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MAY 2008

Florida's Colleges of Pharmacy Preparing the Next Generation of Pharmacy Professionals


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career.

people.

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florida PHARMACY TODAY Departments 4 Calendar 4 Advertisers 5 President’s Viewpoint 7 Executive Insight 31 Buyer’s Guide

VOL. 71 | NO. 5 MAY 2008 the official publication of the florida pharmacy association

Features

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Florida's Colleges of Pharmacy Preparing the Next Generation of Pharmacy Professionals

Florida Pharmacy Foundation Offers Chance to Win Big 118th FPA Annual Meeting and Convention Schedule & Registration Information

MAY 2008

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FPA Calendar 2008

MAY 14-16 ASCP Midyear Las Vegas, NV

20-23 AACP Annual Meeting Chicago, Illinois 31 - 8/3 FSHP Annual Meeting

19-21 NCPA Legislative Conference Washington, DC 26

Memorial Day - FPA Office Closed

August 1-3

June

Southeastern Officer's Conference Biloxi, MS

10-11 Board of Pharmacy Meeting Orlando Florida

3-6

21 Room Reservation deadline for Annual Convention

8 FPA Council and Committee Meetings Orlando, Florida

27

Convention registration deadline July

4 Independence Day, FPA Office Closed 9-13

118th Annual FPA Meeting Conference Orlando, Florida

Southeastern Gatherin Sandestin, Florida

12 - 13 Florida Board of Pharmacy Meeting Orlando, Florida 17 - 19 NABP Regional Meeting Sandestin, Florida

and

11 Gatherin Hotel Registration Ends 18

Last day to register for the 25th Annual SE Gatherin

Mission Statements: of the Florida Pharmacy Today Journal The Florida Pharmacy Today Journal is a peer reviewed journal which serves as a medium through which the Florida Pharmacy Association can communicate with the profession on advances in the sciences of pharmacy, socio-economic issues bearing on pharmacy and newsworthy items of interest to the profession. As a self-supported journal, it solicits and accepts advertising congruent with its expressed mission.

of the Florida Pharmacy Today Board of Directors The mission of the Florida Pharmacy Today Board of Directors is to serve in an advisory capacity to the managing editor and executive editor of the Florida Pharmacy Today

Journal in the establishment and interpretation of the Journal’s policies and the management of the Journal’s fiscal responsibilities. The Board of Directors also serves to motivate the Florida Pharmacy Association members

For a complete calendar of events go to www.pharmview.com CE CREDITS (CE cycle) The Florida Board of Pharmacy requires 10 hours LIVE Continuing Education as part of the required 30 hours general education needed every license renewal period. Pharmacists should have satisfied all continuing education requirements for this biennial period by September 30, 2009 or prior to licensure renewal. *For Pharmacy Technician Certification Board Application, Exam Information and Study materials, please contact Ranada Simmons in the FPA office. For More Information on CE Programs or Events: Contact the Florida Pharmacy Association at (850) 222-2400 or visit our Web site at www.pharmview.com CONTACTS FPA — Michael Jackson (850) 222-2400 FSHP — Michael McQuone (850) 906-9333 U/F — Dan Robinson (352) 273-6240 FAMU — Otis Kirksey (850) 599-3301 NSU — Carsten Evans (954) 262-1300 DISCLAIMER Articles in this publication are designed to provide accurate and authoritative information with respect to the subject matter covered. This information is provided with the understanding that neither Florida Pharmacy Today nor the Florida Pharmacy Association are engaged in rendering legal or other professional services through this publication. If expert assistance or legal advice is required, the services of a competent professional should be sought. The use of all medications or other pharmaceutical products should be used according to the recommendations of the manufacturers. Information provided by the maker of the product should always be consulted before use.

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to secure appropriate advertising to assist the

Journal in its goal of self-support.

Advertisers CVS........................................................................ 2 FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH....... 32 HAYSLIP & ZOST............................................. 13 Healthcare consultants..................... 3 Kahan ◆ SHIR, P.L......................................... 17 Langely Medical Center..................... 14 medical staffing...................................... 18 mcKesson....................................................... 22 mEADOWBROOK............................................ 19 PHARMACY PROVIDER SERVICES (PPSC)........................................ 17 Pharmacy Max........................................... 13 Rx RElief.......................................................... 32 UNITED DRUGS................................................. 9

E-mail your suggestions/ideas to dave@fiorecommunications.com


The President’s Viewpoint by Don Thibodeau, B.S., R.Ph. Guest Columnist

So You Want Your Own MTM Practice My primary charge to the Professional Affairs Council this year was to develop Medication Therapy Management (MTM) business plans for publication addressing the provision of MTM services as part of one’s traditional practice, as an aside to one’s practice, and as one’s primary practice. This guest editorial, written by the chair of that council, dispels some of the myths surrounding MTM. A future article will provide you with an essential foundation: a business plan that you can tear out and use as a checklist to springboard you into the next phase of your career as a pharmacist. Don Bergemann, FPA President So you want your own MTM practice. Great! If you are willing to put in the time and to follow a plan, you can do it. The first rule of success is: believe in yourself and what you are doing. So, I’d like to dispel some MTM myths. 1. Consumers won’t pay me by the hour for pure consulting. 2. Consumers can’t afford to pay appropriate fees for these services. 3. I need to bill insurance companies. 4. Doctors will not cooperate. 5. Only PharmDs can provide meaningful MTM Services. Consumers won’t pay me by the hour for pure consulting On a bright spring day in 1990, I was flagged down as I drove by one of my children’s teachers as he was jogging. He had just been diagnosed with cardiac arrhythmia. He was prescribed a beta-blocker and was given information about the implantable defibrillator that he was going to receive. This very intelligent and well-respected teacher was known for his

“natural” life style. He lived in an earth-sheltered passive solar house that he and his wife built. They were vegetarians and even had a composting toilet. He was the track coach and in great shape. His internist was communicative and well liked. So why did he flag me down and ask me if he could hire me to discuss his medication? I think he felt overwhelmed. He convinced me that he would feel better after sitting down privately with a pharmacist, learn more about his condition, and what side effects and problems might be issues for him. We made an appointment. Upon completion of the one-hour tutorial and question-and-answer session, he took out his checkbook. With a smile and a look of tranquility that I had not seen on his face in some time, he asked how much he could pay me. It’s been that way ever since. For 15 years, my patients have driven me to grow my MTM services. My patients have insisted on paying me for my time and information. They have told me that my fee was too low. They said my service helps them feel better and be more in control. And they have told me not to worry about not accepting assignment! Now that we have our own NPI numbers and Current Procedural Code (CPT) codes, MTM is here to stay. It is up to us to define what it will be. Will PBM-based programs be sufficient, or do consumers need pharmacists available in their communities with whom they can meet, discuss problems and implement solutions? For 15 years, consumers have paid me and other pharmacists around the country who have provided similar services, because we help them feel bet-

Don Thibodeau, B.S., R.Ph.

ter. MTM services statistically improve outcomes by decreasing complications and decreasing costs, but ultimately what sells the service is – we help people feel better. The essence of any business is the premise that it has something people want to buy. The first step in satisfying a market and moving toward success is the business plan. Consumers can’t afford to pay appropriate fees for these services Pharmacists who have provided MTM (under any name) over the years have served their neighbors from every economic background. One of my first cases was a woman who was on Medicaid and felt that she was being prescribed too many medicines from too many physicians. Since no one was taking time with her to help her manage her medications and side effects, she asked me to do so. She felt that until she MAY 2008

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2007/2008 FPA Executive Committee The Florida Pharmacy Association gratefully acknowledges the hard work and dedication of the following members of the FPA leadership who work deligently all year long on behalf of our members.

Chair................................................................................................................. Leo "Lee" Fallon President.....................................................................................................Don Bergemann President Elect.......................................................................................Norman Tomaka Treasurer....................................................................................................Michael A. Mone’ APP Chair.......................................................................................................Suzanne Kelley HOD Speaker.................................................................................................... Goar Alvarez HOD Vice Speaker...................................................................................Suzanne Kelley Region 1 Rep.......................................................................................................Darrell Miller Region 2 Rep.......................................................................................Allison Underwood Region 3 Rep............................................................................................ Anita Thompson Region 4 Rep........................................................................................................ Tim Rogers Region 5 Rep................................................................................................ Alice McNeese Region 6 Rep........................................................................................................Kim Murray Region 7 Rep...............................................................................Sharon Smith-Wollner Region 8 Rep........................................................................................................Tom Cuomo Region 9 Rep.............................................................................................Robert J. Renna Region 10 Rep.....................................................................................................Ayala Fishel Region 11 Rep.............................................................................................................Bob Hoye Region 12 Rep...................................................................................... John "Dolph" Cone Region 13 Rep...........................................................................................Alan Oberlender Region 14 Rep........................................................................................................ Karen Bills FSHP President.............................................................................. Christine Gegeckas Dean FAMU..................................................................................Henry Lewis, Pharm D Dean LECOM................................................................................... Gary Levin, Pharm D Dean NOVA SE.....................................................................Andres Malave, Pharm D Dean PBAC...................................................................................... Dan Brown, Pharm D Dean UF................................................................................................ William Riffee, Ph.D. ASP President FAMU...................................................................................Erin Gaffney ASP President NOVA SE..................................................................Kimberly Lamas ASP President PBAC.......................................................................................Paul Young ASP President UF..........................................................................................Jennifer Kim Educational Affairs Chair...................................Carmen Aceves-Blumenthal Organizational Affairs Chair.................................................................. Alex Pytlarz Professional Affairs Chair................................................................Don Thibodeau Public Affairs Chair............................................................. Mayra Gonazlez-Abreu Journal Board Chair..................................................................... Peggyann Zaenger Foundation Executive Vice President..................................... Patsey Powers Executive Vice President and CEO........................................Michael Jackson

Florida Pharmacy Today Journal Board Chairman................................................Peggyann Zaenger, pzaenger@fdn.com Vice Chair................................................................Gary Dalin, HOSPRx50@aol.com Secretary/Treasurer....................................... Patsy Powers, Editor Emeritus ppowers@pharmview.com Member............................................Greta Pelegrin, gretapelegrin@yahoo.com Member............................................................... Dick Witas, witas@moffitt.usf.edu Member.................................................Joseph Koptowsky, docjik1215@aol.com Member........................................................................Stuart Ulrich, Stuarx@aol.com Member........................Stephen Grabowski, sgrabowski@seniormmc.com Executive Editor................Michael Jackson, mjackson@pharmview.com Managing Editor...................Dave Fiore, dave@fiorecommunications.com 6 |

