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FOREVER YOUNG A Town-Crier Publication

Lifestyle Magazine

Celebrating the 50-Plus Community of the Palm Beaches

June 2012

The

Golden Years Inside Wellington’s New American Legion Post Laser Dentistry With Dr. Marisol Lopez-Belio Digestive Disease Center Of The Palm Beaches Joe Nasuti On ‘Three Stooges’ Memories


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CONTENTS

‘Celebrating the 50-Plus Community of the Palm Beaches’

YOUR GUIDE TO THIS MONTH’S ISSUE

6

JUNE 2012

Published as a supplement to the June 8, 2012 edition of the Town-Crier

Successful Debut For American Legion Post Wellington’s American Legion Chris Reyka Memorial Post 390 is heading into its third year with big plans for the future, including the creation of a community center for veterans in the western communities. Post 390 invites all veterans to get involved in their thriving group. BY CHRIS FELKER

Publisher Barry S. Manning Executive Editor Joshua I. Manning Associate Publisher Dawn Rivera

10 Laser Dentistry Expert Dr. Marisol Lopez-Belio Constantly evolving with the latest and most comprehensive procedures, Dr. Marisol Lopez-Belio has been on the dental forefront for more than 20 years. She has combined her love for art and science into her work as an experienced dentist. BY JESSICA GREGOIRE

14

Project Editor Chris Felker Senior Editors Jason Budjinski Ron Bukley Art & Production Manager Stephanie Rodriguez Bookkeeping Carol Lieberman

Digestive Disease Center Of The Palm Beaches Early detection of gastrointestinal diseases is key to preventative care. That is why Dr. Carlos Leon, Dr. Aviv Katz, Dr. Michael Monzel and nurse practitioner Velta Forbes of the Digestive Disease Center of the Palm Beaches encourage screenings available at their two convenient offices. BY JESSICA GREGOIRE

Account Managers Betty Buglio Evie Edwards Wanda Glockson

18 Couples Explain Secrets Of Marital Longevity Forever Young celebrates the month of June with a special Seniortopia feature — the kind created by four loving couples whose anniversaries have passed the halfcentury mark. They share great relationship advice learned along the way. BY CHRIS FELKER

Columns New ‘Three Stooges’ Movie Brings Back Many Childhood Memories! MEMORY LANE BY JOE NASUTI, PAGE 25 Telephone Conversations With My Parents Can Be Challenging SENIOR MOMENTS BY DEBORAH WELKY, PAGE 26

On The Cover

Mae & Tom Loglisi, one of the couples included in our Seniortopia feature, Page 18 PHOTO BY DENISE FLEISCHMAN/FYLM STAFF

Contributors Denise Fleischman Jessica Gregoire Lauren Miró Joe Nasuti Abner Pedraza Deborah Welky Forever Young Lifestyle Magazine

is published by Newspaper Publishers Inc. 12794 W. Forest Hill Blvd., Suite 31 Wellington, FL 33414 Phone: (561) 793-7606 Fax: (561) 793-1470 www.foreveryounglifestylemagazine.com Forever Young Lifestyle Magazine is published monthly as a supplement to the Town-Crier newspaper. Copyright 2012, all rights reserved by Newspaper Publishers Inc. Contents may not be reproduced in any form without the written consent of the publisher. The publisher reserves the right to refuse advertising. The publisher accepts no responsibility for advertisement errors beyond the cost of the portion of the advertisement occupied by the error within the advertisement itself. The publisher accepts no responsibility for submitted materials. All submitted materials subject to editing.

June 2012 • Forever Young Lifestyle Magazine • Page 5


FOREVER YOUNG PROFILE

Wellington American Legion Post 390 Marks A Successful First Three Years BY CHRIS FELKER | Forever Young Staff Report

WELLINGTON’S AMERICAN LEGION Chris Reyka Memorial Post 390 is heading into its third year with plans to award its first set of Future Leaders Education Grants to three local high school seniors. The post’s leaders also are trying to get more veterans involved and working toward establishing a veterans’ center in the western communities where all veterans groups can share meeting and storage spaces. A May 17 open house at the Wellington Community Center served as an opportunity for the area’s veterans to mingle, learn from guest speakers about the American Legion and services available to veterans, and brainstorm about how they can cooperate to establish the proposed veterans’ community center. Tom Clapp, 64, a U.S. Army Vietnam veteran who is approaching the end of his one-year term as post commander, reported in an April 20 letter to the American Legion department adjutant for Florida, Michael McDaniel, that Post 390 members “are very proud of what we have accomplished in the past year.” He listed the post’s involvement with Wellington’s Veterans Day, Fourth of July, Memorial Day and 9/11 ceremonies as key annual events for the organization. “The biggest event that we, as Post

390, are the most proud of this past year was our inaugural Futures Heroes Golf Tournament,” Clapp noted. “It was held as the lead-in to Wellington’s [Patriot Memorial] dedication. The tournament netted over $5,000, of which $2,000 will be awarded shortly to local students, in the form of Future Heroes Education Grants.” That last amount is actually $2,100: American Legion Post 390 is giving $700 grants to three local students, who are either children or grandchildren of veterans, for use wherever they decide to go to college. In the future, recipients will be chosen from among applicants who also write an essay on patriotism. Mike Pancia, 65, a U.S. Navy Vietnam veteran who served aboard the USS Coral Sea and the USS Constellation, will be taking over command of Post 390 at its meeting June 21, when Clapp said he expects the scholarship money will be formally awarded. Clapp also wanted to acknowledge the significant contributions of the post’s first commander, Tom Wenham, a former mayor of Wellington. “I am not sure our post would exist today without his guidance and continuing support,” Clapp said. “It is through his efforts that we have a regular meeting location and a strong and coordinated working relationship with the village.”

