Page 1

VERITAS Legacy of Leadership

•

Une tradition de leadership

Fall 2011 Automne

Reunion weekend de rencontre


INTEGRATED NAVIGATION AND TACTICAL SOLUTIONS

powered by ECPINS®

INTS - take charge in the littoral! 35 years of leadership in the surface and subsurface military markets — OSI solutions operate on over 400 vessels in fourteen navies and are the fleet standard for many NATO and allied navies including Canada, UK, Australia, Denmark, Portugal, Netherlands, and New Zealand. OSI’s navigation and tactical solutions combine advanced features and extensive experience in warship technology. Our Integrated Navigation and Tactical System (INTS), powered by ECPINS, is a fully scalable, tactical navigation solution that represents a significant increase in any Patrol Craft design. Built on the ECPINS platform and integrated with selected radars and a flexible number and type of sensors from a wide range of suppliers, INTS results in a comprehensive, cost effective enhancement either as a retrofit to existing platforms or new build. Now, Command can rapidly assess and evaluate any situation in fast interceptor craft and OPV platforms, where reduced manning may be a requirement — take charge in the littoral!

Offshore Systems Ltd. an OSI Geospatial company Telephone: +1 778 373 4600 Toll Free in N. America: 1 877 4ECPINS Email Address: sales@osigeospatial.com

Website: http://www. osigeospatial.com/offshoresystems/ index.htm


VERITAS

The magazine of the Royal Military Colleges Club of Canada La revue du Club des Collèges militaires royaux du Canada

RMC CLUB / CLUB DES CMR 8 Exec Notes / Notes 10 President’s Message / Message du président

EX-CADETS / LES ANCIENS 21 Roll Call / L’appel 25 Old Brigade / La Vieille Brigade 32 Reunion Weekend / Weekend de rencontre 45 Book Review / Compte rendu de livre Gilles Lamontagne : Sur tous les fronts Reviewed by M0058 LCol Marc Drolet Compte rendu par M0058 Lcol Marc Drolet 55 Class News 56 5th Military World Games

OBITUARIES / NÉCROLOGIE 58 S.O.S.

FEATURE STORIES / ARTICLES VEDETTES Celebrating academia / Célébrer le milieu universitaire 12 Dr. Pierre Laviolette Royal Military College Saint-Jean 16 Dr. John S. Mothersill Royal Roads Military College 28 Dr. John Plant Royal Military College of Canada 37 Dr. John Scott Cowan Royal Military College of Canada

H25915 Danny McLeod (right) and H2612 Michael Webber at the parade ceremony during RMCC Reunion Weekend. / H25915 Danny McLeod (à droite) et H2612 Michael Webber participent au défilé durant le weekend de rencontre du CMRC.

41 Gentlemen and Scholars / Gentlemen et universitaires Three RMC grads continue giving back long after retirement Trois diplômés du CMR continuent à redonner aux FC longtemps après avoir pris leur retraite. 47 A year to remember in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu Une année mémorable à Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu 50 Ex-cadets lead Forces response to Manitoba Flood Des anciens dirigent la réaction des FC lors des inondations au Manitoba. 52 Right Time, Right Place / Au bon moment, au bon endroit New Canadian Defence Academy Commander welcomes challenges of modernizing individual training and education Le nouveau commandant de l’Académie canadienne de la Défense relèvera volontiers le défi lié à la modernisation de l’instruction individuelle et de l’éducation.

Cover / Couverture

Judge John Matheson presents 25440 Landon Lavictoire with the Captain Nichola Goddard Sword at a Reunion Weekend ceremony at Royal Military College. / Le juge John Matheson présente à 25440 Landon Lavictoire l’épée du capitaine Nichola Goddard lors d’un weekend de rencontre au Collège militaire royal. Cover photo by Stephen McQuaid Photo de la page couverture par Stephen McQuaid

Stay Connected / Demeurez en contact

Please keep us advised on changes to your contact information by writing, emailing (rmcclub@rmc.ca) or phoning us at 1-888-386-3762. Your cooperation is most appreciated. / Veuillez nous informer de tout changement dans vos coordonnées, par téléphone, la poste ou courriel. Nous apprécions grandement votre coopération.


RMC Club of Canada Club des CMR du Canada Patron / Président d’honneur H26223 His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, CC, CMM, COM, CD. Vice Patron / Vice-président d’honneur H4860 General (Ret) John de Chastelain, OC, CH, CMM, CD, RMC Honourary President / Président honoraire H2951 General (Ret) R.M. Withers, CMM, CD, RRMC/RMC Honourary Solicitor / Conseiller juridique honoraire H3356 R.B. Cumine, QC, RMC Honourary Chaplain / Aumônier honoraire 8457 Capt (Ret) Reverend Paul W. Robinson, MA, CD, RMC Adjutant Emeritus, Old Brigade / Adjudant émérite, Vieille Brigade H2612 BGen (Ret) Michael H.F. Webber, CD, RMC

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE / COMITÉ EXÉCUTIF President / Président M0058 LCol (Ret) Marc Drolet, CD, RMC marc_l_drolet@hotmail.com Past President / Président sortant 19307 Cdr (Ret) David Benoit, CD, RMC benoitjd@rogers.com 1st Vice-President / 1er Vice-président 9889 LCol (Ret) Bob Benn, CD, CMR bennr@videotron.ca 2nd Vice President / 2e Vice-président 12059 Mr. Jacques J. Gagné, BA, CPP, LSM gagnejp@mts.net Executive Director / Directeur exécutif intérimaire S125 Maj (Ret) William Oliver, (Acting) MMM, CD oliver-b@rmc.ca 14356 LCol Michael Rostek, CD, Ph.D. (Dec. 1, 2011) Canadian Forces Liaison Officer / Officier de liaison des Forces canadiennes 14245 BGen Richard Foster, CD richard.foster@forces.gc.ca Adjutant Old Brigade / Adjudant de la Vieille Brigade 5611 LCdr (Ret) Gerry Stowe, CD, RRMC/RMC old.brigade@gmail.com Past President Foundation / Président sortant de la Fondation 7076 Lt (N) (Ret) John van Haastrecht, RRMC/RMC Term Ending in 2012 / Mandat se terminant en 2012 8120 Cdr (Ret) Bill Gard, CD, RRMC/RMC 10263 Capt (Ret) Don Lovell, CD, RRMC/RMC Term Ending in 2013 / Mandat se terminant en 2013 14559 Steve Gable, RMC 8828 Capt (Ret) Wayne Kendall, RMC Term Ending in 2014 / Mandat se terminant en 2014 4459 Cmdre (Ret) Ed Murray, OMM, CD, RRMC, RMC 15946 LCdr (Ret) Jill Carleton, CD, RMC M0157 Col (Ret) Bryan Righetti, CD, RRMC, RMC 9143 Bruce McAlpine, B. Eng., MBA, CPC, CMR, RMC