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did, she would not be able to move forward in her life and work her way out of welfare. She was grateful. She paid me. I accepted. For years I got notes from her with joyful progress reports. The Lewin Report discovered and published the range in fees that consumers were paying for MTMS. The full report prepared for APhA can be found here: http://www.pharmacist.com/AM/ Template.cfm?Section=MTM_New_to_ You_&Template=/CM/ContentDisplay. cfm&ContentID=13633 Taking time to write a business plan will include assessing your market and the fee level that is appropriate for them and for you. Keep in mind what fees you pay your consultants – such as your lawyers, accountants, architects, physicians and therapists. Our specialized knowledge of pharmacology and its significance in society merits our inclusion in that group. I Need to Bill Insurance Companies No. Let me repeat that. No. We need to demonstrate how we deliver MTMS. We need to provide care and show our “product” – information services and the physical presentation (the consult document, letters from your office, faxes). By doing so, physicians and third parties will more accurately assess the value of full-service MTM. PBMs are creating their own models for MTMS. In my opinion, they provide value but are not thorough enough for fully enhancing patient outcomes, including an improved sense of well-being. Doctors will not cooperate Ninety percent of the physicians to whom I have provided care plan suggestions have been receptive once they actually saw real cases presented. We need to demonstrate how we deliver MTMS. Again, we need to provide care and show off our “product” – information services and the package in which we physically wrap it. By doing so, physicians and third parties will more accurately assess the value of full-service MTM. At the conclusion of a staff meeting to which I had been invited to present pharcontinued on page 9


Executive Insight by michael jackson, RPhPresident/CEO AND By Michael Jackson, FPA Executive Vice Helene R. Jacobson, Pharm.D. Candidate

FDA Action on Unapproved Hydrocodone Products

H

ydrocodone is a semi-synthetic opiod that is used clinically as a pain reliever (analgesic) and/or cough suppressant (antitussive).1 The precise mechanism of action is unknown, however, the analgesic properties are believed to be related to the presence of opiate receptors in the central nervous system (CNS), similar to codeine which acts on smooth muscle and the CNS.2 The antitussive properties of hydrocodone are thought to work by directly playing on the cough center of the brain.3 Hydrocodone is highly potent and one of the most commonly prescribed medications available for pain relief and cough suppression.1 It also is an exceedingly popular recreational drug of abuse due to its ability to cause feelings of euphoria.1 It is greatly addictive and can lead to life-threatening illness, injury, or death (i.e. respiratory depression and cardiac arrest) when used inappropriately.1 Even under normal, proper use of this drug, it may impair motor skills or judgments, making it unsafe to operate machinery, drive, or engage in other potentially hazardous activities.1 The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has classified plain hydrocodone as a Schedule II drug, however when combined with other products in the United States, such as acetaminophen, it is considered a Schedule III drug.1 On September 28, 2007, the FDA safety information and adverse event reporting program, commonly known as MedWatch, issued an alert on hydrocodone in unapproved prescription products.4 The FDA made an announcement to inform healthcare providers and consumers of its intent to enforce charges against companies

marketing unapproved hydrocodonecontaining prescription drug products.4, 5 This course of action is part of a broader FDA initiative from June 2006 on the advertisement and selling of unapproved drugs.5 Recently, the FDA has been getting reports of hydrocodonerelated medication errors due to formulation changes in unapproved products, as well reports of confusion over hydrocodone-containing medication names because of the similarity between the unapproved and approved drug products.5 In an effort to minimize potential safety issues, the FDA takes into account, as part of the drug approval process, the probability for medication errors and name mix-ups.5 Currently, there are various hydrocodone pain-relief products, such as Vicodin, that are FDA-approved. However, most of the antitussive formulations of hydrocodone do not have FDA-approval.5, 6 The agency is especially concerned about inappropriate pediatric labeling of unapproved hydrocodone cough suppressants, and the danger of medication errors related to these unapproved products.5, 6 A number of the unapproved hydrocodone products have dosage labeling instructions allegedly suitable for children as young as 2, even though hydrocodone antitussives have not been proven safe or effective in children younger than 6 years old.1 For instance, on March 11, 2008, the FDA issued an alert in response to numerous reports of adverse events, including death, associated with the improper use of Tussionex Pennkinetic Extended-Release Suspension (hydrocodone/chlorpheniramine).7 This drug is contraindicated in children younger than 6, and the

Michael Jackson

Helene R. Jacobson

FDA received reports of death in children younger than 6 years of age that were prescribed Tussionex.7 The timeline to discontinue the marketing of unapproved hydrocodone products is as follows:1, 5, 6 ■■ October 31, 2007 – End of manufacturing and distribution of products MAY 2008

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FPA Staff

Executive Vice President/CEO Michael Jackson (850) 222-2400, ext. 200

Director of Pharmacy Services Tian Merren, ext. 120 Director of Membership Gillian Nolden. ext. 110 Controller Wanda Hall , ext. 211 Pharmacy Services Admin. Asst. Ranada Simmons , ext. 121 Pharmacy Services Office Asst. Stacey Brooks , ext. 122 Communication Services Admin. Asst. Leroy Smith , ext. 220 Receptionist/Meeting Planner Catherine Walker , ext. 230 Florida Pharmacy Today Board Chairman....................Peggyann Zaenger, Jacksonville Vice Chair..................................... Gary Dalin, Delray Beach Secretary/Treasurer...................................Patsy Powers, Editor Emeritus, Tallahassee Member................................................. Greta Pelegrin, Miami Member...................................................... Dick Witas, Odessa Member..................................... Joseph Koptowsky, Miami Executive Editor.........Michael Jackson, Tallahassee Managing Editor.........................Dave Fiore, Tallahassee Member..............................Stuart Ulrich, Boynton Beach Member...................................Stephen Grabowski, Tampa

This is a peer reviewed publication. ©2008, FLORIDA PHARMACY JOURNAL, INC. ARTICLE ACCEPTANCE: The Florida Pharmacy Today is a publication that welcomes articles that have a direct pertinence to the current practice of pharmacy. All articles are subject to review by the Publication Review Committee, editors and other outside referees. Submitted articles are received with the understanding that they are not being considered by another publication. All articles become the property of the Florida Pharmacy Today and may not be published without written permission from both the author and the Florida Pharmacy Today. The Florida Pharmacy Association assumes no responsibility for the statements and opinions made by the authors to the Florida Pharmacy Today. The Journal of the Florida Pharmacy Association does not accept for publication articles or letters concerning religion, politics or any other subject the editors/ publishers deem unsuitable for the readership of this journal. In addition, The Journal does not accept advertising material from persons who are running for office in the association. The editors reserve the right to edit all materials submitted for publication. Letters and materials submitted for consideration for publication may be subject to review by the Editorial Review Board. FLORIDA PHARMACY TODAY, Annual subscription - United States and foreign, Individual $36; Institution $70/year; $5.00 single copies. Florida residents add 7% sales tax. Florida Pharmacy Association

610 N. Adams St. • Tallahassee, FL 32301 850/222-2400 • FAX 850/561-6758 Web Address: http://www.pharmview.com

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currently labeled for use in children younger than 6 years old ■■ December 31, 2007 – End of manufacturing of any other unapproved hydrocodone drug product ■■ March 31, 2008 – Cease further shipment in interstate commerce of unapproved hydrocodone-containing products Legal action can be taken against those who are noncompliant to these aforementioned deadlines. Note, however, that this applies to manufacturing and shipment only and therefore unapproved formulations may still be seen in the pharmacy for a period of time after these deadlines pass.1

The unapproved hydrocodone products include: cough suppressants that combine hydrocodone and homatropine with other drugs, such as an expectorant such as guaifenesin, or decongestants such as phenylephrine or pseudoephedrine.1 There are numerous alternatives for patients who may have been using unapproved hydrocodone cough suppressants.5 Various approved antitussive products that do not contain hydrocodone exist.5 There currently are seven FDA-approved antitussive products containing hydrocodone as of October 2007:1 n

PRODUCT NAME

INGREDIENTS

Tussicaps

Chlorpheniramine polistirex; Hydrocodone polistirex

Tussionex Pennkinetic

Chlorpheniramine polistirex; Hydrocodone polistirex

Hydrocodone Compound Mycodone Homatropine methylbromide; Hydrocodone bitartrate Hycodan Tussigon

DOSAGE FORM Capsule, Extended Release Suspension, Extended Release

Homatropine methylbromide; Hydrocodone bitartrate

Syrup

Homatropine måethylbromide; Hydrocodone bitartrate

Syrup

Homatropine methylbromide; Hydrocodone bitartrate

Tablet

Homatropine methylbromide; Hydrocodone bitartrate Homatropine methylbromide; Hydrocodone bitartrate

Tablet, Syrup Tablet

For further information, visit the United States Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration website at www.fda.gov.

References

1. Department of Health and Human Services: U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Questions and Answers About FDA's Enforcement Action Regarding Unapproved Hydrocodone Drug Products. September 28, 2007 October 1, 2007 [cited March 21, 2008]; Available from: åhttp://www.fda.gov/cder/drug/ unapproved_drugs/hydrocodone_ qa.htm 2. Thomson Micromedex. Micromedex Healthcare Series: DrugPoint Summary: Acetaminophen/ Hydrocodone Bitartrate.; 2008. 3. Thomson Micromedex. Micromedex Healthcare Series: DrugPoint Summary: Homatropine Methylbromide/Hydrocodone Bitartrate.; 2008. 4. Department of Health and Human Services: U.S. Food and Drug Administration. MedWatch: The FDA Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program. 2007 Safety Alerts for Drugs, Biologics, Medical Devices, and Dietary Supplements: Hydrocodone in Unapproved Prescription Products. September

28, 2007 [cited March 21, 2008]; Available from: http://www.fda.gov/ medwatch/safety/2007/safety07. htm#Hydrocodone 5. Department of Health and Human Services: U.S. Food and Drug Administration. FDA Takes Action to Stop Marketing of Unapproved Hydrocodone Products. September 28, 2007 [cited March 21, 2008]; Available from: http://www.fda.gov/bbs/ topics/NEWS/2007/NEW01713.html 6. Department of Health and Human Services: U.S. Food and Drug Administration. FDA Action on Unapproved Hydrocodone Products. October 12, 2007 [cited March 21, 2008]; Available from: http:// www.fda.gov/consumer/updates/ hydrocodone101207.html 7. Department of Health and Human Services: U.S. Food and Drug Administration. FDA Issues Alert on Tussionex, a Long-Acting Prescription Cough Medicine Containing Hydrocodone. March 11, 2008 [cited March 21, 2008]; Available from: http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/ NEWS/2008/NEW01805.html


FL Pharmacy Today 2/3 page, BW February 2008 The President's View, continued from page 6

macist-provided MTMS, Dr. John Muir of Naples, Florida, told me that once physicians saw actual consults presented professionally and well documented, they would not be resistant to our participation. He and his staff volunteered that they would appreciate a pharmacological opinion. They said that they would use such a consult in the same way they assess and incorporate opinions from radiologists, cardiologists and other medical specialists. Only PharmDs can provide meaningful MTM Services Not true. All pharmacists who are motivated to become involved in patient information services can practice MTM. Consumers value our knowledge. They crave more of our time. Like any service, different providers will deliver a wide variety of depth, quality and value. The likelihood is that if you are a pharmacist interested in MTMS, you are the kind of empathic person who can and will use your own skill set to affect your patient’s quality of life in a wonderful way. Executive Editor’s Note: The Florida Pharmacy Association is pleased to present to all Florida licensed pharmacists a program to help understand how to implement a practice-based medication therapy management program (MTM). Please arrange your calendars to be with us at the Hyatt Grand Cypress Resort in Orlando, Florida July 9 – 13, 2008, and receive valuable information on how to get on board with this new professional opportunity. n See you in July!