Wenham was commander for the post’s first two years, including the time before it received its permanent charter in May 2010. Post 390’s 41 members have been meeting at Palm Beach County FireRescue Station 30 at 9610 Stribling Way. Clapp said he has spent much of his time trying to find a permanent home. “I have a dream of having a western communities veterans center with offices for all veterans groups,” he said. Pancia said he’s also focused on that goal. “That’s what the open house is for: networking with all the other organizations and getting more membership,” he said. Clapp agreed. “In today’s world, for associations in general, whether they be veterans or Eagles or Shriners, the involvement in civic organizations is not the same as it was 30 or 40 years ago,” he said. “We almost have to tie everybody together. We are working toward that, to the extent that we are setting aside a portion of our income for that purpose.” He also wrote in his letter to McDaniel that during 2011, “we acknowledged, with certificates, the achievement of two Eagle Scouts, the son of our adjutant and the son of our post namesake, in ceremonies at both district and post meetings.” Post 390 is named after Wellington

‘I am perhaps most proud of the work being done by our post service officer chaplain/vice commander-elect. They’ve been key members in the development of a Veterans Court in Palm Beach County,’ American Legion Chris Reyka Memorial Post 390 Commander Tom Clapp said. ‘This new judicial program offers veteran offenders the opportunity to appear before a special court, where the judge may sentence probation under the supervision of a veteran mentor.’ Page 6 • Forever Young Lifestyle Magazine • June 2012


American Legion Chris Reyka Memorial Post 390 Commander Tom Clapp (left) with Incoming Commander Mike Pancia (right). PHOTO BY DENISE FLEISCHMAN/FYLM STAFF

June 2012 • Forever Young Lifestyle Magazine • Page 7


FOREVER YOUNG PROFILE resident Chris Reyka, a U.S. Marines veteran who was a sergeant with the Broward County Sheriff’s Office when he was gunned down in the line of duty on Aug. 10, 2007. The murder still is unsolved, but BSO detectives have reason to believe that it was committed by a gang of drugstore robbers whose leader was arrested in December 2007. “In addition to our Boy Scout troop involvement, we added sponsorship of a Cub Scout pack,” Clapp added in his letter. “For the second year in a row, we participated in the awards ceremony for a local high school JROTC, providing medals to two cadets. ... We also provided funds toward their obstacle training course and are working toward developing an American Legion shooting sports team. We are involved with the American Legion baseball program and partnered with Post 12 sponsoring a team this past year and expect to do the same this year.”

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The post has also assisted Stand Down House, a homeless shelter for veterans in Lake Worth, and provided funds to the Veterans Affairs Medical Center nursing home and volunteers who assist at the VA. “I am perhaps most proud of the work being done by our post service officer chaplain/vice commanderelect,” Clapp continued. “They have been key members in the development of a Veterans Court in Palm Beach County. In the last six months, they have logged over 160 hours and 1,500 miles attending weekly local court sessions. Additionally, they have traveled to Broward County to assist with a start-up there. … This new judicial program offers veteran offenders the opportunity to appear before a special court, where the judge may sentence probation under the supervision of a veteran mentor. Several other members of our post have also received mentor

F OUNTAINVIEW

AND

training. The program has been so successful here that it has been authorized by the state legislature for all of Florida.” Clapp said that this initiative is very important to him. “We’re very excited about it. Two of our members are very much involved with that. Through the Veterans Court, criminal matters are being handled a bit differently. It’s a model program,” he said. Pancia said he will initially be focused on planning for the post’s second annual golf tournament, scheduled for Sept. 8 at the Binks Forest Golf Club. “We’re going to keep doing what we’ve been doing” in 2012, Pancia said. For more about the American Legion Chris Reyka Memorial Post 390, email Clapp at wellingtonlegion390@ gmail.com. FY

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FOREVER YOUNG FEATURE

Dr. Marisol Lopez-Belio Specializes In Laser Dentistry And Newest Technology BY JESSICA GREGOIRE | Forever Young Staff Report

