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Eun-Sook Lee, Ph.D. College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Lewis Johnson, Ph.D. College of Science and Technology In the 2015-2016 academic year, principal investigator Johnson and his team, including Interim Title III Executive Director Charles A. Weatherford, Ph.D., garnered nearly $920,000 in grant dollars from the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Agency. The grant dollars support the project called The Consortium for Research on the Science and Engineering of Signatures. Also known as ROSES, its research efforts include the investigation, characterization and improvement of novel energy materials in science and engineering. The grant dollars also serve to support the development of solutions to improvised explosive devices (IEDs) that have emerged in Iraq, Afghanistan and other locations throughout the world, as an unanticipated and deadly threat to U.S. and Allied military forces. Lewis is the chief scientist in FAMU’s Center for Plasma Science and Technology. His research expertise includes laser plasma physics, laser -induced breakdown spectroscopy with nanosecond and femtosecond sources, ultrafast atmospheric pulse propagation, remote sensing science and technology for rapid detection of materials of interest.

Lee has served in several research capacities in FAMU’s STEM programs. With a background in pharmacology, toxicology and physiology, she has served as a postdoctoral fellow, adjunct professor of organic chemistry, research assistant in the College of Pharmacy and research associate in the University’s Neuroscience Laboratory. She is an “R01”scientist, which means she is a past recipient of one of the highest grant levels by the National Institutes of Health. Her experience helped her and colleagues to generate more than $810,000 in grant dollars from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences during the 2016-2017 academic year. As the principal investigator, Lee is focusing on novel therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative diseases associated with impairment in glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) function and excitotoxicity. The long-term goal of the research is to understand the mechanisms involved in the regulation of GLT-1 expression in relation to excitotoxic neurodegeneration, such as in Parkinson’s disease.

*Compiled from 2015-2017 data provided by the FAMU Division of Research. A&M MAGAZINE // SUMMER 2017 // 53

Profile for FAMU Communications

Summer 2017 A&M Magazine  

Welcome to the summer edition of the award-winning A&M Magazine. This issue highlights alumni, students, faculty, staff, programs and partne...

Summer 2017 A&M Magazine  

Welcome to the summer edition of the award-winning A&M Magazine. This issue highlights alumni, students, faculty, staff, programs and partne...