The Journal is Now Online Starting with last month's issue, the Florida Pharmacy Today is available online to read and download at www. pharmview.com. Don't miss it!

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FLORIDA’S

Colleges of Ph University of Florida College of Pharmacy

FAMU College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Leadership in pharmacy education is the mantra at UF. Faculty, students and alumni all work within their respective circles to advance this common goal. Here are some of the many ways UF is taking leadership to the next level. Pharmacy Program among Top of its Class The UF College of Pharmacy doctor of pharmacy degree program moved up in rank this year, breaking into the top 10 among its U.S. peer colleges according to U.S. News & World Report graduate school rankings released in March. The UF pharmacy program, ranked No. 9, jumped two spots from its last ranking in 2005. Pharmacy Dean Bill Riffee was pleased with his college’s forward momentum in the face of fiscal belttightening that threatens the next two years of state education funding universitywide. "That we've been able to achieve this in the midst of the current budget woes is a testament to our faculty and students," Riffee said. The national recognition, Riffee said, shows the success of his college’s distance-education efforts. The UF Pharm.D. program has grown to 1,200 students at four campuses - Gainesville, St. Petersburg, Orlando and Jacksonville. The program, which blends virtual technology and faceto-face education, draws academic leaders in pharmacy and other health sciences nationally – and internationally – who travel to UF to learn more about how the UF model works.

A Magnificent Year in Review Florida A&M University (FAMU) College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (COPPS) had a stellar 2007 academic year of outstanding accomplishments. Allow us to share a few excerpts from this year, starting with FAMU’s 2007 pharmacy graduates achieving a 100-percent passage rate on the North American Pharmacy Licensure Examination (NAPLEX) exceeding the state and national rate. This group of first-time candidates took the test between May 1 and August 31, 2007, as reported by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy. Seventy-three candidates of the Class of 2007 took the NAPLEX during this time and all passed. Additionally, FAMU’s school average score of 119.15 exceeded the state and national averages of 118.77 and 116.00, respectively. The state passing rate was 98.22 percent, and the national rate was 97.23 percent compared to FAMU’s 100 percent. Moving forward, we highlighted Gwenesia Collins, a 1999 doctor of pharmacy graduate of the FAMU COPPS, who was appointed by Jennifer M. Granholm, governor of Michigan, to the Michigan Board of Pharmacy for a four-year term. The Michigan Board of Pharmacy consists of 11 voting members—six pharmacists and five public members. The Board currently oversees approximately 12,535 pharmacists, 2,931 pharmacies and 937 manufacturers/wholesalers. Another distinguished appointment was Dr. Cynthia M. Harris’ invitation to serve as a member of the U.S. Environ-

See "UF," continued on page 12

See "FAMU," continued on page 14

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harmacy

Preparing the Next Generation of Pharmacy Professionals

Nova Southeastern University College of Pharmacy

Palm Beach Atlantic University

Aligning Our Strategic Plan with Our Mission Statement The Mission of the College of Pharmacy (COP) at Nova Southeastern University (NSU) is to educate professionals who will address the pharmacy-related needs of society.  Known for its innovation and quality, the COP prepares pharmacy professionals and scientists to improve health care outcomes through pharmaceutical care in education, research, practice, and service. Our vision is to achieve the distinction of being a premier college of pharmacy through our programs of innovative teaching, service, research and scholarship. Building upon our already outstanding reputation for pharmacy education, Nova Southeastern University’s College of Pharmacy is ready for the future of evolving practices within the pharmacy profession.  As part of a university renowned for encouraging innovation, we prepare graduates for lifelong learning, humanitarian care, and leadership roles in their professional and personal lives. Our research and scholarly activities emphasize the application and translation of findings to the real-world delivery of patient care; and our multicultural and multilingual students and staff members reflect the diversity of the individuals we serve. Graduates of our college are prepared to transcend the “drug product” to generate real, lasting improvements in healthcare outcomes.   The COP is also poised to advance to the frontlines of glob-

Technology Upgrades Starting in fall 2007, all entering first-year pharmacy students were required to purchase an HP tc4400 tablet PC. These allow students to either type their notes, or with the assistance of a software program called Microsoft OneNote to write directly on the screen similar to a lined notepad. OneNote also functions as a multi-tab notebook to keep lecture notes organized for those who might be “organizationally challenged.” Instructor notes and Powerpoint can be uploaded and annotated via OneNote. There also are synchronized audio recording capabilities. If a section of text is selected, the audio recording is queued to what was being said by the instructor at the time the student was taking the notes. Any diagrams that the instructor annotates also can be captured by the students; traditional laptops do not have the capacity to perform this function. Students also were provided software that can generate virtual note cards. These “ink flash cards” can be flagged to be reviewed again and can be shared with other students who have this software. A built-in “cheerleader” function congratulates the students when they have reviewed all of the flashcards in a section. To replicate traditional study habits with notes, multiple colored ink and highlighters are available. The ingenuity of GSOP students turned the collaborative note-taking function of OneNote into a group study tool when they were not able to be in the same physical location.

See "NOVA," continued on page 16

See "Palm Beach," continued on page 18 MAY 2008

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"UF," continued from page 10

UF Hosts Southeastern Meeting The UF College of Pharmacy played host to pharmacists and pharmacy educators, last August, from the southeastern United States who traveled to Orlando to participate in the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy and American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy annual meeting. The 2007 NABP/AACP District III program, Advancing Pharmacy Through Leadership & Education, was developed by the UF College of Pharmacy and co-hosted along with the Florida State Board of Pharmacy. More than 80 District III members attended the three-day meeting that examined some of today’s most relevant topics in pharmacy. Educational sessions, offering continuing education credit, provided an opportunity for pharmacy professionals to exchange knowledge and information. Professional leaders and educators in pharmacy shared their expertise on issues relevant to the pharmacy industry and education such as; ensuring product quality and standards; Medicare Part D implications for pharmacy practice; and socio-cultural and communication barriers faced by internationally educated pharmacists working in North America. The annual meeting, hosted each year by one of eight District III colleges in the southeastern states, provides an opportunity for dialogue between colleges/schools and state boards on regional and national issues.

(l-r) Association leaders and presenters at the 2007 NABP/ AACP District III pharmacy meeting: Rebecca Poston, Florida Board of Pharmacy, Michael McKenzie, UF College of Pharmacy, Carmen Catizone, National Association of Boards of Pharmacy, and Peter Vlasses, Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education

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National Leaders UF is proud of its alumni who have built successful careers in pharmacy and have gone the extra mile to serve in leadership roles in national pharmacy organizations. John E. Murphy, Pharm. D., associate dean of the University of Arizona’s College of Pharmacy, earned a B.S. in Pharmacy in 1976, and a Pharm.D. in 1979 at UF. A past president of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, he now serves as the president-elect of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy. Ed L. Hamilton, Pharm.D., a Florida community pharmacy owner, has served pharmacy organizations on the state level including that of past president of the FPA Foundation. In 2007, he was named the president-elect of the American Pharmacists Association. Hamilton earned his B.S. in Pharmacy from UF in 1975, and in 2000 returned to earn his Pharm.D. degree through the college’s Working Professional Pharm.D. program while continuing his professional work. Becoming a leader in the field has been time consuming, Hamilton said, but it has also been rewarding because he has helped shape the profession’s future. Diane L. Beck, Pharm.D., graduated in 1977 from the UF College of Pharmacy, and returned to the college as a professor and director of educational and faculty development. She joined the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy with no intentions of becoming a leader. Instead, she saw a need to improve pharmacy professors’ resources for assessing experiential learning. Since she couldn’t find the resources she needed, she decided to help create them. In 2005-06, Beck served as president of the AACP. As her involvement grew, Beck said she became a better pharmacy educator through talking and sharing with other leaders in the field. Student Leadership Home & Abroad This April, UF pharmacy students launched the first-ever public service outreach – as a class – to the local community. The Generation Rx campaign, led by Class of 2010 president Erica Fernandez, sent more than 35 pharmacy student volunteers to area high schools for a peer-led discussion and education about “recreational” prescription drug abuse. The pharmacy students dispensed colored candy packets to a high school class, where each color was assigned to represent a common prescription drug. Employing class participation, the high-school students stood up as their color combinations were called out. The UF students explained what the combined drug effects might be when illegally taken. They also emphasized that the term, “illegal drugs” applies to taking any drug not prescribed to the user. Resource information packets were provided to the high-school students and their teachers. International health outreach programs are a student-faculty team effort, organized by L. Douglas Ried, Ph.D., an associate dean for the college. Each year, the students travel to


remote areas in Latin America in collaboration with other UF health science colleges to provide basic medical services. Leidi Paez, Pharm.D., a 2007 UF College of Pharmacy graduate who grew up in Cuba, knows what it’s like to endure a toothache without adequate medication. That is why, as a pharmacy student, her spring breaks were used for traveling to countries such as Ecuador and the Dominican Republic on interdisciplinary health outreach trips. But not all trip participants have Paez’s Spanish language and cultural background. For this reason, faculty from the colleges of Pharmacy and Medicine teamed up to offer an interdisciplinary course that will help prepare students. The UF International Health course, offered as a pilot evening class over two consecutive semesters, began fall 2007 and continued in the spring 2008 term. The curriculum focuses on two crucial aspects of international trips: public health education and cultural issues. Students who take the preparatory class also will learn life-saving health information they can, in turn, explain to patients. The educational component is vital in order to make a difference after the volunteers are gone said Judith Riffee, B.S.Pharm. “We want to concentrate on ‘joining hands’ with in-country health providers to expand on programs that are important to them,” she said. Building a sustainable project, another program goal, involves working in a single location so that efforts can be con-

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tinued and expanded during future trips. Paez said she thinks the UF preparatory course for outreach team members will be immensely beneficial. Since the current trips involve traveling to Spanish-speaking regions, the students work hard to self-train for basic language proficiency – especially Spanish medical terminology. Pharmacy & the Gator Nation On the distance-learning front, the college continues to expand its online Master of Pharmacy programs in forensic science and in pharmacy regulation. The UF Forensic Science programs, www.forensicscience.ufl.edu, offer degrees in five areas of forensic studies to students worldwide. The newest online master’s in Pharmacy Regulation & Policy, http://dce.pharmreg.ufl.edu, exceeded its 2007 enrollment goals and is graduating its first master’s candidates this May. The program is growing strong in 2008 with the addition of majors being offered in applied pharmacoeconomics, clinical research regulation and ethics, and patient safety and risk management. n

