken advantage of by SeaWorld, Punta Gorda and Walt Disney World Resort, Takeovers are only available to VISIT FLORIDA Marketing Partners. From displaying buildouts and banners to providing literature giveaways, Welcome Center Takeovers are limited only by imagination. At VISIT FLORIDA, we want to continue to improve the visitors’ Florida experience. This year, to better serve those that visit the I-95 Welcome Center, one of the busiest of the five Centers, VISIT FLORIDA is overseeing a renovation of the 4,000 square foot lobby. Scheduled to be completed by June 30, 2018, this refresh will include digital touch screens, an updated Kids Corner, visitor photo opportunities and a dedicated Florida YouTube video wall. So the next time you drive by that iconic Welcome to Florida sign, stop in to one of our Official Welcome Centers. Let us help you discover new hidden treasures in this spectacular state we are lucky to call home.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


IN MEMORIAM

Remembering Young Lives and Promising Futures Lost On February 14, 2018, a terrible and tragic shooting happened in Broward County at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, where 17 innocent people lost their lives. Four of those individuals were a part of our hospitality industry family.

Alyssa Alhadeff, 14

Jaime Guttenberg, 14

Jaime was a Hospitality Tourism & Management Program (HTMP) student training to join our industry. Her father, Fred Guttenberg, is a longtime former Dunkin’ Donuts franchisee.

Alyssa was a Hospitality Tourism & Management Program (HTMP) student and talented soccer player. Her parents, Ilan and Lori Alhadeff, tell us she was destined for law school.

Peter Wang, 15

Alex Schachter, 14

Peter was studying in the ProStart culinary arts and JROTC programs at Stoneman Douglas. His parents immigrated here from China and currently own a local restaurant.

Alex was the nephew of longtime former Dunkin’ Donuts franchisee, Scott Ball. He played in the Marching Eagles Band and dreamed of going to the University of Connecticut.

ALSO

Scott Beigel, 35 Martin Duque Anguiano, 14 Nicholas Dworet, 17 Aaron Feis, 37 Chris Hixon, 49 Luke Hoyer, 15 Cara Loughran, 14 Gina Montalto, 14 Joaquin Oliver, 17 Alaina Petty, 14 Meadow Pollack, 18 Helena Ramsay, 17 Carmen Schentrup, 16

Our hearts go out to their families, friends and survivors as they face this immeasurable loss and tragedy.

FRL A .org

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L E G I S L AT I V E U P D AT E

2018 LEGISLATIVE REPORT VACATION RENTALS DIED IN COMMITTEE SB 1400/1640 (sponsored by Sen. Steube, R-Sarasota & Sen. Simmons, R-Longwood) HB 773 (sponsored Rep. La Rosa, R-Saint Cloud) In 2011, Florida preempted vacation rental regulation to the state preventing local governments from enacting any new law that restricted the use of vacation rentals, prohibited vacation rental, or regulated vacation rentals based on their classification, use or occupancy. In 2014, the Legislature revised the preemption of 2011 so that local governments can regulate vacation rentals, provided the regulations do not regulate the duration or frequency of vacation rentals. SB 1400 and SB 1640 were combined during the committee process. As combined, this bill would require all vacation rentals to be licensed, and for that license to be displayed within the property. It would apply to vacation rentals only some of the same sanitation and safety requirements that apply to public lodging facilities. It would define what constitutes a commercial operator of vacations rental units. It would preempt local regulation of vacation rentals. HB 773 would restrict local governments’ ability to regulate vacation rentals, requiring all properties to be treated the same regardless of whether they are used for vacation rentals or residential property. Neither the Senate nor House proposals adequately

addressed the role of hosting platforms in the vacation rental industry.

• 40 percent of the TDT funds are reserved for tourism marketing efforts.

TOURIST DEVELOPMENT TAX

• An independent analysis to demonstrate the project’s positive impact on tourism is conducted.

PASSED SB 658 (sponsored by Sen. Brandes, R-St. Petersburg)

HUMAN TRAFFICKING DIED IN COMMITTEE

HB 585 (sponsored by Rep. Fine, R-Palm Bay)

SB 1044 (sponsored by Sen. Book, D-Plantation)

HB 7087 (sponsored by Ways & Means and Appropriations Committees)

HB 167 (sponsored by Rep. Spano, R-Riverview)

Recognizing the importance of tourism to Florida’s economy, the Tourist Development Tax (TDT) was adopted to provide a dedicated source of funding for tourism promotion. The Florida Statutes delineate the specific and limited uses to which these dollars can be applied. SB 658 and HB 585 allows for broad use of TDT revenue for infrastructure and other public projects, once certain criteria are satisfied. Both bills stalled in the process and were thought to be dead. The legislation was revived via an amendment to the tax package, HB 7087. The amendment, which closely mirrors the original bill, mandates that TDT funds cannot be used for infrastructure projects unless: •T  he county receives at least $10 million in TDT dollars in the immediately preceding fiscal year. • It is approved by a twothirds vote of the county governing board. • The amount of TDT dollars used is no more than 70 percent of the total project cost.

Estimates show that thousands of men, women and children are trafficked in the United States each year. These traffickers often rely on legitimate businesses to sustain their operations and infrastructure. Unfortunately, hotels are one of the venues that traffickers use to exploit their victims. This criminal activity presents a great risk for the safety and security of hotel businesses, as well as legitimate customers. With millions of visitors coming to our state each year, Florida’s hospitality industry must serve as a leader in the fight to combat human trafficking, and it is critical that our industry continues to raise awareness through education and training.

employer may have a defense against punitive damages. During the final days of session, SB 1044 was amended onto HB 1301 in a very unusual procedural maneuver late in the session. Additional amendments stripped this language from HB 1301, taking the Human Trafficking legislation out of consideration for the 2018 session. The hospitality industry is eager to continue collaboration with our state and local community partners to find meaningful solutions to eradicate this horrible crime.

VISIT FLORIDA FUNDING PASSED HB 5001 – General Appropriations Act Gov. Rick Scott recommended $100 million in Visit Florida funding in his budget. The House and Senate agreed upon funding for VISIT FLORIDA in the amount of $76 million. This allows VISIT FLORIDA to be fully funded at its current level and to continue promoting Florida tourism to attract visitors to the Sunshine State.

SB 1044 and HB 167 would have established a civil cause of action for victims of human trafficking. Under these bills, a trafficking victim could sue an entity that meets the broad definition of a facilitator and recover economic, noneconomic and punitive damages. If the employer has provided training to its employees to help them identify and report instances of trafficking, the

For a more detailed report visit our website at FRLA.org or contact the FRLA Government Relations Team at 850-224-2250.

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


L E G I S L AT I V E U P D AT E

LEGISLATIVE SCORECARD 2018 PASSED

w w w.FRL A .org

DID NOT PASS

ISSUE

ISSUES OVERVIEW

VACATION RENTALS

Preempted regulation of vacation rentals to the state; required vacation rentals to be licensed, pay taxes and adhere to sanitation requirements. Did not address the role of hosting platforms in vacation rental industry.

TOURIST DEVELOPMENT TAX

Allows for broad use of Tourist Development Tax revenue for infrastructure and other public projects, provided certain criteria are met.

FRANCHISEE/ FRANCHISOR AGREEMENT

Proposed a fundamental change between the franchisee/franchisor relationship.

HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Established a civil cause of action for victims of human trafficking against entities meeting the broad definition of a “facilitator.”

VISIT FLORIDA FUNDING

Fully funds VISIT FLORIDA at $76 million.

TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL TRANSPARENCY

Established additional regulations and heightened transparency requirements for local TDCs, including limitations on salaries and expenditures, audit requirements, and public posting of certain financial data and contract information.

COOPERATIVE ADVERTISING

Created an exemption to “tied house evil” prohibitions and permits manufacturers and vendors to engage in cooperative advertising.

BRANDED GLASSWARE

Allows a malt beverage distributor to give, without charge, malt beverage branded glassware to a licensed vendor.

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

Removed the current size limitations for wine and cider; relaxed the meal purchase requirements for patrons who wish to take partially consumed bottles of wine home with them from a restaurant.

ALCOHOL DELIVERY

Allows alcoholic beverage vendors to make deliveries based on “electronic” orders in the same manner as telephone and mail orders.

CITY OF ORLANDO

Allows for a special exception to the alcoholic beverage law for certain premises in the City of Orlando meeting specific criteria.

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PAT H T O P O W E R

Bharat Patel

FLORIDA REGIONAL DIRECTOR OF ASIAN AMERICAN HOTEL OWNERS ASSOCIATION (AAHOA)

B

harat Patel has been working in the hospitality industry for more than 30 years. His journey began in Kentucky, with stops in Atlanta, Daytona Beach, Orlando, Gainesville and, finally, Sarasota/Bradenton. He is a proud graduate of the University of Florida. Patel has served on several hospitality industry boards, including the CHOICE Hotels Owners Council and the Econo Lodge Franchise Association. Patel currently serves on the Sarasota Tourism Development Council, the Sheriff’s Advisory Board and the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association Board of Directors. In addition to that, he is the Florida Regional Director of AAHOA — Asian American Hotel Owners Association: the largest hotel owners’ association in the world. Patel notes that he has “weathered one World’s Fair, one Olympics and Hurricanes Andrew, Charlie, Frances, Ivan and Irma.”

How did you get started in the hospitality industry? Growing up around hard working immigrant parents, I was exposed to the true meaning of what it meant to “Live the American Dream.” My parents owned and operated their first hotel in 1982, located in Corbin, Kentucky, the home of the first Kentucky Fried Chicken in the world.

Early in your career, what was the most valuable lesson you learned? I have always lived by a mantra, which is to aim high, be the best, do what’s right, get results, have fun, go green and give back.

CORE grants support to children of food + beverage service employees navigating life-altering circumstances. Learn how you can help at COREgives.org

Do you have any mentors who were instrumental in helping you achieve your goals? My parents always have been, and will continue to be, my

personal heroes. They showed me how to excel in business and life and laid the foundation for our American dream. They also taught me three important things that I will pass down to my children. First, they taught me to work hard because you can never achieve anything in life without effort. Second is to be educated because whatever path you choose in life, you have to be informed and the learning never stops. Finally, they taught me to stay out of politics which admittedly, I did not follow. Politics, for me, is a passion and a hobby. I always like to say that politics is the art of the possible.

What is the single greatest factor in the success of your career? I believe the one thing that has kept me going strong is something I like to call “grit.” It is my ability to maintain a stiff upper lip and to forever work hard and carry on.

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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Chefs That Sizzle

Dustin Hilinski

DIRECTOR OF CULINARY, RED LOBSTER SEAFOOD CO.

Chef Dustin Hilinski is director of culinary for Red Lobster. He leads the team of chefs who develop all the menu items across Red Lobster’s more than 700 restaurants. Dustin grew up in the food service business, following in the footsteps of his father who worked as a chef. After graduating from the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York, Dustin worked in Europe honing his skills as a chef. He has offered his expertise as a chef in several fine dining restaurants, resorts, hotels and food manufacturing establishments throughout the world. Before assuming his current role with Red Lobster in 2013, Dustin was the Senior Corporate Chef at H.J. Heinz, where he led the development of foodservice concepts and products. He specialized in innovation, and his team worked with the top national restaurant chains developing culinary forward menu items as well as products for the retail industry. Dustin enjoys participating in all aspects of the food and culinary industry. He served as a guest judge at the Food Network’s South Beach Food & Wine Festival and was featured in the Culinary Institute of America’s Pro Chef instructional video series, Food Product Design magazine and major contributing author of Culinology “The Intersection of Culinary Art and Food Science.” When not cooking, Dustin and his wife are busy keeping up with their three boys. Describe your role as a chef with Red Lobster. As Director of Culinary

for Red Lobster, I lead a team of talented chefs in the development of menu items for all of the 700+ Red Lobster locations. We also develop menu items that are featured in Red Lobster’s signature events like Lobsterfest, Crabfest and Endless Shrimp. What inspires your menus? Our vision

is to be where the world goes for seafood, now and for generations. We have to continue to be creative in the kitchen so our guests are inspired and hungry for more.

Hot Chef? Are You Considered Among Florida’s Hottest Chefs? 14  S P R I N G

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I like to say my team and I play with food all day, but the truth is that we are always innovating and looking for new flavor-forward trends. We do that in a variety of ways, including traveling the world with our supply chain team to find new and interesting seafood types and preparations to introduce to our guests. Our guests expect us to give them exciting ways to enjoy their seafood favorites — and to discover new things. Fortunately, seafood’s versatility and broad global appeal provide opportunities for us to create innovative seafood options for our menu. Please explain Red Lobster’s commitment to seafood standards and sustainability. As one of the world’s larg-

est seafood buyers, we work hard to serve seafood that is of the highest quality and is traceable, sustainable and responsible. This is important to ensure we have seafood to enjoy now and for generations. Our buyers and inspectors work face-to-face with longterm suppliers from around the world to make sure only the best seafood comes to our restaurants. Please describe some of your most popular menu items. The great thing

about Red Lobster is that there’s truly something for everyone. We have plenty of customizable options that allow guests to create a perfect meal. We also have classic dishes that combine favorites like our Ultimate Feast, which includes a little bit of everything — tender Maine lobster tail, steamed North American Snow Crab legs, garlic shrimp scampi and Walt’s Favorite Shrimp. We also just introduced tasting plates, good for a lighter bite or group sharing, that are packed with big flavors at an affordable price so guests can explore a variety of new flavors and preparations. What are your signature or “specialties”? Do you have any unique food presentations or any new ideas that you are using? As seafood experts, we’re

always looking to give our guests new ways

to discover and enjoy freshly prepared seafood. We recently introduced a new menu that features Tasting Plates and Globally Inspired entrees. This menu offers guests a variety of new dishes, flavors, preparations and price points. We’ve added a line-up of entrees, inspired by flavors from around the world and introduced a 6-oz., woodgrilled filet mignon as part of our surf & turf options. To what do you attribute your success as a chef? I grew up in the food

service business, following in the footsteps of my father, who was a chef. After graduating from the Culinary Institute of America, I worked in Europe honing my skills. I’ve offered my expertise as a chef in several fine dining restaurants, resorts, hotels and food manufacturing establishments throughout the world. I apply those experiences to my work today, particularly in creating globally inspired flavors and preparations for our menus. I would say the real secret to success is being part of a talented, innovative team. I’m incredibly proud of having a passionate, hard-working culinary team who creates one-of-a-kind recipes to delight our guests.

Know a chef who is creating a buzz with innovative cuisine, exceptional presentation or fresh new ideas? FRLA wants to tell the state about them in a quarterly feature in FR&L Magazine. Submit your favorite chef du jour to editor@frla.org. Please include a brief explanation of why your submission should be considered one of the hottest chefs in Florida. Be sure to include restaurant and contact information. Submissions will be featured in FR&L Magazine as Chefs That Sizzle!

