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I N TER V IE W

I N TER V IE W

Targeting Faster Growth for Export of Agri & Food Products

‘Hamdard transforms itself, reconnects with GENext through energized marketing’

- D. K. Singh, Chairman, APEDA

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P RE - E V E N T

- Says Mansoor Ali

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editorial

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HONEY INDUSTRY

Honey Production and Bee Keeping – A Global Perspective

SNACK & BEVERAGE

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Handling The Millenials: Millenial Marketing

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COFFEE INDUSTRY

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TECHNOLOGY

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FOOD INDUSTRY

Offers US $ 50 billion potential for foreign investment in five years

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Creating Synergy between Global Food Companies and Indian Importers Page 20: List of Participants at Indian Pavilion (Gulfood 2017)

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by AK Singh, Group President, LBI General Trading LLC., Dubai & USA

Indian Snacks & Beverage Industry Booming

– Gurpreet Singh, Head (International Business), Bikanerwala Foods Private Limited, Delhi (India)

A look at how Indian consumers have been steadily changing their patterns of drinking coffee Bühler presents pioneering foreign material detection technology and introduces new segment leader at Fruit Logistica India’s Food Processing industry on fast track

– Amit Lohani, Founder Director of Forum of Indian Food Importers

PRE-EVENTs

Advertiser Index on Page 167

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NEWS


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Editorial....

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s part of an integrated approach to agriculture and rural development to fulfil the promise of doubling the farmers’ income in the next few years, the initiatives proposed in the Union Budget for 2017-18, presented to parliament by Finance Minister Arun Jaitley, have received wide welcome.

Chief Editor S. Jafar Naqvi Consulting Editors T.V. Satyanarayanan Sub-Editor Rummana Zaidi Chief Co-ordinator M.B. Naqvi Editorial Co-ordinator Syed M K Layout & Design Faiyaz Ahmad Mohd. Iqbal Head Office New Delhi: : +91-11-29535593 / 64519106 / 65655264 abfienquiry@gmail.com

Other Business Offices Mumbai: 9702903993 mtpl.mumbai@gmail.com Pune: 9881137397 mtpl.pune@gmail.com

Bangalore: 8050206265 bangalore.mtpl@gmail.com Chennai: 9941130277 mediatodaychennai@gmail.com Admn. & Marketing Office MEDIA TODAY PVT. LTD. J-73, Paryavaran Complex, Neb Sarai, IGNOU Road, New Delhi - 110068 (India) Phone : 91-11-29535593 / 64519106 / 65655264 E-mail: abfienquiry@gmail.com Web.: www.abfionline.com www.mediatoday.in Subscription India : 1 Year Rs. 1000/- by Normal Post Rs. 1300/- by Courier 2 Years Rs. 1850/- by Normal Post Rs. 2450/- by Courier Overseas : US$ 120 for 1 Year / US$ 230 for 2 Years Single Copy in India : Rs. 100/Single Copy Cost for Overseas : US$10 Printed, published and owned by M.B. Naqvi, Printed at Everest Press, E-49/8, Okhla Industrial Area Ph-II, New Delhi - 110 020 and Published from E-11/47 A, New Colony, Hauz Rani, Malviya Nagar, New Delhi - 110017 (INDIA) Editor : S. Jafar Naqvi Vol 14....... Issue 3 ...... March, 2017

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The proposals include doubling of the long term irrigation development fund under National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD) to Rs 40,000 crore, creation of a dedicated micro irrigation fund to improve water use efficiency, greater coverage under crop insurance, a dairy processing and infrastructure development fund, and expansion of agri market, for which states have been advised to de-notify fruits and vegetables from APMC (agricultural produce market committee). Alongside, the electronic National Agriculture Market (NAM) is sought to be expanded to 585 Mandis from 250 at present. While the increased outlay for irrigation is aimed at fast tracking agriculture towards less dependence on monsoon rains, the dairy development fund, with an investment of Rs 8,000 crore over three years would help to create an additional processing capacity of five crore litres of milk per day, which could yield an extra income of Rs 50,000 crore per annum to the farmers. A significant initiative announced in the budget to re-energize the farming activity is the formulation of a model law on contract farming, aimed at bringing manifold benefits to the farmers. Currently, the model APMC Act has a provision for contract farming, but the proposed comprehensive law would seek to subsume contract farming from the purview of this Act. While the existing contract farming framework is limited to marketing of farm produce – that to, only one or two commodities – the proposed law would cover all the commodities. In fact, it would cover farming right from the stage of distribution of seeds to marketing of the final produce. One of the objectives of the model law is to ensure that APMCs themselves do not become arbitrators on contract farming. Since land and agriculture are state subjects, the draft of the model law would be prepared and circulated among the states for adoption. A high powered committee of experts would be soon entrusted with the job of formulating the draft model law. The new legislation, when it comes into force, is expected to draw large investments in agro-processing industries from both within the country and abroad. Experts underscore the many benefits that could accrue to the farmers as well as those in the rural areas through adoption of the proposed law. Predictably, most of the investments would be in the fruits and vegetables sector, where the growers would get greater exposure to extension services or programmes of agro- processors who would be strict in enforcing quality parameters while procuring fruits, vegetables and other produce. Wastage would be much less as the entire produce would be procured by the processer under the contract, and this, again, means more income to the grower. There could be also greater inflow of improved techniques and agricultural practices from abroad as foreign investors would be promoting them among the growers with whom they have signed contracts. Another major benefit for the farmers would be that they would be free from the clutches of money lenders and middlemen. If all such steps can make farming more attractive and profitable, surely, it would help stem the migration of rural youth to the urban areas. Comments are welcome at: editorialmtpl@gmail.com Views expressed by individuals and contributors in the magazine are their own and do not necessarily represent the views of “AgriBusiness & Food Industry” editorial board. AgriBusiness & Food Industry does not accept any responsibility of any direct, indirect or consequential damage caused to any party due to views expressed by any one or more persons in the trade. All disputes are to be referred to Delhi Jurisdiction only. .....Editor

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INTERVIEW

Targeting Faster Growth for Export of Agri & Food Products - D. K. Singh, Chairman, APEDA

Indian agri and food exports have been taking support from Agricultural & Processed Food Products Exports Development Authority, popularly known by its acronym APEDA. This body has been promoting and supporting the Indian exporters in many ways including promotion of India origin food items in potential destinations. Chief Editor of AgriBusiness & Food Industry, as Media Partners of Gulfood 2017 met the new Chairman of APEDA Shri D K Singh, IAS to know more about APEDA activities and his future vision. Excerpts of the Exclusive Interview:

India being the leading exporter of Basmati rice and recently China has also approved some of the export units. Can you explain the potential of Indian Basmati exports to China, Iran and elsewhere? Many types of Basmati and non Basmati rice varieties are cultivated in different agro climatic zones of India. With annual production of about 95-100 million MT, India is second largest producer of rice in the world. India produces about 8 million MT of Basmati paddy annually during Kharif (monsoon) season out of which over 4 million MT of Basmati rice is exported from India every year to over 130 countries.

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Recently I led a 20 member trade delegation of Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority (APEDA) member exporters and officers to Iran. The main purpose of the visit related to promotion of export of rice since Iran is one of the largest importers of Basmati rice from India. About 250 people participated in the sales promotion event held at Hotel Espinas Palace, Tehran. On the spot preparation of Iranian dishes prepared by Iranian Chefs with use of Indian rice was demonstrated and served as part of the lunch. Participants included about 30 media personnel,

AgriBusiness & Food Industry w March 2017

importers, inspection agencies of Iran Government and government officials from Food and Drug Organization (FDO) etc. Film of about 3.5 minutes duration was screened depicting different aspects of Basmati cultivation, processing, issue of health certificate and assurance of Indian rice being GMO free. The delegation met various departments in the government of Iran including Food and Drug Organization, Governmental Trading Corporation and Trade Promotion Organization. Meetings were also held with Iran Chamber of Commerce and Rice Importers Association. The deliberations helped to

dispel the negative publicity which appeared in some part of Iran media causing doubts about the health and safety of rice from India. Government of Iran may soon issue the notification about resumption of issuance of permits for import of rice. To supplement domestic production of about 2 million MT, Iran imports about 1 million MT of rice every year out of which about 7 lakh MT is exported from India. On Chinese front, China has recently approved 14 rice mills for export of Basmati rice. For non-Basmati rice AQSIQ China are yet to convey acceptance for the protocol after completion of pest risk analysis. China is now the largest importer


INTERVIEW

of rice in the world besides being the largest producer. We hope Indian rice varieties will find place with restaurants and hotels serving Indian food. The quantity may be small initially but given the trend of people trying new food items, it is likely to become sizeable over the years. India is emerging as one of the important exporter of processed foods and ready to eat food products in the country for exports? How do you see this portion of APEDA basket ? The Indian food industry is poised for huge growth, increasing its contribution to world food trade every year. In India, the food sector has emerged as a high-growth and high-profit sector due to its immense potential for value addition, particularly within the food processing industry. The export of processed and value added food products primarily consists of Dehydrated Onion and Garlic, Cucumber and Gherkins -- Prepared & Preserved, Mango Pulp, other frozen food products, Jaggery & Confectionery, Biscuits, Cocoa Products, Cereal Preparations, Milled Products, Ready to Eat, Ready to Cook and Ready to Serves products, ethnic food preparation, Groundnuts, Guargum and Alcoholic Beverages. As per comtrade data (2015), the share of processed food export of aforementioned items from India is 1.02% in the global export. The major destination for these products are USA, Europe, Russia, Middle East and South East Asia

v Basmati Exports Flourish -Iran & China market set for Faster Growth v Grapes Exports Set to Grow at 35%

and Africa. Contributing to around 25% export in the total APEDA scheduled product, this sector has witnessed a compound growth 11.40% in last decade from $ 1.35 bn during 2006-07 to 3.98 bn in 2015-16. In Rupee term the compound growth is 15.64 % which increased from Rs 6,095.64 crores to Rs 26,067.64 crores in 2015-16. Indian grapes are quite popular as we find in many countries, especially Europe. How the export of grapes to EU countries is progressing in the current grape season? There has been a good response from the farmers, as the 38128 farms were registered in the current year in comparison to 29050 farms last year, which is a 31% increase. There has been a good agro climatic situation in the grape growing area in Maharashtra and Karnataka

region which has provided a very good crop. Till date 1868 no. of containers has been exported to EU and comparison to 1394 no. of containers in the last year. There has been a 37% growth over the last year from the same period. Is there any new market where the export of grapes has started? Market access for export of grapes to Canada was received last year One trial container was also sent in the last year which was successfully cleared. 20-25 containers of grapes are likely to be shipped in the current season. India has a lot of potential in export of buffalo meat. How you envisage the trend of exports in this sector in next five years? India has a definite

v Meat Exports to Grow 25-50% in next 5 years.

role in the world Bovine meat exports to the world as it has a largest Buffalo population at around 109 Million heads. As seen from the world meat trade trends, India is exporting Buffalo Meat to around 65 countries on constant basis for last 40 years. We anticipate a growth of 5-10 % in every year in next 5 years provided the Foreign Trade Policy remains same, in our exports in value terms. However we may have a setback in 2016-17 where the trade figures went down in November 2016 to Jan 2017. As per the sources, you have successfully launched a promotional campaign in South Africa recently. What is the outcome of the programme and its selling features? A Brand Promotion Programme was organized in association with High Commission of South Africa in Johannesburg. Twelve exporters participated in the promotion programme. The programme was organized for three days. A buyer-seller /trade meet cum exhibition was organized on the 1st day followed by promotion programme in one of the popular shopping mall in Sandston, Johannesburg. A wide range of processed food products were displayed during the exhibitions in the BSM. Field visits were also organized to one of the retail chain headquarter and the retail outlet “Pick & Pay�. The programme was very well publicized through two TV interviews in the channels of South Africa Broadcasting Corporation and CNBC. A good response was received by the participating exporters.

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agri exports

List of Participants at Indian Pavilion A delegation of 60 exporters would be led by Mr. D K SINGH, Chairman APEDA for participation in Gulfood 2017 event. The APEDA participation would be organized by Dr. Sudhanshu, DGM & Mr. Bidyut Baruah, AGM, APEDA. Agricultural & Processed Food Products Export Development Authority(APEDA) Mr. D.K. Singh, IAS, Chairman Dr. Sudhanshu, Deputy General Manager 3rd Floor, NCUI Building 3, Siri Institutional Area, (Opp. Asiad Village), August Kranti Marg, New Delhi - 110016, India Tel.: +91-11-26513204, 26513219 Email: headq@apeda.gov.in Website: www.apeda.gov.in AIREA Mr. Rajendra Sundaresan Mob.: +91-9899898324 Email: airea.delhi@gmail.com Al-Khair Exports Mr. Suhail Mob.: +91-9818001334 Email: alkhairexports@hotmail.com info@alkhairexports.com

Chokhi Dhani Mob.: +91-7665157555 Email: exports@chokhidhanifoods.com

Good Day Foods Pvt. Ltd Tel: +91-22-32460294/32460365 Email: purchase@gooddayfoods.com

Earthling Ms. Shilpy Sharma Mob.: +91-9871693121 Email: shippy.sharma@gmail.com

H R Exports Mr. Mohit Gupta Mob.: +91-9560418989 Email: mohit.gupta@shaziarice.com / shaziarice@gmail.com

Eccoroots Foods India Pvt Ltd Ms. Harwinder Kaur Mob.: +91-7290047061 Email: Intl.marketing@ecorootsfoods.com Elmac Foods Phone: +9126538045/46/47 Email: vnthacker@gmail.com; vt@elmacfoods.com Evexia Nutritional Pvt Ltd Phone: 080-28361855 AK Singh export@evexianutri.com

Harmilapi Impex Mob.: 9811655648 Email: harmilapiimpex@yahoo.com Himalya International Ltd Phone: 01704-223494,8894788545 Email: jinni@himalyainternational.com Indies Global Foods Pvt Ltd Mob.: +91-9729001777 Email: vishalgoel@outlook.com

Al-Quresh Exports Mr. Junaid Qureshi Phone: +91-22 2642 5934 Email: junaidqureshi@al-quresh.com

Falak Frozen Food Exports Mob: 9958099971 Email: amit.falakfrozenfood@gmail.com

Indo Arab Grain Suppliers Mr. Ajay Kumar Mob.: +91-9991101000 Email: accounts@indoarab.co.in

Apsara Food Industries (P) Ltd Fax +911147065863 Email: apsarabiscuits@gmail.com

Fertinvest India Pvt. Ltd Mob.: +91-993000621 Email:- kunal.mazumdar@fertinvest.com

ISCON Balaji Foods Pvt Ltd Mob.: 9099976906 Email: dipal@isconbalajifoods.com

Austin Foods & Beverages Pvt. Ltd. Mob.: 9924300998 Email: info@austinfoods.net

Gee Gee Agrotech Mr. Robin Goyal Mob.: +91-9855116306/09855300313 Email: geegeeagro@hotmail.com

Kohinoor Foods Ltd. Mr. Puneet Mahajan / Mr. Sanjiva Rishi Mob.: +91-9910494240/ 9873880302 Email: info@kohinoorfoods.in/ puneet.mahajan@kohinoorfoods.in

B. Natha Singh Karam Singh Mob.: 9811012626 Email: bnk@doubleelephant.com Baramati Agro Ltd Mob.: 00 91 9767497224 Email: doc1@baramatiagro.com Basic India Limited Tel: +91 11 23355331, 2 Mob.: +91 9810058415 Email: sales@basicindialtd.com Bhikharam Chandimal Bhujiawala Pvt. Ltd Mob.: +91-9950997001 sumit@bhikharamchandmal.in

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G V Rice Unit Mr. Suruinder Kumar Mob.: +91-9996642146/9729178000 Email: doc@gvrice.com

Kundan Rice Mills Ms. Manisha Kapoor Mob.: +91-9711000469 Email: pa.vidit@kundangroup.com

Geewin Exim Mr. G.Chermakani Mob.: +91-9626099777 Email: nfo@geewinexim.com marketing@geewinexim.com

Maclines Trading India Pvt. Ltd. Mr. Kumar Gaurav Mob.: +91-9999308609, +91-9999307809 Email: maclines.india@maclinesme.com

Goel International Rice Mr. Vijay Goel Mob.: +91-9254333544/9215750431 Email: info@goelrice.net

Mala’s Fruit Products Phone: 02168-240312 Email: raghvendra.t@malasfruit.com hujefag@malasfruit.com