VERITAS

VERITAS MAGAZINE / REVUE VERITAS Editor-in-Chief / Rédacteur en chef William Oliver (613) 541-6000 ext. 6699 Fax: (613) 542-7824 Publishing Strategist / Conseillère en publications Suzanne Grant Translation / Traduction 6426 Serge Arpin, CD, RMC 2864 Pierre Bussieres, RMC 24924 Maxime Bernier-Brideau, RMC 24347 Meghan McCready, RMC Photographers / Photographes Brad Lowe Stephen McQuaid Andrew Sheahan Cynthia Kent Mario Poirier Lifetouch Canada — Victoria, BC Copy Coordinator / Coordonnateur des exemplaires 25385 OCdt. Alex Zaporzan Advertising and Circulation Manager / Chef de la diffusion et de la publicité Ms. Mary Darlington Editorial and Design Service / Services de révision et de design Touchplate

Thank You to our Advertisers Merci à nos annonceurs Homestead

9

Guthrie Woods Products Ltd.

19

GE Canada

14

MBNA Canada

15

Four Points Sheraton — Kingston

31

Ambassador Conference Resort — Kingston

31

RHR Expert

20

Muskoka Brewery

49

Engineering Office Deisenroth Canada The Grizzly Grill / Ale House Canteen / The Brass Pub

40

Sommar Brown Royal LePage

43

Kingston Tourism

24

SISIP / RARM Financial Services

27

First Recognition — Graduation Rings

45

The Kingston Brewing Co.

24

Commissionaires

46

Calian

36

Canex

36

Days Inn & Conference Centre — Kingston

49

40

Radisson Hotel Kingston

49

Michael Johnson & Associates Inc.

26

Canadian Forces Personnel and Family Support Services

63

TD — Meloche Monnex

64

Offshore Systems Ltd. (OSI)

2

Royal LePage Realtors Montreal & Area

6

Individual Sponsors

18

Athletic Department

7

Anna Oliver Realtor Toronto

54

Fulcrum

62

Veritas is published three times a year (March, July, November) by the RMC Club of Canada. Canada Post Agreement # 40030365. Veritas est publié trois fois par an (mars, juillet, novembre) par le Club des CMR du Canada. Accord avec Postes Canada 40030365. Undeliverable copies or any change of address should be sent to: Faites parvenir les exemplaires non livrés et tout changement d’adresse au : RMC Club of Canada / Club des CMR du Canada 15 Point Frederick Drive, Kingston, ON K7K 7B4 Please Note: All editorial submissions are subject to editing for content and length at the discretion of the Editor-in-Chief and Editor. Photographs provided electronically must be at a resolution of 300 dpi or higher. Deadline for all material for the next issue is Jan. 15, 2012. Veuillez prendre note que toutes les soumissions seront sujettes à révision pour ce qui est du contenu et de la longueur de l’article, à la discrétion du rédacteur en chef ainsi que de la rédactrice. Les photos que vous nous faites parvenir électroniquement doivent avoir une résolution d’au moins 300 dpi. La date limite pour le prochain numéro est le 15 janvier 2012. The RMC Club of Canada neither endorses nor guarantees any of the products or services advertised in Veritas. We recommend readers thoroughly investigate suppliers of products and services being considered for purchase, and when appropriate, consult a professional. Le Club des CMR du Canada ne se porte garant, dans aucune circonstance, des produits ou des services annoncés dans Veritas. Nous conseillons à nos lecteurs de vérifier à fond les fournisseurs des produits ou des services qu’ils désirent se procurer et, si nécessaire, de consulter un professionnel.


Letters • LeTTRES

Tragic road accident

T

his is an inspired edition of Veritas for me. When you read these lines, don't think of the magazine’s content, but of the sudden departure of my fellow translator A154 LCol Pierre Labelle, who lost his life in a tragic road accident during his daily exercise on his bicycle. The accident happened on a country road in St.-Gabrielde-Valcartier, a few kilometres north of Quebec City and barely five kilometres from where I live. This is the first edition in which he will be missing from the roll since I started lending a hand with the translation of Veritas. I find it difficult not to think of Pierre and how he would have translated a specific expression or whether I am letting him tackle the lion's share of the translation. Of course, the latter will never happen again; I hope the memories I have of him will provide me with the incentive to continue and perhaps do an even better job. Some may say, "You hardly knew him. What makes you say that?" My answer is you didn't have to know Pierre for very long to understand his drive and dedication; these are qualities that everyone in his entourage would immediately think of if you mentioned his name. The distinctive trait of his personality that struck me was how easily he was able to smile. In my mind's eye, that smile represented the positive attitude he adapted to every task I saw him tackle in connection with Veritas.

Was it because of the great amount of knowledge he had accumulated in his life or the way he was able to keep things at a simple level? I think it was all this, and more that I did not have the time to discover. The readers and I will miss you, Pierre. — 6426 Serge Arpin

Tragique accident de la route

J

e ressens une certaine inspiration en travaillant sur ce numéro de Veritas. En lisant ces quelques lignes, ne pensez pas au contenu de la revue, mais plutôt au départ soudain de mon confrère traducteur A154, Lcol Pierre Labelle, qui a perdu la vie dans un tragique accident de la route en faisant son exercice quotidien à vélo. L’accident s’est produit sur une route de campagne à Saint-Gabriel-de-Valcartier, à quelques kilomètres au nord de Québec et à cinq kilomètres à peine du lieu où je demeure. C’est le premier numéro dans lequel il manque à l’appel depuis que j’ai commencé à aider à la traduction des articles de Veritas. Il m’est difficile de ne pas penser à lui ou aux mots qu’il aurait choisis pour traduire une expression particulière, et je me demande encore si je peux lui laisser le gros du travail. Bien entendu, cette dernière pensée ne se réalisera plus jamais, mais j’espère que le souvenir que j’ai de lui saura me fournir la motivation pour continuer et peut-être même faire un meilleur travail. Certains me diront : « Tu le

connaissais à peine. Qu’est-ce qui te fait dire ça? » Je répondrai qu’il n’était pas nécessaire de le connaître depuis longtemps pour comprendre le dynamisme qui l’habitait et son dévouement. Mais il s’agit là de qualités auxquelles toutes les personnes de son entourage pensaient lorsqu’on mentionnait son nom. Ce qui m’a frappé le plus chez lui, c’était la facilité qu’il avait à sourire. Dans mon esprit, ce sourire représentait l’attitude positive qu’il adoptait dans chacune des tâches que je l’ai vu entreprendre concernant Veritas. Était-ce dû à la grande quantité de connaissances qu’il avait accumulée au cours de sa vie, ou à la façon qu’il avait de ne jamais compliquer les choses? Je crois sincèrement que c’était tout ça, et bien plus de choses que je n’ai malheureusement pas eu le temps de découvrir. Les lecteurs et moi te disons : « Tu vas nous manquer, Pierre! » — 6426 Serge Arpin