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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2018

FRLA Chapter Profiles

Chapter Map Chapter Leadership Regional Director Contact Information FRL A .org

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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Get to Know

Your Chapters of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association FRLA is Florida’s premier nonprofit hospitality industry trade association. Our mission is to “Protect, Educate and Promote” Florida’s $111.7 billion hospitality industry which represents 1.4 million employees — making it the state’s No. 1 industry. We offer regulatory compliance and food safety training needs (RCS Training and SafeStaff ®); industry developed career-building high school programs (FRLAEF); sponsor the only event in Florida exclusively serving the restaurant and foodservice industry (FR&L Show, September 6–8, 2018, in Orlando); and we safeguard the needs of the hospitality industry by providing legislative advocacy. We represent and serve more than 10,000 independent and household name members, suppliers and theme parks. In order to service our thousands of members, we have formed local chapters throughout the state that meet regularly, engage in networking and philanthropic events and work together to promote the interests of their region. Our Regional Directors staff each chapter and direct hospitality meetings and events along with promoting membership recruitment and industry involvement.

Should you require more information, please call Dan Murphy, Senior Vice President of Membership and Corporate Relations, at 850-224-2250 ext. 235.


REGIONAL DIRECTOR & CHAPTER MAP

GULF ISLAND COAST LEE PARADISE COAST

FRLA.OR G /MEMBERSHIP


Meet the

REGIONAL DIRECTORS

Lois Croft

Jodi Cross

nchapman@frla.org (904) 574-2259 Chapter: Northeast

lcroft@frla.org (239) 339-7692 Chapters: Gulf Island Coast, Lee, Paradise Coast

jcross@frla.org (561) 410-0035 Chapters: Palm Beach, Treasure Coast

Dannette Lynch

Corey Mobley

Lindsey Norris

dannette@frla.org (727) 642-3404 Chapters: Hillsborough, Pinellas, Space Coast, Suncoast

cmobley@frla.org (850) 375-8373 Chapter: EscaRosa

lnorris@frla.org (561) 410-0035 Chapter: Broward

Nicole Chapman

The Chapters BAY REGIONAL DIRECTOR: Nick Lowe CHAPTER PHILANTHROPIES AND INTERESTS: Hospitality, tourism, local government, state government, education and fishing industry SIGNATURE EVENTS: • Northwest Florida Golf Classic • Bay Chapter fundraiser with Gulf Coast State College • Bay Chapter Bust-a-Clay • Bay Chapter Bowling Social BOARD OF DIRECTORS: President: Paul Schreiner, Texas Roadhouse Vice President, Lodging:

Melinda Lane, Hilton Garden Inn Panama City Vice President, Restaurants: Vacant Treasurer: Paul Wohlford, The Resort Collection Secretary: Woody Drobia, General Manager, Boardwalk Beach Resort Government Relations/PAC Representative: Matt Griffitts, Owner, La Quinta Inn & Suites Membership: Vacant Marketing and Events: Patrick Ryan, Gulf Power and Jason Provorse, Boardwalk Beach Hotel Education and Training: Stephen Withall, Gulf Coast State College Chapter Educational Foundation Representative: Stephen Withall, Gulf Coast State College

Lynne Hernandez

Nick Lowe

lhernandez@frla.org (305) 710-3962 Chapters: Miami-Dade, Monroe

nlowe@frla.org (850) 661-4256 Chapter: Bay, Tallahassee, Northwest Florida

Rosie Riccardi

Marjorie Stone

rriccardi@frla.org (407) 304-8773 Chapter: Central Florida

mstone@frla.org (850) 524-1747 Chapter: Central Florida

BROWARD REGIONAL DIRECTOR: Lindsey Norris CHAPTER PHILANTHROPIES AND INTERESTS: Locally we support Broward County Public Schools, specifically the ProStart Culinary Program and the Hospitality Tourism Management Programs in local middle and high schools, and we work closely with the United Way of Broward County.

Cate Farmer, General Manager, Margaritaville Hollywood Beach Resort Vice President, Restaurants: Carrie Caldwell, Director of Events, The Restaurant People Treasurer: Donald Calder, President and Owner, InVision Strategies, Inc. Secretary: Janna Lhota, Partner, Holland & Knight Immediate Past President: Eduardo Fernandez, General Manager, Sonesta Fort Lauderdale Beach

SIGNATURE EVENTS: • Annual Education Gala • Place Your Bets for Education Casino Night • Golf Tournament BOARD OF DIRECTORS: President: Danielle Rosse, Owner, Oceans 234 Vice President, Lodging:

Broward Board


The Chapters ESCAROSA

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: President: Gus Silivos, Owner, Skopelos Vice President of Restaurants: Dave Knudsen, Franchise Business Consultant, Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Vice President of Hotels: Vacant Treasurer: Robert Remig, Vice President, Fisher Brown

REGIONAL DIRECTOR: Corey Mobley

Central Florida Board

CENTRAL FLORIDA REGIONAL DIRECTORS: Marjorie Stone and Rosie Riccardi CHAPTER PHILANTHROPIES AND INTERESTS: In 2017, Central Florida Chapter raised $7,395.91 for the FRLA Educational Foundation and $6,000 for the FRLA PAC. The Central Florida Chapter’s goals are the following: build our membership, serve as a vital local resource in matters relevant to our industry and support local high school and college-level educational hospitality programs. SIGNATURE EVENTS: • “Hiring Rock Stars” Presentation by Jim Knight and Mini Career Connection • FR&L Show Party • Bowling Bash BOARD OF DIRECTORS: President: Jon McGavin, Vice President of Hotels, The Ritz-Carlton Orlando, Grande Lakes Vice President of Restaurants: Chris Frawley, Divisional Vice President, Miller’s Ale House Vice President of Lodging: Barb Bowden, Complex Managing Director, Loews Sapphire Falls Resort and Loews Royal Pacific Resort Loews Hotels Universal Orlando Treasurer: Christine Fields, Director of Human Resources, Tijuana Flats Secretary: Meghan Stuart, Senior Vice President of Operations, Interessant Hotels & Resort Management (IHRMC) Past President: Leigh Doyle, President, Ellie Lou’s Brews & BBQ

HILLSBOROUGH: REGIONAL DIRECTOR: Dannette Lynch CHAPTER PHILANTHROPIES AND INTERESTS: • Mentor ProStart and HTMP students • The Pediatric Cancer Center SIGNATURE EVENTS: • Breakfast with the FRLA Chairman of the Board • “Give it your Best Shot” Sporting Clay Shoot • Annual Luncheon with the Mayor

CHAPTER PHILANTHROPIES AND INTERESTS: • Milton in May • Feeding the Gulf Coast Chef’s Challenge • Gulf Coast Kid’s House — Taste of Tailgating • Peat & Pearls-Benefitting, Keep Pensacola Beautiful • Fisher House Emerald Coast • Pathways For Change — Hospitality Class SIGNATURE EVENTS: • EscaRosa Crawfish Boil • EscaRosa Beach Bowl • EscaRosa Bust a Clay

EscaRosa Board

GULF ISLAND COAST REGIONAL DIRECTOR: Lois Croft CHAPTER PHILANTHROPIES AND INTERESTS: • Building new chapter boards • Fundraise and support our local High School ProStart programs and local hospitality colleges • Engage and build strong relationships with our local commissioners and government officials

Gulf Coast Island Board

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: President: Eric Potts, General Manager, Bella’s Italian Cafe Vice President of Restaurants: Javier Rasmussen, General Manager of Food & Beverage, Straz Center for the Performing Arts Vice President of Lodging: Jerry Soles, General Manager, Holiday Inn Tampa Westshore Airport Secretary: David Steffen, Partner, Constangy, Brooks, Smith & Prophete LLP Treasurer: Jimmy Walker, Vice President, Dow Sherwood Corporation

SIGNATURE EVENTS: This is a brand new chapter! • Sunset Dinner & Wine Cruise BOARD OF DIRECTORS: President: Robin Madden, Owner, Islander Properties Vice President of Restaurants: Laurie Farlow, Owner, Farlow’s on the Water Vice President of Lodging: Deanne Gabel, General Manager, Wyvern Hotel Treasurer: Rod Girdwood, Sales Representative, Heartland Payment Systems Secretary: Lorah Steiner, Executive Director, Charlotte Harbor Visitor & Convention Bureau Government Relations/ PAC Representative: Sue Randall, Owner, Village Fish Market and La Fiorentina Chapter Educational Foundation Representative: Amanda Brunson, Hospitality Instructor, Keiser University

Hillsborough Board


The Chapters LEE REGIONAL DIRECTOR: Lois Croft CHAPTER PHILANTHROPIES AND INTERESTS: This is a brand new chapter! • B  uilding new chapter boards • Fundraise and support our local High School ProStart programs and local hospitality colleges • Engage and build strong relationships with our local commissioners and government officials SIGNATURE EVENTS: • May Golf Tournament • Chefs’ Educational Fundraiser Dinner BOARD OF DIRECTORS: President: Jeff Webb, Owner, Hampton Inn Vice President of Restaurants: Jay Johnson, Owner, Bubba’s Roadhouse Vice President of Lodging: Brian Kramer, General Manager, Hyatt Regency Coconut Point Resort & Spa

MIAMI-DADE REGIONAL DIRECTOR: Lynne Hernandez CHAPTER PHILANTHROPIES AND INTERESTS: The Miami-Dade Chapter supports many organizations raising more than $70,000 in 2017. Here is an example of organizations that the chapter supported: • Autism Speaks • American Cancer Society • Dress for Success • Ayuda • Camillus House • Toys for Tots • Mission United • Honey Shine Foundation • Breast Cancer Research Foundation • CORE • Hurricane Irma and Maria relief efforts Scholarships and funding are provided to various educational institutions such as: • Empowered Youth • Alonzo Mourning Family Foundation • Academy of Hospitality and Tourism • Hospitality Professional Awards luncheon, student conference and the Around the World Gala • Miami Dade College Culinary/ Hospitality Institute • FIU Chaplin School of Hospitality • Miami Hospitality Institute

Monroe Board Lee Board

MONROE REGIONAL DIRECTOR: Lynne Hernandez

Treasurer: Doug Babcock, CFO, ‘Tween Waters Inn Beach Resort Secretary: Pat Russell, Owner, Best Western Government Relations/ PAC Representative: Fred Hirschovits, Owner, Holiday Inn Fort Myers Airport and Twenty Twenty Hospitality Chapter Educational Foundation Representative: Rey Martinez, General Manager, Hyatt Coconut Plantation Resort

SIGNATURE EVENTS: • Monthly Hospitality Networkers (2nd Thursday) • Power Path Breakfast • Industry Summit • Annual Meeting and Chairman’s Breakfast • Golf Invitational • Holiday Party BOARD OF DIRECTORS: President: Carlos Gazitua, President/CEO Sergio’s Restaurants Chairperson/Past President: Mary Rogers, Vice President and General Manager, Fontainebleau Miami Beach Vice President of Lodging: Steve Keup, Regional Director, Hersha Hotels Florida Vice President of Restaurants: Pallava Goenka, Rusty Pelican Miami Treasurer: Ignacio Garcia-Menocal, Partner, Grove Bay Hospitality Group Secretary: Courtenay Carr-Russo, Tropical Delight

Miami-Dade Board

CHAPTER PHILANTHROPIES AND INTERESTS: The Monroe Chapter prides itself with being extremely caring for the community. This year was an especially challenging year for our members and friends and family in the Keys. The chapter board and members participated in numerous fundraising efforts and personally went above and beyond to help others in need. The outpouring of support was heartwarming, and the efforts still continue to this day. Here are some notable organizations that the chapter supported: • S  ister Season Fund for hospitality workers • Keys Community Foundation • The Salvation Army • Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium • Local high schools through Florida ProStart with educational materials and equipment • Florida Keys Community College Hospitality Program SIGNATURE EVENTS: • Wine on the Water • Taste of the Top Toques BOARD OF DIRECTORS: President: Alan Brand, Highgate Hotels Key West Vice President of Restaurants: Bobby Kuchinsky, Half Shell Raw Bar/ Turtle Kralls Vice President of Lodging: John Trovato, Managing Director, Casa Marina, A Waldorf Astoria Resort Vice President, Upper/Middle Keys: Laura Ciampa, VP of Human Resources, Ocean Reef Club Resort Treasurer: Charles Bauer, Managing Partner, Smokin’ Tuna Saloon Secretary: Raquel Crummitt, District Manager FL, JSA Promotions


The Chapters NORTHWEST FLORIDA

NORTHEAST REGIONAL DIRECTOR: Nicole Chapman

REGIONAL DIRECTOR: Nick Lowe

CHAPTER PHILANTHROPIES AND INTERESTS: The primary philanthropy for this chapter is our Northeast Chapter Scholarship Program.

CHAPTER PHILANTHROPIES AND INTERESTS: Hospitality, tourism, local government, state government, education and fishing industry

SIGNATURE EVENTS: • ROSE Awards • C  hapter Golf Tournament benefitting the scholarship program • Sip & Savor Restaurant Week • Bust-a-Clay BOARD OF DIRECTORS: President: Scott Overton, General Manager, Jaybird’s Inn Vice President, Restaurants: Greg Delks, VP of Business Development, Firehouse Subs of America Vice President, Lodging: David Mariotti, General Manager, One Ocean Resort & Spa Secretary: Rebecca Pemberton, Vizergy Digital Marketing Treasurer: Wayne McLellan, Finance Director, Omni Amelia Island Plantation

Northeast Florida Chapter

SIGNATURE EVENTS: •N  orthwest Florida Awards Banquet • Northwest Florida Bust-a-Clay • Northwest Florida Coastal Boil • Northwest Florida Golf Classic

Northwest Florida Chapter’s Golf Tournament

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: President: Nick Sarra, CEO, Saltwater Restaurants Vice President Lodging: Dawn Moliterno, Regional Director of Operations, Wyndham Vacation Rentals Vice President Restaurants: Jim Shirley, Jim Shirley Enterprises Treasurer: Tyler Jarvis, Owner, Jackacudas

Secretary: Bruce Craul, Emerald Grande at HarborWalk Village Government Relations: Jennifer Frost, Regional Director of Operations, Wyndham Vacation Rentals PAC Representative: Dawn Moliterno, Wyndham Vacation Rentals Membership: Debra Flynn, The Bay Restaurant Marketing and Events: Martin Owen, Owner, Owen Organization Education and Training/Chapter Educational Foundation Representative: Larry Haile, Great Southern Cafe

PALM BEACH/TREASURE COAST REGIONAL DIRECTOR: Jodi Cross SIGNATURE EVENTS: • E.A.T.S. Education & Agriculture: We pair a farm, student and chef to create a culinary dish and proceeds support our local scholarship fund. • G  olf tournament supporting education • Monthly mixers and educational events

PARADISE COAST

Paradise Coast Board

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: President: David Burke, Executive Vice President of Sales & Marketing, The Breakers Vice President Restaurants: Frank Eucalitto, Owner/Chef, Cafe Chardonnay Treasurer: Jordan Beckner, President of Sales, Fiberbuilt Umbrellas Secretary: Robin Bayless, Vice President of Marketing, TooJay’s Management LLC

Palm Beach/Treasure Coast Board Past President: Jason Emmett, President, Duffy’s Sports Grill

REGIONAL DIRECTOR: Lois Croft CHAPTER PHILANTHROPIES AND INTERESTS: This is brand new Chapter! • Building new chapter boards • Fundraise and support our local High School ProStart programs and local hospitality colleges • Engage and build strong relationships with our local commissioners and govenment officials

SIGNATURE EVENTS: Our chapter will be creating fundraisers to support our local High School ProStart Schools. BOARD OF DIRECTORS: Board roles are to be determined.