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Mehrotra Consumter Products Pvt. Ltd. Phone: +91-120-4260545 Mob.: +91-9720170743 Email: kriti@organictattva.com Merry Food Mr. Rajul Tondon Mob.: +91-9935535800 Email: rajultandon1960@gmail.com Misthan Foods Limited Mr. Hiteshkumar Patel/ Mr.Vaibhav pandya Mob.: +91-9925168399/9687620981 Email: vaibhav_pandya@mishtann.com/ info@mishtann.com Modern Agro Foods Mr. Vishal Bhagtani, Mob.: +91-9881236645 Email: vishal@modernagrofoods.com Nakoda Group Of Industries Pvt. Ltd. Phone: +91 712 2778824 / 2721555 Mob.: +91-9225361403, 9172222087 Email: ravindra@nakodas.com Paladiya Corporation Mob.: +91 9545513148 Ph : +91 20 41214100 Email: paladiyacorp@outlook.com

Sarah Foods Mob.: +91-9818294200 Email: sales@sarahfoods.in

TGS Foodz Pvt. Ltd. Mob.: +91 9029682066 Email: akhter@tgsretail.in

Sarjena Foods Pvt Ltd Mob.: +91-9820326776 Email: nirmalgogri@gmail.com

The Punjab State Cooperative Supply & Marketing Federation Limited (Markfed) Mr. H S Bains Phone PBX : (91)-(172)- 2660095-97, 2660161-65, 2660081, 2609470, 2605502

Sarveshwar Foods Ltd. Mr. Rohit Gupta Mob.: +91-9419333000/9419185580 Email: rohit.gupta@sarveshwarrice.com Shah Nanji Nagsi Exports Pvt Ltd. Mr. Ashwin Shah Mob.: +91-9960271564/9873593225 Email: marketing@shahnn.com

Shree Jagdamba Agrico Exports Pvt Ltd. Mr. Samarth Goel Mob.: +91-9215660601/09416031390 Email: exports@shreejagdambaexports.in Shri Shrinivas Traders Email: bafnacold5@gmail.com Shri Venue Exports Mob.: +91-9323313030 Email: shrivenueexports@yahoo.co.in

PJs Overseas Ltd Mr. Pawan Kumar Jain Mob.: +91-9811099456/9958288696 Email: info@pjsoverseas.com/ ajay@pjsoverseas.com

Snj Tradelink Pvt. Ltd Mob.: +91-9899330123 Email: rbajaj@snjtradelink.com

Pss Varadaraj Nadar & Sons Mob.: +91-9249417727 Email: exports@pssvnadar.com Puran Chand Rice Mills Mr. Rushil Gupta Mob.: +91-9991000048 /9034200048 Email: info@pcrice.in /rushil@pcrice.in Rajat Agro Commodities Pvt. Ltd Phone: +91-731- 4235553-54 Email: info@rajatagro.com

Trimurti Corns Agro Foods Pvt Ltd Phone: +91-20 26680184 / 26680213 Email: globaltrade@trimurticorns.com

Shree Gajanan Industries Mr Hiten Bhimani Mob.: +91-9849376111/8096346111 Email: hiten@gajanan.net

Paras Foods Mob.: +91-9416033661 Email: parasfoodsindia@gmail.com

Trimax International Mr. V.K. Manchanda Mob.: +91-9810149841 Email: info@oasisrice.com

Tripurari Agro (Pvt) Ltd Mr. Suraj Parkash Sharma Mob.: +91-9876112061/9872212060 Email: tripurariagropltd@gmail.com United Foods/Fivestar Dehydration Pvt. Ltd. Phone: +91-79-40026880 Mob.: +91- 9537007494 / 9429576231 Email: Marketing@Unitedfoodsindia.Com | Marketing@Fivestardehydration.Com Vinod Rice Mills (p) Ltd Mr. Madan Gheek Mob.: +91-9810258887 Email: exports@vinodricemill.com/ info@vinodricemill.com Vishnu Kumar Traders Pvt. Ltd. P. Vishnukumar Mob.: +91-9840052415/ 9811243872 Email: vktpl@vsnl.net

Southern Health Foods Pvt. Ltd Mob.: +91-8754481894 Email: quality.manna@gmail.com Sri Varadaraja Food Exports Mr.Vivekananda, Director Mob.: +91-9894729389/7200032089 Email: exports@srivaradaraja.com / vivek@srivaradaraja.com STC India Pvt. Ltd Mob.: +91-8692052180 Email: exports@chandanmukhwas.com

Rayban Foods Pvt Ltd Phone: +91-11-43647888 Email: himanshumeemrot0@gmail.com

Sun Bio Naturals Pvt Ltd. Mr. P. Kiruthika Mob.: +91-7299073171 Email: export@sunasia.in

R-Pure Agro Product (P) Ltd Mr. Amit Tondon Mob.: +91-9891570264 Email: export@mdhspices.in

Testel Fine Food Pvt Ltd Mr. Ashoo Talwar Mob.: +91-9930978926 Email: ashoo.talwar@tastelfinefood.com

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pre-event

Creating Synergy between Global Food Companies and Indian Importers

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ndia Foodex 2017 -- the 9th in the series -- is all set to break its past records. The organisers, Media Today Group, are very optimistic about the success of the event because despite a slowdown in the exhibition industry, India Foodex has been consistently growing in terms of size, participants and visitors. This year, the event will be held from 28-30 August 2017, at BIEC, Bangalore, India. Great Indian Platter The food industry, which is currently valued at US$

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39.71 billion, is expected to grow at a Compounded Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 11 per cent to US$65.4 billion by 2018. Food and grocery account for around 31 per cent of India’s consumption basket. The Indian food and grocery market is the world’s sixth largest, with retail contributing 70 per cent of the sales. Food has also been one of the largest segments in India's retail sector. The Indian food retail market is expected to reach Rs 61 lakh crore (US$

AgriBusiness & Food Industry w March 2017

894.98 billion) by 2020. The Indian food processing industry accounts for 32 per cent of the country’s total food market, one of the largest industries in India and is ranked fifth in terms of production, consumption, export and expected growth. It contributes around 14 per cent of manufacturing Gross Domestic Product (GDP), 13 per cent of India’s exports and six per cent of total industrial investment. Indian food service industry is expected to reach US$ 78 billion by 2018. The Indian gourmet food

market is currently valued at US$ 1.3 billion and is growing at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 20 per cent. The leading players in the industry are of the opinion that India has enough room to accommodate domestic as well as international players of the sector. The country has a massive demand for food products and the bourgeoning of the towns and cities has ensured a steady growth. The taste buds of 1.25 billion Indians can certainly accommodate all and they are


pre-event

much eager to experiment. Innovation Rules In order to enhance global acceptance, the Indian food industry is striving to keep abreast with the latest technologies. Each segment of the food industry is developing and prospering, be it dairy, meat, beverages, snacks, RTE or anything, all have a ready consumer base; waiting to explore the possibility of experimenting varieties and new kinds of international foods. India is indeed the ideal destination for every international stakeholder of the food industry. The great Indian platter has undergone many changes in the last two decades. With the initiation of liberalization of the Indian economy, many international brands entered the scene, bringing in the specialities of their respective countries and adding a plethora of options to choose from. It not only opened the way for multinational companies,

but even indigenous brands blossomed in the face of competition, striving and innovating to survive in the long run. India has emerged as a major importer of foods and food ingredients from a number of countries. Amit Lohani, Founder Director of Forum of Indian Food Importers, said “India imports a variety of food products, food commodity from all across the world primarily Canada, USA, Russia, China, Southeast Asia . . . Cheese and dairy products from Europe are very popular and highly acceptable by the avid aspirational Indian consumer. We import a plethora of food products from pasta, olives, olive oil, sauces, chocolates, marmalades, wines, fresh fruits, dry fruits, skimmed milk powder, canola oil and many more. The advantage is the diverse and adventurous palette of the Indian consumer, their hankering for gourmet foods has brought about major brands to tap the great potential of the market.” The demand for new

food products has increased manifold. Number of factors have contributed to this surge, like changing dietary habits, willingness to try new products, higher disposable income, changing lifestyle patterns, and so on. This growing demand for foods and beverages is not just limited to urban areas. It has penetrated into rural areas too. In fact, smaller towns and cities are expected to contribute more in shaping future demand. Reaping Profits According to the data provided by the Department of Industrial Policies and Promotion (DIPP), the food processing sector in India has received around US$ 6.70 billion worth of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) during the period April 2000-December 2015. The Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) estimates that the food processing sectors have the potential to attract as much as US$ 33 billion of investment over the next 10 years and

also generate employment of nine million person-days. Some of the major investments in this sector in the recent past are: • Swiggy, a food delivery start-up owned by Bundl Technologies Private Limited, has raised Rs 230.34 crore (US$ 33.80 million) in a Series C funding round, with its existing investors SAIF Partners, Accel Partners, Norwest Venture Partners and Apoletto Asia Ltd contributing 79 per cent of the new funds raised. • Gujarat Cooperative Milk Marketing Federation (GCMMF), popularly known as 'Amul', plans to invest Rs 5,000 crore (US$ 733.6 million) to establish ten new processing plants as well as expand the current capacity to touch 32 million litres per day (MLPD) capacity by 2020. • American doughnut chain Dunkin' Donuts has tied up with local online grocery delivery platform

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pre-event

Grofers for home-delivery of its packaged and freshly made products. Private Equity (PE) firm India Value Fund Advisors (IVFA) plans to invest around US$ 100150 million in the food business in India over the next two years. Mahindra & Mahindra's (M&M) agri-commodities division has announced its entry into pulses retailing under the brand ‘NuPro’ with Tur dal being the first offering under the brand. Zomato, a restaurant search and discovery platform, has raised US$ 60 million from Singapore government-owned investment company Temasek, along with existing investor Vy Capital, in order to explore new business verticals. ITC Limited plans to invest Rs 800 crore (US$ 117.4 million) to set up a world-class food processing facility in Medak, a district located in Telangana. The company has also formulated plans to enter the dairy market.

Quality conscious consumer The noodles and bread episodes in the recent past, proved to be a blessing in disguise. The Indian consumer is now more quality conscious than ever before and is demanding nothing

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less than the best quality. Every commodity player is now attempting to ensure the best quality of his product by upgrading technology and machinery and presenting their product in consumer packs to reach the buyers through modern retailing, online grocers and traditional kirana shops. To feed increasing domestic demand and also to achieve the export targets of food products, Ministry of Agriculture & Farmers’ Welfare, Ministry of Food Processing Industry and Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority (APEDA) under the Ministry of Commerce are investing a substantial share of the budget to promote technological upgradation and value addition in all segments of rice, wheat, pulses, oilseeds, spices, dairy & feed, and all other food verticals. Meeting ground for entire food industry As per trade sources, India wastes food grains worth huge amounts every year because of weaknesses in storage system & techniques and deficiencies in supply chain. It is unfortunate in a country where a sizeable section of the population goes to bed hungry. The need of the hour is to increase productivity and

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build an effective supply chain to ensure what is produced in the farm reaches the consumer in good shape. In fact, what is imperative is to plug every loophole in the food production and distribution system, which means use of effective available technology and building of modern storage system. When India Foodex was launched in 2009, there was no professional platform for food production, processing, and packaging industry and its allied sectors like warehousing, cold-chain and retailing. The industry required a common platform that could facilitate the exchange of ideas, knowledge, technologies, and machinery in the sector. S Jafar Naqvi, Chief Coordinator, India Foodex, said “Looking at these shortcomings of the food industry, we decided to launch India Foodex in 2009. Since then, this platform has brought together the machinery manufacturers, food brand owners, and other stakeholders of the industry. It has now become the proven most prominent annual meeting ground for the food industry for the sourcing of equipment, accessories, and taking decisions on the set up of new automated plants in India.” Greater use of modern machinery is now prerequisite

in India, where plenty of produce is available for value addition and food processing, but due to inadequate exposure to high technology & inputs, a large chunk of the produce is wasted. As a result, India is emerging as one of the hottest destinations not only for Food Processing and Packaging Machinery & Equipment imports from European and South East Asian Countries, but also for Agro-Food products from international suppliers. Ideal platform for your products India Foodex is proven to be the ideal platform for launching your latest food processing and packaging, storage, and supply chain technologies. The event is in its 9th Edition and has been growing in size through the course of successive years. The event series have been aimed at facilitating interactions among producers, retailers, importers, and exporters of agricultural, dairy, and food products. It promotes trade relations and cooperation between the different sectors of food and its allied verticals at the national as well as international level. Buhler India, the largest grain milling and food processing machinery manufacturer, has confirmed the launching of innovative


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range of machines. Flourtech, Selis, Ortas Milling, Ugur Makina, Hilda Automation, Jarvis, Agaram, Buhler India, Unormac, Pingle, and Shri Vishwakarma have increased their display area and promise to engage the trade visitors with latest technologies and machinery. New product launches are also planned by Zaccaria (Brazil), Keplerweber (Brazil) & Delta Technologies Corporation (USA) through M. K. Associates (Bangalore), SSP, Basant Products, AD Technologies, Kanha Mill, Thermo Fisher Scientific India Pvt. Ltd., Taiwan Yinike Machinery Company Ltd., Perkin Elmar India Pvt. Ltd., Dr. Forbes India, Marine Food Japan, Beehive Farms Pvt. Ltd., Biotrack Foods, Ambal Imports & Exports, Seal & Cut, Srinath Plant & Equipment, Gempack,

Rotopack, MLT Pack Services, Oasis Exports Limited (Greece), Western India Cashew Company, Cothas Coffee, Pakona Engineers, Ghodawat Group, Kuraray India and many more. In order to promote holistic growth of the food industry, the event has concurrent shows for the grain, dairy and meat sectors as well – 8th GrainTech India, 7th DairyTech India and 4th MeatTech Asia. The latest addition to the series is SnackBev India. International Scope and Participation Based on spectacular success in the past, the expo has become India’s largest agri-food and business platform, where 50% of displayed products are from overseas markets. S. Jafar

Naqvi, Chief Coordinator, India Foodex points out, “India has made spectacular progress in food and agriculture, and related fields. Indian food products and technologies, mainly processed value-added products, on massive display may interest the participating countries to boost the trade”. 8th India Foodex had witnessed the participation of almost 30 countries. The focus countries were the Netherlands, Turkey, Canada, Italy, Germany, Korea and China. Canada was a new entrant in the event; their participation was on a larger scale; and Turkey and China continued to be the major participants. Strengthening ‘Make in India’ dream Naqvi further added,

“We hope that it will be a rewarding experience for the exhibitors as well as visitors. The event will certainly help in establishing India in the global market and strengthen the “Make in India” dream envisaged by the Government of India”. 8th India Foodex series was a huge success. There were a record number of over 380 exhibitors and 35000 trade visitors. This year too, for 9th India Foodex, companies from China, Korea, Taiwan, Japan, Canada, Holland, Germany, Turkey and many more have already confirmed their participation. The number of exhibitors and visitors has been increasing annually. For more details visit: www.indiafoodex.com or call +91-11-41407851

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INTERVIEW

‘Hamdard transforms itself, reconnects with GENext through energized marketing’ - Says Mansoor Ali

Hamdard India has been synonymous with trust in traditional Indian consumers. In a recent interaction with Rummana Zaidi of AgriBusiness & Food Industry, the Chief Sales & Marketing Officer of Hamdard, Mansoor Ali shared his ideas about rejuvenating the brand to reconnect with the youth. Ali, who has more than two decades of experience in the FMCG sector, joined the group almost two years back and has massively revised the marketing strategies to enhance the appeal of this age-old trusted brand, the Hamdard Group. Excerpts:

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Hamdard is a very old and trusted brand in India. Could you please share with us the journey that it has covered so far and what are some of the changes that we should look forward to? It’s a very interesting journey because we are more than a hundred year old organization. We are a company with great brands and our biggest achievement is that the moment you say “Hamdard”, it evokes a lot of trust in the people; it’s a very trusted brand. For the past many years, the organization was just going on at a regular pace. However, over the last couple of years, we have been having a lot of transformation in the organization. When I say transformation, it means a lot of things: one is the transformation of the whole structure of the business –we changed the whole distribution network of the

organization, we appointed new partners, we got a lot of professionals in the organization, we have an active team of professionals who come with a lot of experience. Second, the biggest thing is that the brands themselves (though they are great brands) needed a lot of transformation and rejuvenation –the packaging, the advertisement strategy and the campaigns that we are launching now have changed completely. Earlier, it used to be traditional and conservative. Now the approach is thought provoking, and based on deep consumer insights into their every day lives. The larger attempt is also to connect to the youth. Hamdard products were gradually running the risk of diluting their touch with the youth. For example, if you look at a product like Rooh Afza, it’s a great product and