~ New executive director

O

n behalf of the RMC Foundation, I would like to welcome Michael Rostek as the new Executive Director of the RMC Club. I understand that he and our Executive Vice-President Rod McDonald, have already met and are working on ways for our two organizations to enhance the level of cooperation and collaboration in Panet House. In that regard, during Reunion

Weekend, the board of the Foundation, the Club executive committee and the College leadership continued our tradition of gathering for an informal luncheon to allow the members of our governance bodies to meet face-to-face and discuss issues of mutual interest and concern, including in this case, the need to support the RMC Museum. Our congratulations to Bill Oliver, Ed Murray and the Veritas editorial committee on the updated content and format of the Club magazine. We look forward to exploring ways in which the Foundation and the Club can harmonize our communications efforts. I never cease to be amazed and gratified by the generosity of our donors and Reunion Weekend brought its share of significant financial contributions, which will assist in our efforts to enhance excellence at our Royal Military Colleges. During the Foundation legacy dinner, cheques were presented by the Ottawa Branch ($12,000), the Class of ’66 Bike Team ($30,000), the Chasse-Galerie Team ($55,000), and the Class of ’66 ($450,000). A new standard of alumni generosity was set during the cadet badging parade, as I had the honour to announce an offer by 7076 John van Haastrecht, also a member of the Class of ’66, to present the College with a three-part gift consisting of a collection of Canadian art valued at more than $450,000, and cash contributions of $25,000 to fund the cataloguing and recording of the art WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

5


Letters • LeTTRES

and $1 million to install the art collection within the College’s proposed new library/learning centre. This gift represents the single largest contribution to the Foundation in its history to support its mandate to enhance excellence at the Colleges. On behalf of the members of our Board, I would like to thank the staff of both the Club and the Foundation for all of their work in planning and executing a thoroughly enjoyable Reunion Weekend. I would also like to express our appreciation to the Commandant, BrigadierGeneral Eric Tremblay, and the staff of the College for hosting and supporting our activities. Finally, our congratulations to the Class of 2015 on the successful completion of the firstyear orientation period, the obstacle course and their

entry into the Cadet Wing — very well done indeed! TDV — 9660 Cameron H. Diggon, President, RMC Foundation

Nouveau directeur exécutif

A

u nom de la Fondation des CMR, je souhaite la bienvenue à Michael Rostek, le nouveau directeur exécutif du Club des CMR. Je crois comprendre qu’il a rencontré Rod McDonald, notre viceprésident exécutif, et qu’ils cherchent déjà à améliorer le niveau de coopération et de collaboration entre nos deux entités à la maison Panet. À cet égard, lors du weekend de rencontre, le Conseil de la Fondation, le conseil de direction du Club et la direction du Collège ont poursuivi leur tradition consistant à se réunir au cours d’un déjeuner informel pour permettre aux

Open the door to service • value • expertise

membres de nos instances de gouvernance de se rencontrer en personne afin de discuter des questions d'intérêt mutuel et de nos préoccupations, y compris dans ce cas, le besoin de soutenir le musée du CMR. Nos félicitations à Bill Oliver, à Ed Murray et au comité de rédaction de Veritas pour la réorientation du contenu et le nouveau format de la revue du Club. Nous avons hâte de découvrir d’autres façons d’harmoniser les communications entre la Fondation et le Club. Je reste toujours surpris et heureux de constater la générosité de nos donateurs. Le weekend de rencontre nous a apporté d'importantes contributions financières qui nous aideront à favoriser l'excellence dans nos CMR. Lors du Dîner héritage de la Fondation, nous avons reçu des chèques du chapitre

RELOCATING CLIENTS TO/FROM MONTRÉAL & MONTÉRÉGIE St-Jean-sur-Richelieu & Farnham

Suzanne Gauthier

Certified Real Estate Broker Registered Relocation Professional

514 779-9390

suzannecgauthier@videotron.ca

Karen Hébert

Certified Real Estate Broker

514 774-7590

khebert@royallepage.ca

Karine Sabourin Manager, Mobile Mortgage Specialist Directeur, Spécialiste Hypothécaire Mobile karine.sabourin@td.com

514 946-5685 Place Portobello • 7250 boul. Taschereau #8 • Brossard, Québec J4W 1M9

www.royallepage.ca • 450 672-6450 6

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS

d’Ottawa (12 000 $), de l’équipe de vélo de la promotion de 1966 (30 000 $), de l’équipe Chassegalerie (55 000 $) et de la promotion de 1966 (450 000 $). La barre de générosité des anciens a été remontée lors du défilé de remise des écussons, au cours duquel j’ai eu l’honneur d’annoncer un don en trois parties de 7076 John van Haastrecht, également membre de la promotion de 1966. Ce don est constitué d’une collection d'art canadien évaluée à plus de 450 000 $, d’un don en espèces de 25 000 $ afin de cataloguer et de consigner ces pièces d’art, ainsi qu’un don de 1 million de dollars pour financer l'installation de la collection d'art dans la nouvelle bibliothèque/centre d’apprentissage du Collège. Il s’agit là de la plus importante contribution individuelle dans l’histoire de la Fondation pour soutenir son mandat de favoriser l'excellence dans les collèges. Au nom des membres de notre conseil, je tiens à remercier le personnel du Club et celui de la Fondation pour leur travail dans la planification et l'exécution d'un weekend de rencontre très réussi. Je tiens également à exprimer notre gratitude au commandant, le bgén Éric Tremblay, et au personnel du Collège qui ont accueilli et soutenu nos activités. Enfin, nos félicitations à la promotion de 2015 pour avoir terminé et réussi la période d'orientation de première année, la course à obstacles et son entrée dans l’escadre des élèves-officiers — Vous pouvez être fiers! — 9660 Cameron H. Diggon Président, Fondation des CMR ■


RMC Club • Exec Notes

A change in direction

A

s many of you may well know, the job of Editor-in-Chief of a magazine is not a small undertaking. It requires advanced computer skills, a good sense of language and grammar, and commonly the incumbent has a university degree in English or journalism. As I strike out on all these qualifications, you can understand my trepidation upon accepting the challenge of Editor-in-Chief for this one edition. With the bases obviously loaded in terms of workload, matters became further complicated when I was appointed Interim Executive Director for the Club in early June. I suppose these are the reasons I was told that I was “in over my head.” Notwithstanding the workload, the success in publishing this edition rests primarily with a team of committed individuals who gave of their time, experience and expertise to ensure a high-quality product. Without this extremely important team commitment, Veritas magazine might not have met its publishing deadlines.