The Chapters PINELLAS

SPACE COAST

REGIONAL DIRECTOR: Dannette Lynch

REGIONAL DIRECTOR: Dannette Lynch

CHAPTER PHILANTHROPIES AND INTERESTS: ProStart Culinary Programs, Helping the Homeless – St. Vincent DePaul’s Pinellas Hope, Shop with a Cop

CHAPTER PHILANTHROPIES AND INTERESTS: ProStart Educational Programs

SIGNATURE EVENTS: • Breakfast with the FRLA Chairman of the Board • Annual Chapter Showcase Celebration Dinner • 19th Annual Hospitality Golf Classic • Legislative Round Table • 15th Annual Culinary Student Invitational — ProStart Culinary Competition

Pinellas Board

BOARD OF DIRECTORS: President: Chuck Prather, Owner, The Birchwood Inn Vice President, Restaurants: Dan Rose, Director of Operations, Darden Restaurant Vice President, Lodging: Clyde Smith, General Manager, Bilmar Beach Resort Secretary: Jeremy Runo, Owner, Daiquiri Shak Raw Bar & Grille Treasurer: George Glover, Chairman and CEO, BayStar Hotel Group

SIGNATURE EVENTS: • Luncheon with the FRLA Chairman of the Board • 6th Annual “Space Coast Strikes Back” Bowling Tournament • Friends of the Industry Legislative Round Table BOARD OF DIRECTORS: President: Scott Comer, General Manager, Country Inn & Suites Vice President, Restaurants: Laurilee

Thompson, Owner, Dixie Crossroads Vice President of Lodging: Jim Ridenour, General Manager, Courtyard by Marriott West Melbourne Secretary: Sara Malmstrom, Owner/General Manager, Sage Bistro Treasurer: Denzil Noronha, General Manager, Holiday Inn Express Cocoa Beach

Space Coast Chapter Members

TALLAHASSEE REGIONAL DIRECTOR: Nick Lowe

Suncoast Chapter Members

SUNCOAST REGIONAL DIRECTOR: Dannette Lynch CHAPTER PHILANTHROPIES AND INTERESTS: Florida ProStart, University of South Florida, Keiser University and Vet to Chef Program SIGNATURE EVENTS: • Luncheon with the FRLA Chairman of the Board • 8th Annual Shoot the Clays with FRLA • “Mix & Mingle” Holiday Dinner • Legislative Breakfast BOARD OF DIRECTORS: President: Damien O’Riordan, General Manager, The Ritz-Carlton Sarasota Vice President of Restaurants: John Horne, Owner and President, Anna Maria Oyster Bar Vice President of Lodging: Jeff Mayers, General Manager, Longboat Key Club & Resort Secretary: Michael Moench, Dean of Center of Culinary Arts, Keiser Univesity Treasurer: Mary Beth Hansen, Owner, Paradise Grill

CHAPTER PHILANTHROPIES AND INTERESTS: Hospitality, tourism, local government, state government, education, local universities (Florida State University, Tallahassee Community College, FAMU), UF Health Shands Hospital, Leon County Sheriff’s Office, United Way and Ernie Sims’ Big Hits Foundation SIGNATURE EVENTS: • Florida Tourism Day • Bust-a-Clay • Florida State Seminoles Basketball Fundraiser • “Strikes Back” bowling tournament BOARD OF DIRECTORS: President: Ernie Moses, General Manager, Candlewood Suites Vice President, Lodging: Melissa Cleveland, Director of Sales, Hotel Duval Vice President, Restaurants: Drew McLeod, Food and Beverage Director, Jacob’s on the Plaza DoubleTree by Hilton Tallahassee Treasurer: Wade Shapiro, President/Co-Founder, Legacy Insurance Solutions

Secretary: Ashley Dover-Gholston, Events and Catering Sales Manager DoubleTree by Hilton Tallahassee Government Relations/PAC Representative: Michelle Wilson, Sales Executive, Marriott International Membership: Stephanie Nichols, Senior Development Associate, CMN Hospitals, Shands Hospital Marketing and Events: Maurice Moulton, Founder/Manager, Catalina Café Education and Training: Vacant Chapter Educational Foundation Representative: Amanda Morrison, Managing Partner, Social Catering & Events

Nick Lowe, Amanda Morrison and Vince Brockman at NRA Public Affairs Conference


T O U R I S M D AY

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2

Tourism Day 2018

M

ore than 500 Florida tourism industry professionals came to Tallahassee on January 17, 2018, for Florida Tourism Day. Attendees began the day at the Donald L. Tucker Civic Center, where they heard from industry leader and legislators including, FRLA President and CEO Carol Dover, cabinet members, Commissioner of Agriculture Adam Putnam, CFO Jimmy Patronis and Representatives Clay Ingram and Holly Raschein. FRLA members met with their local legislators to discuss the importance of protecting the industry, then came together on Adams Street for the Tourism Day Street Party. The night before Tourism Day, FRLA held a reception to welcome attendees. Thanks to Tallahassee’s DoubleTree by Hilton for hosting!

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1. Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services Commissioner Adam Putnam rallied the Tourism Day audience. 2. The South Florida FRLA Chapters brought a strong contingent to Tourism Day. 3. Florida CFO Jimmy Patronis, Governor Rick Scott, FRLA CEO Carol Dover and VISIT FLORIDA CEO Ken Lawson visited with street party attendees. 4. Former FRLA Chairman Jim McManemon, FRLA Central Florida Regional Director Marjorie Stone, Northeast Chapter Director Nicole Chapman and FRLA Executive Committee member Olivia Hoblit enjoyed representing the industry. 5. RCS Training and friends withstood the freezing temperatures at the Tourism Day street party. 6. Florida Keys’ Representative Holly Raschein spoke to Tourism Day attendees. 7. FRLA leadership and Tourism Day attendees met with legislators and staff during Tourism Day. 8. Tourism Day speakers included VISIT FLORIDA CEO Ken Lawson and Florida CFO Jimmy Patronis. FRL A .org

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THE SHOW PARTY

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Y O U N G O P E R AT O R S

Chris Gannon

B

BOLAY, CO-FOUNDER/PRESIDENT

Favorite social media outlet? Instagram

orn in New Orleans, Louisiana, Chris Gannon graduated from Florida State University with a bachelor’s degree in Finance. While at FSU, he portrayed the famous Chief Osceola riding Renegade at the home football games. Chris’ experience with horses and riding led to a professional polo career in multiple countries and throughout the U.S., giving him the opportunity to network, become fluent in Spanish and learn many different cultures. Chris ended his professional career in polo as one of the youngest players to ever win the prestigious U.S. Open Polo Championship in West Palm Beach, Florida. Chris has created his new fast-casual restaurant concept with his father called Bolay. Bolay restaurants invite diners to build bowls packed with nutrient-rich super foods and tasty proteins. With ingredients that uniquely customize bold, innovative flavors, Bolay innovates the build-your-own bowl experience and pairs it with refreshing cold-pressed juices, infused teas, local craft beer and wine. In Chris’ free time, he is involved in many philanthropic endeavors and organizations. He founded the Charity Polo Classic, which supports the Children’s Cancer Center, the Ryan Nece Foundation and other local charities. He also has worked with the Outback 40 Goal Challenge for disabled players, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, American Red Cross events, the March of Dimes, the Children’s Dream Fund, The Gentlemen’s Society and Eckerd Youth Alternatives. He has worked in and with many of these organizations through fundraising, event coordination, and charitable donations.

Favorite type of restaurant? Build your own Bowl with nutrient-rich bold flavors. What podcast are you listening to? Restaurant Unstoppable Describe the culture of your business in 20 words or less: Our culture at Bolay is created by the next generation filled with adventure, creativity, winning attitudes, BOLD lifestyles, fitness, humility, foodies, collaboration and most importantly FUN! And these are not just corporate words on paper, Bolay embodies this. Where are you going on your next vacation? Wherever our next restaurant opening is. Favorite app? Wall Street Journal Cause you believe in? Military, kids and animals. If you are planning a dinner, who would you invite to represent Florida’s hospitality industry? Jason Emmett, Mike Harper (Bolay COO) and John Kunkel. How did you get into the hospitality industry? I was born into it but left and then magnetically pulled back into it. Best industry in the world.

APRIL 26–29, 2018 Sexual harassment and workplace discrimination lawsuits are on the rise. Just one of these costly lawsuits can put you out of business. That is why it is so important that you, your managers, and your employees know how to deal with these issues. Our full-service Anti-Harassment Training addresses common types of sexual harassment and/or discrimination and precautionary measures businesses should take in order to prevent a sexual harassment and/or discrimination lawsuit in the workplace.

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OF F ICIAL LOD G IN G PA RTN E R

F OU N D IN G PART N ER S

VIS IT

sowalwine.com FOR MO RE

INFOR MATION AND TO PU RCHASE TIC KETS F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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LODGING issue In this edition of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine we are featuring Florida’s lodging industry. We are hoping that the articles that we’ve chosen for this edition are of interest to our readers.

WOMEN IN LODGING As part of our lodging issue, we are highlighting some of the many women who are influencers in Florida’s lodging industry. We are recognizing them as leaders and have asked them some key questions about their career in this dynamic industry.

Aileen Band, Owner/Operator, Tropical Manor on the Ocean, Daytona Beach Shores What attracted you to the hospitality industry? I admired my mother’s work at our

family's hotel, finding great joy interacting with guests. Do you have a career mentor? Cornell

Hotel School professor Dr. Donal Dermody inspired me to provide outstanding, professional service.

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? Be

aware of constantly changing consumer tastes and distribution networks, and create meaningful, authentic products, services and experiences to meet these needs.

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? Finding an acceptable

Barb Bowden, Complex Managing Director, Loews Sapphire Falls Resort, Loews Royal Pacific Resort - Loews Hotels Universal, Orlando What attracted you to the hospitality industry? My first job in high school was in a

theme park. I loved it and knew I wanted to be in the hospitality industry. Do you have a career mentor? I have been

extremely fortunate to work with legends in our industry. In each role, I have had mentors who inspire me.

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? Align

yourself with a quality organization with a culture you admire.

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? We are a 24/7 dynamic

work/family life balance is a daily struggle.

industry — which is one of the challenges I love the most.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? I love the satisfac-

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? Developing teams

tion received from making guests happy and utilizing a variety of skills.

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and working with them to exceed goals.

Peggy Choudhry, Commissioner, Osceola Board of County Commissioners, Kissimmee

What attracted you to the hospitality industry? Our family purchased a small motel on U.S. 192 to initially flip it, but when the economy got really bad we kept it and learned all the ins and outs of the business. Do you have a career mentor? Growing up, my mentors

were my parents. They taught me that hard work and dedication pays off. Peers have also been encouraging, and my husband and daughter have given amazing support.

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? There will be long hours, high and low points

and a chance to meet people from around the world. Remember that treating your employees great will be what makes your hospitality career a success.

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field?

The daily ups and downs that come with this field from both the operations side and the government side. When governmental policies and rules are implemented for small business without understanding the consequences, it is a recipe for major challenges.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? I love that this industry’s main focus is to make people

happy. I love watching families from all walks of life enjoying their vacations and making memories that will last forever.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N

PHOTO BY KADMY / ISTOCK / GETTY IMAGES PLUS

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Women in Lodging

Laura Ciampa, Vice President Human Resources and Training, Ocean Reef Club, Key Largo What attracted you to the hospitality industry? I thought skiing would be a way to

Marcia Dmochowski Clark, General Manager, Hyatt Regency Sarasota

What attracted you to the hospitality industry? The travel, meeting new people

have fun before I joined the real world.

and each day is never the same.

Do you have a career mentor? Beth Howard,

Do you have a career mentor? During my

VP, COO, Beaver Creek Resort is one of the wisest women I’ve ever met.

career: Jim Abrahamson, Eric Long, Jim Haughney and Gary Seibert

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Shannon Dearin, General Manager, Courtyard St. Augustine

What attracted you to the hospitality industry? I was looking for a job and was given a

wonderful opportunity by two people named Ann Shipp and Penny Burns. They really encouraged me to pursue hospitality and started me down this road. Do you have a career mentor? I would have to say

that my mentor was Vivian Scales. She began in the industry as a housekeeper and she became my general manager. She allowed me to run the hotel under her guidance. She inspired me to become a general manager. She had faith in me, probably more faith than I had in myself. Even today, if I need something or some advice, she still makes herself available if needed.

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? This is the

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? You need

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? Cultivating and inspiring

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? Being able to antici-

pate and meet people’s (guests and employees) ever-changing expectations.

passion and go all in. Have fun in everything you do.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? Creating workplace

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? It’s all about the people —

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? Realizing that sometimes a fresh

honorable business of creating experiences. Don’t ever think you can’t make an impact. You decide what kind of impact that will be.

the next generation of both hospitality professionals and consumers.

experiences and career paths for associates beyond their expectations in iconic locales.

to have a passion for hospitality and service, enjoy working with people, love teamwork, have patience and perseverance.

they keep it interesting and fun!

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? You need to make it your

perspective is what you need. Walk away from the work, it will be waiting for you tomorrow.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? Meeting new people is the

best part of my job.

Becky DeCesare, General Manager, Holiday Inn Express Pensacola Downtown

What attracted you to the hospitality industry? I started with the Olympics in Atlanta and just

knew this was for me.

Do you have a career mentor? Yes, she was the

best boss ever!

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? Work in every

department.

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? Sometimes you have to juggle a

few too many hats at once.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? All of the people I get to

meet and host in our city.

Heidi Dennis, General Manager, Pelican Beach Noble House Hotels & Resorts, Fort Lauderdale What attracted you to the hospitality industry? The excitement of meeting people

What attracted you to the hospitality industry? As a builder’s daughter, the architec-

from all over the world, so many different cultures to learn from.

ture of great hotels was what first drew me to this industry.

Do you have a career mentor? I have had

Do you have a career mentor? I have been

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? If you

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? Everything

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? Guest entitlement. In

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? Having enough hours

many throughout different stages of my career and learned so much from all of them.

want a career in hospitality get your degree, but learn all areas from the ground up. Walk in others shoes! Housekeeping, front desk, kitchen, restaurant, etc.

the world of instant gratification and social media, today’s guest expectations have changed dramatically.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? The team! Walking daily

throughout the hotel and really appreciating everything they do every day.

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Cate Farmer, General Manager, Margaritaville Hollywood Beach Resort

fortunate to have had several. You have to learn from everything and everyone.

we do ties back to how you make someone feel. We deliver experiences and memories and it all starts with a smile and a genuine desire to serve others.

in the day.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? The people — guests,

team members, colleagues — it’s an incredible community!

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Women in Lodging

Elaine Fitzgerald, President/CEO, Beach Vacation Rentals, Pompano Beach

What attracted you to the hospitality industry? Hospitality is a happy business.