CONSTANTLY EVOLVING with the latest and most comprehensive procedures, Dr. Marisol Lopez-Belio has been on the dental forefront for more than 20 years. She has combined her love for art and science into her work as an experienced dentist. “Ever since I was 2, I’ve loved creating things and doing stuff with my hands,” Lopez-Belio said. Her passion for the arts, which ranges from creating stained glass windows to sculpting, influenced her desire to become a dentist. “It’s a perfect combination, and I get to work with people and create beautiful teeth for them,” she said. Lopez-Belio earned her degree from Creighton University School of Dentistry in Omaha, Neb., in 1989. She moved to Florida in 1991 and opened her own private dental practice in Wellington in 1992. “My parents moved to the area a few years before I did,” she recalled. “I fell in love with the area, and decided to move here to start my own practice after I graduated.” Lopez-Belio has a great respect and admiration for the older generation. Many of her patients are over 55, and she has observed that they are the ones who are in need of her services more often. “People are living longer and longer now, and they are keeping their teeth,” she said. Many of the senior-oriented oral care services Lopez-Belio provides include dentures, partials, implants, periodontal services, root canals, crowns and

cosmetic work. “We use the laser to do many of these treatments,” she noted. Laser treatment is a painless alternative to shots and drills. A laser beam is used to treat certain areas of the gums for services such as periodontal therapy. It has become one of Lopez-Belio’s specialties, and she enjoys providing this transformational service to her clients. “For gum treatments, the laser has become a really effective tool,” she said. “I use it as an adjunct to eliminate bacteria.” Healing after laser treatment is much quicker than when traditional forms of dentistry are used, and the patient usually does not have to be numbed. This has become a popular procedure among her senior patients, since they don’t have to have as many visits to the dentist and leave with less pain and scarring. “It’s very specific to the job that we are doing,” Lopez-Belio said. “All of the patients I’ve worked with laser on, they absolutely love it.” Laser treatment is also extremely effective in treating cavities. “We can remove the decay without having to numb the patient,” Lopez-Belio said. “That’s really nice. Oftentimes they are on many medications, and we don’t have to worry about it interfering with one of their medicines.” When a patient sees Lopez-Belio for the first time, he or she receives a thorough initial dental exam. “It takes me about an hour to do the exam,” she said. “We take the necessary X-rays,

and then we start with the cleaning.” Lopez-Belio focuses on examining the entire mouth so that she can present many options for treatment to her patients. This way, the patient does not feel overwhelmed and can help put together a personalized treatment plan. Taking the time to explain the examination and the various procedures available to her patients is an important part of the treatment. Lopez-Belio wants her patients to fully understand what is going on with their teeth. This task can be even more significant for senior patients with dementia. “My dad had that disease,” she said. “Usually a family member will come in with them. We try to schedule them when there is a little bit more private time because sometimes they are a little bit embarrassed or fearful.” The process becomes easier for the patients when Lopez-Belio speaks with family members to keep them informed. “We give the family member or guardian a lot of tips to show them how to clean their teeth, because this is a very big problem,” she said. “Many seniors are in nursing home situations, and they are relying on the aides to help them.” Lopez-Belio provides seniors and their caretakers with the tools and information necessary to effect proper oral hygiene. “We make sure to provide them with the proper tools to help seniors, because oftentimes they can’t do it by themselves,” she said. One of the biggest issues with senior

Healing after laser treatment is much quicker than when traditional forms of dentistry are used, and the patient usually does not have to be numbed. This has become a popular procedure among her senior patients, since they don’t have to have as many visits to the dentist and leave with less pain and scarring. ‘It’s very specific to the job that we are doing,’ Dr. Marisol Lopez-Belio said. ‘All of the patients I’ve worked with laser on, they absolutely love it.’ Page 10 • Forever Young Lifestyle Magazine • June 2012


(Above) Dr. Marisol Lopez-Belio with office staff members Mary Almazan, Danielle Prieto, Candy Cerboni and Cindy Genz. (Below) Lopez-Belio works with patient Maria Llano. PHOTOS BY JESSICA GREGOIRE/FYLM STAFF

oral health is gum disease, and LopezBelio emphasizes preventative care through education and treatment. She wants her patients to understand the effects the bacteria has on their overall health. “It has been proven that it’s going to their hearts, lungs and it’s causing diabetes and is linked to a lot of systemic diseases,” she said. The key to prevent gum disease it to keep the amount of bacteria under control. “This way we are able to minimize the possibility of a stroke or a heart attack,” Lopez-Belio said. Although having good oral health promotes healthy gums and nice-looking teeth, it’s also critical for well-balanced nutrition. “Everybody needs to eat to live,” she said. “If you don’t have teeth, then you can’t chew your food, June 2012 • Forever Young Lifestyle Magazine • Page 11


FOREVER YOUNG FEATURE and if you can’t chew your food, then you can’t eat.” Maintaining healthy nutrition can prevent other health problems. “If seniors can’t chew their food, then they

start having stomach and digestive problems,” she said. “Then they have to go to a gastroenterologist and are put on a whole bunch of medication.” Many of Lopez-Belio’s senior pa-

Dr. Marisol Lopez-Belio with the laser treatment machine.