Long-time readers will notice some major changes in this issue. We tried to emphasize the military colleges’ experience — past and present. We have consciously put the spotlight on academics in various forms. At the same time, there are a few interesting articles from the domestic front with an ex-cadet connection. We also managed to include a number of photos and short stories from three very recent reunions: Royal Roads, RMCSJ and RMCC. Because of the regular publishing cycles, Reunion Weekend often seemed to be overlooked in the past. We hope you enjoy the pictures and articles highlighting this significant event for the Club. Thinking green: Prior to closing, we would like to ask you, the Club member, if you would accept receiving an “e-copy” of Veritas magazine? Currently, we print 6,500 copies of Veritas. More than 66 percent of our members are under 50 years of age — most in this demographic are computer savvy. The financial savings for the Club would be tremendous if we printed

S125 Bill Oliver, Editor-in-Chief / S125 Bill Oliver, rédacteur en chef

and mailed only 3,000, or fewer, copies. Let us know at rmcclub@rmc.ca if you are you willing to accept the magazine in electronic format. Last, I want to say how deeply honoured I am to serve the RMC Club of Canada and I want to thank those of you who had the confidence in me to appoint me as Interim Executive Director. To be entrusted for these past few

months with the stewardship of something so important to ex-cadets has been a tremendous experience. Finally, I wish 14356 Michael Rostek, the incoming Executive Director/Editor-in-Chief, nothing but success as he begins his tenure on Dec. 1. Keep looking for Rolande and me in e-Veritas. TDV — S125 Bill Oliver

‘ We have consciously put the spotlight on academics in various forms. At the same time, there are a few interesting articles from the domestic front with ex-cadet connections.’ 8

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS


Club des CMR • Notes

Un changement de direction

C

omme beaucoup d’entre vous le savent sans doute, l’emploi de rédacteur en chef d’une revue n’est pas une petite tâche. Ça nécessite des compétences de pointe en informatique, ainsi qu’une bonne connaissance de la langue et de sa grammaire. En général, le candidat doit posséder un diplôme universitaire en lettres françaises ou anglaises,

ou encore en journalisme. Étant donné toutes ces exigences, vous pouvez comprendre mon appréhension en acceptant le poste de rédacteur en chef pour ce numéro. Avec les « buts remplis » en termes de charge de travail, la question est devenue encore plus compliquée lorsque j’ai été nommé directeur exécutif par intérim pour le Club au début de juin. On m’a dit que je serais submergé. Nonobstant

la charge de travail, le succès de ce numéro repose principalement sur une « équipe » de personnes engagées, qui ont offert leur temps, leur expérience et leur expertise pour assurer un produit de haute qualité. Sans cet engagement d’équipe très important, la revue Veritas n’aurait pas pu respecter ses délais de publication. Nos lecteurs assidus remarqueront quelques changements majeurs dans ce numéro. Nous avons essayé de souligner l’expérience des collèges militaires — passée et présente. Nous avons consciemment mis l’accent sur divers aspects académiques. Et en même temps, il y a quelques articles intéressants sur le front national grâce à des liens avec d’anciens élèves-officiers. Nous avons également réussi à inclure un certain nombre de photos et de courtes histoires de trois réunions très récentes : Royal Roads, CMRSJ et CMRC. En raison des cycles réguliers de publication, un événement important comme le weekend de rencontre semblait souvent être négligé dans le passé. Nous espérons donc que vous apprécierez les photos et les articles soulignant cet événement important pour le Club. Penser vert : Avant de terminer, nous aimerions vous demander, en tant que membre du Club, si vous

accepteriez de recevoir une « copie électronique » de Veritas. Actuellement, nous en imprimons 6 500 exemplaires. Plus de 66 % de nos membres ont moins de 50 ans — et la majorité des membres de ce groupe démographique sont calés en informatique. Les économies financières pour le Club seraient formidables si nous imprimions 3 000 exemplaires seulement, ou moins. Faites-nous donc savoir, en écrivant à rmcclub@rmc.ca, si vous êtes prêt à accepter la revue en format électronique! Enfin, je tiens à souligner que c’est un grand honneur pour moi de servir le Club des Collèges militaires royaux du Canada, et je tiens à remercier ceux d’entre vous qui ont eu suffisamment confiance en moi pour me nommer en tant que directeur exécutif par intérim. Se voir confier l’intendance d’une chose aussi importante pour les anciens élèves-officiers au cours de ces derniers mois a été une expérience formidable. Finalement, je souhaite à 14356 Michael Rostek, le nouveau directeur exécutif et rédacteur en chef, tout le succès possible lorsqu’il commencera son mandat le 1er décembre 2011. Continuez à nous chercher, Rolande et moi, dans les numéros de e-Veritas! — S125 Bill Oliver WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

9


RMC Club • Exec Notes

President's Message

Building on our accomplishments

I

t was with great pride that I accepted on Oct. 1 the role of leading the Royal Military Colleges Club of Canada. I have had the chance to contribute my energy to the Club as a member of the Executive Committee (EC) since 2009, when I was invited to join the officers of the Club as 2nd Vice-President and subsequently 1st VicePresident. I have learned from great leaders and have outstanding examples of leadership to follow. The past year has been particularly challenging for our Club. The Executive Committee and the General Council (GC) made the decision to engage the Club in a renewal phase. I must first and foremost underline the absolutely outstanding work done by our previous President, David Benoit, who assumed the position in December 2010 and committed himself, along with his team, to steering the Club into a new era. Dave has sacrificed family and personal life to give himself unconditionally to our Club. I would like, on behalf of the EC, GC and our membership, to express our sincere gratitude for his dedication, professionalism and engagement to orient our Club toward being the best alumni association in Canada. We have initiated many tasks since the end of 2010 to renew our Club, make our organization more transparent, improve our financial 10

situation, and especially turn our vision toward the future. All of these activities make our Club a stronger alumni association to serve our membership. Our work plan detailed a course to engage, understand, strengthen and expand our membership, to ensure financial sustainability and to provide sound financial management. It was designed to increase the relevance of the parent Club to its branches and classes, including the Old Brigade; to support and strengthen Club communications; to continue to promote and maintain the history and heritage of the College and the Club; to support leadership dinners; and to review our gift shop. In short, it is hoped that with this renewal, the membership will be re-energized to engage in branch activities and take a proactive role in Club functions. No need to state that with such an agenda our EC and GC members, who are all graciously donating their time, have been extremely busy. Looking back, we can all feel proud of our accomplishments, including, to name only a few: a renewed, more cost-effective Veritas magazine serving its members; a significantly more transparent operation; a clearer financial state that should allow for better oversight and management; updated statements of duties and a feedback system for our employees; a better understood and reinforced