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"FAMU," continued from page 10

mental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Science Advisory Board (SAB) Exposure and Human Health Committee for a term that began on October 30, 2007 and will end September 30, 2010. Because of her extensive experience in toxicology, she will serve as Special Government Employee and will provide independent expert advice on technical issues underlying EPA policies and decision-making. Dr. Harris is professor and director of the Institute of Public Health in the College. Many of our faculty members received numerous accolades for their cutting-edged research, fellowships, certifications, and re-certifications. Dr. Ronald D. Thomas, professor of basic pharmaceutical sciences, has new evidence that garlic could play a significant role in the prevention of cancer, and many cancer-prevention research scientists agree that one of the keys to unlocking the door of cancer prevention is eating more vegetables. Dr. Thomas mentioned that, “For many years, scientists have been accumulating evidence that what we eat and how it is prepared has a lot to do with preventing or causing cancer, especially garlic.” Thomas, an environmental toxicologist, suggested that studies have shown that a chemical that helps give garlic its flavor can keep PhIP from triggering DNA damage or the formation of carcinogens in the body. Thomas further suggests that the garlic flavor component, called DAS, triggers a gene alteration in PhIP that might play a significant role in preventing breast and other types of cancer. Dr. Mandip Sachdeva, professor of basic pharmaceutical

sciences, was conferred as fellow of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) at a recent AAPS meeting held in San Diego, California. AAPS confers the honor of fellow to recognize individuals for outstanding contributions, which elevate the stature of the pharmaceutical sciences and for professional excellence in the field relevant to the mission of AAPS. AAPS is an international pharmaceutical organization with more than 10,000 members. Dr. Sachdeva has identified new molecular pathways and mechanisms for therapeutic agents intended for the treatment of lung cancer and skin inflammation. Additionally, he has made significant contributions in understanding skin irritation markers in the skin. Dr. Rafaat Khalil, assistant professor of basic pharmaceutical sciences, received his certification as a diplomat of the American Board of Toxicology, Inc. (ABT). ABT diplomats participate in all aspects of the profession of toxicology including the design and interpretation of safety studies for product development; review and interpretation of such studies for regulatory compliance; basic and applied research into toxic effects, mechanisms of toxic action, toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics; and education of undergraduates, professional and graduate students and the public in the science of toxicology through courses, legal cases and media interactions. He joins Dr. Cynthia Harris in the College with this designation. Dr. Angela M. Hill, professor and director of pharmacy practice (Tallahassee campus), has been board certified in psy-

Full Time Pharmacist Wanted Thomas Langley Medical Center located in Sumter County is looking for a full time Pharmacist. We are a Federally Qualified Community Health Center which offers an excellent opportunity to the Pharmacist who desires to advance and spend more time with their family. Benefits include 8 am to 5 pm working hours, five days a week, no weekends, a good retirement program, liberal holidays and paid time off, and a competitive salary. We provide Professional Liability insurance and excellent working conditions in a brand new Pharmacy. Some management experience desired, but this can be off set with a good work ethic and a desire to advance. References and pre-employment drug test required. Florida License in good standing necessary. Pharmacist is a member of the Senior Management team and will chair the Pharmacy and Therapeutic committee. Must have working knowledge of the Rx 30 software system or be a quick learner.

E-mail or fax CV to jpike@telmedical.com or (352) 793-6269. For more information call Judy Pike, HR manager, at (352) 569-2942.

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chiatry since 1998, and we congratulate Dr. Jocelyn Jones, assistant professor of pharmacy practice (Jacksonville campus) and Dr. Angel Wolf, assistant professor of pharmacy practice (Tampa campus) for recently receiving their certification as Board Certified Clinical Psychiatric Pharmacists. Additionally, Drs. Hill and Marlon Honeywell (associate professor of pharmacy practice) were nominated as Academic Leadership Fellows for the American Association of Colleg-

On April 20-26, 2008, FAMU launched the Coalition on AfricanAmerican Men’s Health (CAAMH) along with the celebration of the National Minority Cancer Awareness Week.   es of Pharmacy (AACP) Programs. AACP’s Academic Leadership Fellows Program was developed in response to the stated needs of their members, both administrators and faculty. Academic pharmacy has been fortunate in that leaders have risen from their colleges and schools throughout our history to address and solve the many challenges facing academic pharmacy. AACP recognizes these challenges continuing and increasing in intensity, necessitating more proactive leadership and effective management throughout the academy. Dr. Keecia King, assistant professor of pharmacy practice (Jacksonville campus), was selected by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) as a member of the 2008 Leadership Institute Class. The Pharmacy Leadership In-

stitute seeks to bring together bright, highly motivated individuals with considerable professional experience. The sharing of expertise, complementary skill sets, and work and life perspectives, ensures effectiveness and impact on each participant. Furthermore, peer interaction and networking will help carry the program benefits back into the workplace. On April 20-26, 2008, FAMU launched the Coalition on African-American Men’s Health (CAAMH) along with the celebration of the National Minority Cancer Awareness Week.   The mission of the coalition was to develop, promote and sustain independent, competitive men’s health research and training programs at FAMU that create opportunities and promote careers for FAMU scientists.  The coalition also created a series of support networks and activities to assist men in the African-American community, including the FAMU-ACS Men’s Health Resource Center. Members of the FAMU CAAMH included the following COPPS’ faculty and staff: Dr. Folakemi Odedina (coalition chair); Dr. James L. Moran, Jr. (community outreach group leader); Dr. John J. Scrivens; Dr. Levi Ross and Ms. Elvonna Atkins. Statistics show that African-American men have the lowest life expectancy compared to any other group in the United States, and they are disproportionately affected by the leading chronic diseases including heart disease, diabetes, cancer and HIV/AIDS. Last, but certainly not least, Dr. Karam F. A. Soliman, distinguished professor and assistant dean for research, received a United States Patent entitled, “Topical Treatment for Dyshidrosis (Pompholyx) and Dry Skin Disorders” (number 7357950). We commend our research scientists for their outstanding, innovative and useful inventions and our faculty members for their distinguished leadership that typifies the caliber and level of commitment to the FAMU COPPS. n

MAY 2008

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"NOVA," continued from page 11

al health care, joining the world’s top multi-disciplinary health organizations NOVA White Coat Ceremonoy and professionals.  New discoveries, challenges, and opportunities in pharmacy research, education, and health care have positioned the College of Pharmacy to provide our students a cuttingedge, rewarding, and challenging professional and educational experience. The College of Pharmacy’s Strategic Plan for the Future defines our goals and methods for further improving on our already outstanding reputation in this arena. The guiding objective of the plan is to continually raise the bar of excellence by discovering new ways to advance our academic programming and services to benefit local, national, and international communities. The goals of our Strategic Plan, aligned with both the University and the College, are not static objectives; rather, “premier” institution.  Formalization and implementathey are evolving initiatives, enabling us to expand upon and tion of this new and unique program of graduate study refine our already successful curriculum. In preparing stuand research leading to the doctor of philosophy degree dents to be ethical professionals in dynamic health care en(Ph.D.) will be comprised of three areas of emphasis withvironments, we focus our programs on four major areas of in pharmacy: drug discovery principles, the development pharmacy education: and formulation of new drug products, and assessment of the socio-behavioral and economic impact on society and ■■ Professional Degree Program leading to the doctor of the health care system. pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree emphasizes drug therapy ■■ Continuing Professional Education Program - highly principles, concern for the patient, lifelong learning, and visible world-wide and successful - meets the growing edcommunity involvement. Our innovative doctor of pharucational needs of pharmacists throughout South Florida macy degree (Pharm.D.) program provides the next genand beyond for students, faculty members, and alumni.  eration of pharmacy professionals with the knowledge The philosophy of lifelong learning is supported by the and skills necessary to advance patient care. COP, which organizes a variety of professional activities ■■ International Partnerships Program goes beyond the that enhance professional skills and knowledge in areas classroom to establish global research and educationthat impact their practice of pharmacy such as consulting, al opportunities recognized for their excellence in eduemergency preparedness, immunization delivery, concational programs and for opportunities to participate in temporary issues, and physical assessment. collaborative study, research, and scholarship.  The COP recognizes the importance of an international presence Our goal for the next decade is to broaden our positive imand of offering collaborative programs with a wide range pact on public health by providing the education, training, of activities to improve students’ understanding of diverresearch, and services of a “premier college of pharmacy.” sity in pharmacy practices and knowledge of cross-culThrough local, national, and global partnerships, we can protural health care among different ethnic populations.  In vide platforms to advance pharmacy education programming addition to our existing programs of student and faculthat serve the greater need for improved health care. The supty exchanges, study by international students and scholport and involvement of our alumni, partners, and stakeholdars in the United States, study abroad, training workers continues to be crucial to our future development and shops, internships, and research collaboration; increased success.  This is only the beginning of our legacy, but a strong collaborative opportunities contribute to strengthening foundation for a new era in patient care. n the training of our scholars and the attainment of groundbreaking research. ■■ Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) Program aimed at expanding our research and scholarship horizons. Pioneering research and scholarship and discovery of new knowledge is fundamental to become a college that is recognized as 16

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MAY 2008

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"Palm Beach," continued from page 11

An additional technology upgrade to the classrooms included installation of Sympodiums by Smart Technologies. These interactive pen displays replace the computer monitors in the front of the classroom and provide tablet PC-type functioning to the instructor. This allows for annotation of diagrams and whiteboard function on the computer screen, which can be saved for later review. For our senior board review this year, fondly known as “Senior Summit,” board-type questions were reviewed using TurningPoint software by Turning Technologies, LLC. This audience response system utilizes Powerpoint and a small handheld “clicker” to do polling and quizzing. Students expressed that the system added to the learning experience. For fall 2008, Vision produced by DyKnow will be introduced to the P1 and P2 classes. This software is an audience response system that allows interactive activities to take place in the lecture hall such as polling, quizzing, and collaborative note taking or “whiteboard” functioning. The purpose is to gauge student understanding of the material so that adequate time can be given to more difficult subjects. Recognition Fourth-year pharmacy student, Kathyrn Castillo, was one of five students nationally to be awarded the American Pharmacists Association 2008 Pharmacy Today One to One Patient Counseling Recognition. She received this recognition

Starting in fall 2007, all entering first-year pharmacy students were required to purchase an HP tc4400 tablet PC.

for potentially saving a patient’s life during a counseling session. When the patient asked about taking an NSAID for leg cramps, Castillo determined that she had symptoms consistent with deep vein thrombosis and recommended that she seek medical attention immediately. The patient did as Castillo instructed and the doctor informed her that Castillo probably saved her life. n

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&LORIDA0HARMACY!SSOCIATIONPROUDLY SPONSORS-EADOWBROOKš)NSURANCE'ROUPFOR YOURWORKERSCOMPENSATIONINSURANCENEEDS WORKERSCOMPENSATIONDIVIDENDPAID TO&0!MEMBERSIN˜

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Are you “In the Loop?” Don’t miss the next issue of the all-new StatNews, the FPA’s official e-mail newsletter. Open it. Read it. Know it. StatNews is a member service of the Florida Pharmacy Association. For membership information, contact gnolden@pharmview.com or call 850-222-2400 and ask for Gillian.