tients have particularly taken a liking to the use of laser treatment for common procedures. “Often with older people, there is a problem with a decrease in saliva, and we tend to see more cavities at the gum line,” she said. “They might have had gum disease for a while, and their gums have receded and their roots are exposed.” Much of the decay occurs at the gum line, and the laser is designed to treat that specific problem. “Patients feel a sensation, but there is no pain, and it cleans everything and is minimally invasive,” Lopez-Belio said. “It cuts less tooth structure than the drill, and it sterilizes as it goes. So it kills all the bacteria, so there is a lot less chance of having new decay in the same area.” Dr. Marisol Lopez-Belio’s office is located at 1200 Corporate Center Way, Suite 101, Wellington. For more info., visit www.wellingtonlaserdentistry. com or call (561) 791-8184. FY

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FOREVER YOUNG FEATURE

Digestive Disease Center Of The Palm Beaches Emphasizes Preventative Care BY JESSICA GREGOIRE | Forever Young Staff Report EARLY DETECTION OF gastrointestinal diseases is key to preventative care. That is why the doctors at the Digestive Disease Center of the Palm Beaches encourage annual screenings. The center has two convenient locations, one on the campus of JFK Medical Center and the other on the campus of Palms West Hospital. The Palms West location is the larger facility, receiving patients from as far away as Hendry County. Certified by HCA, the Hospital Corporation of America, the Digestive Disease Center of the Palm Beaches opened in 2007 to fill the need for more comprehensive gastrointestinal care. Their locations make it easier for doctors to care for hospital patients, who tend to have more severe illnesses. The center has three highly trained and board-certified gastroenterologists: Dr. Carlos Leon, Dr. Aviv Katz and Dr. Michael Monzel. “So much was being done in the outpatient arena, but they still had to go to the hospital for more difficult cases of gastroenterology services,” Monzel explained. The practice also has a nurse practitioner, Velta Forbes, who specializes in explaining chronic gastrointestinal diseases to patients. The Digestive Disease Center of the Palm Beaches offers most of the comprehensive services available at outpa-

tient gastrointestinal facilities. These include patient screening tests for colon cancer, gastrointestinal reflux disease and irritable bowel syndrome. The center treats patients who have liver disease, chronic hepatitis, Crohn’s disease and inflammatory bowel disease. The practice also works closely with the University of Miami’s teaching residency program. Monzel joined the center to be a part of educating students in the residency training program at the center. “I came here with the enticement component that this practice would be growing with the formation of the residency program at JFK Medical Center,” he said. Monzel received his medical degree from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland and practiced gastroenterology in Maine for 24 years before moving to Florida. “Although we all do the basics of gastroenterology, I have done a lot of work with pancreatic biliary disease,” he said, as well as “basically any issues dealing with the pancreas, gallbladder, stone issues or cancers, and a lot of prevention endoscopy.” Preventative care is extremely important in reducing the risk of chronic diseases. The majority of Digestive Disease Center of the Palm Beaches’ patients are Baby Boomers who appreciate that the staff explains the impor-

tance of that. “I try to spend extra time to explain to seniors what we are doing for them,” Leon said. “I want them to have an understanding so they can give me feedback.” Leon received his medical degree in 1996 from the Universidad Central del Caribe School of Medicine in Puerto Rico. He is fluent in Spanish and English. Leon meets with patients to discuss the details of their conditions and to ask them their symptoms to get a full understanding of the affliction’s severity. “We give extra attention to colon cancer screening,” he said. “It’s such a frequently diagnosed problem, so if caught early and the cancer or tumor is taken out, the likelihood of eradication is high.” The emphasis on getting a colonoscopy is extremely important with older patients. “Most of the time for colonoscopies, we find parts that usually are beginning lesions that can become tumors,” Leon said. “Some of these lesions have the potential to become cancerous.” Leon constantly emphasizes preventative tests and screenings to his patients because the consequences of not getting them done can be critical to their health. “Although colon cancer is very curable if caught early, it is also very silent until it becomes advanced,” he explained. “These are short proce-

The emphasis on getting a colonoscopy is extremely important with older patients. ‘Most of the time for colonoscopies, we find parts that usually are beginning lesions that can become tumors,’ Dr. Carlos Leon said. ‘Some of these lesions have the potential to become cancerous.’ Leon constantly emphasizes preventative tests and screenings to his patients because the consequences of not getting them done can be critical to their health. ‘Although colon cancer is very curable if caught early, it is also very silent until it becomes advanced,’ he said. Page 14 • Forever Young Lifestyle Magazine • June 2012


Dr. Michael Monzel (left) and nurse practitioner Velta Forbes (right). PHOTOS BY JESSICA GREGOIRE/FYLM STAFF

dures, which can be done easily. It’s better to get them done before the symptoms are no longer silent.” Some of the most common symptoms of gastrointestinal diseases, according to Monzel, are indigestion and acid reflux-type symptoms. “Other issues would be problems with diarrhea or constipation,” he said. “And even gas or bloating problems are all things that we see in our patients.” The Digestive Disease Center of the Palm Beaches conducts many procedures, both in its outpatient facilities and at the hospitals. “There are a variety of services available at hospital that are going to cross over most of what the patients need,” Monzel said, “whether it is blood work

or studies or X-rays, and whatever else they might need done.” Much of the doctors’ time is spent at the hospitals doing procedures and checking on patients. “Only 30 percent of our time is actually spent in the office talking to the patient,” Monzel said. Forbes is in charge of explaining to the patients the symptoms and problems they are incurring due to certain diseases. One of the most critical aspects, which have been disproportionately affecting the Baby Boomer population, is the chronic hepatitis-C infection. The infection might have been contracted 30 to 40 years earlier and been dormant, and is now showing symptoms.