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is consumed in every home. But if you ask a young person (say 18-21), probably they don’t find it a very “cool” or aspirational product to have, because Rooh Afza is a very in-home product, you have to take it home, make it and then consume. We don’t really see it being consumed in college canteens as it is not available in a convenient ready to go format. So, the first strategy has been to extend the format, and launch a ready to drink brand, “Fusion”, which is in a tetra pack. It is a fusion of the original Rooh Afza along with a fruit juice. It has five flavors and it is a very youth oriented product with attractive packaging. If you look at the advertising of Rooh Afza now, then you will notice that that too has changed completely, and is based on youth based consumer insights. The general perception of Hamdard in today’s generation is that it is a traditional dawakhana that deals in unani medicines and sells its products through specialized outlets. As you just mentioned that you are adopting new marketing strategies, could you please elaborate on some of the strategies that you have taken up to reconnect with youth and change this perception? Firstly, we need to see some trends around us. There is a massive consumer movement happening towards natural, healthy and

herbal products. Consumers are shunning synthetic medicines and products for themselves and their families. Hamdard sits on a core strength of being a natural, herbal products based company. And that is the strength we will ride on. We have been selling our products not only through shops, but through other channels too. We have always had two divisions: one is the FMCG division that is H1, in which we have Rooh Afza, Safi, Sualin, Chyavanprash, etc.; the other, H2 is one in

which we have all the unani medicines. We continue to sell these through the regular shops, grocery channel, and so on. Of course the medicines were being sold through the chemists and the ayurvedic stores. There are a lot of transformations that have happened here too. Due to change in our marketing approach and strategy, we have expanded our distribution network. So, we now sell into more shops, we sell into more than 5 lakh retail outlets. The other

In the FMCG division, we have a 360 degree strategy for consumer communication. We have been investing a lot in terms of producing new TV commercials, and now we have got very cutting edge TVCs that are running across categories..... We have product specific Facebook pages and spends on this front are growing exponentially for us. Like I said very clearly, we need to be connected with the youth.

thing that has happened is that we have increased the relationship with the modern trade outlets, which include the structured retail outlets. So you talk about Walmart, Metro, Spencer’s, Big Bazar, Reliance stores, etc. our relationship there has become much stronger. Also, considering we are the market leaders in Unani, we have launched the Hamdard Wellness business which is a chain of wellness centres with physicians and a full fledged pharmacy. We have opened six of these centers already in the country. This is how we are changing the whole perception and moving away from being a traditional unani dawakhana to a more modern premium service provider in the wellness space. Coming to the FMCG division specifically, what are some of the direct changes that have been initiated by you for promoting the products through TVCs, digital and other media? In the FMCG division, we have a 360 degree strategy for consumer communication. We have been investing a lot in terms of producing new TV commercials, and now we have got very cutting edge TVCs that are running across categories. We do a lot of print too. So, whenever we launch a new product we invest a lot in promoting it through print media, in the main national dailies and

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the leading magazines. Our investments in the digital media have increased too. We now have a digital agency that looks after the social media campaigns and digital marketing. We have product specific Facebook pages and spends on this front are growing exponentially for us. Like I said very clearly, we need to be connected with the youth. My clear strategy is that unless you have the next two generations hooked onto your product, you won’t be able to provide a bridge across generations. It’s our job to make our brands relevant and aspirational for the youth and millennials. What was it in particular that prompted this revision of the marketing strategy? It’s all about conviction and clarity. One has to sit back and reflect upon where the market is. Usually the most relevant thing when it comes to FMCG is to evaluate where the actual consumption is happening. It’s a very basic logic that seriously evaluates who is your end-consumer. Even if you invest a lot in other business development strategies and miss out on your end-consumer, then you cannot be in the game. We realized that the youth is a big segment that we were missing out due to a lot of factors like packaging design, or the earlier advertising and communication strategy. So we decided to reconsider, revaluate, and revise our

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entire strategy. So, just to tell you on the advertising bit, now it’s not just our FMCG, but even our traditional medicines are heavily advertised and are getting rave reviews; the sales too have reported a very positive growth. Hamdard’s reach cannot be called pan-India yet because the products are more popular in north and central India and do not enjoy the same kind of reach in south, east and west India. So, are you planning to rework and redesign the distribution network and supply chain management to make it equally prominent in other parts of India, while strengthening your reach in north and central India? In the earlier days, north and central India used to be the forte because Rooh Afza is our highest selling product and that usually sells in this belt. However, in the past two years we have taken up many steps to reduce the dependency on north and central India, while growing the other markets. One of the steps that we took up in this direction was to launch a 250 ml bottle of Rooh Afza, because as you must be aware, earlier the product was only available in a 750 ml bottle. This smaller pack has been launched in the softer markets (in the south, some parts of the east and west) and is available for just Rs. 50. It was more of a trial pack meant for

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the consumers who are not regular Rooh Afza consumers. This trial pack made it easier for them to pick it up at a convenient price and it makes its way into their home. So, now the dependence on north and central India has reduced. Markets like Hyderabad, Bangalore, Chennai, and Kolkata are picking up on sales and our consumer base is expanding. While we are growing the entire business, we are also ensuring an equitable spread of the business across the country rather than just concentrating on one or two regions. You mentioned that you are also in touch with the retail chains. Could you highlight some of the key factors that determine one’s success in reaching out to the endconsumers through these modern retail formats? Our relationships with the retail chains are built on the spirit of partnership and aggressive growth. We have a separate key account manager, who only handles modern trade. Moreover I, personally, am involved in all these relationships. We have regular meetings with the heads of these chains and work on continuous growth oriented strategy. So, you name it: Walmart, Metro Cash n Carry, Reliance, Future’s Big Bazar, Spencer’s, Hypercity, Nilgiris, and Heritage; we work closely with all of them. The key is that you work both on long term strategy,

as well medium term tactical inputs and schemes. Rooh Afza has been able to strike out many large MNC players in Modern Trade in these two years. Undoubtedly, the retail chains have high margin expectations, and we ensure a balance to maintain an equity. There is a standard that is set for every category in these chains, and it is a structure that they maintain and we have to respect. Many beverages have been launched under the category of functional foods. Do you think they can give competition to your products? If you talk about Rooh Afza, it’s a beverage and we fall in the category of concentrates and syrups. We are not competing with the carbonated drinks. Our category is of about 900 crore, out of which our share is about 45 per cent. Apart from that Safi is also a stand-alone product for skin cleansing because all other products for this purpose are application based and this is the only one which is internally consumed. Roghan Badam-Shirin is also a leader in the almond oil category. So, I don’t think that any of the functional foods is a direct competition for us. But anything that enters as a new category is always interesting to watch and for future growth we will also be evaluating the new categories. Patanjali Ayurveda’s entry in


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the FMCG sector is giving a tough challenge to many of the leading brands. What are your views about this? Do you see any competition from Patanjali coming your way? None. I respect Patanjali and Baba Ramdev for having created a massive brand. But I don’t consider it as a competition because the business model is very different. We don’t position ourselves as a owner of all categories in grocery and kirana. Patanjali has been entering multiple categories, and they sell atta, biscuits, dal, chawal [rice], ghee and so on. We don’t do that. We are very specific to our category. Our plan is not to spread ourselves very thin and enter into every possible category - our business model is very focused, and growth for us will come from our core strength and related brand extensions. It’s great that an Indian brand is doing so well. My thoughts on the communication and business strategy are very different from what Patanjali does. So, it is a case of co-existence. Lately, Hamdard group has been participating in many leading international fairs of the food and beverage industry. How has this exposure contributed to enhancing the exports of your products? Our international strategy is very clear. We will not do sporadic business – we will always go and look for setting up permanent, long term distribution networks. The first thing, of course, through participation in such fairs is that one gets to represent oneself. One gets to meet a lot of people of the sector, network with them, and they find out what our company is all about. We on our part get to evaluate many partners for distribution, and visit their facilities. Hence, you get to know what is

Our relationships with the retail chains are built on the spirit of partnership and aggressive growth. We have a separate key account manager, who only handles modern trade. Moreover I, personally, am involved in all these relationships.... Walmart, Metro Cash n Carry, Reliance, Future’s Big Bazar, Spencer’s, Hypercity, Nilgiris, and Heritage; we work closely with all of them. happening on the global level. These big fairs like Gulfood, Anuga and SIAL are not just about going there and representing yourself in that specific market, but it’s a global market, where a lot of people come from across the globe and hence you do a lot of networking. We also get to sample our products to a lot of new consumers. Rooh Afza today goes to a lot countries, because we have the Indian diaspora staying there, and interestingly now local people have also started taking to our products. The diaspora is our first target group, but we do not wish to restrict ourselves to just that. What are the main countries that you are focusing on? There are a lot of markets. The USA and Canada are of immediate focus; the UAE and GCC, including Saudi Arabia is a big market; Russia has huge potential; and our next focus is going to be Australia and New Zealand. It doesn’t make sense to spread

into too many geographies all at once – so the strategy has to be focused on prioritization of markets, build one’s base, and then move onto the next market. So far, how has the response from the local populations of your target countries been? Tremendous! For example we were in the USA last year and it was fantastic! We were walking around Park Avenue in New York and in many of the key stores, our products were literally stacked. We have also started marketing in the overseas markets. For instance, Rooh Afza is being promoted as the “Drink of India”. It’s working really well. Apart from the revision of the marketing strategy, what are some of the other plans that you will take up for enhancing the image and rekindling the growth of the Hamdard group in the near future? Transformation and

expansion, like I said, cannot be haphazard or chaotic. It’s very important to have a strategy and a vision. So, the big planks that we are running on right now are definitely expansion of products and categories. You can see it in the big product Fusion that is being launched and you will see it in a few more categories in the near future. The second, is to get in more consumers into our fold, which is through advertising; through running consumer promotions; through making people aware and also through initiatives like Hamdard Wellness, because that is also a big platform for spreading awareness on Unani. The third is to keep increasing the reach, the overseas; modern trade; institutional sales; and expansion of distribution with the right processes. We are setting up a lot of processes in terms of scientific distribution, we are going to automate the sales force, so that all the data is captured at the sales point and it can be seen and analysed live. For this purpose we are installing software at the distribution points. These are all the processes we are taking up to make it a more scientific business rather than just being a seasonal business.

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Sushil Mansotra Head - Exports

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honey industry

HONEY PRODUCTION AND BEEKEEPING – A Global Perspective

by AK Singh, Group President, LBI General Trading LLC., Dubai & USA

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n-depth study of total honey production and exports indicates serious and obvious contradictions. During the last couple of years , there has been dramatic surge in total global exports without a corresponding increase in the number of bee colonies around the world. It is a known fact that global bee population is declining and under tremendous stress due to climate change, extensive migration, GM crops, and subjugation of bees to single flora. In the most advanced and professional beekeeping operations in the world, productivity per hive has substantially declined. Areas which are known for high beehive productivity are now yielding lowest production and under adverse weather conditions even less. Increasing global honey exports in the context of both a stable number of beehives and declines in productivity per hive in the major producing countries creates an anomaly which suggests widespread honey adulteration.

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Consequences are continuously collapsing prices of export and burdens thereupon on beekeepers and honest players terrible to bear .Unfortunately cost of production has not declined in relation declined prices . This is a troubling trend and aberration going to pose serious imbalance between production and consumption of honey. This threatens survival of honest beekeepers throughout the world, putting in jeopardy agriculture, agricultural production, food security, food safety and the sustainability of ecological systems

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whose fragility and vulnerability are appreciated now more than ever before. Without understanding the machinations of honey adulteration and circumvention, full proof safeguard is not possible. However, new scientific tools like NMR, TMR, SMR, Foreign Enzyme tests make us optimistic for using this interface to make circumvention and adulteration more difficult. Economic behavior and systems of certain honey producing countries are still in contrarian to the professional beekeeping and vigorously contributing to this anomaly. The opportunities for honey are considerable. So, the national authorities of producing countries must work to craft ways for bringing such machinations down to ground zero. The global appreciation of the honey bee has never been deeply discussed and understood than at present. Way to bees - Keep the hives alive!


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snack & beverage

Indian Snacks & Beverage Industry

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ndia is home to some of the major brands in snacks and beverage industry like Haldiram, MTR, Bambino, Bikano, BTW, Jaimin, Wonder Fry, Miraj Namkeen, Godawat, Savour, Tata, Priyagold, ITC, Rasna, Bikaji, Dabur, Amul, Savorit, and Balaji Wafers, Vadilal, Parle to just name a few. Leading international brands like McCain, Nestle, Britannia, PepsiCo, Coca Cola, Cadbury, and many more have also established themselves in India. Things have been changed now in India. There are just too many options that flood our platter and we are spoilt for choice. Though pakoras, samosas and papads still hold their place strong, but French fries, croissant, pizza, burger, patties, pastries, pasta, buns, puffs, and uhmmm . . . such mouth-watering delicacies have made their way into our daily food habits and “no one can eat just one”. The great Indian platter has undergone many changes in the last two decades. With the initiation of liberalization of the Indian economy, many international brands entered the scene, bringing in the specialities of their respective countries and adding a plethora of

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options to choose from. It not only opened the way for multinational companies, but even indigenous brands blossomed in the face of competition, striving and innovating to survive in the long run. Indian Industry The processed foods industry in India has a total turnover of around USD 65 billion. The demand for snacks has increased manifold. Snacks are no longer considered to be occasional indulgences, but have almost acquired the space of a fourth meal. The Indian snacks market has been forecasted to have the highest growth among all the other countries in the world – 16.6 per cent between the years 2015-2020. The beverage industry constitutes of around USD 230 million from the 65 billion of the processed foods industry. Number of factors have contributed to this surge, like changing dietary habits, willingness to try new products, higher disposable income, changing lifestyle patterns, and so on. This growing demand for snacks and beverages is not just limited to urban areas. It has penetrated into rural areas too. In fact, smaller towns

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and cities are expected to contribute more in shaping future demand. Innovation is of prime importance. The snacks and beverage industry has to constantly come up with something new to keep the consumers on their toes. Though, some products are loved round the year and never fade into oblivion, but that little something to tweak it a bit does no harm. Surprise and delight are two ruling notions for the industry. Apart. From this packaging plays a crucial role in a product’s marketability, more so with snacks and beverages. The packaging should be such that it is manageable, handy, attractive and beckoning.

Booming Market The biggest factor that will now have international brands rushing to the Indian market is that in the recently announced budget, India has allowed 100 per cent foreign direct investment in multi-brand retailing in food products. India’s booming snack and beverage market is attracting the eyes of many profit seekers. It is the most suitable sector for start-ups, foreign investors and multinational giants. The taste buds of 1.25 billion Indians can certainly accommodate all and they are much eager to experiment. Though in 2013, India had allowed 51 per cent FDI in multi-brand retailing, but


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management, retailing, etc. The expo is held annually in Bangalore, India. This year, India Foodex event series will be held from 28-30 August 2017 at BIEC, Bangalore. It boasts of the participation of over 370 companies from 30 + countries. We invite you all, be it manufacturers of chips, doughnuts, pizza, pasta, cakes, baklawa, juices, milk

had a host of riders including 30 per cent mandatory local sourcing, $ 100 million upfront investment and so on. The new ruling allows retailers to sell their own food products without any restriction as long as they are produced within the country. It is expected that this move will prove to be a game changer as it will make food affordable for consumers and the domestic sourcing of the products will help to benefit the farmers. A new show in India “To address the growing demands of snacks and beverages in India, we have launched a new vertical last year i.e. SnackBev India as a concurrent show with

shakes, soft-drinks, frozen snacks, biscuits, cookies, breads, buns, or even the packaging chains that ensure the shelf life of these products and their appeal, to come and participate in our latest show and have your share of the Indian snack and beverage industry. www.indiafoodex.com

India Foodex series. It will help multinational giants to introduce their products in India and provide a head start to new entrants in the sector.” said S. Jafar Naqvi, Chief Coordinator of the Show. 2nd SnackBev 2017 India will be a co-located show with the 9th edition of India Foodex 2017, which was started by Media Today Group in 2009 to provide a platform to the Indian food industry to showcase its products and meet international stakeholders. Today, it is India’s largest food business show, focussing on all related verticals including processed foods, agribusiness, dairy, meat, packaging technologies, supply chain

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HANDLING THE MILLENIALS: MILLENIAL MARKETING – Gurpreet Singh, Head (International Business), Bikanerwala Foods Private Limited, Delhi (India)

This generation is pretty unique in its own way owing to strong association with self, optimism towards life and more open ness towards the various stages of life. Their approach towards adulthood is different and unique in its own way.