MAY 2008

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FLORIDA PHARMACY FOUNDATION Scholarship Endowment Fundraiser

WE NEED YOUR HELP…AND CONTRIBUTIONS Donation to the Endowment Fund Gets You Support Your $100 a Ticket for the Annual Drawing at Hyatt Regency Scholarship Grand-Cypress, Orlando, FL – July 11, 2008 Program One Winner at $10,000*

ONLY

600TS

TICKE

One Winner at $3,000* Two Winners at $1,000* Ten Winners at $500*

Fourteen chances to win. You do not need to be present to win

Our Goal is a $300,000 Endowment FUND *Assuming the receipt of 600 entries. In the event 600 entries are not received, prizes will be reduced proportionally. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE 1-800-435-7352 WITHIN THE STATE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE.

TICKET SALE

You can make multiple ticket sale forms by duplicating this form. Multiple forms can be mailed in one envelope.

Endowment Fundraiser Hyatt Regency Grand-Cypress, Orlando, FL July 11, 2008 Please Print

Please Charge My Credit Card: q MasterCard q VISA q Discover

Name Address City State

Enclosed is my check in the amount of $_____________ Make Your Check Payable to: Florida Pharmacy Foundation Endowment Fund 610 North Adams St , Tallahassee, FL, 32301

ZIP

CARD No. Exp. Date Signature

Y o u r D o n a t i o n i s T a x De d u c t i b l e


Florida Pharmacy Foundation: Win A Flat Screen TV, Wii or Cash Prizes by PATSEY J. POWERS FOUNDATION EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

The Florida Pharmacy Foundation will host three separate drawings on the last dayt of exhibiting, Friday, July 11, 2008, at 7:00 p.m., booths 67-69, during the FPA Annual Convention, held in Orlando July 9-13, 2008. On display and turned on for your viewing will be a 46-inch Vizio, LCD HD flat screen TV, contributed by Trustees Todd Schmidt and Bill and Cyndi Mincy. A Wii video game system ready to take on all players was contributed by Trustee President Ken Norfleet and will also be on display. Tickets for the TV are $50 each or 3 for $100; tickets for the Wii are $20 each or 3 for $50. The Endowment Fund tickets are $100 each.

The Endowment Fund drawing is offering cash prizes of One Winner at $10,000 One Winner at $3,000 Two Winners at $1,000 Ten Winners at $500

PATSEY J. POWERS

P.S. — If you win the TV, you will be responsible for getting it home.

Only 600 tickets will be sold. In the event all 600 tickets are not sold, the winning ticket amount will be reduced proportionally. You do not need to be present to win. Walgreens is sponsoring the Foundation’s Annual Ice Cream Social, Thursday, July 10, from 6:30-7:30 p.m. You will not want to miss seeing your Trustees, as they don their traditional white aprons and lofty chef hats for the occasion. There will be lots of ice cream, a variety of toppings and syrups to please everyone’s taste. So plan your convention schedule to join in the fun at all of the Foundation’s activities. For advance ticket sales, e-mail Pat Powers at ppowers@pharmview. com or call the FPA office (850) 222-2400. A COPY OF THE OFFICIAL REGISTRATION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION MAY BE OBTAINED FROM THE DIVISION OF CONSUMER SERVICES BY CALLING TOLL-FREE 1-800-435-7352 WITHIN THE STATE. REGISTRATION DOES NOT IMPLY ENDORSEMENT, APPROVAL OR RECOMMENDATION BY THE STATE. MAY 2008

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Florida Pharmacy Association 610 North Adams St Tallahassee, Florida 32301

“Florida's Premiere Continuing Pharmacy Education Provider”

PRST STD U.S. POSTAGE PAID TALLAHASSEE, FL PERMIT # 801

Florida Pharmacy Association’s

118TH Annual Convention and Meeting Hyatt Regency Grand Cypress One Grand Cypress Blvd. Orlando, Florida 32836 July 9-13, 2008

Florida Ph 118TH A a Florida Pharmacy Association’s Hyatt Reg 118TH Annual Convention One Gr and Meeting Hyatt Regency Grand CypressOrlan One Grand Cypress Blvd. Orlando, Florida 32836

J

July 9-13, 2008

CONSULTANT PHARMACISTS HOSPITAL PHAR CONSULTANT PHARMACISTS ~ HOSPITAL PHARMACISTS ~ PHARMACY~ TECHNICIANS COMMUNITY PHARMACISTS ~ PRESCRIPTION DRUG WHOLESALER DISTRIBUTORS COMMUNITY PHARMACISTS ~ PRESCRIPTION D LONG TERM CARE PHARMACISTS ~ PHARMACY STUDENTS

LONG TERM CARE PHARMACISTS ~


WEDNESDAY, JULY 9, 2008 PRE - CONVENTION EDUATIONAL PROGRAMS M O R N I N G

7:00AM 8:00AM – 8:15AM

REGISTRATION DESK OPEN WELCOME and INTRODUCTORY REMARKS

8 HRS GCE

Facilitator: Suzanne Kelley, RPh, CPh, Covenant Hospice

8:00AM – 8:50AM Wholesale Industry Perspective on Pedigree Requirements Speaker: Elizabeth A. Gallenagh, Esq., Director, State Government Affairs, HDMA ACPE# 165-000-08-10-L04-P

8:15AM – 8:30AM

Program Objectives and Self-Study Review 8:30AM – 9:40AM

Immunization Certificate Program Conference

8:50AM – 10:20AM Compliance with Florida Wholesaler Regulations and Laws Speaker: Greg Jones, RPh., Compliance Manager, Florida Department of Health ACPE# 165-000-08-11-L04-P

9:40AM – 10:15AM

Immunization Certificate Program Conference 10:15AM – 10:30AM 10:30AM – 12:00PM

A F T E R N O O N

FPA REGULATORY AND LAW WHOLESALER CONFERENCE 8 HRS GCE

IMMUNIZATION CERTIFICATION PROGRAM

BREAK

Immunization Certificate Program Conference 12:15PM – 1:15PM 1:15PM – 3:30PM

10:20AM-10:30AM BREAK 10:30AM – 11:20AM NABP Perspective on Wholesale Drug Distribution 1 hr. GCE/TECH Speaker: Joshua M. Bolin, Board Liaison, National Association of Boards of Pharmacy ACPE# 165-000-08-12-L04-P

3:30PM – 3:45PM BREAK 3:45PM – 4:45PM Immunization Certificate Program Conference 4:45PM – 5:00PM Immunization Certificate Program Conference Wrap 5:00PM – 6:00PM Immunization Certificate Program Examination ACPE # 202-165-06-118-H01 (Home Study) ACPE # 202-165-06-111-L01 (Live Presentation) THE FLORIDA PHARMACY ASSOCIATION AND THE AMERICAN PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION ARE ACCREDITED BY THE ACCREDITATION COUNCIL FOR PHARMACY EDUCATION AS A PROVIDER OF CONTINUING PHARMACY EDUCATION.

(SEATING FOR THIS PROGRAM IS LIMITED)

E V 5:00PM – 6:00PM E 6:00PM – 7:00PM N I 6:00PM – 8:00PM N G 7:30PM – 9:30PM

1.5 hrs GCE/TECH

LUNCH

Immunization Certificate Program Conference

4:00PM – 5:00PM

1 hr. GCE/TECH

HOUSE OF DELEGATES (HOD) BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING FPA PACCE MEETING BUDGET AND FINANCE COMMITTEE MEETING FLORIDA PHARMACY FOUNDATION ANNUAL MEETING OFFICER’S DINNER

11:20AM – 12:20 PM LUNCH SYMPOSIUM / Certified Designated Representative Speaker: Valeria Williams, Regulatory Supervisor, Florida Department of Health ACPE# 165-000-08-13-L04-P 12:20PM – 1:10PM Examining the Impact of Amphetamine and Methamphetamine Precursor Division and Why It Affects The Pharmaceutical Industry Speaker:: John Mudri, Mudri Associates Incorporated, ADEA Consultancy ACPE# 165-000-08-14-L04-P

1 hr. GCE/TECH

1 hr. GCE/TECH

1:10PM – 1:50PM Inspector’s Perspective and Evaluation Criteria for Florida 1 hr. GCE/TECH Speaker: Richard Sands, Statewide Inspection Manager, Florida Department of Health ACPE# 165-000-08-15-L03-P 1:50PM-2:00PM

BREAK

2:00PM – 3:30PM Panel Discussion: Federal and State Pedigree Requirements Facilitator: Becky Poston Panel Members: Gregg Jones, Elizabeth A. Gallenagh, Joshua M. Bolin, Valeria Williams, John Mudri and Richard Sands ACPE# 165-000-08-16-L03-P

1.5 hrs. GCE/TECH

The Pharmacy Technician Certification Board accepts many ACPE accredited programs for Pharmacy Technician Certification renewal. Technician Objectives for this program appear in red and are designated by (*) for each individual course. Courses that do not have red objectives contain course material applicable to Pharmacists and Technicians.

The Florida Pharmacy Association (FPA) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. See individual program descriptions for the Universal Program Numbers and number of CEUs. A statement of Continuing Pharmacy Education Credit will be provided within six weeks of the conclusion of the event to all paid registrants who attend the entire program. Please complete the program evaluation sheets and submit them with your attendance sheets prior to exiting the meeting location. The FPA is also a Florida Department of Health approved provider of continuing education and will be reporting the course completion of all Florida licensed medical professionals to CE Broker. Contact the Florida Pharmacy Association if you need reasonable accommodations as defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act

Acronym Key GCE = General Continuing Education

TECH = Technician


THURSDAY, JULY 10, 2008 “MEDICATION THERAPY MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT FOR PHARMACISTS” 7:00AM

REGISTRATION DESK OPEN

1:30PM-2:30PM

8:00AM – 8:50AM History of Medicare Modernization Act (MMA) 1 hr. GCE/TECH Speaker: Goar Alvarez, PharmD, FASCP Assistant Dean for Pharmacy Services, Director of Pharmacy Operations, Nova Southeastern University ACPE# 165-000-08-021-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-021-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Describe the history leading up to the MMA; Examine the laws outlined in the MMA; Discuss the relationship between MMA and Medicare Part D; Examine who pays for MMA; Examine who receives payment for MMA * Describe the history leading up to the MMA; Define the laws detailed in the MMA; Discuss how the MMA affects health care

M O R N I N G

8:50AM – 9:40AM 1 hr. GCE/TECH The MTMS Business Plan and Dealing With Legal and Billing Issues Speaker: Dan Buffington, President and Chief Executive Officer, Clinical Pharmacology Services, Inc ACPE# 165-000-08-022-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-022-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Identify effective sources for business plan models; Differentiate between a service and product based business plan; Assess MTMS malpractice insurance and how it differs from traditional pharmacist liability insurance; Identify malpractice software *Identify a business plan to initiate MTMS; Recognize the legal issues involved in billing for MTMS; Illustrate methods to handle MTMS legal and billing issues 9:40AM – 9:50AM

BREAK

“Laughter: A Healthy Influence”

Besides being a well-known Southern artist, Larry Wamble is also one of the most sought-after professional speakers and humorists in America today.