Forbes calmly educates patients who might not have been well-informed on the disease and its effects or forms of contraction, which is an important part of successfully treating patients. “Treatment-wise, it’s important for people to understand the hepatitis-C infection,” she said. Although the disease might have been contracted many years ago, the effects take many years to surface. “It can be contracted through the sharing of needles, or through tattooing from many years ago,” Forbes said. It is important for the patients to fully understand what is going on with their bodies. Patients get personalized treatment that is adapted for their health and age. “The focus has to be

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FOREVER YOUNG FEATURE on the person,� Monzel said. “If someone is 85 and has many issues, they get a different approach and care than someone who is 60 because everything is individualized.� Most patients of the Digestive Disease Center of the Palm Beaches are referred by either a primary care physician, emergency room or other center. “We do have a number of patients who have been referred by other patients and referral lines by the hospitals,� Monzel said. The center has an easy and convenient appointment system. Many of their patients can call in and get an appointment to see a physician the next day or even

that same day, depending on the severity. “We see patients five days a week, and there are three physicians here,� Leon said. “Getting an appointment is simple, and our patients appreciate that — especially seniors who may have conditions that can’t afford to wait.� The Digestive Disease Center of the Palm Beaches is located at 12953 Palms West Drive, Suite 201, Loxahatchee. For more information, call (561) 7955130. The Atlantis location is at 5511 S. Congress Ave., Atlantis. For more information, call (561) 439-0961. Visit them on the web at www.digestivediseasecenter pb.com. FY

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SENIORTOPIA: THE GOLDEN YEARS

Couples Together More Than 50 Years Explain Secrets Of Marital Longevity BY CHRIS FELKER | Forever Young Staff Report IT’S JUNE, NAMED for the Roman goddess Juno who brings good fortune. We’re celebrating a special Seniortopia — the kind created by loving couples whose anniversaries have passed the half-century mark. These four couples all have found exemplary ways to keep their romances strong over many decades. Each had words of wisdom for young couples who’ll be tying the knot, the voice of tried, tested and true experience that new lovers would do well to heed if they want to eventually celebrate a lifetime together. Newbolt and Hyacinth Wilson, whose romance blossomed in Jamaica when they were teenagers, are the junior couple among those we chose to

feature — they’ll mark 54 years together on Sept. 27. Mrs. Wilson said the secret to their togetherness is that “we always try to operate as a team; we have the same goals, and it works.” Her husband added, “Being supportive of each other is the most important thing.” Doris and George Melissinos just celebrated 61 years together May 26. When they got married in 1951, Doris Hanly took her betrothed’s name, which means “honey wine” in Greek, and the pair learned that they both preferred the same wine of happiness. They built their romance after they’d already married, since their courtship was so short, in a 1912 bungalow right on Jamaica Bay in Rockaway, N.Y.,

Newbolt and Hyacinth Wilson have been married for 54 years. PHOTO BY CHRIS FELKER/FYLM STAFF

Page 18 • Forever Young Lifestyle Magazine • June 2012

where they raised two boys and a girl. They met at a dance and kept on dancing through the years. Tom and Regis Wenham hail from Needham, Mass. They will mark 60 years of marriage on Jan. 19, 2013. They met with a splash off a wharf on the public lake across from Tom’s childhood home while he was on leave from the Air Force. They married a few months later, just before he shipped out for Korea. They learned early on that staying together for the long term was going to depend on a mutual commitment to each other when they ended up all the way across the country from family, in Las Vegas, where Wenham was stationed after the Korean War ended. And finally, Mae and Tom Loglisi will celebrate 55 years as a couple on Oct. 5. Their paths first crossed when Mae’s sister, Angie, set her up on a blind date after Tom had returned from an Army infantry tour in Korea. Mrs. Loglisi, who admits to not having liked Tom very much when they first met, said they’ve stayed together through many moves due to her husband’s job transfers because “we just worked at it.” NEWBOLT “NEWLY” AND HYACINTH WILSON The Wilsons, who live in Wellington’s Meadow Wood community in a beautiful pool home on a large lot, left their native Jamaica before its independence in 1962, when Hyacinth took a job as a registered nurse in New York. Newly had met her through his sister’s introduction; the two girls attended the same school in Kingston. “He was at my 16th birthday party,” Mrs. Wilson recalled, “and by the time I was