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS

M0058 Marc Drolet, new President of the RMC Club of Canada M0058 Marc Drolet, nouveau président du Club des CMR du Canada

governance model; and a much improved communication link to the branches that are closer to our membership at large. It is evident, however, that our work plan for improvement is only beginning. We are now engaged in enhancements such as: implementation of a Veritas editorial advisory group; implementation of a Strategic Review Committee; continued and evolving review of our communication mechanisms; complete review of our constitution and governance structure; a search for closer integration of our Club in the two College campuses (Kingston and Saint-Jean); and a way to reach out to the five generations that compose our alumni association. As one can imagine, we still have lots to do to remain one of the strongest alumni associations in Canada, and we will invest ourselves to reach our true potential. I feel confident with the support of Bob Benn (1st Vice-President), Jacques Gagne (2nd Vice-

President), and the EC and GC members, that as a team we will use 2012 to further improve our Club in all aspects. I would also like to welcome our newly selected Executive Director, Michael Rostek. We are looking forward to his arrival on Dec. 1 and to working with him as we rejuvenate the Club and, in turn, its membership. He comes with a wealth of experience and expertise that promises to complement these renewal efforts. We shall do all these things while keeping our Club a gentlewomen’s and gentlemen’s Club, respecting each other and adhering always to our values: Truth, Duty, Valour. On a final note, by the time this magazine reaches you, Christmas season will be nearly upon us. I would like to take this time to wish every member and his or her family the peace and joy of the season and safe travels for those who may be on the move. Enjoy the season responsibly and remember branch Christmas functions in your plans. — M0058 Marc Drolet


Club des CMR • Notes

message du PrÉsident

Faire fond sur nos réalisations

C

’est avec une grande fierté que j’ai accepté le rôle de président du Club des Collèges militaires royaux du Canada le 1er octobre 2011. J’ai eu la chance de contribuer à l’organisation en tant que membre du Comité exécutif depuis 2009, après quoi j’ai été invité à me joindre aux Officiers du Club en tant que 2e vice-président et ensuite, comme 1er vice-président. J’ai beaucoup appris des Officiers du Club, qui sont de grands leaders dont on peut suivre l’exemple. La dernière année a présenté de grands défis pour notre Club. Le Comité exécutif (CE) et le Conseil général (CG) ont pris la décision de lancer le Club dans une phase de renouveau. Je dois souligner avant tout le travail incroyable fait par notre président sortant David Benoit, qui a assumé ce poste depuis décembre 2010 et s’est engagé, avec son équipe, à mener le Club dans une nouvelle ère. Il a sacrifié sa vie personnelle et sa famille pour se consacrer entièrement aux besoins du Club. J’aimerais, au nom du CE et du CG et au nom de tous les membres de notre Club, exprimer notre sincère gratitude pour son dévouement, son professionnalisme et son engagement qui ont permis à notre Club de devenir la meilleure association d’anciens au Canada. Nous avons lancé plusieurs tâches depuis le début

de l’année pour renouveler notre Club, donner plus de transparence à nos actions, améliorer notre situation financière et, tout particulièrement, tourner la vision du Club vers le futur. Toutes ces initiatives ont été lancées pour faire de notre Club une association d’anciens plus solide et ainsi mieux servir nos membres. Ces initiatives sont reflétées dans un plan de travail détaillé visant à favoriser l’engagement, la compréhension, le renforcement et l’augmentation des membres du Club; à assurer la viabilité financière et offrir une gestion financière plus saine; à accroître la pertinence du Club pour les chapitres et les promotions, y compris la Vieille Brigade; à appuyer et renforcer les outils de communications du Club; à continuer de promouvoir et de préserver l’histoire et l’héritage des collèges militaires et du Club; à appuyer les dîners de leadership; et à passer en revue la boutique du Club. En bref, nous espérons que grâce à ce renouvellement du Club, nos membres auront un regain d’énergie pour participer aux activités des chapitres et assumer un rôle proactif dans les fonctions du Club. Nul n’est besoin de mentionner qu’avec un tel programme, les membres de notre CE et de notre GC qui donnent tous généreusement de leur temps ont été très occupés. Lorsque nous nous tournons vers le passé, nous pouvons tous être fiers des

actions accomplies : une revue Veritas renouvelée et moins coûteuse pour servir les membres; un processus administratif nettement plus transparent; des bilans financiers plus clairs qui devraient permettre une meilleure surveillance et une meilleure gestion; des descriptions de tâches mises à jour et l’établissement d’un système de rétroaction pour nos employés; un modèle de gouvernance renforcé avec une bien meilleure compréhension; des communications améliorées avec nos chapitres, qui sont plus près de l’ensemble de membres; et bien d’autres accomplissements. Il est toutefois évident que ce plan d’action pour améliorer notre Club n’en est qu’à ses débuts. Nous travaillons pour l’instant à d’autres améliorations, telles que les suivantes : la mise sur pied d’un groupe consultatif de rédaction pour notre revue Veritas; la création d’un comité d’examen stratégique; un examen permanent et évolutif de nos mécanismes de communications; une revue complète de notre constitution et de notre structure de gouvernance; la recherche d’une intégration plus profonde de notre Club dans nos deux collèges (Kingston et Saint-Jean); et un mécanisme pour joindre les cinq générations qui forment notre association d’anciens. Comme on peut facilement l’imaginer, il nous reste encore beaucoup à faire pour que notre Club demeure la meil-

leure association d’anciens au Canada, et nous allons nous y mettre du nôtre pour réaliser notre plein potentiel. Je suis certain qu’avec le soutien de Bob Benn (1er vice-président), de Jacques Gagné (2e viceprésident) et des membres du CE et du CG, nous allons en équipe profiter de 2012 pour faire progresser notre Club sur tous les fronts. J’aimerais aussi souhaiter la bienvenue à notre nouveau directeur exécutif, Michael Rostek, qui accédera officiellement à son poste le 1er décembre 2011. Nous avons tous hâte de travailler avec lui pour donner un renouveau à notre Club et, par le fait même, à tous nos membres. Michael apporte une longue expérience et de grandes compétences qui devraient contribuer à ces efforts de renouvellement. Nous accomplirons tout cela en gentilshommes du Club, dans le plus grand respect de chacun, sans jamais nous écarter de nos valeurs que sont la Vérité, le Devoir et le Courage. Au moment où cette revue sera dans vos mains, la période des Fêtes sera à nos portes. J’aimerais donc, pour terminer, saisir cette occasion pour souhaiter paix et bonheur à chaque membre du Club et à sa famille et, à ceux d’entre nous qui devront voyager, je souhaite bonne route. Profitez bien de cette période et n’oubliez pas de participer aux activités des Fêtes dans les chapitres du Club. — M0058 Marc Drolet ■ WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