A F T E R N O O N

9:50AM – 10:40AM 1 hr. GCE/TECH MTMS Documentation Speaker: Don Thibodeau, Clinical Pharmacists and CEO, The PillHelp Co., ACPE# 165-000-08-023-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-023-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Evaluate evolving MTMS documentation models and programs; Incorporate MTMS Core Standards into practice; Understand the value of effective documentation; Evaluate documentation tools and select tools that fits your professional needs as a Pharmacists *List necessary elements needed for MTMS documentation; Identify where to locate and retrieve the appropriate paperwork; Prepare a record keeping system of MTMS documentation 10:40AM – 11:.30AM 1 hr. GCE/TECH Delivering MTMS To The Senior Population Speaker: Jeff Delafuente, Associate Dean for Professional Education, Professor and Director of Geriatric Programs, Virginia Commonwealth University ACPE# 165-000-08-027-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-027-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Identify unusual presentations of adverse drug events in older patients; Describe unique aspects of delivering MTM to a senior population; Discuss risk factors that predispose elderly people to experience adverse drug events and how MTM can decrease the risk; Identify sources of MTM referrals for the senior population * Explain the MTM process to the senior population; Describe techniques to provide MTMS to the senior population; Define unique aspects of delivering MTMS to seniors.

A F T E R N O O N

11:30AM – 11:40AM

BREAK

11:40PM-12:30PM 1 hr. GCE/TECH Overcoming the Barriers to MTMS Implementation Speaker: Richard Marasco, BS Pharm., FASCP, CGP, HRM ACPE# 165-000-08-024-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-024-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: List personal and professional barriers to the implementation of MTMS; Perform an analysis of the resources, both currently available and those missing needed to implement MTMS in your practice; Describe program and strategies that may be employed o overcome identified barriers in the implementation of MTMS * List barriers to implementing MTMS; Identify how barriers affect MTMS in detail

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Larry was a practicing retail pharmacist, successful businessman and dedicated civic leader for over twenty years, serving along the way as a city councilman, justice of the peace, bank director, professional association president, national advisory board member, political fund-raiser and an advisory board member to a major university. Larry Wamble His diversified background and the qualities that allow him to entertain his audiences are very evident in his art. He simply makes people feel good. Larry's artwork, along with his original slogans, are definitely "feel goods," allowing the viewer to recall good times with cherished friends, to relish a lighthearted, yet thought-provoking experience. Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Describe the importance of developing and maintaining rewarding individual relationships in professional and private settings; Explore the positive effects of humor in dealing with everyday situations in the workplace and as a tool in building patient confidence; Learn the value of personal attitude in dealing with stress in the professional setting and improving an individual’s positive and creative outlook of the future; Explore the basics of human nature and how they affect occupational events and personal actions; Reveal the healthy influence of laughter as it relates to a positive mental attitude as well as to physical well-being. ACPE# 165-000-08-046-L04-P

ACPE# 165-000-08-046-L04-T

2:30PM-6:30PM EXHIBIT HALL GRAND OPENING 2:30PM-6:30PM JOURNAL BOARD MEETING E V E N I N G

4:00PM-6:00PM FPA PACCE MEETING ADOPT-A-STUDENT and MENTOR SOCIAL 6:30PM-7:30PM FLORIDA PHARMACY FOUNDATION RECEPTION SOCIAL 7:30PM—9:30PM 12—STEP RECOVERY MEETING (Open to all attendees and spouses)

2 hrs. GCE/TECH

Facilitators: David Templeman, PharmD, Clinical Pharmacist Bertfish Medical Center and Nelson Naiman, RPh, Staff Pharmacist, Rxperts ACPE #. 165-000-07-019-L04-P ACPE #. 165-000-07-019-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Understand the disease state of addiction with a brief overview of the topic; Describe the signs and symptoms of chemical dependency, intervention, treatment and monitoring; Evaluate and educational example of a 12 step recovery and explain how it works

12:30PM – 1:30PM

ANNUAL BUSINESS MEETING AND LEGISLATIVE UPDATE LUNCH AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE 12:30PM-2:30PM 12:30PM-1:30PM

CE PROVIDER WORKSHOP LUNCH

Acronym Key: GCE = General Continuing Education RC = Consultant Recertification TECH/ * = Pharmacy Technician INVT = Invitation Only STC = Student Education


FRIDAY, JULY 11, 2008 “MEDICATION THERAPY MANAGEMENT TOOLKIT FOR PHARMACISTS” 6:30-7:30AM 7:00AM 8:00AM 7:30AM 8:00AM -9:45AM

M O R N I N G

CHRISTIAN RPH BREAKFAST REGISTRATION DESK OPEN TENNIS TOURNAMENT GOLF TOURNAMENT LOCAL UNITS LEADERSHIP MEETINGS

8:00AM – 8:50AM Opportunities in Employer Based Health Care 1 hr . GCE/TECH Speaker: Katherine Heller, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Palm Beach Atlantic University ACPE# 165-000-08-028-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-028-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Define employer-based health care (EBHC); Briefly overview the economics driving employer-based health benefits decisions ; Discuss recent trends in EBHC; Identify MTMS opportunities for pharmacists in EBHC; Introduce working models of RPH-directed EBHC initiatives * Define Employer based health care system; Define possible challenges with MTMS in the health care system 8:50AM – 9:40AM Clinical and Patient Documentation / 1 hr. GCE/TECH Examining the Patient Chart Speaker: Richard Finkel, PharmD, Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Studies, Nova Southeastern University ACPE# 165-000-08-029-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-029-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Manage the patient’s overall medication-related health issues utilizing the five core elements of Community Pharmacy MTMS; Examine patients history, labs and total medication list along with personal interview to solve or prevent medication and health problems; Create a plan of action based on the patient’s personal medication record to optimize medical outcomes and improve quality of life; Practice Documentation of Services for evaluating progress and billing Issues * Express the importance of documentation; Collect information for clinical and patient documentation; Interpret information from a patient chart 9:40AM – 9:50AM

9:50AM-10:40AM The Expanding World of Electronic Prescribing 1 hr. GEN/TECH Speaker: Ken Whittemore, Jr., R.Ph., MBA, Senior VP, Clinical Practice Integration, SureScripts ACPE# 165-000-08-031-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-031-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Define what is meant by true electronic prescribing connectivity and briefly describe its bidirectional nature; List three potential benefits of e-prescribing connectivity to patients , pharmacists, prescribes, and other important stakeholders * Define e-prescribe and explain when e-prescribing is appropriate 9:00AM-10:50AM 2 hr. GEN/TECH/STC National Alliance of State Pharmacy Association (NASPA) and Non Prescription Medicines Academy (NMA) Facilitator: Tian Merren, PharmD., Director of Pharmacy Services, FPA ACPE# 165-000-08-10-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-10-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Identify and explain aspects of the effective and safe practice of pharmacy self-care treatments through the process of answering a selected group of questions similar to what one would experience on a national board exam; Analyze the usage and effectiveness of over the counter medications; Classify different groups of over the counter medications based on drug treatment classes. Acronym Key: GCE = General Continuing Education

RC = Consultant ReTECH/ * = Pharmacy Technician INVT = Invitation Only

STC = Student Education

10:00AM-12:00PM

DELEGATE REGISTRATION

11:00AM – 11:50AM North American Board of Pharmacy 1 hr. STC License Examination (NAPLEX) Review Speaker: Dell Robertson, PharmD, MBA, Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice, Florida A&M University Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Review the fundamental areas of competence: managing drug therapy, safety and accuracy, preparing and dispensing medications and providing drug information and promoting public health 10:40AM-11:30AM Resources Available for MTMS 1 hr. GEN/STC/TECH Speaker: Jennifer Pytlarz, PharmD., Clinical Coordinator, Publix Supermarkets, Inc ACPE# 165-000-08-033-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-033-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Discuss common MTMS platforms to help facilitate initiating an MTM service; Identify various MTMS resources for documenting, billing and marketing MTM services; Describe various strategies to stay current with information on therapeutics, evidence-based medicine and clinical practice guidelines;* Review the resource tools available to enhance MTM

MTMS TRACK BREAK

8:50AM – 10:30AM Reducing Medication Errors Through 2 hrs. GCE/TECH Implementing a Continuous Quality Improvement Program Speaker: Michael Jackson, Florida Pharmacy Association Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer ACPE# 165-000-08-030-L03-P ACPE# 165-000-08-030-L03-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Define elements of a Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) Program; Restructure a pharmacy practice to address quality related events; Analyze some common causes of quality related events; Implement an action plan to address quality of care in pharmacies with a goal towards error reduction and prevention; Recite quality improvement regulations for Florida pharmacies * Define CQI; List most common medication errors; Employ techniques to reduce medication errors by using CQI

certification

M O R N I N G

10:00AM – 12:50PM Ordering and Evaluation Laboratory Data 3 hrs. GCE/TECH To Improve Patient Outcomes Initial Lab Certification// Recertification Facilitator: A.J. Jackson, Manager, RPh, Strategic Projects-Inland Empire ACPE# 165-000-08-032-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-032-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Select appropriate laboratory tests for patient care; Identify and avoid common problems associated with the use, ordering and interpretation of lab tests; Interpret laboratory values to monitor and improve pharmacotherapy; Discuss the legal aspects, restrictions and requirements for order and evaluation of lab studies; Document pharmaceutical care inventions

11:30AM-1:00PM

A F T E R N O O N

LUNCH

1:00PM – 2:40PM Over-The-Counter (OTC) Medications 2 hrs. GEN/TECH/STC Speaker: Reginald Harris, PharmD, MBA, RPh, President and Founder, InfoSource Communications, LLC ACPE# 165-000-08-047-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-047-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: List reasons why some products may be sold OTC; Understand the dangers of OTC medications; List general safety tips and common interactions; Interpret a drug label; Discuss alternative medicines; Identify reasons vitamins may not always be safe medications 1:00PM-3:00PM MTMS Panel Discussion 2 hrs. GCE/TECH Facilitator: Don Thibodeau Panel Members: Dan Buffington, Goar Alvarez and Richard Finkel ACPE# 165-000-08-049-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-049-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Give a brief overview of the economic conditions driving EBHC; Discuss creation and implementation of a plan of action to based on participants medication records; Identify types of malpractice and advantages and disadvantages to use 3:00PM-5:00PM 3:00PM-3:50PM

E V E N I N G

HOUSE OF DELEGATES Issues Presentation: PTCB Certification 1 hr.GCE/TECH/STC Speaker: Melissa Murer Corrigan, Executive Director and CEO, PTCB ACPE# 165-000-08-10-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-10-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Examine advances made for the workforce and the Certified Pharmacy Technician; Review snapshot of technicians in FL; Discuss PCTB and NCCA standards 4:30PM-6:00PM

Poster Presentations

4:30PM—7:00PM 5:30PM 6:00PM-7:30PM

EXHIBIT HALL RE-OPENS Golf Winners Announced Past Presidents, Unit Assoc. and Student Leadership Reception (INVT Only) University Receptions #1 Club Reception (INVT Only)