18 and ready to go to nursing school, we had become close. But my mother made him understand that nothing was happening ‘until she’s become a registered nurse,’ and when I was 21, we got married.” They knew the whole time they’d get married, so Newly bided his time while working with Myers, maker of the famous Jamaican rum, and playing with a soccer club. They’re fuzzy on when he formally proposed; he thinks it was around her birthday, and she says it was just after graduation. In any case, they were wed on Sept. 27, 1958. After they emigrated to the United States, Hyacinth began working at Beth Israel Medical Center, where she remained for 27 years. Newly’s first U.S. job was with American Union Transport. He earned a business degree at St. Thomas Aquinas College and then took a position with Xerox in 1968 and stayed for 26 years, returning as a consultant for a few years until retiring for good in 1999. The Wilsons moved to Florida shortly afterward. They joined the Caribbean-Americans for Community Involvement (CAFCI) and St. David-inthe-Pines Episcopal Church and began getting involved in their new community, with efforts to bring CAFCI into the local chamber of commerce and also representing the group on the county’s Planned Approach To Community Health (PATCH) advisory council. “We firmly believe in family, and we also have a firm belief in that, if you’re blessed with kids: Listen to them,” Newly, now 78, said. “So that has kept us really close — concern for family and friends.” His wife agreed. “We try to understand before we are misunderstood; avoid sarcasm before we speak; and, if we have to be sarcastic, we call it an observation,” Hyacinth said. “We try not to be judgmental, and try to keep the ANTs away …” Her husband explained, “That’s an acronym for ‘annoying negative

George and Doris Melissinos celebrated 61 years together May 26. PHOTO BY CHRIS FELKER/FYLM STAFF

thoughts.’ We try to be positive about things, and it can be challenging, but I’m always optimistic.” They have one son, Kevin, 48 who is a trauma specialist in Washington, D.C. DORIS AND GEORGE MELISSINOS Wellington’s Edge residents Doris and George Melissinos met in a ballroom in Astoria, N.Y., after Melissinos had returned from four years’ service with the U.S. Marines in World War II. He’d turned 18 while crossing the Pacific and saw action at Guadalcanal in 1942, in the Philippines and China. After their meeting, they went out for six or seven months and got engaged quickly by today’s standards. “I was at that age,” he said. “We used to go to this dance club a lot, the A-1 Club, and others.”

They were married in 1951 and a few years later bought their dream bungalow in Breezy Point, N.Y., where they lived and raised their family for more than 35 years. “We knew lots of people and we had so much fun,” taking part in many parades and bands, said George, 87. He owned and operated TAG Trucking, a warehousing, transportation and pier delivery company that he started with his brother Ted in the late 1950s, for nearly 38 years. Doris, now 81, worked for the board of education for 30 years. Their two sons apparently learned how to last in a marriage from their parents: George, 59, has been married to wife Laurie for 32 years; Gary, 57, recently marked 30 years with his wife Shari. They are teachers living in New Jersey. Between them, they have three children; and one granddaughter is about to get married.

June 2012 • Forever Young Lifestyle Magazine • Page 19


SENIORTOPIA: THE GOLDEN YEARS

Tom and Regis Wenham will soon celebrate 60 years. PHOTO BY CHRIS FELKER/FYLM STAFF

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The couple moved to Palm Beach County in 1995 to be near their daughter, Gaile, who was living in Parkland at the time; she later got married to husband Matt and they now have a young son. Their secret to togetherness is that through good times and bad and despite raising three kids, they still made time for fun and relaxation, going to the racetrack and casinos regularly. They still play bingo together. Doris noted that she has traveled quite a bit with daughter Gaile, a marathon runner, and also works with her in autism groups. She and George have done some traveling, to the Southwest and on cruises.

TOM AND REGIS WENHAM The Wenhams, who live on Pine Valley Drive in Wellington, still get laughs out of the story about their meeting. Tom was home on leave on the Fourth of July in 1952. He was at the lake with his two younger brothers. “Regis went to school with my middle brother,” Tom recalled. “I was out on the wharf, and she thought she was going to push my younger brother into the water, and as she did, she pushed me and I turned around and saw her.” Tom’s brother “had been dunking me all day,” Regis recalled. After she pushed him, “he was in midair, and


I thought, ‘Uh-oh, that’s not Mark!’” They still guffaw over that memory. “I was 14,” she said. There was a significant difference in their ages, and “naturally, my mother wasn’t too thrilled,” Regis said. After they’d spent a little time together on another of his leaves from the service, “I knew he was the one for me,” she said. They got engaged and were married before he left for Korea. Tom came home just after Christmas in 1953 and was then assigned to Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada, so the couple said goodbye to their families and moved to the desert, which basically forced them to ensure their romance would last.