11


Celebrating academia

Célébrer le milieu universitaire Pierre Laviolette

Royal Military College Saint-Jean CollÈge militaire royal de Saint-Jean

P

ierre Laviolette, a former Dean of the Royal Military College Saint-Jean before its closure in 1995, and architect of its present resurrection, opened our interview with the words, “Moi, je suis un Québecois (he paused) nationaliste.” I was reminded of the recent furore over the choice of Nicole Turmel as interim leader of the NDP, when her card-carrying ties to the Bloc Québécois were discovered. Can one be a Quebec nationalist and a federalist? In 1972, such a notion was unthinkable. The Quebec nationalists of that time were born out of inequality — out of anglophone hegemony and francophone disadvantage. As Dr. Laviolette admits, the bosses then were English-speaking and the workers were French-speaking. Even at the College, if one person at the lunch table was English-speaking, the entire group would switch into English. Economically and culturally, francophones were subsumed by the dominant anglophone culture. History has been written on the backs of those who have tried to redress this situation. In 2011, the issue takes on a different hue. “Selon moi, le Québec doit se développer et je pense que le Québec doit faire sa place dans la confédération […] il ne peut pas survivre comme ça tout seul.” Quebec cannot stand alone, he says. It needs to work with others, in Canada, in North America. “Les premiers concernés, qui devraient comprendre le mieux, ce sont les anglo-

P

ierre Laviolette, ancien doyen du Collège militaire royal de Saint-Jean avant sa fermeture en 1995, et architecte de sa récente réouverture, a commencé l’entrevue avec les mots suivants : « Moi, je suis un Québécois (il fait une pause) nationaliste ». Il a ensuite évoqué le scandale entourant la nomination de Nicole Turmel comme chef intérimaire du NPD lorsqu’on a appris qu’elle avait été membre du Bloc Québécois. Peut-on être à la fois un Québécois nationaliste et fédéraliste? En 1972, une telle notion était impensable. Les nationalistes québécois de l’époque étaient issus d’un mouvement de dénonciation des inégalités causées par l’hégémonie anglophone au détriment des francophones. M. Laviolette avoue d’ailleurs qu’à l’époque, les patrons étaient anglophones et les travailleurs, francophones. Même ici au Collège, au dîner, si une personne à la table était anglophone, le groupe entier se mettait à parler anglais. Économiquement et culturellement, les francophones étaient subsumés par la culture dominante anglophone. L’histoire a été écrite sur le dos de ceux qui ont essayé de remédier à cette situation. En 2011, cette problématique prend une tout autre couleur. « Selon moi, le Québec doit se développer et je pense que le Québec doit faire sa place dans la confédération […] il ne peut pas survivre comme ça tout seul, dit M. Laviolette. Les premiers concernés, qui devraient comprendre le mieux, ce sont les anglophones du Canada. » Il raconte ensuite comment un collègue de l’Association des collèges militaires du Canada avait refusé de venir au Québec pour prendre

‘ You can work to effect change from outside the system or from within. Dr. Laviolette chose, like Socrates, to work from within.’ / « On peut travailler à changer les choses de l’extérieur du système ou de l’intérieur. M. Laviolette a choisi, comme Socrate, de travailler de l’intérieur. » 12

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS


Defence Minister Peter MacKay (right) presents Pierre Laviolette with an honourary Ph.D. in military science at RMCC in May 2009. Le ministre de la Défense Peter MacKay (à droite) présente à Pierre Laviolette un doctorat honorifique en sciences militaires au CMRC.

phones du Canada.” It is important for anglophones in Canada to understand Quebec, he says. Laviolette recounts a story of a colleague with the Association of Military Colleges of Canada, who refused to come to Quebec for meetings, fearing the francophone separatists, fearing terrorism, and fearing being poorly received. Well, you can work to effect change from outside the system or from within. As an educator with the Royal Military College Saint-Jean for 36 years, Dr. Laviolette chose, like Socrates, to work from within. “C’était ici, c’était une petite université, chacun pouvait faire sa place.” Here, each one can find his place. Dr. Laviolette found his calling in many ways at RMC SaintJean — as a professor, as a researcher, as the organizer of math seminars for the students and pedagogy seminars for the professors, and for eight years as President of the Association of Military Colleges of Canada. He was Dean of Studies from 1987 until the closing. He was the driving force behind the preparation of Prep Year in 1995. Most recently, in June 2008, he contributed to the writing of a report in which recommendations were made to the Directorate of Academic Learning and Innovation in the Canadian Forces concerning the service that the Royal Military College Saint-Jean could render to the Canadian Forces. With RMC Saint-Jean as the first stop for French-speaking

part à des réunions, craignant les séparatistes francophones, craignant le terrorisme, et craignant d’y être mal reçu. Et bien, on peut travailler à changer les choses de l’extérieur du système ou de l’intérieur. Au cours de ses 36 ans de carrière dans le domaine de l’éducation au Collège militaire royal de Saint-Jean, M. Laviolette a choisi, comme Socrate, de travailler de l’intérieur. « C’était ici, c’était une petite université, chacun pouvait faire sa place. » M. Laviolette a trouvé sa voie au Collège militaire royal de Saint-Jean à la fois comme professeur, chercheur, organisateur de séminaires de mathématique à l’intention des étudiants et de séminaires de pédagogie à l’intention des professeurs, et pendant huit ans, comme président de l’Association des collèges militaires du Canada. Il a été doyen des études de 1987 jusqu’à la fermeture du Collège. Il a également été à l’origine de la création de l’année préparatoire en 1995. Tout récemment, en juin 2008, il a collaboré à la rédaction d’un rapport énonçant des recommandations au Directorat de l’apprentissage et de l’innovation des Forces canadiennes concernant les services que le nouveau Collège militaire royal de Saint-Jean pouvait rendre aux Forces canadiennes. En tant que porte d’entrée pour les étudiants francophones, le Collège militaire royal de Saint-Jean a grandement contribué à offrir aux francophones les mêmes chances de réussir, et ce, à tous les niveaux institutionnels des Forces canadiennes. Aujourd’hui, les élèves-officiers anglophones provenant de partout au Canada sont aussi nombreux à faire leurs premiers pas au WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