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Introduction: Millennial tagged as the selfie generation these days is composed of the biggest part of the living population across the globe. They are readily occupying the vacate space created by the baby boomers. Millennials are actually the consumer set with maximum purchasing power at this point of time and hence is one the most important and vital aspects for any company . No business would like to avoid knowing more and more about the strongest prospects and purchasers. This generation is pretty unique in its own way owing to strong association with self, optimism towards life and more open ness towards the various stages of life. Their approach towards adulthood is different and unique in its own way. This article shall highlight some key aspects towards millennial marketing. 1) Brand connect with millennial: Brands actually feel that it is difficult to connect with the millenials with little understanding on their part actually that millennials are quite straight forwards to connect to . A brand actually needs to build a connect to the value that actually drives them – passion, uniqueness, innovativeness, happiness,

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joy and liberty. Secondly the brands need to understand their actual lifestyles which are based on freedom of expression and should actually find ways to magnify this. And most importantly with millennial just doing a straight marketing will not work. This is one generation which wants to be involved and well informed. 2) Diversity in demographics: Millenials happen to weigh very high on demographic diversity . One can find a single mother or a single father, a joint family, a nuclear family, live ins, DINKS in a single population mix. Marketers should actually be focusing on the segments more rather than the demographic as a whole. 3) Hyper connectivity: Millenials has actually been a generation that grew up with technological gadgets being invented right there in front of them. They have always been connected and this connectivity has actually enhanced in current times. Without technology they actually feel handicapped and helpless. Hence brands need to put in effort to stay connected to them all the time. It is now 24*7*365. 4) The social media savvy: This generation is always connected to others through various social media platforms.

For a brand to be successful, it is important that it should also be an actor on social media platform so that it connects well its audience. Companies doing cutting edge marketing make it a point that they are always sharing things on online media and always look in for new ways to engage on social arena. 5) Viral marketing : Since millennial tend to be well informed and high in sharing , they trust the fellow consumers more in comparison to the promotional campaign by the brands . Brands need to create more of a viral influence and hence should contribute to the social cause as a whole 6) Less on loyalty: Millenials are experimentingclass of consumers. They will never stickto one brand. Brands need to realign the fact that they can’t expect loyalty from millennial. But if wooed properly that also have a tendency to stick to you for a longer time. Conclusion Marketers need to adapt to millennialswhich is making up the bulk of the workforce. Learn what they respond to and what matters to them. It could just be the breakthrough your business needs to move forward into the future.


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Savour India Private Limited W

e, Savour India Private Limited, are one of the leading processors, suppliers and exporters of a wide gamut of Breakfast Cereals, Soy / Soya Products and Spices. Our range includes variety of spices and ready to eat breakfast cereals. We ensure to make use of advanced techniques so that our products are processed as per the international quality standards. Further, our prime aim is that our products, are stored, packed and transported under hygienic conditions. In addition, we emphasize on maintaining quality to ensure high nutritive breakfast cereals with a longer shelf life. Products We are one of the leading processors, exporters and suppliers of a wide range of Breakfast Cereals, Soy / Soya Products and Spices. Our range of Indian Spices comprises • Ajwain • Clove • Elaichi • Kali Mirch Further, we also offer Breakfast Cereals such as • Choco Yumm • Cornflakes • Dalia • Macaroni • Mini Soya Chunks • Muesli • Poha • Seviyan • Soya Granules • Vermicelli In addition to it, our range of Breakfast Cereals are known for their features like munchy taste, high nutritive value, rich proteins and free from fats. Infrastructure We have been able to meet the constantly growing needs of the clients with our well developed processing facility. Our infrastructure is spread over a large sprawling area and is divided into various departments which perform processing, quality testing and packaging. Every unit in our organization is equipped with necessary

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machines and technologies, which ensure that the entire work is carried under the most hygienic conditions. Our fully automated infrastructure helps us in meeting the demands of bulk orders within the stipulated time frame. Quality Assurance We being the quality conscious organization focuses on the hygiene of the products that we process. Further, we have a well equipped quality testing lab that helps us to sterilize the spices and the breakfast cereals in order to control any kind of bacterial contamination. Our process of production, procurement, packaging and distribution methods is supervised under the guidance of our experts and is tested on the parameters like aroma, flavor and shelf life. Packaging and Storage We are well-equipped with a spacious warehouse that is designed in a way that it has the ample storage capacity to preserve our processed products before it is delivered to the customers. After processing, our products are carefully packaged in hygienic and environment friendly bags using food grade material such as good quality plastic bags and cartons. Further, our professionals monitor the entire production process which ensures the proper and measured packaging of the product. These are available in different sizes of packets. We make sure that our packaged products are well versed with the necessary detail like date of manufacture, date of expiry, direction of use and list of ingredients used that should be mentioned on the packet. In order to store our products in an easy manner, we make use of inventory management system. Moreover, we make sure to store our products in a clean and dust free condition with the proper pest control mechanism so that our products are not invaded by moths.

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Wide Distribution Network Our organization has been able to gain a strong foothold in the markets across India including Delhi, Uttar Pradesh, Haryana, Rajasthan, Punjab, Himachal Pradesh, Maharashtra and Jammu & Kashmir. Further, our products are available across the country and for this we have co-signee agents, C&F's and distributors(state-wise) who help us is delivering our products to the clients in every area of the country. In addition to it, our processed products are supplied to the general merchants, departmental stores, grocery suppliers, chemist shops and other co-operative stores. Moreover, owing to our quality range, we have been serving over 15,000 clients in India. Client Satisfaction Since our establishment, we have aimed at providing our clients with the products as per their needs. For this, we use various upgraded techniques and machines. In order to ensure that our spices and breakfast cereals can be utilized for longer time, we make use of proper preservatives. Products manufactured by us are reckoned for their quality and pleasing taste that adds a flavor to the food. In addition to it, our client centric approach in supplying has enabled us to form a large clientele base. Moreover, we make sure that our processed products are vacuum packed and delivered to our clients within the stipulated time frame. Also, the products processed by us are acknowledged by kirana goods suppliers, general merchants, departmental stores, chemist shops, cooperative stores and pan shops. We have been able to form a large clientele base in India catering to the 15,000 clients. The organization has gained strong foothold in the markets of Delhi, Uttar Pradesh, Haryana, Rajasthan, Punjab, Himachal Pradesh, Maharashtra and Jammu & Kashmir.


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Sensograph Packaging Technology Pvt. Ltd. Sensograph opened its doors in 1989 as a weigh controller manufacturing company. By 2005 the company’s innovative spirit and customer focus gave way to new opportunities. With strong customer co-operation and in house design strengths; company carried out forward integration successfully. Today Sensograph has entire range of FFS Machines, be it “First Indian Made”, “Multi Head Weigher”, VFFS Weigh Fillers, Auger Filler, Easy Pac (Semi automatic ) weighers, Counting machines and Cup Fillers. Now, Sensograph’s engineered solutions operate on the manufacturing floors of some of the world’s best known brands and in the shops of many small entrepreneurs. Form, fill, and seal machines are packaging equipment that uses flexible, heat-sealable, plastics film to form packages that can be filled with a product and then sealed and cut. Following the purchase of the raw materials, stage wise quality check and quality control is implemented as per ISO 9001:2008 standard to ensure high quality assurance. Our professional engineering team designs, customizes ergonomic solutions that enhance efficiency in material handling and packaging in production shops around the world. At Sensogragh, we have built our business on integrity and trust. That reflects through our unmatched service, availability & equality. We have a team of 5 technocrats and 2 technical directors, 8 engineers and 15 technicians who are well qualified and skilled. They have decades of industry experience and an in depth knowledge of the industry trends and consumer pattern. The proper organizational hierarchy and the communication between the levels of hierarchy enables us to deliver clients expectation. In sensograph we believe in delivering the commitments.

At Sensograph Packaging Technology Private Limited, our team is inclusive of production managers, quality controllers, Research and development, designing, sales & marketing personnel and other supporting staff. Selected by our management, our employees hold expertise in their area of operation. Regular training sessions helps our employees in enhancing and polishing their technical and professional skills in the most efficient manner.

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Ravi Foods Private Limited (RFPL)

Famous for excellence in standards, professionalism & integrity

R Rajender Kumar Agarwal Managing Director

Ankit Agarwal Director – International

avi Foods Private Limited (RFPL) is the flag ship company of Singhania Group of companies engaged in the business of manufacturing processed foods all over India. The family owned organization commenced its activities in 1985 in Hyderabad, India. It had started exports in the year 2000, since then it has grown into a dominant player in the processed foods industry (especially biscuits & cookies) in the international market. RFPL recorded good turnover in 2015-16 and aims more turnover for the fiscal financial year 2016-17 making it one of the leading biscuit exporters of India. The Group Companies are building up team of qualified professionals with varied industry work experience and are installing modern management tools like ERP, supply chain logistics, thus creating a seamless backend support, to propel its ambitious

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business growth in years to come. RFPL Mission Statement: We work with full faith in strategic innovation which takes the road less travelled and enables to look beyond defined business boundaries. We believe in a growth propelled by our commitment to excellence in standards of client servicing combined with professionalism and integrity. RFPL Vision: We intend to explore technological developments and globalization which offer limitless opportunities to foster international alliances and consumer communications in new territories and establish product manufacture, distribution and sales to not only to ascent ourselves in developed countries by also to accomplish a category of dominance in the arena of

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processed food products. Ravi Foods Pvt. Ltd. markets its well diversified range of products under the brands “Treff” and “Dukes”. Our plants are HACCP, ISO 22000 and BRC certified. Our thirteen plants are located in South India and Uttaranchal, and are compliant to food safety and quality related requirements. A team of reputed Food Technologists from Germany & Holland are the guiding force in the areas of new product development, modern product practices across the globe, quality assurance & process improvement. RFPL currently exports to the USA, Canada, Mexico, Chile, Guatemala, Panama, Colombia, Caribbean Islands, Romania, Portugal, UK, Japan, Taiwan, Singapore, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Australia, African and the GCC regions. Our group also manufacturers for private label prestigious brands.

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coffee industry

A look at how Indian consumers have been steadily changing their patterns of drinking coffee

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ith its misty mountains, green meadows filled with flowers and almost unrelenting beauty, Polibetta, a small town in Kodagu or Coorg, is often fondly called “the Scotland of India“. However, drive down its winding roads fringed with tall rosewood trees and the occasional apple tree and you cannot miss its tropical context. Ancient banyans with thick aerial roots propping them up stand on sentinel duty as women in bright saris with equally bright baskets propped on their heads snake down the narrow mountain roads, pausing only to give us quick directions. Inside Nellikad Estate, our destination that morning, Tej Thammaiah, a third-generation planter, sits at a long dining table for eight, with his family. Breakfast is in progress. Kodava-style akki rotis, made from dough that uses both cooked rice and rice flour in the mix, plumped up like self-respecting northern phulkas, are being used to scoop up pandhi curry, the traditional pork preparation from the region.

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There's a fragrant orange cake that Shuchi, Tej's wife, has baked, flavoured with rind from the fruit that grows so plentifully in this sprawling 150 acre estate. To wash all this down is coffee -made in two ways. For the Thammaiah grandmother, touching 90, traditional Kodava coffee is being stirred. It is diluted, boiled with spices and sweetened with jaggery. This is the brew the community in this part of Karnataka has always had as their beverage of choice, ever since the British introduced coffee plantations here. For the rest of the family, there's another way of making and drinking coffee that is been adopted more recently. Tej is doing the honours that morning -with an AeroPress. He carefully measures out 10 grams of the coarsely ground Clouds in My Coffee, a bestselling gourmet blend by The Flying Squirrel, an artisanal coffee brand that he co-owns. He puts this in the AeroPress and pushes hot water through it. Voila, in less than a minute, we have a cup full of clean flavours -with just a whiff of the monsoon


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mustiness this particular blend promises. The difference between the way in which the Thammaiah matriarch drinks her coffee and the rest of the family now does summarise the phenomenal change in India's coffee culture over the last few years. From believing that sipping from glistening steel tumblers was the only “proper“ way to drink filter coffee -steaming hot, mostly milky, sweet and often chicory-adulterated -to driving down for “cool“ cappuccinos and lattes at chains like Barista, Cafe Coffee Day and lately Starbucks, Indian consumers have been steadily changing their patterns of drinking the world's favourite beverage. For the last two years or so, we are in the midst of the third wave of drinking coffee. Gourmet beans are becoming hip lifestyle choices. The AeroPress, pour-overs and even cold “nitro” brews are no longer alien terms. “Artisanal”, “singleestate”, “bean to cup” are badges of sophistication to flaunt in a world where instant is instantly dismissed. In the midst of all this, the younger metropolitan coffee drinker is also perhaps discovering what it means to taste -whether the roast is fresh, dark or light, the nose imbued with vanilla or spice, the blend more arabica than robusta or balanced -and indeed whether she likes it at all, which is really what any discovery of food and drink should be about. The Third Wave Leading the third wave of artisanal coffee -freshly roasted, blended by amateur or sometimes professional “cuppers“ (coffee tasters) to highlight various intrinsic flavours in the beans, and mostly retailed online -are brands like Thammaiah's The Flying Squirrel, which came up in Bengaluru in 2013. Almost at the same time, in Delhi, Blue Tokai, which sources its beans from several estates in the country but does not own any of these, also started marketing its coffee and changing the perception of young drinkers. Since then there has been a spurt in artisanal Indian coffee labels that promise a worldclass experience in your cup because it is a mistake to see all Indian coffee as necessarily indifferent or inferior to, say, what the African nations or the South Americans produce. Today, there are a handful of artisanal

coffee brands in the country, including The Flying Squirrel, Indian Bean, Blue Tokai, Halli Berri, Third Wave Roasters, Estate Craft, Riverine and Bynemara. Most of these source their beans from estates in Kodagu, Chikmagalur and Wayanad, traditional coffee growing areas in the Western Ghats. However, only about half of these companies have their own estates and can be called beanto-cup operators -where the growers themselves are also the retailers. The Flying Squirrel is the biggest in terms of volume (even though this is small-batch coffee) and in its reach (online retail, B2B reach and now a cafe directed at end consumers). When we drive down to the Nellikad Estate, from where almost all the beans for the blends the company makes come, it is harvest season. Delicate white coffee flowers are in bloom; a rare sight because they last for just about three days in the season. The ground is strewn with dark brown berries left to sun dry; and there is a lab with almost constant activity -testing, tasting and R&D. “The reputation that Indian coffee has -of being sub-standard or inferior to that produced in Africa or South America -is illdeserved. In fact, some of the best Ara bica grows here and it is used in some top-quality blends in countries like Italy and Germany. This image is because of lack of marketing,” says former ad man Ashish D'Abreo, founder-partner, The Flying Squirrel. D'Abreo, who ran an agency in Bengaluru, has just quit that to devote his attention to the coffee business, which began as a passion

project with his collegemate Tej. India is the sixth largest coffee producer but exports 70% of its beans. Most of the coffee in the domestic market -estimated at `36.6 billion in 2015, according to a Euromonitor 2016 report, “Coffee in India“ -is obviously instant and bulk. However, the small artisanal business seems to be catching on. While consolidated figures are not available for the fledgling business, individual players offer a sense of the potential. The Flying Squirrel says it doubled its sales last year, selling 6 tonnes of coffee to customers in 32 cities in 2016, up from 3.5 tonnes in 2015. From being primarily online re tailled or supplying to select cafes in the metros, the artisanal players are now upping the ante. Both Blue Tokai -which received a seed investment from Snow Leopard -and The Flying Squirrel have now opened their own cafes because it is important to educate the customers and allow them to taste and compare the coffees.“Consumers' tastes have evolved. Earlier, people were happy with something hot, frothy and bittersweet. Now most can discern the difference in taste among various coffee chains. There are also many customers who further appreciate the finer points of high-quality coffee,” says Rhea Sanghi, who works with Blue Tokai. The company plans to open more cafes in Delhi and Mumbai. In Bengaluru's Kora mangala, The Flying Squirrel cafe is a cheerful space, where you can peck at deliberately non-coffee