“I would say the reason we’ve been together so long is that, when we first got married, we went to Las Vegas — just the two of us out there all by ourselves — so we either survived or we weren’t going to survive,” Mrs. Wenham said. “And that gave us a base. I think a lot of kids now, they’re missing that base.” “We couldn’t run home to mother’s,” her husband added. “Our son was born there.” Son Mark, now 56, has two children and lives in Massachusetts. Tom, now 79, earned a degree in engineering management from Northeastern University after they returned to Massachusetts; he

June 2012 • Forever Young Lifestyle Magazine • Page 21


SENIORTOPIA: THE GOLDEN YEARS worked for several municipalities in New Hampshire and Massachusetts before the couple moved to Florida in 1981 after he accepted a job with the Palm Beach County Property Appraiser’s Office. He then worked for Palm Beach County Fire-Rescue for many years, retiring just this year. Tom got involved in Wellington government early on; he served on the Acme Improvement District Board of Supervisors before incorporation, was elected to the inaugural Wellington Village Council, and was later elected mayor, serving until 2008. He still volunteers on Wellington’s Parks & Recreation Advisory Board and aims to get more involved in protecting the community’s future now that he has retired. For Tom, the most important thing in his relationship with his wife is that “you look out for each other, even now. ‘Are you OK,’ I’ll always ask her. And she’ll ask me the same thing.” MAE AND TOM LOGLISI The Loglisis hail from The Bronx and met on that blind date, but neither remembers exactly where they went. “I couldn’t stand him when I first saw him,” Mae recalled. “She didn’t like me,” Tom agreed. “But I stuck.” “Oh my God,” she exclaimed, remembering that long-ago hesitation. “My sister said, ‘He’s a nice guy; give him a chance.’” So she did. “He just kept calling me. And then we went out again, I think to a movie,” Mae said. “I had just come out of the Army,” Tom said. “I was in Korea, in 195152, in the infantry.” They went out for about two years, Mae said, before they got engaged and married in 1957. He ended up taking a position with Chase as a bank officer, and it turned into a career that lasted 37 years. After several moves to different cities when he was transferred, they moved to Melbourne, Fla., after retiring in the

Mae and Tom Loglisi have been married for 55 years. PHOTO BY DENISE FLEISCHMAN/FYLM STAFF

early 1990s, where they took a place on the barrier island. One of their first experiences in Florida was dealing with a mandatory evacuation when Hurricane Erin struck in August 1995 and being followed around by CBS News’ Harry Smith. “He stayed with us in the shelter. We were on television, and he interviewed us,” Mrs. Loglisi said. They didn’t stay in Melbourne long, partly because of that experience and partly because they wanted to move closer to their new grandchildren. Now they live in Grand Isles near their daughter Lisa, 49, and son-in-law Rob, who have three children. The Loglisis have seven grandchildren altogether. Daughter Marcia is 52 and married to Dale and has a son and daughter; and son Vincent is 48 and has a son and daughter with his wife, Tanya. Tom is 84 but appears much younger; Mae is 76. “She takes care of me,” he said. “I do,” she admitted, adding, “Well,

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he took care of me when I had breast cancer, in 2004. He was my caregiver, and I couldn’t have done it without him.” She is now cancer-free. The Loglisis spend a lot of time with their grandchildren; they’re planning a trip to the Mediterranean with Maria and Dale and their kids in July. Mae is also on the board of the Wellington Seniors Club, and both are very involved with their church, St. Therese de Lisieux Catholic Church, where she works with the Council of Catholic Women and he is a fourth-degree knight and recording secretary for the Knights of Columbus and a member of the St. Vincent de Paul Society. “Every marriage has its ups and downs,” Mae said. “You have to work at it. I notice today, a lot of the young couples, their first thing is to separate out and part when they have difficulties. We just worked at it. We had our problems bringing up the kids and moving, but we worked it out. And, of course, when you take those vows, it’s for better or worse.” FY


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MEMORY LANE BY JOE NASUTI

New ‘Three Stooges’ Movie Brings Back Many Hilarious Childhood Memories!

GROWING UP WITH the Three Stooges in the 1950s was nonstop laughter, and much to my critical surprise, the new movie The Three Stooges truly honors their memory — and brings back a lot of memories and loads of laughter! We all remember Moe, Larry and Curly. But actually there were six Stooges total: Moe Howard and Larry Fine were the mainstay of the trio, along with: two of Moe’s brothers, Jerome (Curly) and Shemp, who performed with him as members of the Three Stooges, as well as Joe Besser and Curly Joe DeRita. I loved their comedic stupidity over the years, and then in 1972 (ouch, that was 40 years ago!), I had the pleasure of meeting Moe Howard in Philadelphia when he did me the honor of filming a public service announcement for the Leu-

Joe Nasuti is an entertainment columnist for the Town-Crier newspaper. His monthly Memory Lane columns feature memories from bygone days.