Christy Galzerano, General Manager, DoubleTree Oceanfront Hotel

What attracted you to the hospitality industry? The hotel business is fun and every day

Julie Hilton, Vice President/Co-Owner, Hilton, Inc. dba Paradise Found Resorts & Hotels,
Panama City Beach What attracted you to the hospitality industry? I enjoyed helping our guests create

Travelers from around the world arrive happy and leave happy.

is different, an adventure really.

Do you have a career mentor? No. I chose to

create my own business model for hotel efficiency and good service.

amazing mentors: my bosses Scott Schrank, Michele McLean, John E. Anderson III and Julie Garrison.

Do you have a career mentor? My parents,

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? Your mindset

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? Get started

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? Stay pas-

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? Challenges can include

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? Negative market con-

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? I love greeting guests,

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? My team ... my team ...

must be to always go the extra mile for your co-workers and your guests. Strive for excellence in safety, cleanliness and guest comfort.

long hours, ability to always communicate clearly, and multitasking to the max.

and later when they say they’ve had their best stay ever.

Olivia Hoblit, General Manager, Seaside Amelia Inn, Innisfree Hotels, Amelia Island What attracted you to the hospitality industry? My love and passion for service and

Do you have a career mentor? I had four

working in the business at the ground level as soon as you can. The work experience you’ll gain is essential to your success.

ditions that lead to cost-cutting measures to get through them.

my team. They are truly a pleasure to work with and make my job fun.

Kristin Iversen, General Manager/Lead General Manager, SpringHill Suites Navarre Beach What attracted you to the hospitality industry? People! Meeting new people and

treasured memories they wanted to repeat again and again! Charles and Lela Hilton, inspired me at age 11 to love legendary hospitality.

sionate about serving people, be true to yourself, treasure genuine friendships, carefully choose priorities, let go of negativity — and you’ll love your amazing life!

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? Finding friendly people

committed to serving others, willing to do physically and mentally challenging jobs.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? Inspiring team members

and creating magnificent moments for guests — having fun helping others have fun!

Sheila Johnson, Founder and CEO, Salamander Hotels & Resorts

What attracted you to the hospitality industry? I was approached about a piece of

people is what attracted me to the hospitality industry.

getting to know their stories has always been a passion of mine.

property in Middleburg, Virginia. From the moment I saw it, I knew I wanted to build a resort.

Do you have a career mentor? David and

Do you have a career mentor? I’ve been

Do you have a career mentor? My mother

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? Be sincere

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? Immerse

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? In the

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? The most challenging

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? Surrounding yourself

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? It’s a dynamic industry.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? Creating memories for

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? Every day is a new

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? Our employees are

Susan Caples, James McManemon and Mark Ward helped me advance in my career.

and flexible. Think like a guest and go the extra mile. Take care of your team, and they will take care of you. Smile.

aspect is a manager who doesn’t recruit people who care since can’t “teach” caring.

our guests. Hearing their laughter and seeing their smile warms my heart.

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blessed with many, but Fred Cerrone, the Chairman of Hotel Equities, stands out.

yourself in all of the departments, cross-train as much as you can, and never stop learning or striving to grow.

with the right people — your team has a huge impact on your property’s success.

opportunity to exceed our guests’ expectations and make lifelong customers.

had the most influence in my life and career. She made me believe anything was possible.

hospitality industry, you have to be authentic. This applies to personal career choices or the development of a hotel brand.

You must always stay abreast of developments and ahead of the competition.

genuinely friendly and hospitable. It’s a pleasure to work and converse with them.

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Women in Lodging

Kara Lundgren, General Manager, CIRC Hotel, Hollywood

What attracted you to the hospitality industry? It’s all I ever wanted to do. I’m

spontaneous and thrive on personal interaction.

Do you have a career mentor? My uncle

Steve Lundgren worked 25 years for Marriott. Great GM and huge career supporter.

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? Work hard. Be

a sponge. Learn everything you can. Remember, hospitality is a global industry, and your guests visit from all over the world.

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? Dealing with so many

personalities — associates, guests, owners. You get a lot of opinions.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? The people, especially

my team. I’ve built so many friendships over the years.

Robin Madden, Owner, Islander Properties, Punta Gorda

What attracted you to the hospitality industry? After retiring from BellSouth Telecom-

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Beverly Mogelnicki, General Manager, Courtyard by Marriott, Tampa

What attracted you to the hospitality industry? While working in hospitality during

munications, we bought a vacation rental, real estate and property manangement company.

college, I made it my major, and it’s still my passion!

Do you have a career mentor? I have had

Do you have a career mentor? My “unofficial

many throughout my career and they have all helped me in different aspects of my personal and business life.

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? You must

be focused on providing the best customer service and product possible to make the experience one they will remember and want to come back for more.

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? Things out of my control

that impact our business, like an oil spill that never put oil on our beaches, but the entire country thought it was here.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? The customers are, by

mentor” was the second general manager I worked for. Very strong, fair and empowering.

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? My advice

would be to embrace change, stay current, get involved, accept challenges and take responsibility for your future development.

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? Attracting, motivating

and maintaining an energetic workforce with a passion to help people every day.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? Getting to interact with

so many different people every day and hopefully making a positive impact.

far, the most rewarding aspect of working in this industry.

Dawn Moliterno, Regional Director of Operations, Wyndham Vacation Rentals, Fort Walton Beach What attracted you to the hospitality industry? The people, there is no greater reward

Ramola Motwani, Chairwoman, Merrimac Ventures, Fort Lauderdale

What attracted you to the hospitality industry? I saw an industry with endless

Gabriella Mullins, Owner/Operator, Holiday Inn Express Dunedin

What attracted you to the hospitality industry? I grew up with my mom and pop

than watching someone enjoy their vacation with us.

opportunity.

running a “mom and pop” motel.

Do you have a career mentor? I’ve had

Do you have a career mentor? Experiences of

the hospitality industry.

Do you have a career mentor? Yes, I have

several. I’ve been fortunate to work with several including Lino Maldonado who inspires leadership and service in all of us.

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? Buckle up

and be ready for the ride! Learn as much as you can and don’t be afraid to ask the “why” behind processes and, in some cases, make changes.

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? We have a wide range of

responsibilities, and there are never enough hours in the day.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? Being surrounded by

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? Passion,

perseverance, exploring the endless opportunities and growth. Educate yourself.

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? 24/7. Business which

does not close.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? Meeting people. Enjoying

people from all walks of life.

two; George Glover, Holiday Inn icon, and Bruce Kennedy, who exemplifies hospitality.

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? Don’t do it,

not unless you truly love people. Even then the landscape changes, and the only constant is they need to feel the love.

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? Sometimes a few bad

apples cause you to wonder, but the majority redeems your purpose.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? It keeps you on your toes,

and no one day is ever the same.

amazing people who thrive on serving others and delivering dream vacation experiences.

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Women in Lodging

Dorathy Nevitt, Director of Human Resources, Orlando World Center Marriott What attracted you to the hospitality industry? Like many people — my first job was

in a restaurant while in high school.

Do you have a career mentor? Early on, I had

a mentor that helped me make the move from operations side to human resources.

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? Get as

many diverse experiences early on in your career to build a base of knowledge and expertise that will serve you well as you grow your career.

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? Besides being a 24/7

business? Meeting the needs of a very diverse and multi-generational workforce.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? Watching and helping

individuals grow and develop and reach their full potential.

Barbara Readey, General Manager, The Vinoy Renaissance Resort and Golf Club, Saint Petersburg What attracted you to the hospitality industry? During the Penn State University ca-

Mary C. O’Donnell, General Manager, Omni Amelia Island Plantation Resort

What attracted you to the hospitality industry?

It was confirmed for me after attending a Broadway show called “Grand Hotel” which featured intersecting stories of guests in a hotel. I decided at 8 years old that I wanted to be a GM. Do you have a career mentor? A former general

manager, Jim Oliver, that pushed me every day to have a positive impact on guests and associates.

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? This industry

requires discipline, passion, dedication and many personal sacrifices but worth every minute of the ride! What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? It is challenging myself and

others to be better than we were yesterday. A new day brings new beginnings and opportunities.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? How blessed I am to meet

the most extraordinary associates and guests every day. I chose a career enabling me to make people happy every day! No two days are the same or what you expected!

Mary Rogers, Vice President/ General Manager, Fontainebleau Miami Beach What attracted you to the hospitality industry? I always believed the hospitality indus-

Laura Radler, General Manager, Edgewater Beach Hotel, Naples

What attracted you to the hospitality industry? I enjoyed the fact that every day

presents new opportunities and challenges.

Do you have a career mentor? No one in

particular; I’ve made great friends in the industry whom I look to.

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? Have a passion

for serving people, take the time to delight a guest every day. And be ready to work hard!

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? This is a demanding

industry so it’s sometimes difficult to find worklife balance.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? You make a difference

in people’s lives as hospitality is all about serving people.

Thea Sargent, Disney’s Wilderness Lodge, Orlando

What attracted you to the hospitality industry? Growing up as an only child, I love

reer development and interview process, I realized I was “myself” when talking with hoteliers.

try would be a gateway to travel the world while enjoying a very fulfilling career.

working with people around me every day.

Do you have a career mentor? Yes — I have a

Do you have a career mentor? Yes, I am

no one mentor provides everything. Seek out and invest in several relationships.

good friend I can rely on for honest coaching.

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? My advice

is to broaden your experiences. Serve in a variety of different disciplines, work in different types/ brands of hotels and resorts and relocate to new markets.

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? Integrating work and

life when the hospitality business is 24/7 can be challenging.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? Making a difference in

the lives of other people. Whether teaching a new skill to an ambassador or delighting a guest — watching the twinkle in their eye light up is so rewarding!

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fortunate to have a number of mentors in this business. Individually each played a very important part in my career development.

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? The beauty

of our industry is that you can work your way up from entry level to executive level. The sky really is the limit if you are committed, passionate and love people.

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? Our industry is constantly

evolving, and, as such, our greatest challenge is to keep up with new trends and stay one step ahead in today’s fast-moving and competitive world.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? The favorite part of my

Do you have a career mentor? I have several,

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? Be honest,

positive and a continuous learner. Treat people with respect and kindness. Demonstrate integrity as priority. Become an expert in your business. Do your best.

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? It requires hard work,

being committed to working through the tough times.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? Our industry is constantly

growing, innovating and reshaping, our future opportunities are limitless.

job is that no day is ever the same. Each day, I am presented with new challenges and opportunities to learn, which helps me stay focused and engaged with our guests and team members.

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Women in Lodging

Diane Schmidt, General Manager, Margaritaville Resort & Marina, Key West

What attracted you to the hospitality industry? Endless opportunities, endless

experiences and endless fun!

Do you have a career mentor? I have

mentored mostly by listening to my associates.

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? Show

initiative and live by the mantra “go slow, be warm, stay cool and have hope.”

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? Taking time to per-

sonally reenergize.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? The same things

that attracted me to the industry are still my favorite parts!

Dawn Southworth, General Manager, Omni Jacksonville Hotel

What attracted you to the hospitality industry? While I was serving a table of hotel executives,

they asked me if I had ever thought about going to a school that focused on culinary and hospitality. And then, the story began …

Do you have a career mentor? I believe that ev-

ery individual has several mentors. I am grateful for all of the individuals that have shaped my career.

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? Hands-on

experience is priceless. Understanding all parts of the business are critical to being successful and relating to the “big picture.”

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? There are no challenges — there

are only opportunities that allow us to grow and learn.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? The greatest reward of my

job is the people — it brings me such satisfaction to mentor and coach individuals and help them to grow in the field for which I am so passionate.

Meghan Stuart, Senior Vice President Operations, Interessant Hotel & Resort Management What attracted you to the hospitality industry? The ability to make a positive impact

on our employees and guests.

Do you have a career mentor? My mentor

has been Mr. Jan Gautam, his knowledge and tenacity for this industry coupled with the ability to adapt to any situation has been inspiring.

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? Our

industry has challenging ups and downs. With a positive attitude and a smile, its much easier to accomplish our goals. Be hospitable, always.

What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? Staying current and

competitive in order to be the best we can be. It’s more motivational than challenging.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? Our people. It’s

rewarding to work with our employees on a daily basis and watch them grow and learn in the same fashion I did.

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Shelly Pappas, General Manager, Marriott West Palm Beach

What attracted you to the hospitality industry? I enjoy assisting people when they

travel and love cooking, so I thought about being a chef.

Do you have a career mentor? I have

multiple career mentors.

What advice do you have for someone entering the hospitality industry? You really

need to love to take care of people, and it is so rewarding when you exceed guest expectations. What is the most challenging aspect of working in this field? It is a 24-hour and 7

day a week business.

What is your favorite part of working in the hospitality industry? Traveling to differ-

ent locations and meeting and working with outstanding associates.

Fontainebleau Miami Beach Appoints Mary Rogers as Vice President and General Manager

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ontainebleau Miami Beach recently announced the appointment of Mary Rogers as Vice President and General Manager of the iconic 1,504-guestroom Miami Beach property. Designating Rogers as the first female general manager of the resort, her new role will involve overseeing all day-to-day operations of the 20-acre beachfront hotel. “We are thrilled to have Mary Rogers take on a new role as Vice President and General Manager,” says Philip Goldfarb, President and Chief Operating Officer, Fontainebleau Miami Beach. “Having excelled for nearly a decade at the resort, Mary has played an integral role in upholding our commitment to excellent service and guest experiences, and we are excited for her to take the next step in her career at Fontainebleau.” Touting nearly 20 years of experience in the hospitality industry, Rogers joined Fontainebleau in 2009 and has held numerous positions at the historic property, including Executive Assistant Manager of Rooms, Senior Director of Catering and Conference Services and most recently as Vice President of Operations, Rooms. Prior to joining Fontainebleau, Rogers held various leadership positions across the Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, in destinations including Las Vegas, Washington D.C., Orlando, Grand Cayman and Rose Hall, Jamaica. Rogers is active in the South Florida community and serves as Vice Chair of the Miami-Dade Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association, as well as a founding member of the South Florida Chapter of Women in Lodging. A Certified Meeting Professional (CMP), Rogers holds a Bachelor of Arts in Hotel and Catering Management from Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology and graduated magna cum laude with first class honors.

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Security

Low Security Budget? No Problem! No-cost security practices can protect hospitality properties from crime By RICK DE TREVILLE, CPP

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uest and employee safety are “hot button” hospitality topics. Today’s lodging properties routinely invest in security hardware, such as surveillance camera systems, automatic deadbolt locks and alarms. But when the budgeted money runs out, “Crime-Prevention Through Environmental Design” techniques can still expand and strengthen your security program. CPTED’s inexpensive approach uses social management to supplement hardware. CPTED-designed properties send behavioral cues to criminals. They create a perception of risk that will deter and displace illegal activities. When properly applied, CPTED will make legitimate property users feel safe while potential criminals feel nervous. These “best security practices” can reassure guests and deter criminal activity at the same time.