7:00PM-9:00PM 8:00PM-9:00PM


SATURDAY, JULY 12, 2008 “ALZHEIMER’S AND THE PHARMACIST” 7:00AM

REGISTRATION DESK OPEN

11:00AM – 11:50AM Understanding Cognitive Loss and How it 1 hr. GCE/TECH/RC Affects Patients with Alzheimer’s Speaker: Eileen Poiley, Director of Education, University of South Florida, Suncoast Alzheimer’s and Gerontology Center ACPE# 165-000-08-038-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-038-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Specify the mental processes lost due to cognitive decline; State the effect of cognitive losses on behaviors and communication; Describe the changes in memory and language of the dementia patient; Discuss the implications for the caregivers as the cognitive functions decline * Define cognitive loss; Explain the progression of cognitive injury to patients and their families; Recognize signs of cognitive loss in Alzheimer’s patients

8:00AM – 8:50AM Diagnosis and Treatment of 1 hr. GCE/TECH/RC Alzheimer’s Disease Speaker: Angela Massey Hill, PharmD., BCPP, RPh, Professor, Director of Pharmacy Practice, Florida A&M University ACPE# 165-000-08-035-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-035-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Describe the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease; Discuss the diagnostic measures used to evaluate Alzheimer’s disease; Describe the role of the Pharmacist in diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease; Compare and contrast treatment options used to treat Alzheimer’s disease; Describe the role of various imaging techniques used to augment the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer’s * Recognize the signs and symptoms of Alzheimer’s; Describe the progression of Alzheimer’s; List various treatment options to manage Alzheimer’s

M O R N I N G

8:50AM – 9:40AM New Directions in Alzheimer’s Research 1 hr. GCE/TECH/ RC Speaker: Amanda G. Smith, MD, University of South Florida Suncoast Alzheimer’s & Gerontology Center ACPE# 165-000-08-036-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-036-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Identify facts about Alzheimer’s including risk factors, basic pathology, symptoms and course; Discuss current treatments available for Alzheimer’s and state their limitations; List and explain the commonly used medications for treating behavioral problems associated with Alzheimer’s and other dementias; Review treatment options * Compare standard treatment options for cognitive and behavioral symptoms; List alternative therapies for Alzheimer’s; Identify clinical studies in the Alzheimer’s field 9:40AM – 10:10AM

A F T E R N O O N

BREAK

10:10AM –11:00AM Non Alzheimer’s Dementias 1 hr. GCE/TECH/RC Speaker: Kristin Fargher, MD, University of South Florida, Suncoast Alzheimer’s and Gerontology Center ACPE# 165-000-08-037-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-037-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Discuss the epidemiology of the various types of dementias; Discuss clinical characteristics of non-Alzheimer’s dementias syndromes; Analyze pharmacological options and challenges in treating non-Alzheimer’s dementia syndromes * Define non-Alzheimer’s dementia; Recognize signs and symptoms of dementia; Discuss disease states that lead to dementias other than Alzheimer’s 10:10AM-11:50AM 2 hr. GEN/TECH/STC The Pharmacy Career Forum Facilitator: James B. Powers, RPh., Past President; FPA Speakers: Bob Fishman, Hollywood-Bio-Equivalent Hormone Replacement Therapy; Carsten Evans, Ph.D, Assistant Dean for Continuing Education and Professional Affairs, Nova Southeastern University; Lois Adams, Wellness Practice; DeAnn Mullins, RPh, CDE and Stuart Shipe, RPh, D.O.M., Dipl. Ac& CH ACPE# 165-000-07-022-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-07-022-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Describe the difference between residency and fellowship; Examine different career options available to pharmacists; List personal strengths and weaknesses to consider when contemplating career choices; Describe practice setting that best suits the individuals skills and abilities Acronym Key: GCE = General Continuing Education RC = Consultant Recertification TECH/ * = Pharmacy Technician STC = Student Education INVT = Invitation Only

WANT TO JOIN THE FLORIDA PHARMACY ASSOCIATION? CONTACT THE FPA MAIN OFFICE AT 850850-222222-2400 or VIEW OUR MEMBERSHIP INFO ON THE NET AND REGISTER ONLINE AT www.pharmview.com “SEE ANY MEMBER OF THE FPA STAFF FOR ASSISTANCE”

12:00PM-1:00PM

LUNCH

1:00PM-2:30PM

DELEGATE REGISTRATION

1:00PM – 1:50PM New Drug Update 1 hr. GCE/TECH/STC Speaker: Dan Hussar, PhD, Remington Professor of Pharmacy ACPE# 165-000-08-039-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-039-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Discuss the aspects of some of the new drugs: Approved and off-label indications; contradictions; clinical pharmacology and pharmacokinetics; instructions for uses; additional counseling information; Potential drug interactions 1:00PM – 1:50PM Understanding the Role of the Caregiver 1 hr. GCE/TECH/RC and Strategies to Cope with Caregiver Stress Speaker: Angela Massey Hill, PharmD., BCPP, RPh, Professor, Director of Pharmacy Practice, Florida A&M University ACPE# 165-000-08-040-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-040-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Identify responsibilities of caregivers in dealing with patients with Alzheimer’s disease; Review challenges in dealing with patients with Alzheimer’s disease; Describe strategies for caregivers to handle the stress associated with Alzheimer’s disease *Discuss the role of the care giver; Understand the physical and mental strain on the care giver; Recognize coping strategies for care giver stress 1:50PM-2:40PM Communication and Behavior 1 hr. GCE/TECH/RC Management Strategies Speaker: Eileen Poiley, Director of Education, University of South Florida Suncoast Alzheimer’s and Gerontology Center ACPE# 165-000-08-041-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-041-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Describe strategies for effectively communicating with the Alzheimer’s patient to prevent behavior problems and maximize quality of life; Examine non-pharmacological approaches to managing difficult behaviors; Differentiate between primary symptoms and behaviors in the Alzheimer’s individual; Identify common misperceptions, ineffective approaches and behavioral concerns of care givers * Understand the effects communication and behavior change in the course of Alzheimer’s disease; Identify ways to manage communication difficulties; List strategies to cope with memory and behavioral loss

2:40PM-4:30PM

E V E N I N G

HOUSE OF DELEGATES RECONVENES

The New 118th ANNUAL AWARDS PRESENTATION AND JAZZ CAFÉ 6:00PM-10:00PM We are thrilled to bring singer, songwriter and saxaphonist Stacey Knights to the stage as the star of the Jazz Café and Award’s reception. She is a native of Massachusettes but currently resides in southwest Florida. Audiences have come to love and admire her blend of Adult Contemporary and pop-jazz influenced sound. The attire for the Jazz Café and Awards Presentation is Business Casual in “Shades of Black and Grey”. Come help the Florida Phamacy Assocation recognize the best in the profession of pharmacy in beautiful Orlando, Florida.


SUNDAY, JULY 13, 2008 “ALZHEIMER’S AND THE PHARMACIST” CONT. 7:00AM

REGISTRATION DESK OPEN

11:30AM –12:30PM

7:30AM-9:00AM PRESIDENT’S BREAKFAST AND INSTALLATION OF 2008-2009 OFFICERS

M O R N I N G

9:00AM-9:50AM Pharmacist’s Screening in 1 hr. GCE/TECH/RC the Community Speaker: Suzanne Kelley, RPh, CPh, Covenant Hospice ACPE# 165-000-08-042-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-042-L04-T Upon completion for this program participants should be able to: Identify the 10 warnings signs of Alzheimer’s disease; Understand the difference between Alzheimer’s diseases and other types of dementia; Describe the stages of the diseases and the “treatment”; List the causes and risk factors; Suggest “tips” to caregiver; Know when and where to refer * Recognize the 10 warning signs of Alzheimer’s diseases; Differentiate other types of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease; Understand that the different stages of the disease; Know the various risk factors and possible causes; Recommend “caregiver tips”: List groups, agencies and websites and other “support” to the caregiver 9:50AM-10:40AM Hospice and Palliative Care 1 hr. GCE/TECH/RC Speaker: Suzanne Kelley, RPh, CPh, Covenant Hospice ACPE# 165-000-08-043-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-043-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Compare the definition of hospice care and palliative care; Know the history of hospice and its “modern” movement; Identity the members of the interdisciplinary team (IDT) and their importance in the patient’s care; Describe the six constituents of EOL care; Understand the vital of the pharmacists in the care of the “terminal patient”; Realize th4e IMPORTANCE of symptoms management in the hospice patient * Define hospice care and palliative care; Understand the hospice history and how it came to the United States; Identify the hospice interdisciplinary team (IDT) members and their role in caring for the patient 9:50AM-10:40AM HIV/AIDS Update 1 hr. GCE/TECH Speaker: Michael Thompson, PharmD., BCNSP, FAMU Professor of Pharmacy Practice ACPE# 165-000-08-044-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-044-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Review current modes of transmission and prevention of HIV; Identify risk behaviors; Discuss the role of the pharmacist is providing care for the HIV infected patient; Describe the rationale behind combination therapies; Discuss Florida laws related to the care of patients with HIV/AIDS * List methods of transmission of HIV/AIDS; Identify high risk behaviors 10:40AM-11:30AM The Pharmacists and Cognitive Impairment 1 hr. GCE/TECH/RC and the Treatment of Contributing Factors Speaker: Michael Franz Raab, M.D. ACPE# 165-000-08-000-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-000-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Understand the role of homocysteine as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease; Discuss the metabolic pathways relating to homocysteine; Examine the impact of Vitamins B12, B6 and Folate on homocysteine * Define homocysteine; Examine the relationship between homocysteine and Alzheimer's disease

The Florida Pharmacy Association is the largest and oldest organization representing the profession of pharmacy in Florida. The Association represents members on issues of economics, political action, and public relations in the interest of pharmacy. The FPA promotes, supports and provides education and research for the enhancement of professional, management and leadership development. It establishes and promotes standards of practice and ethics for the delivery of pharmaceutical care. The FPA also identifies, evaluates and responds to trends and events that impact pharmacy and health care delivery. The Association takes pride in providing effective communications between pharmacists, healthcare organizations and the public.

LUNCH

12:30PM-1:20PM Planning for Care and Community Resources 1 hr . GCE/TECH/RC Speaker: Sandra Mutolo, MSW, LSCW, University of South Florida, Suncoast Alzheimer’s and Gerontology Clinic ACPE# 165-000-08-045-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-045-L04-T

A F T E R N O O N

Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: List and discuss the six keys to success caregiving; Recognize “Caregiver Burnout” and list five warning signs that a caregiver needs assistance; State three legal issues every caregiver should address ASAP; Describe community resources available to family caregivers * Compare various facilities for patient care settings; Access the financial aspect of different residential care options; Identify community resources for patients, their family and caregivers 1:20PM – 2:10PM Trionoamine Modulators: A New Doorway to the Treatment of Depression 1 hr. GCE/TECH/ RC Facilitator: Leonard Lado, MD ACPE# 165-000-08-034-L04-P ACPE# 165-000-08-034-L04-T Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Discuss the current treatment options for mood disorders; Describe the current standard treatment of achieving full remission; Explain the role of Gaba Modulator in the treatment of mood disorders; Define the treatment approach using Timonoamine Modulators; * Discuss the current treatment options for mood disorders; Describe the current standard of achieving full remission 2:10PM – 3:00PM The Patient and the Caregiver: Sharing Life’s Experiences Facilitator: TBD ACPE# 165-000-08-036-L04-P

1 hr . GCE/TECH/RC ACPE# 165-000-08-036-L04-T

Upon completion of this program participants should be able to: Recognize issues that caregivers face when managing the health and welfare of patients with Alzheimer’s disease; Use empathy and patience as a tool to encourage a healthy caregiver-patient relationship; Propose pharmacist initiated caregiver support groups.