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offerings such as beer-battered prawns, zucchini cakes and pulled pork (with pandhi curry spices) and millets lasagne. However, the attention remains focused on the in-house micro-roastery. “We do all our roasting here and since all the coffee that we send out is freshly roasted, the roastery is always in use. This is a good way to engage the customers and educate them,“ says D'Abreo. For the record, you should keep a freshly roasted coffee for maximum 25-30 days. In the general market, sometimes, commercial blends as old as six months sell. Wake Up and Smell the Coffee Freshness is a requisite but what makes a coffee gourmet or at least good? At least, part of the answer must be terroir. The world of coffee has surprising parallels with the world of wine. If one of the most frequently heard discussions around wine is whether a superior wine is made in the vineyards or in the cellar, this is how we must now also discuss coffee. The role of the cellar master can hardly be over emphasised when you

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talk about a quality champagne, for instance, which is also a blend. Whether to emphasise strength or delicacy? How to bring out the best notes of freshness or complexity? How to balance the acidity, tannins, sweetness? How much to age to give wine its body and emphasise structure? All these are decisions the cellar master takes based on his palate and understanding. This is similar to the role of a cupper who will roast the beans and blend them to produce different flavours. Should your final blend come from 100% arabica (and which strains should it be) or should there be structure imposed by the robust robusta, and in what proportion? How should the beans be processed -in the traditional sun drying method, or the “wet“ method (in which all the pulp is removed before drying the beans), or newer experiments by which some of the pulp is left behind? How much should the beans be roasted? All these are decisions the taster-roaster takes that impact the taste of what's in your cup. However, you cannot produce good wine from bad grapes. Nor can you

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produce quality coffee from bad beans -which is why the idea of “single estate” coffee being inherently quality coffee is flawed. The tag “single estate” may mean nothing more than a snobbish statement if the beans are not grown and processed correctly. In fact, for some estates, it may be better to balance their production by blending them with beans from elsewhere. Terroir in the world of wine means everything from the slope of the land to the sunshine, water and air of a place that affects the grapes. The French popularised the term and marketed it but it really is an important factor in winemaking as also in any agri business. In the coffee estate, as we see some bushes sheltered by trees; others, hardier, exposed to more sunlight; and patches interspersed with vanilla, pepper plants and even oranges and gooseberries, we begin to understand the dynamics a little better. One day, a whiff of any or some of these may find its way into our cup back home in a dusty, choking city. Courtesy: Economics Times


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JABS INTERNATIONAL Infusing Flavours into the World

knowledge, experience, will power and prayers marched into the City of Dreams-Bombay three decades ago hoping to make his modest dreams turn into reality. The company strives hard to bring unto its varied and vast clientele across the globe only the finest of the authentic spices from few of the best sources available in the country, fusing them with their expert equipments and acquired and well-honed knowledge and skills thus making sure that each and every product of theirs is not only of the highest standards but also genuine in its character, surpassing customer expectation.

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abs International, the trade name of spice industry as the world profoundly knows it today, marks so many years since its foundation had been laid down by Mr. Bhaskar B. Shah.Mr. Shah, who had then been an aspiring businessman wanting to build a conglomerate out of the vast experience and earnest interest he had acquired by assisting at his Family Business, with a dream of establishing a break through entry in the World of Spices gave Dawn to the beautiful Morning that Jabs International is today- enriched with promising products and world class services. Jabs International acquired its present reputable and highly regarded position in the Spices Market not only amongst its customers but also its competitors ever since Mr. Shah, well-armed with his vast knowledge, experience, will power and prayers marched into the City of DreamsBombay three decades ago hoping to make his modest dreams turn into reality. Jabs International- is a socially, technically and ethically certified organization is recognized by the Food Safety Management SystemISO 22000:2005, Quality Management System-ISO 9001:2008, BRC ‘AA’,

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U. S. Food and Drug Administration Pursuant and it is also a Three Star Trading House having several other such credible ratings, certification and registrations by AGMARK, KOSHER, HALAL, FSSAI etc., standing tall among its competitors because of its continual efforts at upholding the standards set by these rule setters of the industry and yet, earnestly catering to the needs of their vast clientele; striving hard to keep all their stakeholders contended and satisfied. Like an Oak tree, JABS Internationalwhich has its roots in the city of Mumbai flourished and branched out its clientele into several cities spread across 50 countries including India. Jabs Internationals deals majorly in export of expert quality spices (whole, blended and grounded), Raisins (black, brown, golden) and sesame seed (natural, hulled and roasted) as well as other agrocommodities namely Cumin, Celery, Fennel, Turmeric, Coriander, Fenugreek, Ginger, Dill Seeds, Niger Seeds, Curry powder, Glum Olibanum etc as and how the requirements are received. It thus takes delight in contributing to 15% of the total exports to the Indian Economy. Jabs International acquired its present reputable and highly regarded position in the Spices Market not only amongst its customers but also its competitors ever since Mr. Shah, well-armed with his vast

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v JABS has its two factory in Navi Mumbai which is located at the heart of state. Apart from this one in Unjha and two in Mundra [Gujarat State] and one in Warangal [Andhra Pradesh] v We have installed latest Buhler make A5 Series Sortex Machine with multi vision TM Technology. The processing machine in our plant is installed by Buhler only. v We have dedicated full-fledged LAB [Chemical & Micro biological] and R& D centres at the manufacturing locations enabling us to set new bench marks in terms of scale, sophistication and speed.


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Fivestar Dehydration Pvt. Ltd. United Foods

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ivestar Dehydration Pvt. Ltd., since 2002 recognized as India’s finest manufacturer & exporter of Dehydrated Onion, Garlic & Other vegetables. FSDPL has always been a revolutionary company to bring latest techno. & Automatization in the History of Dehydration in India, which today brings all the Units of Fivestar’s Dehydration at most automatic plant in the industry, Keeping in mind the safety standards of a British Retail Consortium rules & International Standards.

Nishat Bhurani,

FSDPL understands the corporate work style in the International market & To stay on their commitments & services for their valuable customers. “Vertically Integrated” system in place &making our self also engage in FMCG Products like Peanut Butter, Jam, Sauces, etc with our Sister concern co. United Foods managed by same Managements, help us to meet the quality of service for our end customers with a hygienic & safe supply. Director, Fivestar Group

Ours plants, designed with 100% atomization brings best line up where machineries are concerned, placed separate Buhler Sortex for Individual dryers, with 10 Dryer making the biggest dehydration plant in India. With Production capacity of 50 MT/per day with 300 work force on place. Fivestar Dehydration holds BRC Certificate, USFDA, HACCP ISO 22000:2005, OK Kosher, Halal India, Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority (APEDA) & Indian Oilseeds and Produce Export Promotion Council (IOPEPC), Our achievements include supply to Indian Defense Service, Indian Modern Trade/Super Markets & Many other national & International Customers. Fivestar Group exports annually minimum 5000 MT of Just Dehydrated Onion in the International & National market, followed by Peanut Butter, Garlic, Jam sauces, Mayonnaise, Pastes, etc. As per our exporting records we supply to not less than 35 Countries round the Globe. Which are USA, Canada, Mexico, Brazil, United Kingdom, Germany, Spain, Netherlands, France, UAE, Belgium, Australia, New Zealand, Israel, South Africa, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Japan, Liberia, & many Other countries.

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www.unitedfoodsindia.com


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technology

Bühler presents pioneering foreign material detection technology and introduces new segment leader at Fruit Logistica

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housands of visitors to this year’s threeday Fruit Logistica exhibition in Berlin, Germany, will have the opportunity to meet The Bühler Group’s new Segment Development Manager for Fruit & Vegetables in Europe and CIS, Stefano Bonacina and to step inside the SORTEX F the industry’s most hygienic optical sorting platform for frozen fruit and vegetables. Available with SORTEX PolarVision™ technology, this system actively targets smaller and difficult-to-detect foreign material (FM) and enables processors to sort their produce hygienically - making it easier to comply with ever stricter safety specifications. Enthuses Stefano: “Bühler’s optical sorting portfolio, which includes the popular and respected SORTEX K and SORTEX E ranges, provides solutions for all stages of fruit and vegetable processing – from farm to freezer. The addition of the all-new SORTEX F, developed by Bühler’s in-house specialists, using current best-practice and hygenic product design, offers its most advanced hygienic technology to date, with a stainless-steel frame, sloped surfaces, hygienic conduits, and hygienic grade fixings.

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This unrivalled machine, with zero tolerance for product build-up, minimises the risk of contamination.” He adds that SORTEX PolarVision™ technology, available on the SORTEX F and the SORTEX E, is a sophisticated FM detection system, capable of delivering outstanding results, across a wide variety of frozen produce – from single products, such as peas or raspberries, to complex

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vegetable or fruit mixes. It uses a combination of sophisticated technologies, developed in response to industry demands for an advanced solution to tackle hazardous and problematic FM, including snails, dark and light plastics, wood, cardboard, cigarette ends, glass and stone. Stefano, whose experience in the fruit and vegetable industry spans 29 years – 18 of those with Bühler - started his

career in fruit and vegetable packaging. Before stepping into his current role, he was Bühler’s Sales Manager for Italy, with responsibility and a great track record in sales of optical sorters, across various industry sectors, including fruit & vegetable processing businesses. He also successfully managed the team of service engineers in Italy, to achieve a high level of customer satisfaction. He will be joined on the Bühler stand by regional specialists from Poland, Benelux, Austria and the UK. Now, in his new role, Stefano is planning to build on Bühler’s leading position in the fruit and vegetable processing market, by building even stronger and closer partnerships with key accounts, while also working on forging new relationships. He says: “I’ll be looking to recognise and understand new market trends and how Bühler can help customers capitalise on the opportunities these trends bring. It will also be important for me to build strong and trusting relationships across the sales network to drive consistent business growth.” Visitors to Fruit Logistica can find Buhler in Hall 8.1, stand B-24.


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THE NEXT GENERATION TECHNOLOGY ON YOUR WAY

Mr. Bhaskar Shastri

Mr. Chitrang Shastri

BHAGYODAYA Industries is a innovative and leading machinery manufacturing company based at Ahmedabad, India and is managed by 1st Generation Technocrat turned entrepreneur Mr. Bhaskar Shastri along with his son Mr. Chitrang Shastri We are glad to introduce ourselves as one of pioneer businessman who have modestly commenced the business in the Roller Flour Mill Plant with related brushes from the year 1978 and glad to state that we have deepen our roots very fast in the last two and a half decades. At the moment we are now expert and adept in manufacturing of all type of Roller Flour Mill Plant Machineries viz. Wheat Atta Plant, Gram Besan Mill plants, Gaur Gum Plants etc and also related auxiliaries spares and also successfully captured and lion part of the manufacturing of the related machinery of the entire India and its borders have been now expanding to other Western countries and African continent that proves our stuff. We have also completed successfully Turnkey Wheat Atta Plant projects in India and abroad and also take an opportunity to express thanks and gratitude for reposing trust and confidence on us, which has, enables us to climb such an apex destination. We have an associated firm like New Tech Engineering works, Kamdhenu Enterprise & Bhadrakali Industries.

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Sifter International

S. C. Sharma

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elcome to Sifter International, a legacy of trust, reliability and honesty along with new mantra of youth, dynamism and aggressive – a company that is committed to bringing world class agro based food processing machinery to its customers. Sifter International is a leading manufacturer of agro based food processing machinery which started in 1978 in India. With the experience of more than 3 decades and a team of more than 300 people, Sifter International is a renowned name worldwide which has successfully exported machinery in more than 40 countries like USA, Ukrain, Iran, Iraq, Syria, UAE, Balgium, Romania, Bulgaria, Nigeria, Ivory Coast, West Indies, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Spain, Mozambique, Malawi, Republic of Sierraleone, Borkinofaso etc. Sifter International an ISO 9001 (Quality Control) & ISO 22000 FSMS (Food Safety Management System) Registered Firm & Group companies are equipped with state –of the-art production plants in the heart of industrial town Faridabad, Haryana. The company is having CE certification for supplying the machines to European countries. The company has

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been engaged in the manufacturing of wide variety of agro based food processing machineries like: 1. Rice Mill 2. Wheat Roller Flour Mill 3. Dal and Besan Mill 4. Dehulling of Seeds 5. Essential Oil & Oleoresin 6. Cattle Feed Machinery 7. Maize Starch, Grit Machinery 8. Guar Gum Powder Machinery 9. Spices Machinery 10. Extraction From Herbs 11. Fruit Juice Machinery 12. Tomato Processing Machinery 13. Potato Chips Machinery 14. Solvent Extraction Machinery 15. Basic Drugs From Roots Our manufacturing facilities are equipped with latest machines like CNC Laser Sheet Cutting, Bending, Punching Machine, CNC Turret Punch Press, CNC Press Brake, NC Shearing Machine, Universal Milling Machine, Dynamic and Static Balancing Machine & Grinding Machine to keep pace with changing technology and requirement. Our R&D unit of Sifter International is equipped with the state f art technology & professional from the different field of engineering. With the feedback and suggestion from the global customer sifter continuously work on improvement and innovation of technology. In sifter R&D unit various activity such as development of new technology, improvement of existing machines, development of new process technology, process optimization etc. have been carried out to meet the demand of our esteem customers.

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SIFTER INTERNATIONAL, INDIA received the World Quality Commitment Award in the Gold Category

At this unit demonstration of various process and machineries have been carried our from time to time. It also organizes various demonstrations on clients request. In our R&D unit w have installed complete cleaning & grading plant of any type of cereals, de-hulling machines for various seeds, different types of dries like tumbler drier, spray drier, spin flash drier, vacuum drier, scrap surface drier, three stage evaporator, fludized bed drier, ACM grinding system, dall mill, rice mill machines and degerminator & dehulling machine. At Sifter International, it has always been our endeavor to provide quality, consistency, and excellent service. Business Initiative Directions is the leading organization awarding companies worldwide. We are awarded for the WQC (World Quality Commitment) International Star Award in the Gold Category at Paris, France 2009, We received Global award for Perfection Quality and Ideal Performance at Berlin (Germany) for the year 2010. www.sifterinternational.com


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DAHELA ENGINEERS (INDIA)

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e are pleased to introduce ourselves as one of leading manufacturer & exporter of ROLLER MILLS & ROLLER FLOUR MILLS machinery and Flour mill

machinery spare parts since 1982. Our machines are operational in all over India and we ensure best quality product.

Since your esteemed Company is one of those above machines are used. It would be our honors to serve such company. Enclosed catalogue will convince you about the

supremacy of our products. Therefore, we approach your good self to let us know about your requirement of above machines and place your valued order. The company assures its customers of consistence in quality as well as value for their money.