13


students, their chances for success in the entire military establishment were greatly increased. Nowadays, RMC Saint-Jean is also the first stop for a large contingent of English-speaking officer cadets from across Canada. They come to mix and mingle with their francophone counterparts, to absorb some of the uniqueness of Quebec, and, of course, to improve their French — a must for advancement in the Canadian Forces. “We are all stronger together,” says Dr. Laviolette, who has worked tirelessly throughout his long career to promote the young people of Quebec and to prepare them for action on the national stage. Perhaps this is the real key to the modern Quebec nationalism. Rather than a movement for sundering the ties that bind, it supports a strong French province in a bilingual federalist union. Certainly, the Royal Military College Saint-Jean is an enviable model of French/English cooperation, where a full range of classes is offered in both official languages, and where officer cadets live, work, and study together. Good for Canada, good for the Canadian Forces. “A strong Quebec,” says Pierre Laviolette, “benefits the whole of Canada.” — Nanette Norris

14

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS

CMR Saint-Jean. Ils y viennent pour se mêler à leurs homologues francophones, pour s’imprégner de ce que le Québec a de particulier à offrir et, bien sûr, pour parfaire leur maîtrise du français, une nécessité pour progresser au sein des Forces canadiennes. « Nous sommes tous plus forts ensemble », dit M. Laviolette, qui a travaillé sans relâche tout au long de sa carrière pour soutenir les jeunes du Québec et les préparer à une participation sur la scène nationale. Peut-être que la clé d’un nationalisme québécois moderne réside non pas dans un mouvement risquant de briser le lien historique qui existe entre cette région et le reste du pays, mais plutôt dans un appui à une province francophone forte au sein d’une confédération bilingue. Le fait que le Collège militaire royal de Saint-Jean offre tous ses cours dans les deux langues officielles et que les élèves-officiers y vivent, y travaillent et y étudient ensemble en fait un modèle enviable de coopération francophone-anglophone. C’est bon pour le Canada, c’est bon pour les Forces canadiennes. « Un Québec fort, dit M. Laviolette, profite à l’ensemble du Canada. » — Nanette Norris ■


Specialized.

Spécialisé.

The RMC Club Platinum Plus® MasterCard® credit card was selected for its specialized benefits. There’s ideal credit lines and access to your account 24-hours a day by phone or online. Plus you’ll get peace of mind with MasterCard Zero Liability~ fraud protection and automatic MasterPurchase® protection for your purchases — jewellery, electronics, anything — at no additional charge** and so much more.

La carte de crédit MasterCardMD Platine PlusMD du Club des CMR a été choisie pour ses avantages spécialisés. Vous bénéficiez d’une excellente limite de crédit et d’un accès à votre compte 24 heures sur 24 par téléphone ou en ligne. De plus, vous avez l’esprit en paix grâce à la protection antifraude Responsabilité Zéro~ MasterCard et à la garantie MasterAchatMD qui protège automatiquement vos achats — bijoux, accessoires électroniques, n’importe quoi — le tout sans frais supplémentaires** et bien davantage.

Learn more today. Call 1.877.428.6060

a

and quote priority code: CJW4 Monday – Friday 9 a.m. – 9 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST)

Renseignez-vous aujourd’hui. Appelez au 1.877.428.6060a et mentionnez le code prioritaire CJW4

Du lundi au vendredi de 9 h à 21 h et le samedi de 10 h à 18 h, heure de l’Est (HE)

~ As a MasterCard credit card cardholder, you’ll receive the benefit of Zero Liability in the event of an unauthorized use of your Canadian issued MasterCard credit card. Zero liability is provided under specific conditions; see www.mastercard.com/ca/personal/en/mastercardsecurity/zero_liability.html. **Certain restrictions apply to this benefit and others described in the materials sent soon after your Account is opened. a By telephoning to apply for an MBNA Platinum Plus MasterCard credit card, you consent to the collection, use and processing of information about yourself by MBNA, its affiliates and any of their respective agents and service providers, and to the sharing or exchange of reports and information with credit reporting agencies, affiliates and service providers in relation to processing your application and, if approved, administering and servicing, your account. You also acknowledge that the account, if approved, will not be used by any third party other than a third party specifically designated by you, and then only in accordance with MBNA policies and procedures then in effect. MBNA Canada Bank is the exclusive issuer and administrator of the RMC Club Platinum Plus Credit Card Program in Canada. MBNA, MBNA Canada, MBNA Canada Bank, MBNA Platinum Plus, CreditWise and the MBNA logo are all trademarks of FIA Card Services, National Association, used by MBNA Canada Bank pursuant to licence. MasterCard, MasterPurchase and MasterRental are registered trademarks of MasterCard International, Incorporated, used pursuant to licence. ~ En tant que titulaire d’une carte de crédit MasterCard, vous bénéficierez de l’avantage de la Responsabilité Zéro en cas d’utilisation non autorisée de votre carte de crédit MasterCard émise au Canada. La Responsabilité Zéro est fournie en vertu de conditions spécifiques; veuillez consulter www.mastercard.com/ca/personal/fr/mastercardsecurity/zero_liability.html ou votre Convention de compte pour plus de détails. **Certaines restrictions s’appliquent à ces avantages ainsi qu’à tout autre bénéfice, tels que décrits dans les dépliants envoyés peu après l’ouverture de votre Compte. a En téléphonant pour demander une carte de crédit MasterCard Platine Plus MBNA, vous consentez à la collecte, à l’utilisation et au traitement de renseignements à votre sujet par MBNA, ses affiliées et tout représentant et fournisseur de service respectif, ainsi qu’au partage et à l’échange de rapports et de renseignements liés au traitement de votre demande et, si cette dernière est approuvée, à l’administration et à la gestion de votre compte avec des agences d’évaluation du crédit, des affiliées et des fournisseurs de services. Vous reconnaissez aussi que, si la demande est approuvée, le compte ne sera pas utilisé par une tierce partie autre qu’une tierce partie désignée spécifiquement par vous, et seulement conformément aux politiques et procédures de MBNA alors en vigueur. La Banque MBNA Canada est l’émettrice et l’administratrice exclusive du programme de carte de crédit Platine Plus du Club des CMR au Canada. MBNA, MBNA Canada, Banque MBNA Canada, Platine Plus MBNA, CréditSage et le logo de MBNA sont des marques de commerce de FIA Card Services, National Association, utilisées sous licence par la Banque MBNA Canada. MasterCard, MasterAchat et MasterLocation sont des marques déposées de MasterCard International, Incorporated, utilisées sous licence. AD-03-10-0117 © 2010 MBNA Canada Bank/Banque MBNA Canada