1 Strongly promote a “Challenge Culture.” Encourage employees to politely question someone that seems suspicious.  each how to correctly issue a trespass warning to unwanted visitors. Staff should 2 T understand that law enforcement must be called if someone refuses to leave the property after being asked or told.  imit your property’s ingress and egress after hours. Close secondary entrances 3 L and exits that can’t be effectively monitored. But make sure signage is in place to alert guests.  ave your staff monitor unused meeting rooms, remote restrooms and perimeter 4 H doors. These daily security checks can be included in any employee’s route to and from their own work area.  tress that situational awareness is today’s mantra for employee personal safety. 5 S A quick threat assessment of the surroundings needs to become a normal routine practice. 6 Learn to think like a criminal. Analyze your property’s vulnerabilities by asking yourself, “How would I steal from this place or victimize these guests?” Then make corrections.  evelop employee information sources (confidential informants). Then have a 7 D positive but private discussion with them about internal/employee theft. Select employees who seem to reflect these four characteristics: 1) They have bonded with the company and like their job. 2) They appear to have good values — a well-developed sense of right and wrong. 3) You have some rapport with them. 4) They are “street smart.”  reate “what if” training scenarios and drill your staff on how to handle them. 8 C Examples would be a disruptive person who refuses to leave the property, a person found wandering in a restricted area, proper response when a suspicious package is located, if someone fits the profile of a “human trafficking” suspect, and when a guest is obviously intoxicated. Role-playing is essential!

No-cost CPTED security procedures will send a “go somewhere else” message to potential criminals. Train, support and encourage your employee security culture, and don’t forget to celebrate their successes. After a 12-year full-time law enforcement career, security consultant Rick de Treville, CPP, spent the next 10 years as security, safety and training director for the Hyatt Regency Grand Cypress Resort in Orlando. He added six years as security, safety and park services director at SeaWorld Adventure Park Orlando. Since 2000, Rick has taught “Security Issues in the Hospitality Industry” for Valencia Community College. For those who are interested in having Rick provide a thorough and in-depth presentation in your area, contact your local regional director. Find your regional director on page 22 in this edition of FR&L Magazine.

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Florida Law Requires

Smoke Alarms for Hearing Impaired By CARLOS LEZCANO, Statewide Training Manager and LISA LAMBERT, Training and Research Consultant

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e are all familiar with the frightful pictures. Whether in movies or far too often in real life, we have seen the horrifying flames reaching out through the exploding windows of a high-rise building engulfed in a fast-moving fire with desperate people trapped inside. The fear of perishing in a fire is innate in all of us. However, the cause of most fire-related deaths is smoke inhalation rather than flames. Studies show most fire deaths occur between midnight and 8 a.m., when most people are asleep. Every second counts when a building catches on fire, and the sooner an individual becomes aware of the dangerous situation, the better their odds of escaping. Smoke alarms have proven to be extremely effective in sounding the early warning needed to survive. These now-ubiquitous devices

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typically make a very high-pitched sound at a frequency of 3100 Hz. Unfortunately, for people with age-related or occupational hearing loss, this frequency falls in a range that is difficult to hear. As a result, traditional smoke alarms may fail to alert those who are deaf or have major hearing loss, as well as those with relatively mild hearing loss, especially during sleep. In addition to producing the familiar high-pitched sound, smoke alarms for the hearing impaired have a high-intensity flashing strobe light that is effective in alerting people who are deaf or hard of hearing. Chapter 509, Florida Statutes, and Chapter 61C, Florida Administrative Code, address the need for specialized smoke detectors in public-lodging establishments. Each public-lodging facility must have one specialized smoke detector per every 50 guest rooms, or fraction thereof, up to a maximum of five. Staff responsible for registering guests must know the location of the detectors, and the detectors must be made available on request without an additional charge. Specialized smoke alarms for the hearing impaired can be permanently installed in rooms designated for guests with disabilities or can be portable devices that plug into electrical outlets not controlled by wall switches. The smoke alarms should bear the label of a recognized testing laboratory and can be purchased from various manufacturers. If alarms are permanently installed in rooms, those rooms should be the last ones rented to make sure they are available for guests with disabilities. The Division of Hotels and Restaurants inspects most transient public-lodging facilities at least twice per year. The inspection includes ensuring smoke detectors for the hearing impaired are available and operational, and that front-desk staff who register guests are aware of their location. Although it is guests’ responsibility to request a specialized smoke detector, it’s a good idea to train staff to inform guests of available fire-safety equipment. Another option is to have the information posted on a sign or included in the guest-information booklet in each room. Whether on business or pleasure, a stay at a public-lodging facility should never end tragically. It might be impossible to prevent fires, but with proper training and equipment, it is possible to minimize loss of life.

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Seasons

South Florida Lodging Industry TAKING ITS PLACE ON THE WORLD STAGE By: GREGORY T. BOHAN, Instructor and PETER RICCI, Director Florida Atlantic University Department of Hospitality & Tourism Management

“Offseason” — Once upon a time in the not-too-distant

past, this word sent shivers of fear up and down the spines of South Florida hoteliers and restaurateurs. In the generally-accepted parlance, “offseason” described the relatively quiet period when tourism to South Florida ebbed from the peaks of what was typically called (as you would expect), “The Season.” Life was distinctly less hectic for those in the hospitality industry and for most South Florida residents. But, as discussed in this article, the distinct lines between “Season” and “Offseason” are blurring as South Florida matures into a year-round, world-recognized destination. During most of Florida’s tourism history, “The Season” was the term used by hotel and restaurant people to describe the period roughly between Christmas and Easter; i.e. late December to early April, during which time tourism boomed and the bulk of profits for the year were accumulated. The balance of the year -“Offseason”– described roughly the period from late April to early December, when hotel occupancies were low; restaurants were relatively empty (especially those without a strong local following) and many of the smaller hospitality business owners actually closed up shop and fled north from the South Florida heat. Traffic around South Florida was generally far lighter than normal – something that locals relished. In fact, those of a certain age will recall that, during the summer, many small coastal towns would set their traffic signals to simply blink amber – caution – at intersections. Traffic was so light that a caution light was sufficient to maintain safety! 38  S P R I N G

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Fast forward a few years. Anyone living in South Florida now will attest to the fact that the world has changed. Traffic never seems to ebb and, for the most part, the pace of life in South Florida remains upbeat and frenetic all year. For the purposes of this article, we will focus on how this change is manifesting itself for the hotel industry in one locale – Miami Beach, in many respects the quintessential South Florida resort town. As recent as 20 to 25 years ago, a pedestrian strolling along Collins Avenue or Ocean Drive during August would have had little company. The entire city of Miami Beach seemed to be taking a summer siesta. No matter where you went, reservations were seldom needed at the restaurants – if they were open. Hotels were generally in clean-up/renovation mode. Hotel occupancies, for those that remained open, were generally hovering around 50 percent — often even lower — and average rates were a fraction of their seasonal levels – heavily impacted by the price-sensitive SMERF groups that took advantage of the low rates so that they could afford the Miami Beach experience. Contrast the above with the experience one would have today when visiting South Beach during August. Hotels are running at or close to capacity. Rates, while lower than during the seasonal peaks, are strong. The social

scene is in full swing with restaurants and bars packed with visitors. Retailers along Collins and Washington Avenues and Lincoln Road are open and doing brisk business. To provide evidence of what is happening, we requested information from Smith Travel Research (STR) regarding hotel performance in the Miami Beach Tract (as they define it) focusing on the 20-year period from 1998 through 2017. Hotel occupancy is arguably the most frequently examined barometer of hospitality industry health and provides a good, if somewhat simplistic, means of demonstrating our point. We asked STR to provide data for the Miami Beach market quarter-by-quarter from Quarter 1, 1998 through Quarter 3, 2017. The bulk of what is usually considered “The Season” takes place in the first quarter of the year – January 1 through March 31. And the nadir of hospitality industry performance for what is considered “offseason” takes place typically during the Third Quarter of the calendar year – July 1 through September 30. We decided to look at the relationship between occupancy performance during those periods as a means of illustrating how the “offseason” is catching up – albeit gradually – with the typically healthiest seasonal period in the Winter.

Miami Beach Quarter 1 Occupancy

Based on STR data, we have created the following graph illustrating Miami Beach hotel occupancy during Quarter 1 (“The Season”) of each year from 1998 through 2017. As shown, the overall trend (dotted line) in occupancy has been upward, despite the cyclical patterns shown with the average occupancy for the entire 20-year period being 77 percent (gray line):

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We now take a look at occupancy data for Quarter 3 (“Offseason”) of each year over the same 20-year period in the graph below – trend line moving upward and average occupancy of 66 percent:

Miami Beach Quarter 3 Occupancy

As shown, occupancy for both the First and Third Quarters of the year has been trending upward over the period studied, albeit with several downturns, including one that has occurred in the recent past owing, in large measure to new supply coming into the market and other cyclical factors. The most recent data shows that occupancy in both periods, however, has remained above the longterm average.

Combining and comparing performance in this manner shows that, over the 20-year period, “offseason” Third Quarter occupancy has been trending in the direction of “catching up” with First Quarter occupancy. During the decade from 1998 to 2007, Third quarter averaged 81 percent as busy as First Quarter. The following decade, 2008 through 2017, Third Quarter averaged 89 percent as busy as the First Quarter.

In 2011, Third Quarter was at a peak 96 percent as busy as First Quarter. While the most recent data shows a drop to an 84 percent index, the overall trend is still upward. So what is behind this waning seasonality? In a nutshell, the power driving this change has been hard work – elbow grease on the part of the on-site sales and marketing teams at the hotels as well as, and perhaps even more importantly, at the regional and state level. Heavy and consistently excellent marketing of Florida, the BRAND by organizations like VISIT FLORIDA has expanded the reach of the State well-beyond its traditional roots – when visitation was comprised mostly of Northeasterners coming to escape the cold. A fundamental shift has occurred in summer visitation. A walk along Ocean Drive during August, when all the cafes and restaurants are buzzing provides an experience akin to visiting the United Nations. The most predominant languages heard are Spanish and Portuguese, spoken by South Americans. August is winter in South America. Via savvy marketing, residents in the sleeping giant markets — Brazil, Argentina, just to name two among a host of countries — have fallen in love with South Florida as the go-to place for their annual winter getaway. While the numbers are sure to fluctuate from year to year, it appears that this trend is here to stay. New hotels are opening – developed and operated by brands that were unrepresented in the U.S. until recently, many of which have chosen Miami Beach to test the waters. South Florida, from the perspective of international tourism, has taken its place on the world stage at last.

With respect to trend lines, it is also obvious that the offseason Third Quarter occupancy has increased more rapidly than has the First Quarter – as evidenced by the steeper trend line. The relationship – i.e. the comparison – between the two periods can be quantified by comparing one to the other as a ratio. For example, if occupancy during the First Quarter of a year was 80% and occupancy for the Third Quarter was 60%, it can be said that the Third Quarter was only 75% as busy as the First Quarter (60 divided by 80 = 0.75 or 75%). This same comparative relationship is shown, year-by-year for the Miami Beach market in the graph that follows:

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Education

Florida’s High School Lodging Training Program

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TMP (Hospitality, Tourism & Management Program) is a nationwide, two-year high school curriculum developed by the American Hotel & Lodging Association Educational Institute (AHLAEI). HTMP introduces high school students to the hospitality and tourism industry on a global scale with a large focus on diversity. It teaches employability skills, along with job-specific technical skills for careers in this industry. HTMP was developed with input from hospitality industry experts to ensure the curriculum aligns with industry’s needs. There are over 2,000 students enrolled in 32 Florida HTMP programs.

WHO ARE HTMP STUDENTS AND EDUCATORS?

»» HTMP serves all types of communities, from rural to inner-city schools across Florida »» Students take it as an elective track in traditional high schools, career and technical centers or vocational high schools »» Educators range from high school instructors with a marketing background to industry professionals who transitioned from the industry into the classroom

CERTIFIED HOSPITALITY & TOURISM MANAGEMENT PROFESSIONAL

FLORIDA HTMP SCHOOLS 2017-2018 SCHOOL YEAR Alachua County Gainesville High School Dawn Bekaert, Instructor Brevard County Rockledge High School Christine Kearns, Instructor Broward County Blanche Ely High School Dorreen Kennedy, Instructor Cooper City High School Linda Snider, Instructor CW Flanagan High School Enelisa Mare, Michael Rothouse, Instructors Fort Lauderdale High School Susan Primrose, Instructor Miramar High School Gerson Puig, Instructor

The Hospitality & Tourism Management Professional Certification is the exciting culmination of the HTMP program. To earn it, students must complete the two-year program, pass two national exams and complete 100 hours of experience. This certificate is nationally recognized and allows the student to earn college credit for the HTMP class and scholarships; It also provides opportunities for employment.

Monarch High School Guila Matarasso, Instructor

HTMP JOB READINESS

South Broward High School Vicky Edgcomb, Instructor

HTMP students come to an employer ready to make an immediate impact. They are trained in industry-specific and transferable skills that bring value to the employer. The program and curriculum teach, among other topics: »» Sales and Marketing »» Hospitality Soft Skills »» Safety and Security

»» Hospitality Leadership Skills

»» Operational Leadership

»» Management Food & Beverage Operations

»» Managing Business Operations

»» Operational Areas

GET INVOLVED

»» Hire HTMP students and graduates »» Sponsor a class by hosting a guest lecture, classroom demo or field trip »» Participate as a judge for the FRLAEF HTMP Competition »» Donate to the FRLAEF »» Fund HTMP scholarships CONTACT: 850-224-2250, laura@frla.org, FRLA.org/educational-foundation

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Nova High School Jennifer Sosa, Instructor Piper High School James Taylor, Instructor

Stoneman Douglas High School Mitchell Albert, Instructor Stranahan High School Robert Bryant, Instructor Dade County Alonzo and Tracy Mourning Senior High Don Festge, Instructor Barbara Goleman High School Laura Diaz Rodriguez, Instructor Felix Varela High School Sharon Hyatt, Instructor

Miami Dade College Shelly Fano, Instructor Miami Norland Senior High Katrina Minus, Instructor Miami Springs High School Maggie Mena, Instructor Miami Sunset Senior High School Milagros Perez Robert Morgan Educational Center Kathy Horton, Instructor Orange County Colonial High School Richard Grace, Instructor Dr. Phillips High School Laura Doud, Instructor Orange Tech College, Mid FL Kimaris Hickey, Instructor Orange Tech College, Winter Park Erin Giordano, Instructor Oak Ridge High School Vanessa Zameza, Instructor Winter Park High School Meg Pietkiewicz, Instructor Osceola County Osceola High School Valerie Woodring, Instructor Palm Beach County Forest Hill High School Diana Sardina, Instructor Olympic Heights High School Susan Klevansky Palm Beach Gardens High School Fred Mullins, Instructor Polk County Winter Haven High School Linda Robinson, Instructor

Miami Beach High School Patricia Gregory, Instructor

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Partnerships

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Lodging Partnerships

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RLA partners with various organizations to bolster hospitality industry efforts in Florida. We are proud of our lodging sector partners, and together we collaborate to bring the best of lodging to guests throughout the state. The Asian American Hotel Owners Association (AAHOA) is a key partner in our lodging sector partnerships. With more than 17,700 members nationwide and representing nearly half of all hotels in the United States, AAHOA is a strong partner with members ranging from the small operator to some of the largest in the state. In addition, AAHOA is the largest hotel owners’ association in the world. Carol Dover, President and CEO of FRLA noted, “We are thrilled to partner with AAHOA because its members represent the best and brightest in the business. It is evident the organization is committed to ensuring small business owners are protected against burdensome regulations and that the Florida hospitality continues to thrive. This partnership fits perfectly with our mission to protect, educate and promote the state’s hospitality industry.” For information about AAHOA, visitaahoa.com. The nearly 18,000 AAHOA members own almost one in every two hotels in the United States. AAHOA is a strong partner in Florida, with members ranging from the small operator to some of the largest in the state. With billions of dollars in property assets and hundreds of thousands of employees, AAHOA members are core economic contributors in virtually every community across the nation. In addition to being a proud defender of free enterprise and the foremost current-day example of realizing the American dream, AAHOA is the largest hotel owners’ association in the world.