Product Range n Roller Flour Mill Plants n Roller Mill n Mini Flour Mill n Horizontal Scourer n Whole Wheat Atta Chakki Plant n C.I. Roll Grooving & Grinding n Flour Mill Machinery n Bran Finisher (Vibro) n Purifer (Vipro) n Separator (Vibro) n De- Stoner n Hammer Mill n Plan Shifter n Entoleter n Intensive-Damper n CI Rolls n Gear For any other information please feel free to communicate S. HARPAL SINGH DAHELA S. BHUPINDER SINGH DAHELA S. GURJEET SINGH DAHELA Telefax-0161-2490315, 5047315, 98142-26707, 98551-01405 or visit our Website www.dahelaengg.com, www.dahelaengineers.com

www.indiamart.com/dahelaengineers/ & Email us at info@dahelaengg.com, dahela@gmail.com

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food industry

India’s Food Processing industry on fast track Offers US $ 50 billion potential for foreign investment in five years – Amit Lohani, Founder Director of Forum of Indian Food Importers

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he Indian food and beverage sector is poised for tremendous growth, with its increasing contribution to world food trade every year. In India, the food and beverage sector has emerged as a high-growth and high-profit sector due to its immense potential for value addition, particularly within the food processing industry. India has also emerged as a global destination and this two way trade approach is continuing to benefit the consumers. The food industry, which is currently valued at US$ 39.71 billion and is expected to grow at a Compounded Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 11 per cent to US$65.4 billion by 2018. Food and grocery account for approximately 30 per cent of India’s consumption basket. Accounting for about 32 per cent of the country’s total food market, The Government of India has been instrumental in the growth and development of the food processing industry. The government through the Ministry of Food Processing Industries (MoFPI) is making all efforts to encourage investments in the business. It has approved proposals for joint ventures (JV), foreign collaborations;

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industrial licenses and 100 per cent export oriented units. Other Government of India agencies like Food Safety and Standards Authority of India are working hand-in-hand to support the initiative of trade development in India. Indian Food market The Indian food and grocery market is the world’s sixth largest, with retail contributing 70 per cent of the sales. Food has also been one of the largest segments in India's retail sector, which was valued at US$ 585 billion in 2016. The Indian food retail market is expected to reach US$ 894.98 billion by 2020. The Indian food processing industry accounts for 32 per cent of the country’s total food market, one of the largest industries in India and is ranked fifth in terms of production, consumption, export and expected growth. It contributes around 14 per cent of manufacturing Gross Domestic Product (GDP), 13 per cent of India’s exports and six per cent of total industrial investment. Indian food service industry is expected to reach US$ 78 billion by 2018. The Indian gourmet food market is currently valued at US$ 1.3 billion and is growing at a Compound Annual

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Growth Rate (CAGR) of 20 per cent. The online food ordering business in India is at a nascent stage, but witnessing exponential growth. The organised food business in India is worth US$ 48 billion, of which food delivery is valued at US$ 15 billion. With online food delivery players like FoodPanda, Zomato, Tiny Owl and Swiggy building scale through partnerships, the organised food business has a huge potential and a promising future. Changing Consumer Trends: Riding on factors like dual earning households, high aspiration levels, exposure to global cuisine, and various national and international food shows shopping trends in India are noticeably changing. Urban India is demanding more international and convenience food and with deep penetration of electronic media rural India is becoming more and more aware. According to Forum of Indian Food Importers (FIFI), the food processing sector in India is growing based on the exposure to international brands &products and courtesy efforts put in by domestic processing units more and more quality options are available for the

end consumers. International Investments FIFI estimates that the food processing sector in India has received around US$ 1.82 billion worth of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) during the period April 2015 - March 2016 and hold potential to draw as much as US$ 50 billion of investment over the next 5 years which will be a boost to the domestic processing sector. FIFI believes that in present world of globalization it is of great value to have imported consumer food products and ingredients compliment the domestic processing industry to warrant vast range of production with in India. To demonstrate its support and to benefit the Indian processing sector FIFI has recently signed multiple MOU's with various international government and trade organizations to promote imports and investments in India. A key initiative which will have major positive impact on the business environment with technology transfer and international benchmarking. The MOU were signed with Polish Manufacturing Federations, Agriculture market agency Poland (ARR), Government of Ontario


food industry

Canada and Singapore Manufacturing Federation . Some of the major international investments in this sector in the recent past are: • Mondelez International, the US-based confectionery, food, and beverage major, inaugurated its new manufacturing plant in Andhra Pradesh set up for Rs 1,265 crore (US$ 190 million), with an annual production capacity of 250,000 tonnes. • Di Bella, the Australia-based coffee chain, plans to invest Rs 67 crore (US$ 10 million) for setting up around 20 new outlets in Mumbai, besides entering Delhi and Bangalore by 2017. • KKR & Co LP, the US-based private equity firm, plans to invest about Rs 520 crore (US$ 77.38 million) in dairy company Kwality Ltd, which will be used to strengthen its milk procurement infrastructure and increase processing capacity. • PureCircle, a Malaysia-based natural sweetener producer, plans to invest around Rs 1,300 crore (US$ 200 million) in India to set up a manufacturing plant and make the country its regional production and export hub in the next five years. • Swiggy, a food delivery start-up owned by Bundl Technologies Private Limited, has raised Rs 230.34 crore (US$ 33.80 million) in a Series C funding round, with its existing investors SAIF Partners, Accel Partners, Norwest Venture Partners and Apoletto Asia Ltd contributing 79 per cent of the new funds raised. • Private Equity (PE) firm India Value Fund Advisors (IVFA) plans to invest around US$ 100-150 million in the food business in India over the next two years. • Zomato, a restaurant

search and discovery platform, has raised US$ 60 million from Singapore government-owned investment company Temasek, along with existing investor Vy Capital, in order to explore new business verticals. Government's Positive Approach: Government of India’s Ministry of Food Processing and Industries, released Vision Document – 2015, with an objective to promote food processing sector, increase level of processing and exploit the potential of domestic and international market for processed food products. The document envisages trebling the size of investment in the processed food sector by increasing the level of processing of perishables from 6 per cent to 20 per cent, value addition from 20 per cent to 35 per cent and share in global food trade from 1.5 per cent to 3 per cent by 2015. The Government of India has also relaxed foreign direct investment (FDI) norms for the sector, allowing up to 100 per cent FDI in food product e-commerce through automatic route, which is expected to act as a catalyst for the growth in the sector. Some of the major initiatives taken by the Government of India to improve the food processing sector in India are as follows: • The Government of India allocated US$ 225.7 million and announced various measures under the Merchandise Exports from India Scheme (MEIS), including setting up of agencies for aquaculture and fisheries in coastal states and export incentives for marine products. • Union Budget 201617 has proposed 100 per cent FDI through FIPB (Foreign Investment Promotion Board) route in marketing of food products produced and manufactured in India.

• The Government of India has approved the setting up of five numbers of Mega Food Parks in the states of Bihar, Maharashtra, Himachal Pradesh and Chhattisgarh. The Government plans to set up 42 such mega food parks across the country in next three to four years. • Ms Harsimrat Kaur Badal, Union Minister for Food Processing Industries, Government of India inaugurated the first of its kind US$ 20 million mega international food park at Dabwala Kalan, Punjab. • The Ministry of Food Processing Industries announced a scheme for Human Resource Development (HRD) in the food processing sector. The HRD scheme is being implemented through State Governments under the National Mission on Food Processing. • The Ministry of Food Processing Industries has taken some new initiatives to develop the food processing sector which will also help to enhance the incomes of farmers and export of agro and processed foods among others. • Spices Board, set up by the Ministry of Commerce to develop and promote Indian spices worldwide, aims spice exports of US$ 3 billion by 2017. • In the Budget 2015-16, a corpus of US$ 293.44 million was created under National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD) to provide cheaper credit to food processing industry. Excise duty on plant and machinery for packaging and processing has been brought down to six per cent from 10 per cent. • The Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) has issued new rules and amendments for importing products, to ensure quality products for Indian consumers, simplified the

process by setting shelf-life norms, and edited labeling guidelines to make them more trade friendly. • The Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) under the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare has issued the Food Safety and Standards (Food Product Standards and Food Additives) Regulations, 2011 and the Food Safety and Standards (Contaminants, Toxins and Residues) Regulations, 2011 which prescribe the quality and safety standards, respectively for food products. Way Forward: Going forward to have an acceptance in global market and to serve quality products to domestic consumers it will be important to adapt food safety and quality assurance mechanisms such as Total Quality Management (TQM) including ISO 9000, ISO 22000, Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP), Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) and Good Hygienic Practices (GHP) . . Government of India’s bodies will have to continue considering associations like FIFI as an asset and on other note roles and responsibilities of forums like FIFI will increase manifold as they will be holding Indian flag at several occasions and will have to ensure that two way trade is accepted and acceptability of brand India is enhanced.

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ODTIN (OFSPL) Fast becoming world's best TURN-KEY food processing solution provider

ODTIN Food Solutions Pvt. Ltd. (OFSPL) was established in the year 2010 in Indore, Madhya Pradesh, located in central part of India. In a short period of time, we do have to our credit a long list of satisfied customers in Indian and in International market as well. Our customized approach towards the project, makes us different from the others, and therefore becomes the first choice of the client world over to be their TURN KEY SOLUTION partner of their choice. ODTIN Food Solutions Pvt. Ltd. is in engineering assistance and project management in food processing sector. ODTIN’s vision is to become the world's best TURN-KEY food processing solution provider. Being the best means providing outstanding quality, service and value, so that it can make every client fully satisfied. MISSION "ODTIN (OFSPL) has absolute clarity about what we do ‘WE SELL HIGH QUALITY FOOD PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICES.’ Our success will ensure: customers will build their business, employees build their futures, and stakeholders build their wealth. Our CORE VALUES are: Integrity, Transparency, Honesty, Responsibility, Unity & Agility. SUPERIOR TECHNOLOGY We provide high end solutions, world wide know-how, customization, food safety management, hygiene by design, energy efficient solutions, eco–friendly engineered approach, project identification, project execution, monitoring & control, site plan, environmental protection plan installation & commissioning, training resource management, Assist in acquiring various international certifications required for food processors.. We Have Now Expanded Our Horizon in Product Lines- and Capacities 1. Potato Chips Production line (Full, semi-

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automatic). (100 Kg/hr- 1000 kg /hr) 2. Potato Flakes line. (Full automatic) (600 kg/hr- 1200 kg /hr) 3. Banana/Cassava Chips Production line. (Full, semi-automatic) (100 kg/ hr- 1000 kg /hr) 4. Indian Ethnic production line. (Full / semi-automatic) (100 kg /hr – 1000 kg /hr) Lentil / Dal /Nuts Frying line Full Automatic (300 kg / hr – 1000 kg /hr) 5. Extruded Pellets Process & Frying Line. (fully, semi-automatic) (300 kg/ hr- 1000 kg /hr) 6. Frozen Food Process Line. (French Fries, Vegetables) (500 kg /hr- 5000 kg /hr) 7. PASTA Production line. (Short cut / Long cut / Instant Pasta) (150 kg /hr12000 kg /hr) 8. Roaster of various capacities (Can be customized) 9. Chikki line (250 kg/hr- 500 kg / hr) 10. Juice Line various capacities 11. Mineral Water Line various capacities 12. Fruit Ripening Chambers 5tons per day to 10tons per day 13. Cold Rooms / Cold Storages. 14. Packing Machines wash down models for frozen products 15. Multihead weighers Our International Association for India Market: As a result of ODTIN’s smart and aggressive working we have a presence not only all over India but also covered International markets as well like Russia, Kazakhstan, Nepal, Afghanistan, Egypt, Nigeria, Columbia, Colombo etc.. Resulting we have new partners for Indian market namely STORCI, SPA (150-600 kg/hr) and FAVA SPA, (1000-12000 kg/ hr) for Italy for their Pasta production Lines ( International World Fame Proven Patented Unbeaten Technology) and EIMA GMBH, Germany known for Potato Processing Lines world over for higher capacities. And KON, in Moscow, Russia. AGRO SERVICES l Site survey, feasibility, selection and prioritization l Climatic condition study and recommendations l Cropping pattern study, recommendations for crop rotations, inter cropping & mix farming l Consultancy on Farm

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development, seed and crop production (includes field crops, fruits and vegetables), Integrated pest management, pre/post harvest management, along with supply chain and storage. Backward and front linkage with strategic procurement plan. l Suggesting for implementation of short/long-term plans for achievement of business objectives and designing strategies to address quality issues OUR TEAM Our team of young, energetic, enthusiastic, and likeminded engineers with in-depth experience in the field of food processing, project execution, marketing and accounts strives hard to give complete turnkey solution to industries related to Food Processing with an objective to serve them from A to Z. As we are adding on the products to our product line, we are also enhancing the strength not only by numbers but also by knowledge gaining. Three senior most international food technologists have joined the panel of ODTIN Food Solutions Pvt. Ltd., Indore, India, leveraging to play in any part of world in any food processing sector with a competitive edged as far as the technology is concerned. PROMOTERS Mr. Parth – Director Technical, B E, M Tech (Mechanical Engg.), MBA (Finance Management)—is an icon in project management and food processing manufacturing machineries since last 15 years. He served Tata Group of Companies, INDIA in project management. Mr. Shekhar – Director Sales, M Sc (Agriculture). Having a wide experience in sales of Agri input, output and procurement of agro commodities, over all exposure of feasibility study of region for farm management, climatic studies, cropping patterns, pre and post harvest management and supply chain of agro commodities for more than 22 years. Served to Reliance Industries, Hindustan CIBA Geigy, Indo – American Hybrid Seeds. Apart from promoters, team of 10 qualified engineers and technicians and 12 marketing professionals working cohesively to achieve the set targets. OUR CLIENTS We always value people, be it our team, our clients or the customers served through them with a strong urge to have long term business relations with our clients. We believe in Growth by Growing Together. Our satisfied customers are spread in almost every part of world including domestic market of India carrying a huge BRAND VALUE.


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profile

M. K. Overseas

Stands for Quality & Safety from Farm to Fork M. K.

Overseas has been exporting products to various countries around the world. The major importing countries include Indonesia, UAE, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Iran, Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq, Bahrain, Oman, Qatar, Yemen, Georgia, Malaysia, Vietnam, Angola and West African countries. The company has a HACCP and

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ISO certified world class state-of-the-art integrated abattoir. The abattoir is equipped with a German slaughter line from BANSS, a rendering plant, a well equipped laboratory for inhouse quality control and an effluent treatment plant. The livestock is sourced from the state of Punjab, which is one of the leading states of India in agriculture

AgriBusiness & Food Industry w March 2017

and animal husbandry. Punjab harbors the best livestock, which is raised organically on natural pastures and are free from growth hormones. Each buffalo slaughtered in the abattoir is subjected to antemortem and post-mortem examination by highly qualified Veterinarians under the supervision of the Animal Husbandry Department of the State Government. The slaughtering is done strictly as per the Islamic provisions for HALAL, producing genuine Halal Buffalo meat. The carcasses are chilled above +2ยบC for 24 hours till the pH drops below 6. The carcasses with pH below 6 are deboned, deglanded, packed and frozen in blast/plate freezers to achieve a core temperature of -18ยบC. The deboning, fresh packing and frozen packing halls are air conditioned to maintain low temperature. During the course of all operations, the international standards are followed for maintaining hygiene, sanitary, GMP, GHP and all necessary measures for production of safe and wholesome frozen buffalo meat. The human resource engaged in various procedures and operations are skilled and well trained

Chaudhary Mohd. Kamil Qureshi

Chairman

to carry out the procedures in a hygienic manner to ensure that M. K. Overseas is able to produce its world famous brands of buffalo meat. The frozen meat is packed in cartons, strapped, shrink wrapped and subjected to metal detection. The packed meat is stored at a temperature of -18ยบC in cold stores. The product is dispatched to the importing countries pan-globally in reefer containers via sea as well as aerial routes in a manner that the quality is ensured all along the supply chain. M. K. Overseas has won several awards and accolades and has emerged a leading buffalo meat exporter to Middle East, CIS, South East Asia, Central Asia, Far East and African continent. Email: mko@mkoverseas.in Web: www.mkoverseas.in


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pre-event

Middle East stands out as a key growth area for food providers in global packaged F&B, with market tipped to reach USD2.2 trillion by 2020

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he most significant representation of leading F&B brands the MENA region has ever seen will soon be converging in Dubai, as more than 140 major international food and beverage producers come together at the new Power Brands segment at Gulfood 2017. Represented by a contingent of major food industry heavyweights including Unilever, Nestle, Del Monte and IFFCO, the throng of leading F&B brands will go on display at the 22nd edition of the world’s largest food and hospitality show, which runs at Dubai World Trade Centre (DWTC) from 26 February to 2 March. Commenting on the influx of world-class food producers and distributors at the show, James George, Analyst, Euromonitor International, said: “Manufacturers and distributors alike are looking at the Middle East and North Africa as one of the key growth regions. This is mainly fuelled by a handful of markets particularly the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia and Egypt. With recent Euromonitor data highlighting that the global packaged food market is expected to reach USD2.2 trillion by 2020, George revealed that Asia-Pacific, and

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the Middle East and Africa are prevailing as the key growth drivers of packaged food globally. “Through new entrants or brand expansion, many brands will look to capitalise on the growth potential that these regions offer with significant investments across the region. The need for quality products and services will continue to rise as a growing population drive increased demand in the food and beverages sector,” added George. Capitalising on this growth curve, the new Power Brands segment at Gulfood will connect regional buyers with international producers and distributors of both high-end and household name food and beverage brands in one place. “2017 is a special year for Del Monte as we are celebrating our 125-year anniversary. We have

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come a long way, focusing always on quality, product innovation and freshness. During these years, Del Monte kept its promise by serving a meaningful cause - the health of its consumers - and providing nutritious, convenient and affordable fresh products,” said Heloise Buzet, Head of Marketing MENA, Del Monte (UAE). “For us, Gulfood and the new Power Brands segment in particular is an amazing opportunity to do business. As a truly global event, we are able to examine trends while increasing our trade networks to export on an even more significant scale,” she added. Furthermore, Fonterra the world’s largest exporter of dairy products - is set to debut at Gulfood with its eyes firmly set on MENA region growth. “Built on the expertise and heritage of New Zealand

dairy farming, Fonterra is behind brands known and loved by millions of people in more than 140 countries,” said Santiago Aon, General Manager Fonterra Middle East. “We’ve supported the growth in dairy consumption across the Middle East and Africa for more than 40 years and we are focused on future investment and growth in this important region. “Gulfood is a great opportunity for us to showcase our high-quality NZMP ingredients and Anchor Food Professionals products. We are keen to engage with customers to better understand and meet their evolving needs,” added Aon. Products being featured in the Power Brands segment at Gulfood 2017 include elite brands distributed regionally by La Marquise International, a specialist department of regional sector heavyweight Buhaleeba Group’s Foodservice Division, and Spanish food and beverage leader MVF Select. La Marquise, who recorded a 25 per cent increase in sales in 2016, will use Gulfood 2017 to promote a range of speciality products including Saffron Syrup by 1883 Maison Routin. “Our Gulfood stand will be interactive and engaging


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because we want our visitors to feel like they’re not at an exhibition, but in a bar with 1883 Maison Routin, or in a coffee shop with Pellini or a gourmet store with IRCA, Palais du Chef and MEC3.” MVF Select, which markets its products as perfect for “the most discerning palates”, is looking to its fifth Gulfood showing to introduce ‘Spherification Products’, a natural health product of fruit and honey, as well as its star performers - original Organic Caviar and Halal Meats and Pâté (deer and ostrich). “The region is a very important market for us,” explained Yamila Tawfik, MVF Select’s International Business Manager. “It’s the connection between Europe and Asia and offers great potential as a fast-growing market in high gastronomic

products.” The F&B purveyors are among 140 headline names lining up for Gulfood’s first Power Brands feature. Trixie LohMirmand, Senior Vice President, Exhibitions & Events Management, DWTC said: “With more than 5,000 exhibitors, Gulfood is the perfect springboard for major

distribution players who are looking to demonstrate their innovative products and solutions to international retailers. The show will provide a unique experience for buyers sourcing a full spectrum of boutique and household name brands. “Following unprecedented demand for space, the new Power Brands platform will

read like a Who’s Who of the F&B world, reflecting the growing need for quality products and services in this region.” Power Brands is one of eight dedicated segments now housed within Gulfood to ensure buyers can navigate the expansive show more effectively. The other sectors are: Beverages; Dairy; Fats & Oils; Health, Wellness & Free-From; Pulses, Grains & Cereals; Meat & Poultry; and World Food. Gulfood 2017 is a trade event open strictly to business and trade visitors. The show is open 11am-7pm from February 26 to March 1 2017 and 11am-5pm on March 2 2017. Visitors can pre-register at www.gulfood. com to save AED150 (US$ 40) on the on-site entry fee of AED350 (US$ 95).