kemia Society. He was 75, and I was like a 30-year-old kid in a candy store. I notified the local media, and we had an impromptu news conference at the TV-48 studio. It was a pure pleasure. When he started the news conference, he had his hair combed back, but when the cameras began to roll for the PSA, he put his famous bangs down over his forehead, got into character and the laughter began. During the conference, he said the best and easiest job in all of Hollywood was being a script writer for the Three Stooges. It would read something like this: A train pulls into the station … and the Three Stooges do their thing … The Stooges get on the train … and do their thing … a beautiful girl walks by … and the Three Stooges do their thing … it made no difference if it was a train station, hospital, hotel, etc. … the scripts had one thing in common. There was no dialogue. It was all ad-lib. Perhaps that’s why it was so funny … because the boys did their thing! The new Three Stooges movie captures the original slapstick humor. The resemblance is uncanny, and I was glad to take my grandson to see what I enjoyed while I was growing up. Talk about quality time — this was something we will talk about for years. And yes, I plan to buy him the video (oops, DVD) as soon as it becomes

available. In fact, I just might buy an extra one for myself. Besides the Three Stooges, Laurel & Hardy were another of my favorites in my preteen years, along with Milton Berle, Red Skelton, Jack Benny, Sid Caesar, Peter Sellers, Groucho Marx, Martin & Lewis, Burns & Allen, Abbott & Costello and, of course, we all loved Lucille Ball back then. Laughter did not require any four-letter words, just great comedians who related to us children of all ages. What happened? I recently purchased a

painting of Laurel & Hardy, aka “Fatty and Skinny.” It is as unique as they were. The painting: a light gray, “black and white” features their eyes, eyebrows and lips that are three shades darker, and they pop! Every time I look at my painting, it reminds me of some fine memories of the laughter I shared with my mom, dad, uncles, aunts, cousins and grandparents … and now with my children and grandchildren. Until next time, remember, we can’t help growing older … but we don’t ever have to grow up ... so stay Forever Young! FY

June 2012 • Forever Young Lifestyle Magazine • Page 25


SENIOR MOMENTS BY DEBORAH WELKY

Telephone Conversations With My Parents Can Be Extremely Challenging I AM ONE OF THE LUCKY ONES — even at my age, I hang-ups — either I suddenly have to visit the bathroom or still have both my parents. It’s comforting to know that a) my mother quickly excuses herself by saying: “I’ve got to they like me and b) they’re just a phone call away. Some go. Your father is stuck in his jacket.” Once I called and my mother said, “Pam?” days you just need to be able to call someone who likes “This is Debbie.” you, ya know? “Well what happened to Pam? I was just talking to her.” But sometimes (and I am not blaming them), our phone Dad (on the extension): “This is Debbie.” calls could benefit from the services of an interpreter. SomeMom: “I know it’s Debbie! But what happened to Pam? I times I’ll say “white car” when I mean “silver car.” Sometimes they’ll call me by my sister’s name. Sometimes nei- was talking to her when she said, ‘Oh, damn!’ and hung ther of us can remember who married Kelly’s new hus- up.” Dad: “I wasn’t on the line then.” band’s mother or, heaven forbid, the town in which he lives. Mom: “She was driving. It’s illegal in California to talk Part of it is a short-term memory loss problem. Part of it is dyslexia. Part of it is simple laziness. (“What’s-her-face! on your cellphone and drive. So either she got arrested or she’s been in an accident.” You know who I mean!”) But the Me: “Hel-lo-o-o … ” greater part of it is that our internal Dad: “I don’t think she got in an Rolodexes are cram-jammed full accident. You would’ve heard the and running out of cards. (Note to phone fall.” the younger generation: a Rolodex Mom: “So you think she got aris a once-valuable desktop accessorested?” ry comprised of removable cards Me: “Hel-lo-o-o … ” containing the names, addresses and Dad: “I’m not saying she got artelephone numbers of everyone we rested! How should I know what have ever or will ever need to conhappened to her?” tact. Today, this is all stored in your Mom: “I think we should call her smartphone, and, if it isn’t, there’s back.” an app for that. We’d do it your way, Dad: “Absolutely not! She but we can’t see those little tiny shouldn’t have been on her phone icons and we keep accidentally callat all!” ing the bakery when all we really Me: “Hel-lo-o-o … ” want to do is find an emergency Mom: “Debbie? Is that you?” room before it’s too late.) Dad: “Debbie, what did you do So you put a 60-year-old on one to Pam?” end of the phone and an 80-yearWhen we were all younger, I old on the other, and what you’ve would’ve made a joke about it and got is an exaggerated version of that So you put a 60-year-old on one said: “Nothing. Here, I’ll put her childhood game called “Gossip,” where each kid whispers the mes- end of the phone and an 80-year-old on the line.” But not anymore. There aren’t sage into the ear of the child next on the other, and what you’ve got enough “anytime minutes” in the to him until it comes full circle as is an exaggerated version of that world to cover the time it would something completely different — take me to explain that Pam and I you know, like real-life gossip. childhood game called “Gossip.” are not in the car together, have not And then there are the quick had an accident, are not even in the same state and that, Deborah Welky’s humor column The Sonic Boomer is yes, this was my big idea of a joke. “That is simply not published weekly in the Town-Crier. Follow her on Twitter funny, Missy.” at www.twitter.com/TheSonicBoomer and visit The Sonic I have to behave myself because I do need them to like Boomer page on Facebook. me. Somebody has to. FY Page 26 • Forever Young Lifestyle Magazine • June 2012


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June 2012 Forever Young Lifestyle Magazine