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he Florida Bed and Breakfast Inns Association (Florida Inns) is another one of these partners. The mission of the Florida Inns is marketing, advocacy and education for the hospitality industry. This Association is committed to fostering a knowledgeable, caring and conscientious community of professional innkeepers, networking throughout Florida to help member inns achieve their marketing goals and deliver the highest level of professionalism and experience. Florida Inn’s executive director, Pattie Detwiler noted that, “The Florida Inns focus on education, advocacy and marketing for independent bed and breakfast, boutique and independent hotel inns. The partnership with FRLA postures Florida Inns to better serve our members in the advocacy arena, and the education that the FRLA provides goes hand in hand with our mission statement. “This collaboration brings together two nonprofit organizations aimed at developing unique guest experiences, at the same time safeguarding the needs of the public and attracting guests to Florida. With support from FRLA, we boost our efforts across the state to reach industry leaders and help the hospitality industry thrive.” All independent properties are welcome to join Florida Inns at Florida-Inns.com.

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uperior Small Lodging is another lodging association that FRLA has partnered with for advocacy and education. These are privately owned, hotels, inns, bed and breakfasts, cottages, condos and vacation rentals that typically are small business operations throughout Florida. There are 150 members of this association giving a “voice” to the small property owner. For more information about Superior Small Lodging go to superiorsmalllodging.com. With member properties from Pensacola to Key West, our association of independent lodging properties, 75 rooms or fewer, meets the needs of a special niche in Florida’s travel market. Visitors looking for small, personal places in undiscovered spaces have the opportunity to create a unique experience not too far off the beaten path. Our member properties’ white glove hospitality and personal attention consistently draw a high level of return visitors! Superior Small Lodging of Florida (SSLoF) is pleased to partner with the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association (FRLA). The advocacy, education and networking we enjoy with the members of FRLA benefit us in more ways than we could count. Together, FRLA, AAHOA, the Florida Inns and the Superior Small Lodging Association work to represent all aspects of Florida’s lodging industry. Want to know more? Contact Dan Murphy, Senior Vice President of Membership & Corporate Relations at 850-224-2250, extension 226. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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Human Trafficking

Human Trafficking By PAM BONDI, Florida Attorney General

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uman trafficking is modern-day slavery. It is also a multibillion dollar criminal industry exploiting people of all races, genders and walks of Pam Bondi, Florida Attorney General life. It is prevalent in Asia, Africa and South America. However, it is also thriving in Florida and throughout our country. According to Polaris, a nonprofit organization dedicated to ending this global atrocity, more than 20 million people worldwide are being trafficked. Many are young women and girls forced into the sex trade — being raped repeatedly to profit their captors. Victims are also being kidnapped and forced into involuntary servitude requiring them to perform back-breaking labor in grueling conditions. The role of FRLA is critical as we work to put an end to forced labor, domestic servitude and sex trafficking in Florida. We need your help to stop bad actors. It is imperative that hotels, motels and restaurants in our state join us in this fight. Victims of human trafficking are beaten, raped or forced to take drugs against their will. Many are branded by their captors. Women who become pregnant as a result of their captivity, are forced to have abortions. Victims who attempt to escape are tortured or even killed. In Mexico, with other attorneys general, I met survivors rescued after years of sex trafficking. These brave women were tortured and raped — often more than a dozen times in a single day. I visited a safe house hidden deep in the Mexican countryside to protect survivors as they received

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treatment and counseling. I met a young girl who was being sold every day for labor and domestic servitude by her mother. While in Morocco, I met with government officials in an effort to strengthen the working relationship between our countries and bolster efforts to combat human trafficking and other transnational crimes. I met a survivor who was kidnapped from Morocco at the age of 10 and not rescued until she was an adult. Her two brothers were also kidnapped and trafficked in different countries. Today, this remarkable survivor is a human rights advocate, working to stop human trafficking and save lives. Sadly, there are also plenty of stories of human trafficking right here in the United States. There are also every day heroes, like the Uber driver in California who saved a life when he noticed a teen passenger under the control of an adult companion. The driver overheard the adult giving the teen what sounded like prostitution instructions. They were headed to a hotel. As soon as the driver dropped off the passengers, he called police. The teen was rescued and the trafficker arrested. A brave flight attendant also took swift action. On a flight, she spotted a teenage girl sitting with an old-

er man who did not appear to be a relative. When she approached them, the man reportedly became defensive. The flight attendant left a note and a pen in the bathroom, then whispered to the girl to go to the bathroom. The girl replied to the note asking for help. The flight attendant notified the police, who were waiting for the man when the plane landed. We need more heroes likes these to help us as we work to make Florida a zero-tolerance state for human trafficking. We appreciate the involvement of the FRLA and its members. FRLA President and CEO Carol Dover has been instrumental in this effort. My Office of Statewide Prosecution works tirelessly to capture and prosecute traffickers, as do each of our 20 state attorneys and the three U.S. attorneys in Florida — but we cannot win this fight without you. You are our eyes and ears on the ground. That is why I launched the website, YouCanStopHT.com — so citizens can learn how to spot a trafficking victim and how to report the crime. Awareness is a powerful tool. Through awareness, if we can empower even one person to get involved, that person can save a life and improve our world.

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Sound of Your Stay

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Guests To Rock Out WITH SOUND OF YOUR STAY®

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pening in 2018, the new beachfront Hard Rock Hotel Daytona Beach will offer the brand’s music-inspired signature amenities for overnight guests and local residents alike, including the complimentary Sound of Your Stay® program. Available to all overnight guests, Sound of Your Stay offers an all-encompassing music experience in the comfort of their hotel room. The program includes three unique elements: WAX®, PICKS® and TRACKS®, encouraging guests to channel their inner rock star. The newest component of the brands music amenity program, WAX® amplifies the in-room music experience with a Crosley turntable and a collection of 10 carefully curated vinyl records, chosen by Hard Rock’s team of music experts. Exclusive to Hard Rock Hotel guests, the PICKS® Fender guitar room service program lets guests choose from an enticing menu of 20 Fender guitars, including Stratocasters, Telecasters and even basses. Each guitar is delivered to their room, complete with a Fender Amplifier and premium headphones, for use during the guest’s stay. Offering guests the chance to experience each city through the lens of their favorite artists and tastemakers, TRACKS® lets you enjoy the songs from those that you know and love, while also experiencing artists that are on the cutting edge and ready to break out. For more information about Hard Rock Hotel Daytona Beach, visit HRHDAYTONABEACH.COM.

An Ounce of (Anti-Harassment) Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure

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s you listen to the news reports about the excessive number of harassment cases coming to light, do you assume your establishment is doing just fine? In fact, the restaurant and lodging industries have a big problem with harassment in the workplace. While one in three women have been sexually harassed at work, in the restaurant industry that number skyrockets to nine in 10! While the total number of cases has decreased over the years, thanks to increased anti-harassment training, there are still 11,000 reported cases of sexual harassment every year. This can be a huge problem for your business. Lack of attention to harassment in the workplace can hurt business through increased absenteeism and turnover, low productivity and litigation expenses. That’s why FRL A .org

it is crucial for you to have a plan in place to stop harassment before it begins. Education is the best defense against harassing behavior that could tarnish your business’ reputation and put you in legal hot water. Anti-harassment training should include: • Teaching management and employees what is and isn’t harassment • Identifying what a potential hostile work environment looks like • Explaining how to report harassing behavior • Demonstrating the importance and legal ramifications of an effective grievance process • Understanding how to maintain necessary paperwork safely and securely

These elements need to be part of a comprehensive anti-harassment prevention program that all employees attend. In addition to helping you meet state mandates regarding food and alcohol service, RCS Training helps your business create a mandatory anti-harassment program, which includes ongoing training for all employees. You might think it can’t happen to you, but it’s important to be proactive in protecting your business and your employees. Give us a call today to schedule a meeting with an RCS Training representative to learn the benefits of implementing an affordable anti-harassment prevention program. RCS Training RCSTraining.com 800-537-9863 F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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First ‘Gig Economy’ Trial Decision:

Independent Contractor By SUZANNE SINGER, ssinger@rumberger.com and SALLY R. CULLEY, sculley@rumberger.com

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he Lawson v. Grubhub, Inc., trial has been closely monitored by those in the gig economy, since it is the first trial to address the classification of “gig” workers. At issue: whether a delivery driver for Grubhub was an employee entitled to California’s minimum wage, overtime and employee expense reimbursement laws, or an independent contractor not entitled to any of those things. The trial itself took place before Magistrate Judge Jacqueline Scott Corley in September 2017, closing arguments were held on Oct. 30, 2017 and Judge Corley’s 33-page ruling came down on Feb. 8, 2018. Bottom line: Judge Corley ruled in favor of Grubhub and found that Lawson was an independent contractor and not an employee during the four months he made deliveries for Grubhub.

Factual Background Raef Lawson was an aspiring actor, writer, producer and director who lived in the Los Angeles area. In late August 2015, he entered into a contract with Grubhub to be a delivery driver. Pursuant to his contract, he made food deliveries for Grubhub in the Los Angeles area from Oct. 25, 2015, through Feb. 14, 2016. On Feb. 15, 2016, Grubhub terminated its agreement with Lawson, stating that Lawson had not “been available to receive orders” and had not “performed delivery services during a high proportion of the delivery blocks that (he had) signed up for.” Some other facts included: »» Lawson chose the blocks of time in which he wanted to work by moving the toggle button on the Grubhub driver app to “available” and could either accept or reject a delivery.

»» Lawson also worked as a delivery driver for Postmates and Caviar, two of Grubhub’s food delivery competitors, during the same period he worked for Grubhub. »» Lawson learned to “game” the Grubhub driver app by signing in late (sometimes hours late), accepting offers for deliveries and then asking that they be reassigned to someone else, putting his phone on airplane mode or otherwise making his cell phone “out of network,” and reporting that he had completed a delivery after the end of his scheduled block (thus ensuring that he would be paid for extra time).

Judge Corley’s Analysis In coming to her decision that Lawson was an independent contractor and not an employee of Grubhub, Judge Corley considered the factors set out in S.G. Borello & Sons, Inc. v. Department of Industrial Relations, 48 Cal.3d 341 (1989). The most important Borello factor is the level of control by an employer over the manner and means of accomplishing the work to be performed by the employee/independent contractor. Judge Corley found that Grubhub exerted little control over the details of Lawson’s work. For example, she determined that there was no control over whether or when Lawson made deliveries for Grubhub and for how long; the type or condition of Lawson’s vehicle that he used to make deliveries; what he wore while making deliveries; or what supplies he used for making deliveries, other than his smartphone and equipment sufficient to insulate food orders.

Judge Corley also considered several secondary factors set forth in the Borello test: 1. Whether the one performing services is engaged in a distinct occupation or business. 2. The kind of occupation, with reference to whether, in the locality, the work is usually done under the direction of the principal or by a specialist without supervision. 3. The skill required in the particular occupation. 4. Whether the principal or the worker supplies the instrumentalities, tools and the place of work for the person doing the work. 5. The length of time for which the services are to be performed. 6. The method of payment, whether by the time or by the job. 7. Whether or not the work is a part of the regular business of the principal. 8. Whether or not the parties believe they are creating the relationship of employeremployee. Judge Corley found that factors 1, 3, 6 and 7 weighed in favor of an employment relationship, factors 2, 4, and 5 weighed in favor of an independent contractor finding and factor 8 was neutral. After weighing all of the factors, Judge Corley concluded that “(while) some factors weigh in favor of an employment relationship, Grubhub’s lack of all necessary control

»» No one at Grubhub assigned Lawson blocks or instructed him to sign up for blocks. »» Grubhub did not require Lawson to attend any mandatory training or onboarding. »» Grubhub provided Lawson with training videos, but did not monitor whether he watched the videos.

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B U S I N E S S M AT T E R S

over Mr. Lawson’s work, including how he performed deliveries and even whether or for how long, along with other factors, persuade the court that the contractor classification was appropriate for Mr. Lawson during his brief tenure with Grubhub.”

Impact of This Ruling

Judge Corley’s decision provides a detailed roadmap for the internet food ordering industry, and is, to date, the most comprehensive analysis by a judge of worker classifications in the gig economy. The decision will be dissected and analyzed by all those in the gig economy who classify workers as independent contractors or hope to do so. The ruling will likely have a particularly strong impact in California, where the lawsuit was based. The lawsuit asserted violations of California law, and the Borello decision relied upon by Judge Corley was a California decision. Grubhub can feel confident, at least

for now, in its designation of drivers as independent contractors in California. Other gig economy businesses in California should feel encouraged if they classify their workforce as independent contractors, but they should keep in mind that Judge Corley’s decision was based on the specific facts presented at trial. If different facts were presented, she could come to a different conclusion. For example, if a gig economy business exerts more control over a worker by requiring particular shifts to be worked, or that the work be conducted in a certain manner, a different result is possible. Outside of California, the impact of this decision will be more limited. Other courts are not required to follow California decisions, although they may be persuaded by Judge Corley’s analysis. Also, because the Lawson decision is fact intensive, different facts might result in different outcomes. Finally, this decision may be undercut very soon if the California Supreme Court decides to

SAVE THE DATE! 2018 FRLA Keys Reef & Flats Fishing Tournament JUNE 14, 2018 CASA MARINA PIER, KEY WEST, FL

do away with the Borello test and adopt, instead, the ABC test which is not favorable to gig economy businesses. This is a very real possibility, as the California Supreme Court heard oral arguments on that very issue Feb. 6, 2018. In other words, while the Lawson decision is certainly impactful, the issue of worker classification in the gig economy is far from settled. Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell provides litigation and counseling services in a wide range of civil practice areas, including labor and employment law, product liability, commercial litigation, construction, real estate, intellectual property litigation, securities litigation, bankruptcy, insurance coverage, professional liability and administrative law. Offices are located in Orlando, Tampa, Miami, Tallahassee and Birmingham, Alabama. For more information, please visit rumberger.com.

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oin the FRLA Monroe Chapter for a fishing tournament in the one of the world’s best fishing areas, the beautiful Florida Keys! Enjoy a day on the water networking with key hospitality decision makers.

Sponsorships are available at different levels. This year select a luxury deep-sea charter boat or sleek flats boat with a captain to fish the deep-sea reefs or fish the flats. Captain’s Party: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 (7–9 p.m.) Flagler Beachside at Casa Marina Fishing Tournament: Thursday, June 14, 2018 (8 a.m.–Noon) Weigh in and Awards Party: Noon to 2:30 pm. Great prizes, awards will be given. Raffle and auction items will also be available! For more information and sponsorship opportunities contact Lynne Hernandez at 305-710-3962 Lhernandez@frla.org or contact Dan Murphy, Senior Vice President of Membership at 850-224-2250 ext. 235 or dmurphy@frla.org.