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profile

Azan Group –

Global Meat and Other Products

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zan Group comprising of Azan Group of Industries, Azan International, Al Azan Exports, Al Azan Frozen Food, Azan India Exim Logistics Pvt. Ltd., A N Exim Solution Pvt. Ltd and Azan India Exim Logistics has Head Office in New Delhi headed by its fonder Mohammed Ather, as Managing Director, Azan Group. According to him "This group is a quality-oriented organization, adhering to ISO and HACCP quality standards, we take additional precaution to ensure that each of the products we deal in is healthy, high on nutritional content, safe, and uncontaminated. We have a team of qualified and experienced professionals who follow clean and hygienic conditions at our state-ofthe-art processing unit. What started in 2011 with a petite investment of Rs. 3 lakh is today near about Rs. 80 to 100 crore group with seven associate companies (4 companies involved in exports and 3 in logistics). The mindbogglig 100% plus growth rate is well exemplified by the group's turnover of Rs. 15 crore in the preceding year and an implausible Rs. 80 to 100 crore this fiscal year . Our products are free from all kinds of adulterants. Our

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Mohammed Ather, MD range of ready to eat food and curries are 100% hygienic, approved by ministry of food processing, and certified with ISO HACCP.” “Our products contain no preservatives and are gluten free. No refrigeration or cold storage is required for these products. Besides they have a shelf life of more than 12 months, whereas the ready to eat products have the shelflife of 8 months." utters the exuberant and vibrant Mrs. Nazia Ather (wife of Mohammed Ather). Product Portfolio • Halal Fresh Frozen Boneless Buffalo

2012-2016: Five years of uphill battleship annexed 7 awards of triump

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Meat : Compensated Meat, Forequarter and Hindquarter Halal Fresh Frozen Buffalo Offals : Frozen / Salted Omasum, Tripes. Ready to Eat Products : Chicken / Mutton / Vegetarian etc. Agro Products : Onion, Pumpkin, Potato, Basmati / Non-Basmati Rice, PET Foods, DOG Food like Omasum and Tripe Tastes do vary according to preferences and Most of the products are available in different flavors and contain high nutritional value.

The group's processing units are duly certified and approved by concerned regulatory bodies. "We have an advanced packaging unit. To preserve the quality features, nutrients, and original properties of the ingredients and to prevent penetration of moisture and dirt into the packets, we use the finest quality food grade packaging material, utters the vivacious Mrs. Nazia Ather. According to Mohammed Ather, his wife Mrs. Nazia Ather, a qualified Professional, who is also involved in the group's state of affairs, is his lady luck, creating the magical aura in all his endeavors and triggering the fast growth of the group. Mohammed Ather also owes the success of the group to the blessings of Allah. "Everything is possible if you are loyal and confident," says Mohammed Ather to the readers. The dynamic, aggressive, and sincere husband-wife with three kids namely Miss Sahar Noor Ather, Mr. Mohammed Arham and Mohammed Ibrahim duo are looking forward towards generating three times the present turnover soon.


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pre-event

March Hosts the ninth edition of the Dubai Drink Technology Expo

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he 9th edition of the Dubai Drink Technology Expo (DDTE) is scheduled to be held fromMarch 7 –9, 2017atthe Dubai International Convention and Exhibition Center. DDTE aims to facilitate networking, learning and the sharing of experiences and knowledge in the beverage industry, from bottling and canning to production and packing.Held annually, DDTE is now stepping into its 9th year making it a must attend event for the beverage Industry. The expo will host a fantastic list of local and international exhibitors covering the entire spectrum of technologies and services catering to thebeverage industry, ranging from Production and Processing Equipment, Packaging Equipment and Supplies, Ingredients and Flavors, Plant Equipment and Maintenance, Sanitation, Labeling and Printing Equipment, Dispensing and Vending Equipment, Conveying and Material Handling Equipment, to providers of Merchandising and Promotional Materials. This year, DDTE is marked by the participation of over 100 exhibitors, coming to display and share their latest

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products, services, techniques, and expertise, all focusedon the beverage industry. DDTE is one of the main platforms in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) to engage with your customers, demonstrate your latest products, build your brand awareness, conduct face-to-face business, and – hopefully, make sales. DDTE 2017 promises to be a welcoming destination for attendees, representing every facet of the beverage industry. Meet exhibitors and representatives eager to engage in conversations and to show the best in the marketplace. DDTE also boasts a wide range of learning and networking opportunities that will definitely help businesses make the right connections. The beverage industry in the Gulf and the Middle East and North Africa region has been witnessing a remarkable growth and development in the past years. This is due to the constant increase in local demand, in addition to the increase in the population growth rate and personal income rate in the region. In line with theseamazing developments, Dubai will also host the Global Water and Beverage

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Technology Congress (GWBT).Basically an outstanding meeting that attracts senior executives and influential speakers from across the industry, GWBT will discuss pressing topics and latest trendsthat matter the most for the regional water and beverage industry. The Dubai Drink Technology Expo is organizedby INDEX Conferences and Exhibitions Organization Est., member of INDEX Holding, and itis supported by the International Society of Beverage Technology (ISBT), the American Beverage Association, TEA board of India, Arab Asian Beverage Alliance, UAE Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Dubai Export Development Corporation, Jebel Ali Free Zone (JAFZA), and Dubai Department of Economic Development.

GWBT Congress 2017 Highlights: • Innovations in the Water & Beverage Industry • Sanitation & Microbial Control • Beverage Trends and Regulatory Environment • Trends, Challenges and the Future of Beverage Packaging


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News Round-up Dairies take baby steps into growing infant food products

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ising number of working women and increasing awareness are driving demand for infant foods. Indian private dairy firms are increasingly looking at expanding capacities to produce infant food to serve clients in business-to-business segment, as the market for infant food is witnessing a healthy growth. The primary factor that is helping buoyant demand for infant food primarily includes the rising number of working women across the country, apart from increasing awareness across the society to ensure that children get nutritious food. Some private dairies like Schreiber Dynamix and Prabhat Dairy have already set up dedicated production facilities to make infant food, while other dairies are looking

at adding production capacities in modular formats. Anand Ranjan, analyst with IMARC, said that India currently has about 125-150 million children within the age of four, making it the largest market in Asia for milk-based infant food producers and allied industries. Schreiber Dynamix recently inaugurated its `250 crore speciality ingredients plant for infant nutrition products. The company, which closed a deal with Abott India for infant food, is currently in talks with other firms like Nestle. Managing director of Schreiber Dynamix Amitabha Ray said: “The market for infant nutrition powder has started maturing now with an increasing population of working women.“ Mumbai-based Parag

Milk Foods, which recently ventured into the nutrition foods market, plans to foray into infant nutrition as well. “We are currently working on a plan to introduce infant nutrition as part of our mainstream dairy business, which also consists of four brands namely Gowardhan, Go, Pride of Cows and Topp Up,“ said Mahesh Israni, chief marketing officer, Parag Milk Foods. French nutrition and dairy major Danone India in January launched its global flagship infant formula brand Apta mil and plans to launch 10 other brands this year. Rodrigo Lima, managing

FSSAI notifies comprehensive regulations for food recall

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early two years after the Maggi saga and after much deliberations, the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI) has notified a comprehensive food recall policy, making it mandatory for all food companies to formulate a detailed recall plan. However, it exempts food retailers from having such a plan unless they manufacture, import, or are involved in wholesale supply of food. This notification has been formulated to ensure removal of food under recall from all stage of the value chain, ensure timely dissemination of information to consumers.

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It also sets out guidelines to ensure retrieval, destruction or reprocessing of the recalled food products. The regulations have given out detailed guidelines for initiation of food recall, operation of food recall and recall communication. “The food business operator shall maintain the food distribution records which include the names and addresses of suppliers and customers, nature of food, date of purchase, date of delivery, lot number, batch code, pack size, brand name, date of manufacture, date of expiry and best before date, and shall maintain such records for a

AgriBusiness & Food Industry w March 2017

period of one year from best before date or the expiry date, as applicable,” the regulations stated. The food operators will also need to ensure they give out “Food Recall Notice” to promptly inform consumers. The notice needs to have details about the reason for the recall, places or outlets

director, Danone India, in an earlier interaction said that the company was looking at doubling its nutritional business in India by 2020 during which it would launch Neocate, prescribed for nutritional management of infants. The other products that Danone India is looking to introduce include a malt-based drink and a range of products for children with inborn errors of metabolism. According to Ranjan of research firm IMARC, “It is the high margins that are attracting these dairy giants to the infant food market, which is growing on the back of rapid urbanisation. The increasing population of working women is among the major factors.“ According to IMARC, the approximate size of milkbased infant nutrition market was Rs 4,000 crore in 2016 and will touch nearly `7,000 crore by 2020, growing at the rate of around 10-15%.

where the food is found and the action that the consumer needs to take. In addition, the food business operator will need to submit periodic status reports (weekly or otherwise specified) to the FSSAI CEO regarding the progress of the recall. They will also need to retain complete documentation on food recall for inspection by the FSSAI or State food safety commissioners. The storage of the recalled food products will need to be done at clear labelled areas. To subscribe

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News Round-up Biscuit-makers demand exemption from GST

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he Rs. 36,000-crore Indian biscuit industry, demanded complete waiver of Good and Services Tax (GST) on Low Price-High Nutrition (LPHN) biscuits priced under a maximum retail price of Rs. 100 a kg. “LPHN biscuits are the only hygienically produced and affordable snack sold in small packs retailing at Rs. 2-5. Consumed mainly by the lowincome group, any increase in price of LPHN biscuits causes a direct reduction in demand,” said Mayank Shah, VicePresident and spokesperson of the Biscuit Manufacturers’ Welfare Association.

He said while there is a 62 per cent weighted average hike in input costs (maida, sugar and vegetable oil) over the last decade, the biscuit manufacturers have been unable to increase their realisation pro-rata. Glucose biscuits offer consumers 72 kilo calories/ per rupee (Kcal/re) compared to 55 by bread, 18 by potato chips and 29 by namkeens. All three enjoy concessional rate of taxes. A 70 gram pack of glucose biscuits which retails at Rs. 5 offers 315 Kcal, which is about 16 per cent of the daily dietary recommendation of the government.

Last year, the biscuit industry procured agriculture produce of over Rs. 13,300 crore. Sugar prices have more than doubled in the last decade and the current wheat flour and vegetable oil prices make net margins on LPHN biscuits reduced to just 3 per cent. Fear of the advent of negative margins phase forces manufacturers to curtail production leaving demand unsatiated. Glucose biscuits retailing at Rs. 70 a kg today attract net taxes of Rs. 7.21 which is higher than the

value addition earned by the industry (Rs. 7.01). Premium category “The government may tax premium biscuits as they deem fit. We are a highly compliant industry with last annual contribution to the exchequer at Rs. 3,075 crore. However, on behalf of over 600 manufacturers of LPHN biscuits retailed at up to MRP of Rs. 100 a kg, I urge the GST Council to completely exempt the LPHN biscuits,” Shah added.

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News Round-up Food-tech firms focus on the last mile to deliver the goods

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yberchef, an online marketplace for homecooked meals, recently shut down operations in Mumbai and Gurgaon. The food-tech portal did not own the delivery part of the business and could not provide consistency in both quality and delivery to its customers. “The tech model in food is failing as delivery is the biggest issue. Food has to be delivered within a time frame; and to make it work, it requires extra cost which the customer will not bear. Besides, food is a personalised business where maintaining taste and quality is always a challenge,” says Neha Puri, founder, Cyberchef. Six-month-old Gorb from Essel Group is already floundering on delivery time. The new food-tech player is apologising to its customers for failing with its ‘just-intime’ deliveries. Delivery is the key to control the complete customer experience, and those who

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have a full-stack model seem to survive the business. For instance, well-funded players such as Holachef and Box8 are still trying to make a success of their business models. But while Holachef is on consolidation mode in Mumbai, Box 8 is spreading its operations to new markets. “The full-stack model has helped us get the unit economics right,” says Anshul Gupta, co-founder, Box 8. “Food-tech is a tough business, but there has to be a balance between profitability and growth. We will be in two new markets of NCR and Hyderabad this year with the Rs. 50-crore funding we raised from IIFL and Mayfield last year.” Targeting a Gross Merchandise Volume (GMV) of Rs. 100 crore this year, the two-year-old start-up claims it has the bandwidth to go to new cities (after Mumbai, Bengaluru and Pune) with funds that will last for the next

AgriBusiness & Food Industry w March 2017

24 months. However Ratan Tatabacked Holachef believes in being cautious, and is targeting a GMV of Rs. 50 crore before expanding its operations beyond Mumbai. The twoyear-old firm claims its endto-end full-stack business model has helped it cover the ‘blind spots’ in the food tech business. “We are still seeking healthy margins, and plan to take up up our operating margins to 20-25 per cent to achieve break-even this year,” says Saurabh Saxena, CEO and founder, Holachef. Others like Reliance Industries-owned Burrp, the oldest restaurant discovery and listing platform, is making a comeback by transitioning to an online ordering and transaction-led model, but without delivery. “After resurrecting our brand last year, we are now moving from an online listing to a transaction-led model, and expect to break even in the third year of operations with a turnover of Rs. 150 crore,” says Pradeep Prabhu, Co-Business Head, Burrp.

In a parallel move, there is consolidation within the food-tech category. Last year, delivery app Runnr took over beleaguered food-ordering start-up Tiny Owl, and merged its operations to become a food ordering-cum-delivery platform. “Tiny Owl did an asset sale and its promoters continue to hold less than 10 per cent stake in the company. Since it did not have a delivery model, it was not able to control the customer experience, which was a thin-stack model,” explains Mohit Kumar, cofounder and CEO, Runnr. According to research the Indian online food delivery industry experienced many roadblocks in its growth in 2016. This was also visible in low investor sentiment, wherein the industry saw a total funding of less than $80 million in 2016 against $500 million in the same period a year before. But the industry grew at 150 per cent year-on-year last year with an estimated GMV of $300 million in 2016.