We are your premier continuing pharmacy education provider and we have already begun the planning of the 119th FPA Annual Meeting and Convention at the Renaissance Resort at World Golf Village! 500 South Legacy Trail St. Augustine, Florida 32092 July 8-12, 2009 See an FPA staff member for details.


GENERAL INFORMATION Meeting Site Location:

Hyatt Regency Grand Cypress One Grand Cypress Boulevard Orlando, Florida 32386 (407) 239-1234 or (888) 421-1442 Room Rate: $129 + Taxes and Resort Service Fee of $7.00 Deadline: June 16, 2008 The Florida Pharmacy Association celebrates our 118th Annual Meeting and Convention at the Hyatt Regency Grand Cypress. The hotel is located just 20 minutes from the Orlando International Airport and a short drive from all the Central Florida attractions. The Hyatt Regency Grand Cypress offers transportation to the Walt Disney World, Universal Studios and Sea World theme parks. The 1,500 acre resort includes a 45 –hole Jack Nicklaus golf course, a 12 acre Lake Windsong which is perfect for sailing, rowboats, paddleboats and canoes. The Hyatt Regency is the perfect Rx for FPA members and pharmacists throughout the state of Florida! Room Rates: (FPA Room Rate cut off date is Monday, June 16, 2008): The Florida Pharmacy Association room rate is $129.00 per night plus tax and resort service fee for either single or double occupancy rooms. Please be sure to ask for the FPA group rate. The CheckIn time is 4:00PM and Checkout time is 12:00PM. For room reservations please call (407) 239-1234 0r 888-421-1442. General Education Track: We have assembled an All-Star Cast of professionals that will give you most current news in the area of Medication Therapy Management Systems. The general education track will also offer courses designed to educate pharmacists is a wide variety of important topics pertaining to their pharmacy practice. Specific courses being offered are HIV/AIDS Update, New Drug Update and Reducing Medication Errors. Consultant Education Track: The Pharmacist and Alzheimer’s Disease: Alzheimer’s remains one of the hottest topics in all Medical professions. We have the information you need to be ready to administer care for the Alzheimer’s patient. We are also taking a look at Policy of industry support: The FPA adheres to all United States Food and the effects of caring for patients with Alzheimer’s on the Pharmacist. Drug Administration (FDA) polices and procedures for educational activities. The FDA requires that we conduct educational programs funded by corporate FPA Annual Business Meeting: Participate in the Annual Business Meeting. Meet your grants independently of and without control of the granter of the program’s plancurrent FPA leadership and participate in the development of Association policy. ning, content or execution. Furthermore, all programs must be free of commercial bias for or against any product. APhA/FPA Co-Sponsored Immunization Program: Pharmacy Based Immunization Delivery is an innovative and interactive training program that provides pharmacists with skills Cancellation Policy: Cancellation request made in writing within 30 days prior necessary to become a Primary source of vaccine advocacy, education, and administration. to a continuing education program will be made minus a charge of a $10 dollar The program teaches immunology and focuses on practice implementation and legal/ service fee. Cancellation requests made in writing 10-29 days prior to a CE proregulatory issues. The goals of the program are to: Provide comprehensive immunization gram a refund will be made minus a $50 service fee. Cancellation requested made education and training; Provide pharmacists with the skills, resources, and materials neces- after that date will result in a credit towards a future CE program. The transfer of sary to establish and promote a successful immunization service; Train pharmacists to iden- credit is redeemable for up to 12 moths from the date of cancellation. tify at-risk populations needing immunizations; Train pharmacists to maintain necessary immunization records. Pharmacy Based Immunization Delivery is conducted in 2 parts. The 2008 Continuing Education Calendar first part is a self-study learning component designed to ensure that all participants have a (Schedule Subject to Change) solid understanding of the role of pharmacists as vaccine advocates. Successful completion of the self-study learning component results in 12 hours of continuing pharmacy education 25th Annual Southeastern Gatherin credit. The second part of the program is a live training seminar which involves an active August 3-6, 2008 at The Village at Baytowne Wharf learning experience. An additional 8 hours of continuing pharmacy education credit is Destin, Florida granted for attending and completing the live training seminar. A Certificate of Achievement Title: The Pharmacist Role in the Management of Obesity is awarded to participants who complete all program requirements. The Certificate of and Infectious Diseases Achievement is invalid, however, without written proof current CPR or BCLS certification. 12 hrs. GCE or 12hrs. RC Student and Pharmacy Education: Friday-Sunday: Student and Pharmacy Technicians will benefit from the interacting with practicing pharmacists, attending student and technician focused Continuing Education programs. The student track will offer 12 hours of challenging and exciting interactive education. House of Delegates: Be a delegate or an observer and see the importance of your Florida Pharmacy Association is the state capital and on the national stage. Get a first hand look at the direction of the FPA and the profession of Pharmacy as a whole. FPA PACCE Reception: Purchase a ticket and support the future of pharmacy by mentoring a pharmacy candidate. Get involved with your Political Actions Committee. Special Thanks: The Florida Pharmacy Association would like to thank Carmen Aceves Blumenthal, Chair, Educational Affairs and the members of her committee for their dedication and service in the development and implementation of continuing education programming in the areas of general, consultant and nuclear pharmacy. Dee Dugan Darrell Miller Kira Munger Jennifer Pytlarz

Jim Powers Kimberly Lamas (Nova Student) David Laven Kattie Donahue (UF Student) Aubrey Wilkerson Matt Sech (PBA Student) Lisa Devonick (Tech)

Fall Consultant CE Conference September 20-21, 2008 at the Hyatt Regency Bonaventure Fort Lauderdale, Florida Title: TBD 12 hrs. GCE or 12hrs. RC 2008 Mid-Year Clinical Conference October 18-19, 2008 at the Sheraton Orlando North Title: “The Pharmacists Use of Technology In the Management of the Elderly patient” Orlando, Florida 12 hrs. NCE or 12 hrs. RC or 15hrs. GCE The December Regulatory and Law Conference December 6-7, 2008 at the Hyatt Sarasota Bay Title: The 2008-2009 Regulatory and Law Conference Sarasota, Florida Featuring the Florida Wholesaler’s Regulatory and Law Conference 2008 Please see a member of the FPA staff, log on to our website at www.pharmview.com or call the office at 850-222-2400 for more details. See you at one of our beautiful locations!


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Flo r i d a P h a r ma c y To d a Y


Buyer’s Guide florida PHARMACY TODAY

ADVERTISERS: This is a special section designed to give your company more exposure and to act as an easy reference for the pharmacist.

Support Our Advertisers! Use the “Buyer’s Guide” PHARMACY RESOURCES

PHarmaceutical WHOLESALER

PPSC Retail Pharmacy Purchasing Program (888) 778-9909

McKesson Drug Company Jim Springer (800) 804-4590 FAX: (863) 616-2953

PHARMACY CONSULTANTS HCC Pharmacy Business Solutions Bob Miller (800) 642-1652 Hayslip and Zost Pharmacy Brokers LLC (713) 829-7570 (727) 415-3659

TEMPORARY PHARMACISTs – STAFFING HealthCare Consultants Pharmacy Staffing Bob Miller (800) 642-1652 Medical Staffing Network (800) 359-1234

INSURANCE Meadowbrook Workers Comp Insurance Endorsed by FPA (800) 825-9489

Rx Relief (800) RXRELIEF PharmacyMax Inc. Professional Staffing Solutions (800) 889-8737

LEGAL ASSISTANCE Kahan ◆ Shir, P.L. Brian A. Kahan, R.Ph., and Attorney at Law (561) 999-5999 Kenneth J. Metzger Attorney at Law (850) 681-0847

FREQUENTLY CALLED NUMBERS AHCA MEDICAID PHARMACY SERVICES 2727 Mahan Drive Tallahassee, FL 32308 (850) 487-4441 www.fdhc.state.fl.us/medicaid/ pharmacy AMERICAN PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION (APhA) Washington, D.C. (800) 237-2742 www.aphanet.org AMERICAN SOCIETY OF HEALTH SYSTEM PHARMACISTS Bethesda, MD (301) 657-3000 www.ashp.com/main.htm Drug Information Center Palm Beach Atlantic University (561) 803-2728 druginfocenter@pba.edu DRUG INFORMATION CENTER Florida A&M University College of Pharmacy (800) 451-3181 UF College of Pharmacy Gainesville, FL (352) 395-0408 www.cop.ufl.edu/vdis FLORIDA BOARD OF PHARMACY 4052 Bald Cypress Way Bin #C04 Tallahassee, FL 32399-3254 (850) 245-4292 www.doh.state.fl.us/mqa FLORIDA POISON INFORMATION CENTER NETWORK 1-800-282-3171 http://ora.umc.ufl.edu/ pcc/fpicjax.htm National Community Pharmacists Association 100 Daingerfield Road Alexandria, VA 22314 703.683.8200 703.683.3619 fax info@ncpanet.org

Advertising in Florida Pharmacy Today Display Advertising: please call (850) 264-5111 for a media kit and rate sheet. Buyers’ Guide: A signed insertion of at least 3X per year, 1/3 page or larger display ad, earns a placement in the Buyers’ Guide. A screened ad is furnished at additional cost to the advertiser. Professional Referral Ads: FPA Members: $50 per 50 words; Non‑members: $100 per 50 words; No discounts for advertising agencies. All Professional Referral ads must be paid in advance, at the time of ad receipt.

Recovering Pharmacists Network of Florida (407) 257-6606 “Pharmacists Helping Pharmacists”

MAY 2008

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H MRC units are community-based and function as a way to locally organize and utilize volunteers-medical professionals and

others-who want to donate their time and expertise to augment public health activities throughout the year and to prepare for and respond to emergencies. MRC volunteers become part of a system to supplement existing local emergency and public health resources.

H MRC volunteers include health care professionals such as physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dentists, veterinarians, and

epidemiologists. Other community members such as interpreters, chaplains, office workers, and legal advisors can fill other vital support positions.

MRC Can Enhance Public Health By:

MRC Emergency Preparedness Volunteers:

H Supplementing public health preparedness & response H Improving health literacy H Eliminating health disparities H Enhancing public health preparedness H Helping at community health events

H Bolster public health and emergency response

Log on to - www.servfl.com - or contact the Florida Medical Reserve Corps at: 850-245-4746

infrastructures by providing supplemental personnel

H Train with local emergency response partners H Enable communities to meet specific health needs


May 2008 Florida Pharmacy Journal  

May 2008 Issue

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