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A LA CARTE Hampton Inn & Suites, Fort Myers Colonial Blvd. has recently been recognized with nine Lighthouse Awards in a row, representing the top 5 percent of the Hampton Brand and was recognized as No. 1 for Hampton Inns & Suites Americas for the third quarter of 2017.

Richard’s Run For Life 16th Annual ‘Richard’s Run For Life’ 5K Donates $200,000 to USF’s Latino Scholarship Program

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he 16th annual “Richard’s Run for Life” 5K raised $100,000 for the University of South Florida’s Latino Scholarship Program and was matched by Richard and Melanie Gonzmart’s personal check for another $100,000. 100 percent of every dollar donated and raised benefits the Richard and Melanie Gonzmart Endowed Latino Scholarship at the University of South Florida. These scholarships go to academically gifted but financially challenged minority students – many of them the first generation in their families to attend college. It’s a gift that encourages further giving; some of the original recipients are now funding scholarships of their own. Next year, Richard and Melanie will fund 10 new four-year student scholarships, in addition to the eight scholarships already in place. Richard Gonzmart, fourth generation family member and president of the Columbia Restaurant Group, learned the importance of giving back from his parents, Cesar and Adela Gonzmart. They provided financial support and counsel to USF since the university’s opening in 1960. Adela initiated the first Latino Scholarship in 1991. Today, that first recipient, Paola Sequeira, is a physician at UCLA Medical Center. After his parents passed away, Richard created the Adela and Cesar Gonzmart Memorial Endowment and the Columbia Centenario Endowment. Both endowments provide fully funded scholarships through the USF Latino Scholarship program. “Richard’s Run for Life” has raised more than $1,153,000 since 2002.

The 2018 race will be Friday, Nov. 2, 2018, and will benefit the Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Program at Moffitt Cancer Center. The program seeks a cure as well as new and improved treatment for the second-leading cause of cancer in this age group.

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Congratulations! Irina Barakshina, human resource coordinator at Holiday Inn Fort Myers Airport at Town Center, rolls a trolley of treats for housekeepers Transito, Mara, Maria and Esther.

Holiday Inn Fort Myers Recognized

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hen it gets busy, a manager at the Holiday Inn Airport hotel rolls out the “Treat Trolley,” a rolling mini buffet of soft drinks, candy bars, chips and water. But this snack station on wheels isn’t for the guests. Instead, it’s always delivered by a manager for team members who clean the hotel’s 169 rooms and who need a pickme-up from their hard work in the middle of the afternoon on the busiest days. The “Treat Trolley” is one of the many reasons the Holiday Inn Fort Myers recently won the coveted Kemmons Wilson Spirit of Family Award, the only one of 736 Holiday Inn hotels in the Americas to earn this award. The hotel also was one of three Holiday Inn hotels out of 654 properties in the U.S. to win the prestigious Torchbearer Award from InterContinental Hotels Group. “It’s very simple: If you take care of your team, they will take care of the guests,” says Brian Holly, managing director and partner of the Holiday Inn Fort Myers Airport at Town Center.

Sustainability Chef John Minas, Peter Stein, CEO, Reunion Center, Chef Art Smith, Rob Olin, CEO - Panacea Oyster CoOp Corp. and Dan Murphy, FRLA and community members met at Chef Art Smith’s Reunion Center/ Wardlaw-Smith Mansion for a chance to eat America’s best oysters, mingle with experts, and learn about sustainable seafood conversation F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


SEXUAL HARASSMENT

Harassment Claims Take Center Stage National Reckoning Demands Attention By KEVIN JOHNSON, JOHNSON JACKSON LLC

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arvey Weinstein. Matt Lauer. Al Franken. What initially seemed like a lurid story about a high-profile Hollywood producer became a cascade of revelations about high-profile men in Hollywood, Washington, New York, and other centers of power who had abused their positions in the pursuit of sexual gratification. And as the list of offenders grew during late 2017, it soon reached well-known figures in the restaurant industry. How did the exposure of sexual harassment become the defining phenomenon of 2017? And what does it mean for operators in the restaurant and hotel industries? The ingredients of this volatile mix are familiar – sexual desire mixed with power. But a new catalyst has been added to the mix – the influence of social media. Stories of outrageous conduct by famous perpetrators have gone viral thanks to #MeToo, with new examples appearing almost daily. Lately, some commentators have begun to express concerns that the wave of outrage is reaching conduct that is awkward rather than harassing. Although the process of drawing lines for appropriate sexual behavior is ongoing, it is clear that even the powerful can no longer expect tolerance for abusive conduct. But will this line-drawing mean more litigation over harassment? Most observers expect the answer to that question to be yes, with a particular focus on harassers in positions of power and complaints from those who may be encouraged by the wave of press coverage. Ultimately, the restaurant and hotel industries are likely to be under significantly greater scrutiny. Plaintiff’s attorneys believe FRL A .org

that they can paint employees in the service industries as having been forced to put up with many indignities, either as a condition of continued employment in well-paying tipped positions or due to insecurity about their immigration status. The definition of harassment remains the same: unwelcome conduct that is based on sex or some other protected characteristic and that is severe or pervasive enough to create a hostile or abusive working environment. Generally speaking, an employer becomes liable for harassment when it has knowledge of the unwelcome conduct but fails to take effective remedial action. Supervisors are subject to a higher standard, though, and an employer is vicariously liable for its supervisors’ actions unless it can show that it has taken appropriate steps to distribute and enforce an appropriate harassment policy, and that the victim failed to report the problem. Although many corporate operators have robust anti-harassment policies and training programs in place, even those policies may not be enough to save operators who neglect to enforce those policies vigorously. Operators who are likely at heightened risk include (1) operators who have not adopted appropriate policies or training programs, (2) operators who are perceived by their employees to have a history of poor response to reports of harassment, and (3) independent or family-owned businesses in which the owner or highest onsite manager is not perceived to be subject to any meaningful restraints. To reduce the risk of an expensive harassment lawsuit, operators must treat the elimination of harassing behavior as an operational priority – not a side issue driven by HR. The

starting point is always a well-drawn harassment policy that makes clear that it applies to all forms of unwelcome conduct that are based on protected characteristics. The policy should specify reporting contacts who will know how to recognize and respond to complaints. Any complaints received should be immediately and thoroughly investigated, with the understanding that investigation means more than just asking the accused “did you do it?” At the end of the investigation, the operator needs to be prepared to make an honest judgment as to whether the allegations have been substantiated and whether – even if the law has not yet been violated – the accused has nonetheless displayed such poor judgment that his or her continued employment is no longer advisable. Operators should understand that it is critical to set the tone from the top of the organization. This means that the leaders in the organization must always be cognizant that they serve as role models and must be able to call out and correct improper behavior by their employees without waiting for a complaint and without being undermined by the appearance of hypocrisy. After all, if the leader is engaging in inappropriate behavior, he or she is hardly in a position to lead the charge to eliminate it. For over 20 years, Kevin Johnson has defended hospitality-industry employers of all sizes from harassment claims. He is a shareholder at Johnson Jackson LLC in Tampa, Florida. Kevin is Board Certified in Labor and Employment Law by the Florida Bar. Kevin can be reached at kjohnson@ johnsonjackson.com. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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H O S P I TA L I T Y H A P P E N I N G S

Palm Beach E.A.T.S. was very successful! David Burke (The Breakers), John Smith (Duffy’s Sports Grill), Jason (Duffy’s Sports Grill) & Kelsey Emmett, Bill Horn (PGA National) and friend, Bonnie and Rich Roberto (Ecolab).

The Hillsborough Chapter held their first annual Clay Shoot Shooters Safety Class.

We are proud to highlight the latest happenings in hospitality. This section is designed to serve as an update on our industry and provide a snapshot of what we’re accomplishing together. If you would like to share something significant that’s happening in your area, feel free to submit your story to editor@frla.org.

Dannette Lynch attended the AHLA Women In Lodging Executive Committee on behalf of FRLA.

The Tallahassee Bowling Tournament 2017 was a lot of fun for all! 48  S P R I N G

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


H O S P I TA L I T Y H A P P E N I N G S

The Pinellas Chapter partnered with law enforcement on Shop With a Cop program.

Everyone enjoyed the Northwest Florida Chapter’s Coastal Boil last fall.

The EscaRosa Bust-a-Clay was a fun event! FRL A .org

Sheldon Suga, Kevin Speidel and Alan Brand at a recent Monroe Chapter event honoring Chairman Kevin Speidel.

Casino Night at the Broward Chapter was a blast!

The Central Florida Chapter had a well-attended holiday celebration. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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ENGAGE

Tourism Day Shows the Importance of Grassroots By JOE KEFAUVER, ALIGN PUBLIC STRATEGIES

T

he recent Tourism Day in Tallahassee was a huge success for the industry in a lot of important ways. Traditionally, this event has given us a chance to show off our size, scope and importance to the overall economy of Florida. Additionally, it provides us a forum to get the entire legislature’s attention at once and force our elected officials to focus on the issues important to the industry. And this year was no different. As always, our members came from all corners of the state to be heard, and the staff and leadership of FRLA were able to harness that energy to significantly impact the legislative process. But this year’s event was a little different — and maybe even more important — because of the unique nature of many of the critical issues hotels and restaurants are currently facing. Historically, issues affecting the hospitality industry have generally stayed within a certain level of government. Federal issues such as immigration and health care have remained federal, state issues like taxes or food and beverage regulation have stayed at the state level and local issues such as zoning and land use have stayed local. But in the past few years, that has been turned upside down, and key issues for us are playing out 50  S P R I N G

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at multiple levels of government at the same time. Two of the bigger issues impacting us at this year’s Tourism Day — tourism funding and short-term rentals — are playing out at the legislative level in Tallahassee and in city halls and county commissions across the state simultaneously. By taking the time to participate in advocacy days, we’re not only demonstrating to our legislative leaders what the face of the industry looks like but also connecting them with a local face as well. Building meaningful relationships with elected officials means better results for our businesses, employees and communities. Although session has come to a close, it is vitally important that we are equally engaged at both levels simultaneously, that we have the same consistent message, that state leaders know how this issue affects us in our communities and that local leaders know that uniformity is important. We have to be equally invested on both ends, or we risk weakening ourselves. That’s why we started the FRLA Engage program. The famous quip by longtime U.S. House Speaker Tip O’Neill that

“all politics is local” has never been more accurate. But another similar quote is equally instructive — “government goes to the ones that show up.” Our members did a great job showing up to Tourism Day in Tallahassee. When we are also showing up the same way in Miami, Tampa, Orlando, Jacksonville, Palm Beach, Fort Lauderdale, Pensacola and other cities, we really will be an industry that elected officials will be reluctant to tangle with. As industry ambassadors, it’s critical we keep up to date on emerging, hot topics and trends impacting our industry. Stay informed and be a part of the conversation by following Working Lunch, a weekly podcast featuring the Align Public Strategies team. Align Public Strategies is a full-service public affairs and creative firm that helps corporate brands, governments and nonprofits navigate the outside world and inform their internal decision-making.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


U N I T E D H E A LT H C A R E

Addressing the Diverse Health Care Needs of the Hospitality Industry

U

nitedHealthcare works with the National Restaurant Association (NRA) and the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association (FRLA) in a strategic alliance, offering exclusive health care pricing and solutions for every size NRA/FRLA member business — including small, midsize and large employers.

4 Ways NRA/FRLA Member Businesses Can Access UnitedHealthcare’s Exclusive Offerings 1. F  or small businesses:

New Restaurant & Hospitality Association Benefit Trust option for fully insured hospitality groups with 2-99 eligible employees.

2. F  or businesses with 51 or more employees:

Up to a 5 percent discount on manual medical rates for fully insured groups with 51 or more eligible employees.

3. F  or large self-funded businesses:

An annual invoice credit of up to 5 percent on administrative fees for new ASO medical products for self-funded groups with 100 or more eligible employees.

4. For businesses of all sizes:

Up to a 5 percent discount on specialty benefits products (dental, vision, life, disability, accident and critical illness) for fully insured groups — in addition to all other discounts including bundling benefits programs.

New Restaurant & Hospitality Association Benefit Trust Option for Small Employers The Restaurant & Hospitality Association Benefit Trust is now available to quote as an option for NRA/FRLA hospitality member groups. The RH Association Benefit Trust is a new health benefits solution insured and serviced by UnitedHealthcare and focused on small employers with 2-99 eligible employees. This solution can offer NRA/FRLA members some of the same advantages of large employers regarding more health plan designs for product and potential pricing flexibility. Available nationally, the new RH Association Benefit Trust features a product portfolio with more than 120 health plan designs. It is just one more way for hospitality businesses to access UnitedHealthcare’s solutions for NRA/FRLA members.

WHO BENEFITS? NRA/FRLA members who are fully insured with 2-99 full-time employees

EXCLUSIVE PRICING/SOLUTION WITH UNITEDHEALTHCARE New Restaurant & Hospitality Association Benefit Trust option for small employers in the hospitality industry — NOW AVAILABLE!

NRA/FRLA members who are manually rated and fully insured with 51+ full-time employees

Up to a 5 percent discount on manual medical rates

NRA/FRLA members who are self-funded with 100+ full-time employees

Up to a 5 percent discount on specialty benefits products (dental, vision, life, disability, accident and critical illness)

NRA/FRLA members who are fully insured —all group sizes

Up to a 5 percent discount on specialty benefits products (dental, vision, life, disability, accident and critical illness)

Find out what the FRLA and UnitedHealthcare can do for your business. Visit FRLA.org/unitedhealthcare. For more information, contact your broker or Kimberlee Vandervoorn at kvandervoorn@uhg.com.

Some restrictions and exclusions apply. Discounts are available only to members of the National Restaurant Association and its state restaurant association partners; and may vary by location and group size. The Restaurant & Hospitality Association Benefit Trust is not available in Minnesota, New York or Vermont. Insurance coverage provided by or through UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company, UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company of Illinois, Inc. or their affiliates. Administrative services provided by United HealthCare Services, Inc. or their affiliates. Health Plan coverage provided by or through UnitedHealthcare of Florida, Inc.

FRL A .org

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FLORIDA TOURISM Creating jobs and driving Florida’s economy.