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News Round-up Haldiram races past MNCs & regional rivals like HUL's food division, Bikanervala with revenue of over Rs 4,000 crore

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esi halwai and snacks maker Haldiram’s revenues grew 13% to cross Rs 4,000 crore in FY16 shrugging increased scrutiny from food regulator amid the Maggi crisis. The Indian snack major is now twice the size of Hindustan Unilever's packaged food division or Nestle Maggi and larger than the India turnover of the two American fast food rivals Domino’s and McDonald’s put together. The company has three distinct areas of operations with Haldiram Snacks and

Ethnic Foods with that clocked Rs 2,136 crore from the northern region, Nagpur based Haldiram Foods International that caters to western and southern markets with annual sales of Rs 1,613 crore and a much smaller company, Haldiram Bhujiawala, for the eastern market with revenues of Rs 298 crore in FY16. These figures, when combined with other regional snacking firms, conclusively demonstrates one thing — in fast food or munchies, despite the profusion of MNC brands with high cool quotient, good Indian palate prefers local savouries. "We have increased our reach and developed products in-house that ensure quality control. We also understand

Goli Vada Pav co-founder shares his success story

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successful entrepreneur understands the needs of society and thinks of fulfilling them, said Venkatesh Iyer, founder of Goli Vada Pav. Speaking on the second day

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of TiECon-2017, Iyer said that he converted challenges as the steps to achieve success. “Finally, I got success in ethnic food business along with co-founder Shivadas

AgriBusiness & Food Industry w March 2017

Indian palate well and that comes handy while launching new products,” says 43 yearold Kamal Agarwal, fourth generation member of the founding family. The brand, that experts feel, could have more than Rs 5,000 crore in retail sales, has survived through disputes and break-ups in the original Agarwal family that started with a small shop in Bikaner in 1937. Haldiram’s is the biggest brand of those launched by Agarwals and the second largest Indian food brand after Parle. While restaurants and casual dining was the beginning, packaged products now make up 80% of revenues. Haldiram’s is by far the market leader in traditional

snacks market and bigger than five of its regional rivals — Balaji Wafers, Prataap Snacks, Bikanervala, Bikaji Foods and DFM Foods — combined. “Food is culture in the country and Indian food should do well. But consumers are experimenting with food and it is under scrutiny. Companies would have to adapt and stay relevant especially for millennials,” said Devendra Chawla, Future Group president that has recently launched traditional aloo bhujia in peri peri, wasabi and schezwan flavours. The snacks market is still dominated by western snacks such as potato chips and finger sticks controlled primarily by Pepsi Frito Lays and ITC Foods. Even these companies are gradually entering into Haldiram’s turf. For instance, Pepsico’s Kurkure has 16 variants of Indian namkeen while Paper Boat will soon enter the category

Menon,” he said. Iyer said that he did not lose hope when his outlets in Mumbai were shut and many cases were registered against him. “It was the best lesson in my life and I took it as challenge,” said Iyer. He said Goli Vada Pav has 350 outlets at 90 places in the country. Iyer advised the young generation not to limit their dream to jobs and become entrepreneurs and create jobs. “Idea is more important to entrepreneurs. Without a proper idea, no entrepreneur can taste success. If ideas are shared with others, they will get a better shape. Exchange of thoughts is more important in entrepreneurship,” he said. Iyer recalled that in 2007, an investor liked his story but joked, saying “vada pav” cannot be corporatized.

“Finally, one of the top names in Indian financial industry, Jerry Rao decided to invest in our company. Following that, a couple of other high net worth individuals took stake in the business and raised a first round funding of Rs 5 crore. Thereafter, we planned to open 300 stores in the city. However, steep rentals, high real estate costs and unavailability of space prevented us from doing so,” he informed. “Try out new things. Many of them may not work out, but don’t give up. Exploration will lead you to innovation which will lead you to best operational strategy. The design of business is the reason we have been able to scale up in an efficient manner and this came to us because we were not scared of exploring options and even failing at some,” said Iyer.


News Round-up Kolkata street food goes online

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ove over biryani, daab chingri and Thai green curry. Now, Kolkata's street food is available on online food delivery platforms. From bhelpuri, soda shikanjiand papri chaat to rose khass, phuchka and even paan -everything can be ordered online and delivered at your doorstop. The online menu of Sandip Soda Shikanji at Vivekananda Park now lists everything from rose milkshake and kachha aam milkshake to kala khatta and khass. Mouthwatering

pictures of khatta meetha churmur, dahi pakora chaat and dahi phuchka are all available on line as are paans from Ashok Paan shop on Bondel Road. "It's been three months since we started offering this servi ce to keep pace with the digital world," said Rahul Kumar Chaurasia from Ashok Paan shop, adding that the app helps them deliver to places as far away as Tollygunje and Kasba. Most of his clients opt for gundi paan, which costs Rs 8 each, but there are also many takers for the special singara paan that costs Rs 50. Delivery boy Bapi Roy says he delivers street food worth Rs 300-400 each day. “There is one client on Mayfair Road who has ordered lachha paan worth Rs 150 at least 25 times

in a month!“ Roy said. Piku Pandit, who runs the popular Durga Pandit Ka Phuchka Stall, is upbeat about online delivery. “Clients who can't physically come down are happy to be served this way. On some days, I even get as many as 15 online orders,“ said Pandit, who packs extra chillies, onion and lime with every order. Sandip Das, the owner of Sandip Soda Shikanji stall, insists that it is important to ride the app bandwagon to survive. “This shop was set up by my grandfather. Elderly people might not understand apps, but I need to be savvy to survive. There are days when I get 50 orders through the app,“ Das said. He rues that he can't serve online customers his trademark golas because he hasn't been able to “get the packing right“. Advocate Tridib Sen drives down to Das's stall only to have the gola. The rest he orders online. “Time and distance are

important. In my profession, it is difficult to find time to go and have food on the streets. Since these are now available online, why wouldn't I avail the facility? It costs approximately Rs 10 more per delivery but that doesn't pinch my pocket at all. In betwe en work, all I need to do is go online and order a masala thumsup or a shikanji and it's delivered within minutes,“ Sen said. Piyali Saha, in-charge of an educational institute, places online phuchka orders at least thrice a month. “Of course, the fun of having phuchka on the streets is missing at home or office.Yet, it's better than not having it at all. It's all about adapting to the need of the hour,“ she said. There's one catch though. Customers can no longer cajole for a free sukhha puchka or a helping of bhujia to top the chaat. But that's a small sacrifice to make for street food delivered straight to your workstation.

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News Round-up Bikano eyes Rs 1,000 crore turnover by FY 2019

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ast food and snacks retailer Bikano, part of Bikanerwala Group, is eyeing Rs 1,000 crore

turnover by fiscal 2019 as it expands product offerings and plans to open more outlets across the country. "We are looking at Rs 1,000 crore turnover by financial year of 2019 as we expand our food and snacks offerings. We are also looking to increase our retail outlet count," Bikanerwala Director Manish Aggarwal said. The company, which entered ready-to-eat segment

Capital Foods targets Rs 500 cr revenue this fiscal

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MCG firm Capital Foods, owner of Ching's Secret brand of instant noodles and masalas, is targeting a topline of Rs 500 crore this financial

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year and expects 40 per cent increase next fiscal. "This year we will close at Rs 500 crore and next year we are looking at a turnover of Rs 700 crore. We are growing at a CAGR of 40 per cent," Capital Foods Managing Director Ajay Gupta told. Capital Foods sells Ching's Secret brand of instant noodles, masalas, sauces and Smith & Jones range of ketchup and

AgriBusiness & Food Industry w March 2017

last month, reported turnover of Rs. 550 crore in the previous fiscal and looking to close the current financial year with sales of Rs. 650-675 crore. The company is also setting up two new plants in Greater Noida and Hyderabad for an investment of Rs. 150 crore. "We are investing Rs 150 crore for setting up these two plants. Greater Noida plant is expected to be operational by end of this calender year while Hyderabad will be by the end of next year. These plants will significantly expand our manufacturing capacities," Aggarwal said.

At present, the company has three manufacturing plants -- in Greater Noida (Uttar Pradesh), Rai (Haryana) and in Delhi -- in the country. At present, Bikano has a network of 55 stores across the country and is looking to add up to 25 more in 3-4 years. "We plan to open 20-25 outlets in 3-4 years time. We will also look at entering new markets. At present, we don't have presence in South India and Maharashtra and also in far east India. Our stores are both company owned and franchised," he said.

ginger garlic paste. Masalas contribute around half of the company's revenues. "The soup and noodles is peripheral to us. Masalas contribute around Rs 250 crore out of the Rs 500 crore. Masala as a category is going to become Rs 1,000 crore for us in the next three years," he said. Capital Foods is present in 11 states, with Maharashtra and Gujarat accounting for 45 per cent of its sales. It plans to enter tier III and

IV cities in the next two years. The firm also plans to add two new facilities to its existing seven at an investment of Rs 75 crore. "We are doing a plant at Panipat and one more at Vapi, to manufacture sauces, which will be commissioned in the middle of this year. The cost of the plants would be roughly Rs 75 crore," he said. Capital Foods also exports frozen parathas and naan, Gujarati frozen vegetables and frozen fruits, under the brand Swad, to cater to the Indian diaspora. Gupta said exports contribute Rs 70 crore to the overall revenues. It has earmarked Rs 75 crore for advertising for 2017-18. "This fiscal year we spent Rs 70 crore on advertising and next year we plan to spend Rs 75 crore," he said. The company is also looking at inorganic growth and is scouting for acquisitions in the same product categories, Gupta said.


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News Round-up Parle plans more snacks offerings in efforts to cut reliance on biscuits

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iscuits and confectionery firm Parle Products Pvt. Ltd plans to launch three new variants under its traditional Indian snacks category in the next financial year even as it throws its might behind consolidating market share in the premium biscuits segment. Parle plans to increase contribution from the snacks and confectionery segments to 20% from 15% at present by the end of the next fiscal, said Parle’s category heads Krishna Rao and Mayank Shah. The consumer goods firm currently sells four different types of snacks: potato chips under its Parle’s Wafers brand, a twisty snack called Full Toss, nacho chips under the Mexitos name, and traditional Indian namkeens called Parle Namkeen. It will rebrand to

Namkeen as Chatkeens over the next three or four months and is launching three new variants in the category: cornflakes mixture, dalmoth and Punjabi Tadka between March and April. Snacks make up just 3% of Parle’s overall business, which is dominated by biscuits— including Parle G and Krackjack brands—that account for about 85% of total revenue. The remaining 12% of the business comes from confectionery brands like Eclairs, Melody, Mango Bite, Kismi and Poppins. Still, snacks and confectionery are the fastest growing categories, according to Krishna Rao who looks after both portfolios. He is aiming at increasing contribution from both to a total of 20% in the next financial year and is

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AgriBusiness & Food Industry w March 2017

targeting revenue of Rs1,000 crore from snacks by 2020. “The rebranding exercise is on the packaging front. Apart from that, we haven’t really done as much of an investment,” Rao said. “Snacking is definitely growing. If you look at the US, Europe, Japan or even China, the amount of snacking options available to people in those markets is huge. Indian firms have been very timid. So anybody who is bringing in more variety, more categories into it, I think they are doing the right thing,” said Harminder Sahni, founder and managing director at consulting firm Wazir Advisors. Last year, Parle launched five new confectionery brands priced at Re1—Spicy Kaccha Mango Bite, Juicy Mango Bite, Cafechino, Cremax Eclairs and Melody Chocomel Eclairs. Going forward too, the focus is on launching new confectionery priced at Re1 rather than the older 50 paise as earlier. In biscuits, Parle has strong presence in the mass and popular price segments, including biscuits that cost less than Rs100 per kg and between Rs100 and Rs200 respectively, according to Shah, category head for biscuits and chocolate. The focus now is to increase market share in the premium

segment, or biscuits priced above Rs200 per kg. Rivals in the premium end of the market include Britannia Industries Ltd (NutriChoice), ITC Ltd (Dark Fantasy) and Mondelez India Foods Pvt. Ltd (Oreo). “You launch, you build, you consolidate and then you look at a new launch; that’s how the cycle works. You consolidate a new launch over a period of two years or so— we missed on that opportunity because of demonetization last year. So, we are not looking at any launches for the next six months at least,” said Shah. Parle launched its Hide & Seek Black Bourbon, Hide & Seek Choco Rolls and Milano Centre Filled premium ranges only a couple of years ago. In biscuits, Parle earns about 40-45% from its mass offerings, 35-40% from popular brands and about 10-15% from premium biscuits. It expects growth to be driven by popular and premium going ahead. “Premium biscuits are a very competitive market. I think (Parle) may be right in holding the horses there. They may want to focus on creating large volumes and I would say that’s the way to look at it because the premium end is very competitive and it’s still fairly small today,” said Sahni of Wazir Advisors.


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ADVERTISERS INDEX

Adan Exports

161

Kabir Foods (P) Ltd

17

AgriTech India 2017

165

Khosla Agro Overseas

97

Allround (India) Veg. Processing Machines Pvt. Ltd.

115

Kings Dehydration Foods Pvt. Ltd.

Amar Singh Chawal Wala

39

Kirti Foods Pvt. Ltd.

Annapurna Universal Foods Pvt. Ltd.

63

KS Overseas (P) Ltd

APEDA Directory

163

League Foods Pvt. Ltd.

Azan Group

168

M K Overseas Pvt. Ltd.

Bankey Bihari Packaging Pvt. Ltd. Bhagyodaya Industries Bharat Cereals Bijson Innovation Pvt. Ltd.

47 121 11 151

Bikaji Foods

55

Bikanervala Foods Pvt. Ltd.

57

Bishnoi Agro India Pvt. Ltd.

93

Black Sea Grain

133

BSR Foods

109

BTW India Pvt. Ltd. Buhler (India) Pvt. Ltd.

61 Back Page

Chaman Lal Setia Exports Ltd.

78

Coffee Board

77

Dahela Engineers (India) DairyTech India 2017

126 48

Dubai Drink Technology Expo

155

Fivestar Dehydration Pvt. Ltd.

103

Food Systems Asia

46

Foodpedia Private Limited

83

G.S. Agro Systems Godhum Grains & Farm Products Pvt. Ltd.

157 2,3 & 73

Goel International Pvt. Ltd.

23

Golden Rise Trading L.L.C

87

Goldin (India) Engineering Co.

117

Goodrich Cereals

67

GQM Services Pvt. Ltd.

16

Graham Blow Pack Pvt. Ltd.

31

GrainTech India 2017

72

Gurunanak Engineering Works HMA Agro Industries Ltd Holyland Marketing Pvt. Ltd.

131 170,171 145

HR Exports

13

Humdard Laboratories (India)

37

India Factory

125

India Food Park Expo 2017

134

India Foodex 2017 Indo World

30, 96 131

Innovaequity Solutions Pvt. Ltd. (India)

81

J. Food Products

96

Jabs International Pvt. Ltd.

85

Janak Dehydration Pvt. Ltd.

107

Marya Frozen Agro Foods Mavin Impex MeatTech Asia 2017 Metallic Alloys Pvt. Ltd.

29 111 41 143 4 101 100 100,149 127

Multivac Laraon India Pvt. Ltd.

51

Natureland Organic Foods Pvt. Ltd.

14

Naturepure Bio Products Pvt. Ltd.

51

Nutrition Summit India 2017

128

Odtin Food Solutions Pvt. Ltd.

147

Olive Tech, Turkey

159

Onion Dehydration

105

Optics Technology

113

Pari Agro Exports

43

Panicle Food Private Limited

135

Pest Control M Walshe

129

Poultry & Livestock Expo 2017

132

Pure Life Organic Foods Ravi Foods Pvt Ltd Royal Import & Export Rustom Foods S.S. Milling & Engineering Co. Salt Range Foods Pvt. Ltd. Sastha Agro Exporters Satake India Engineering Pvt. Ltd.

71 12 139 6 119 49 161 9

Savour India(P) Ltd

65

Sensograph Packaging Technology Pvt. Ltd.

69

Setia Marketing

59

Shree Swami Enterprises Fze Shri Rudra Confectionery Pvt. Ltd. Siba International Sifter International SnackBev India 2017

91 141 99 123 53,153

Sonic Biochem Extractions Ltd.

95

Star Global Multi Ventures Pvt. Ltd.

89

Sulson Overseas Pvt. Ltd.

5

Sunstar Overseas Limited

45

Suruchi Spices Pvt. Ltd. The Punjab State Cooperative Supply & Mktg. Fed. Ltd. Unique Equipments

169 15 118

Vijay Agro Feeds (I) Ltd.

76

Wagh Bakri Tea Group

25

Worldwide Formations

7

AgriBusiness & Food Industry w March 2017

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