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to evaluate the student, because at that point, we are expecting the language to be established, so that we can focus now, not on acquiring the language, but learning with that language.” Teachers in the dual-language program at New Horizons are from all over the world, including Spain, Puerto Rico, Columbia, Venezuela and Mexico. “All of the mix of cultures represents a different aspect of learning for our students,” Arcos explained. “We are actually teaching the children to listen to it and understand it, so they will eventually start trying it. It’s not a formal language class, like this is how you write a sentence or spell. We are actually teaching the student to listen to the language and pay attention to it, slowly acquiring the understanding.” Communication can be difficult when visiting another culture. If there are no language skills to communicate, one is forced into having to find a way to speak. “With children, we are tactful, because we don’t want to cause any kind

Second-grade students participate in a Spanish language spelling bee.

of frustration,” Arcos explained. “This is the beautiful thing about doing this at the elementary stage, where we can use videos and music, where teachers can be silly and act out what they are trying to communicate.” The lessons are not repeated in a dual-language program. For instance, the student who receives lesson one in English, will move to lesson two in Spanish. They are not receiving the same lesson in both languages. Learning the language this way represents a challenge for the student. “Students must keep up with what’s happening,” Arcos said. “This is where it is extremely important that both the English and Spanish teachers commu-

nicate. This is why we refer to them as partnerships, because they need to communicate what students are struggling with when having difficulty understanding the lessons.” For those students learning Spanish, the teacher is going to have to give more support in English, Arcos noted, while for those learning English, the Spanish teacher will have to give more support in Spanish. “Our students are also a great tool,” Arcos said. “They are strategically put together so that an English speaker can help a Spanish speaker in English, and vice versa.” To learn more about the Dual Language International Spanish Academy, call (561) 651-0500.

Private Montessori School In Wellington Grades 1-12 Serving Families Of The Western Communities For 18 Years

Looking For Something Different? A Teacher For Every 8 Students Open Year Round Montessori Materials Hard Copy Books Digital Curriculum Focus On Independence And Concentration

Active Learning | Self-Discipline Love Of Learning | Social/Emotional Skills Executive Function 12794 Forest Hill Blvd., Suite 23, Wellington, Florida 33414 Located in the “Original” Wellington Mall | 561-753-6563 wellington the magazine | august 2019

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Wellington The Magazine August 2019  

ON THE COVER Participation from local youth helped Wellington take first place in the 2019 Let’s Move challenge sponsored by the Palm Healt...

Wellington The Magazine August 2019  

ON THE COVER Participation from local youth helped Wellington take first place in the 2019 Let’s Move challenge sponsored by the Palm Healt...