F L O R I D A’ S S H A R E O F T H E

112.4 million

global

MARKET

In 2016 F l o ri d a we l c o me d out of state and international v i si to r s

3.3 1.6 1.0 757 538

1.9 million

78

visitors to the state

supports

1

tourism job

7.2%

of Florida's visitors are domestic travelers 9 7 . 9 M 2016 9 1 . 3 M 2015

O F T R AV E L & T O U R I S M

11.6

$

In 2016 Visitors spent

111.7

$

Visitors spent an average of $ million per day in 2016

billion

306

jobs in Florida in 2016

2011

up

In 2016 billion in state and local tax revenue was generated

1.4 million B $87.2

87.1 %

impact

Visitor spending supported

$91.5

2 B 201

B $98.5

2013

189

countries

Canada UK Brazil Argentina Colombia

visitors come to Florida on any given day = more people than live in 15 different US states + District of Columbia

ECONOMIC Every

M M M K K

from

$

4 B 201 104.7

$1

2015 08.8B

2016

FIVE STRAIGHT YEARS OF RECORD TOURISM SPENDING 52  S P R I N G

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


REACHING OUR

target

AUDIENCE

2.3 million

26 million

More than

Over

1.8 million

pieces of content generated with

views on YouTube with 23 million minutes watched for 2016

#LoveFL

followers on Facebook, Twitter,YouTube, Instagram, Pinterest and Google+ Accounts

35

$

Partners invested over million in VISIT FLORIDA co-op programs Generating 14.5 billion consumer impressions through dedicated advertising in domestic and international markets

1.3 billion

consumer impressions were generated from 234 promotional programs

SUCCESS THROUGH

1

$

Through promotions, over

93 million

$

in media value generated

collective

2.15 in tax revenue is generated* $94.3M 2011/12

The Florida tourism industry invests $2 in marketing programs per $1 the state of Florida invests

I M PA C T

138.5 million

$

2:1

54.2% of visitors were significantly influenced by VISIT FLORIDA marketing efforts in FY 2016/17

$

12 k

Over industry businesses partnering with VISIT FLORIDA

For every the state invests in VISIT FLORIDA,

= The equivalent of one person watching VISIT FLORIDA’s YouTube channel for 42.8 years straight

$57.1M 2010/11

$108.6M 2012/13

2014/15

$120.1M 2013/14

Private investment in VISIT FLORIDA’s total budget shows growth

*Office of Economic and Demographic Research

We’re on our way to becoming the No. 1 travel destination in the world. VisitFRLSunshineMatters.org, the official blog for Florida Tourism. A .org

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G 53 Revised 1/2018


SECRETS OF SUCCESS

SHARKY’S ON THE PIER

S

harky’s on the Pier officially opened on February 12, 1987, at the site of what was once an outdated beach concession. The original idea was to create a fun family dining experience with Gulf views and live music in Venice, Florida. Fresh seafood, steak and chicken all cooked to perfection are what draw guests to Sharky’s. Sharky’s is family owned and located at the Venice Fishing Pier.

PLEASE DESCRIBE A TYPICAL DINING AND DRINKING EXPERIENCE AT SHARKY’S. With live music playing

and the sunsets over the Gulf, visit the upper deck and take in the panoramic views of Venice. Step off the dining deck and let your feet meet the sand of one of the region’s most beautiful beaches. Search for fossilized sharks’ teeth, play volleyball on the sand courts or fish from the public Venice Fishing Pier, where no license is required. Guests can also purchase bait and 54  S P R I N G

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tackle at Papa’s Bait Shop, along with souvenirs and clothing. Our goal is to provide a memorable experience for each and every person who visits Sharky’s. Sharky’s offers a tiki bar, indoor or outdoor seating and a full menu all day long. PLEASE DESCRIBE YOUR SIGNATURE DISHES AND DRINKS. Sharky’s could

not have made it for 30 years without serving great food. Get your own party started with popular appetizers, such as the beach sampler, shark wings, cabo calamari or cheesy beach bread. Menu items range from pier favorites, including Sharky’s famous grouper wrap and Baja tacos, to pier pastas, like island jambalaya and aruba style pasta, to salads, including boathouse and top of the pier. Do you need gluten free options? Don’t worry! Sharky’s has that covered, too. Of course, Sharky’s serves a wide variety of frozen island drinks and margaritas on the rocks.

PLEASE SHARE ABOUT THE NUMEROUS AWARDS SHARKY’S HAS GARNERED OVER THE YEARS.

Sharky’s has won many awards over the years including: »» Herald-Tribune “Venice Reader’s Choice” »» Venice Gondolier Sun “Best of Venice” for Waterfront Dining, Live Music and more »» Sarasota Magazine “Best of 2016” »» No. 1 Florida Best Beach Bar For 2013 »» Venice Iron Chef Competition »» Venice Iron Bartender F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


DOES SHARKY’S PARTICIPATE IN THE COMMUNITY?

The Venice Pier Group (Fins at Sharky’s, Sharky’s on the Pier and Snook Haven) family has a rich history of involvement in the Venice community, actively sponsoring and participating in several local charities. As a member of that family, Sharky’s is no exception. We are lucky to be a part of the wonderful Venice community and strive to give back in as many ways as possible. WHAT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING SHARKY’S EMPHASIZES WITH STAFF ABOUT GUESTS? Our staff

focus on friendly, professional service.

WHAT ARE SHARKY’S SECRETS OF SUCCESS? We consider every employee as invested in the business. If we are developing a new system or idea, we ask them for feedback and value their ideas. We are very thankful to our employees and are proud to say that we have very little turnover. We believe low turnover is a true testament of taking care of our employees. As a family-run business, we consider our employees part of the family. Our organization is fully invested in each employee, and we expect the same in return. Another top priority for us is to consistently provide fresh food and outstanding service to our guests. We strive to accomplish this on a daily basis by sourcing ingredients from as many local companies as possible, in addition to always serving items that are in season on our menu. Additionally, we have daily staff meetings serving as an opportunity to inform employees on a variety of different topics including new menu items and upcoming events. These meetings reinforce positive attitudes in the workforce, so that we can ensure all guests leave full and happy. We believe that the key to growth and success is our respect for our employees. Here at Sharky’s, we work very hard to maintain an environment that not only allows the questioning of HOW we do things but also encourages everyone to question WHY we do things. We take great pride in our commitment to our employees, as well as to our customers. We offer a competitive wage scale and in 2015, implemented a minimum wage of $10 for all employees. We also offer support to employees with opportunities for training and advancement. Employees are encouraged to take full advantage of these. We offer an excellent benefits package to all full-time employees, which includes affordable health and dental insurance, a matching 401K retirement plan, free YMCA membership, paid leave, free uniform replacement four times per year to front-of-the-house employees, a holiday savings plan and an employee emergency fund. We also believe that a healthy work-life balance is crucial to maintaining a positive work environment for all employees. Twice a year, we close the restaurant and host employee appreciation days. Once a year, employees can bring their family members for a fun day of activities, food and celebration. The other day is for employees only, where we recognize tenure and give thanks for our employees. In 2015, we chartered buses and took our whole staff to Busch Gardens for an amazing team-building day. FRL A .org

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MOVERS AND SHAKERS

Movers & Shakers Chau Nguyen Congratulations to longtime FRLA member Chau Nguyen of Kobe Steakhouse, recently honored as Asian Entrepreneur of the Year at the Golden Dragon Awards, hosted by the Asian American Chamber of Commerce. The award highlights an individual entrepreneur of Asian heritage whose record of innovation and business success serves as a role model to aspiring Asian entrepreneurs. Hien Nguyen, his son, accepted the award on his behalf.

Padgett Joins Government Relations Team at the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association FRLA is excited to announce the recent addition of Samantha H. Padgett as General Counsel. Padgett joins FRLA’s stellar Governmental Relations team, currently led by Richard Turner, Senior Vice President of Legal and Legislative Affairs. Padgett performs legal functions, provides legal advice, and will strengthen the association’s advocacy efforts at the state and local levels. “We’re extremely proud to have Samantha H. Padgett join our team. Padgett is a well-respected professional in Tallahassee circles and across the state. I’m confident her legal expertise and experience will enhance the Florida hospitality industry’s presence,” said Carol Dover, President and CEO of the FRLA. Previously, Padgett served for ten years as the Vice President and General Counsel of the Florida Retail Federation (FRF). Padgett is a member of The Florida Bar and received her J.D. degree cum laude from the University of Florida College of Law in 2005, and received her B.A. from Emory University in 2001. She also volunteers as a Board Member on the VISIT FLORIDA Board of Directors, University of Florida Center for Retailing and the Florida Recycling Partnership.

Meet the New Secretary of the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation, Jonathan Zachem Jonathan Zachem was recently named secretary of the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR). Prior to this appointment, Zachem served as the deputy secretary for DBPR, chief attorney and then director of DBPR’s Division of Pari-Mutuel Wagering. Before his employment with DBPR, Zachem served in the Prosecution Services Unit (PSU) for the Florida Department of Health. Zachem received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Florida, his master’s degree from the University of South Florida and his law degree from the Barry University School of Law.

Richard Gonzmart Honored as (DiRoNA) 2018 Hall Of Fame Inductee The Distinguished Restaurants of North America (DiRoNA) Award – one of the most prestigious awards for fine dining – has announced Richard Gonzmart as a 2018 Hall of Fame inductee, joining the ranks of the most celebrated restaurateurs. Gonzmart is a fourth-generation “caretaker” of the Columbia Restaurant Group. 56  S P R I N G

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Candidates must have at least 25 years of service and have made significant contributions to the distinguished dining industry. The full DiRoNA Hall of Fame list is at Dirona.com/ hall-of-fame The Gonzmart Family of Restaurants consists of five concepts, including the Columbia, Cha Cha Coconuts, Ulele, Goody Goody™ Burgers and Café con Leche Ybor City. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


GIVING BACK

Support CORE

I

ndustry nonprofit organization Children of Restaurant Employees (CORE) has a unique mission — offering support to the children of food and beverage service employees navigating life-altering circumstances. Active for more than a decade, the organization just celebrated their best year yet. Most people are involved with or know someone who works in the food and beverage service industry. In fact, it’s that very notion that led to the inception of CORE and the support of this beloved, yet underserved community. The family nature and passion that this industry exudes is similar to none. So when your fellow industry members experience life-altering tragedies like illness, natural disaster or death, organizations like CORE come to their aid. To raise funds in support of food and beverage service industry families experiencing these circumstances, CORE relies on donations from fellow businesses and individual supporters passionate about their cause. Here’s how anyone can help: »» COREporate Memberships — Starting at just $1,000 a year, companies of any size are able to help CORE give back to their own. COREporate partners play such a vital role at CORE. Hosting events is also a great way for companies to get involved and a fun, easy way to donate. COREporate partners can host or

FRL A .org

sponsor an event such as a dinner, product tasting, cocktail making competition, silent auction or ongoing food or drink promotion as the perfect way to spread the word and support CORE’s mission. CORE loves working with businesses to support these fun, life-changing celebrations all year round! »» Bear-a-factor Program — Every donation to CORE helps them get that much closer to supporting food and beverage service industry families across the country through life-altering circumstances. CORE’s Bear-a-factor Program allows anyone to donate easily every month! Each CORE child receives a CORE bear. For $25, one bear will be totally covered for a child in need. Know a family who could benefit from CORE’s support? The organization is always accepting recipient referrals. Referring someone who needs CORE in their life is another way to show support.

the organization, meeting with new families and setting up fundraising opportunities. A great way to get involved, these ambassadors allow the Nashville-based organization to extend their reach nationally while continuing to garner support, awareness and funds. “We are so grateful to all of our donors, COREporate partners, supporters and ambassadors for continuing to advocate on behalf of CORE,” Executive Director Lauren LaViola said. “We are able to give back to our own and continue changing lives because of them and their support. Our goal is to extend our CORE family and help even more food and beverage service industry families in 2018!” With more than $3 million raised and over 300 families supported in more than 30 states to date, CORE aims to expand into all 50 states in the new year. Want more information on the organization, how to get involved and why you should help? Visit coregives.org or contact Lauren@COREgives.org directly!

»» Ambassadors — CORE has ambassadors across the country working to spread awareness for their cause. This passionate group of volunteers do anything from assisting with events, advocating for CORE and sharing their mission, to representing F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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CITY

Apr

May

Jun

E D U C AT I O N A N D T R A I N I N G

LOCATION

ALTAMONTE SPRINGS

4

9

13

Hampton Inn

BOCA RATON

18

16

20

Hilton Garden Inn

DAYTONA BEACH

11

16

20

Hampton Inn Daytona Airort

FORT LAUDERDALE

23

22

12

Crowne Plaza

FORT MYERS

5

3

7

Hilton Garden Inn

FORT PIERCE

12

10

14

UF Indian River Research

FORT WALTON

3

5

Northwest Florida State College

FORT WALTON

8

Wyndham Garden

GAINESVILLE

5

3

7

Best Western Gateway Grand

ISLAMORADA

TBD

TBD

JACKSONVILLE

17

17

13

Lexington Jacksonville Riverwalk

JACKSONVILLE BEACH

19

23

11

Four Points by Sheraton

KEY WEST

8

DoubleTree Grand Key Resort

KISSIMMEE

Holiday Inn

LAKELAND

16

21

18

Courtyard by Marriott

MELBOURNE

3

1

5

Holiday Inn Hotel & Conference Center

MIAMI

17

15

19

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami

MIAMI (SPANISH)

10

1

5

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami

NAPLES

26

31

28

DoubleTree Suites

OCALA

17

15

19

Homewood Suites Ocala Heathbrooke

ORLANDO

10

8

5

Embassy Suites

PANAMA CITY

11

23

27

Gulf Coast State College

PENSACOLA

17

22

19

Hampton Inn Pensacola Airport

PORT RICHEY

5

1

7

Days Inn & Suites

SARASOTA

12

3

7

Holiday Inn Lakewood Ranch

ST. AUGUSTINE

4

15

6

Holiday Inn Express & Suites

ST. PETERSBURG

3

3

5

Holiday Inn Express

TALLAHASSEE

19

17

14

Lively Technical Center

TAMPA

9

7

11

Holiday Inn Tampa Westshore

VENICE

4

9

13

Hotel Venezia

WEST PALM BEACH

16

14

18

Holiday Inn West Palm Beach Airport

Islander Resort

Dates subject to change without notice. Please see SafeStaff.org for current schedule.

Food Manager Training & Testing Schedule To register, call toll-free (866) 372-SAFE (7233) or visit safestaff.org. DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION: Register for training at least three business days prior to exam date or 10 business days prior for Test With Confidence Packages.

ServSafe® Goes Hi-Tech! All ServSafe Food Protection Managers Exam results are being upgraded to complimentary ServSafe® eCertificates. No more waiting for certificates in the mail. Log in and download your certificate as soon as your exam is graded! You can even share it electronically with your company via an email share link. Find out more: ServSafe.com.

* Dates are tentative

safestaff.org 58  S P R I N G

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


SAVE THE DATES

AUGUST 7 - 8 Marketing + Operations Summit Fort Lauderdale Marriott Harbor Beach Resort & Spa

JUNE 11 - 13 Summer Board Meeting Casa Marina Key West

2018 CORPORATE EVENTS

SEPTEMBER 6 - 7 Fall Board Meeting Orange County Convention Center, Orlando

FRLA.ORG/EVENTS

SEPTEMBER 6 Hospitality Stars of the Industry Celebration Hyatt Regency Orlando

SEPTEMBER 6 - 8

OCTOBER 18

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show Orange County Convention Center, Orlando

NRA/FRLA Bob Leonard Golf Classic ChampionsGate Golf Club, Orlando


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Florida Restaurant & Lodging Spring 2018  

Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine is the trade publication for Florida’s hospitality industry. Content is directed toward our hotel an...

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Spring 2018  

Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine is the trade publication for Florida’s hospitality industry. Content is directed toward our hotel an...

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