John S. Mothersill

Royal Roads Military College Collège militaire Royal Roads PAR 5119 LE CAPTC (RET.) BILL SHEAD Traduit par 6426 Serge Arpin

3

237 John S. Mothersill (RMC 1950-52) served as the last Principal of Royal Roads Military College from 1984 to 1995. He earned a B.Sc. in physics and mathematics in 1953 and a B.Sc. in geological engineering in 1956. After carrying out petroleum exploration activities in Turkey, Nigeria, Colombia and France, he completed a Ph.D. in geology at Queen’s University in 1964. In 1966, Dr. Mothersill joined the geology department at Lakehead University as an Assistant Professor. He was Dean of Science from 1975 to 1985 and taught courses in sedimentation, stratigraphy, geophysics and petroleum exploration. In 1984, Dr. Mothersill was appointed Principal of Royal Roads Military College. His arrival coincided with that of the first contingent of female cadets to begin studies at the College. He taught a fourth-year course in geophysical and geological oceanography for several years, and pursued his research, which evolved from sedimentary processes and stratigraphic investigations to

3

237 John S. Mothersill (CMR, 1950-1952) a été le dernier à occuper le poste de recteur du Collège militaire Royal Roads, de 1984 à 1995. Il a obtenu un B.Sc. (physique et mathématiques) en 1953 et un B.Sc. (génie géologique) en 1956. Après avoir réalisé des activités d’exploration pétrolière en Turquie, au Nigeria, en Colombie et en France, il a obtenu un Ph.D. (géologie) à l’Université Queen’s en 1964. Il est entré au département de géologie de l’Université Lakehead comme professeur adjoint en 1966. Il a été nommé doyen des sciences en 1975 et a occupé ce poste jusqu’en 1985. Il a enseigné des cours de sédimentation, de stratigraphie, de géophysique et d’exploration pétrolière. En 1984, il a été nommé recteur du Collège militaire Royal Roads. Son arrivée a coïncidé avec celle du premier contingent féminin d’élèves-officiers commençant leurs études au Collège. Il a enseigné un cours de quatrième année en géophysique et océanographie géologique pendant plusieurs années, en plus de poursuivre des travaux de recherche qui sont passés de l’étude des processus sédimentaires et des enquêtes stratigraphiques à l’étude des lacs (les Grands Lacs d’Amérique du lake studies (the Great Lakes of North America, African lakes Nord, les lacs Victoria, Édouard, Albert et Tchad en Afrique ainsi Victoria, Edward, Albert and Chad, as well as a number of small qu’un certain nombre de petits lacs en Colombie-Britannique) et lakes in British Columbia), eventually establishing and utilizing enfin à l’étude de l’établissement et utilisation du relevé paléothe paleomagnetic record of lacustrine sedimentary sequences in magnétique des séquences sédimentaires lacustres pour déterdetermining the postglacial evolution of these lakes, as well as miner l’évolution postglaciaire de ces lacs et suivre le mouvement tracking the movement of the north magnetic pole over the past du pôle nord magnétique au cours des 8 000 dernières années. 8,000 years. His published a total of 85 articles on his research. Ses recherches ont abouti à la publication de 85 articles. During Dr. Mothersill's tenure at RRMC, a two-year M.Sc. Pendant son mandat au Collège militaire Royal Roads, un Sadly HMS (océanographie Excellent is no etmore – ofserving a totem pole (Hosaqami) to program in oceanography and acoustics was sentation initiated for programme de maîtrise ès sciences acousby thedes RNForces in thecanalate HMSincreased Excellentfrom – the RN training facility officers in the Canadian Forces. Cadet numbers tique) de deux ans futhaving lancé been pour closed les officiers As tragic,estHosaqami “returnin Portsmouth 220 to 350 when the Millward Wing was completed in 1991.England. The diennes. Le nombre 1980s. d’élèves-officiers passé de is220 à 350 ing to the earth” a rocky en outcropping was of anthe initiative of l’ajout the GunCollege provided an extension program open toThis members lorsque de l’aile Millward fut interminé 1991. Le near the Chiefs Petty Officers nery Branch. TheTofollowing extract Canadian Forces and the Department of National Defence. Collègeis aanoffert un programme élargi&aux membres desMess Forin Esquimalt, Although Hosaqami from the my Maritimes Junior Officer’s Journal about reduce the first-year failure rates of cadets from ces canadiennes et aux employés duB.C. ministère de la Défense remained display on Whale, it the event combined written whilenationale. serving in HMCS and the Prairies, Dr. Mothersill pushed for a five-week Afin de réduire le tauxond’épublic chec en première année des was severely damaged in aM. major storm. a St. Croix in the summer of 1960. academic/military pre-entry program, which was initiated in 1991 élèves-officiers des Maritimes et des Prairies, Mothersill

Confirmation of the rumour came on Feb. 22, 1994. La rumeur fut confirmée le 22 février 1994.

16

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS


I

l y as 50 ans un groupe de marins autochtones se sont portés volontaires pour participer à une manifestation pour fêter les 50 ans de l’association de la MRC avec la Royal Navy. En tant que jeune (et très junior) officier de marine, je commandais le groupe qui formait l’escorte pour la présentation d’un mât totémique (Hosaqami) au HMS Excellent – le centre de formation de la RN à Portsmouth en Angleterre. C’était une initiative de la division des canonniers de la MRC. Ce qui suit est un extrait de mon journal d’officier subalterne au sujet de l’événement écrit à bord du NCSM St. Croix à l’été de 1960. Malheureusement HMS Excellent n’est plus – ayant été fermé par la RN à la fin des années 1980. De manière tout aussi tragique, Hosaqami est en train de « retourner à la terre » sur un affleurement rocheux près du mess des chefs et maîtres mariniers à Esquimalt, en Colombie-Britannique. Bien que Hosaqami soit resté exposé au public sur Whale Island (où était situé le HMS Excellent), il a été gravement endommagé lors d’une sévère tempête qui a ravagé le Royaume9318 Dave la Bindernagal ) and 3237 John Mothersill display Uni après fermeture(left d’Excellent. the ceremonial mace used during convocation at Royal Roads Military College, which was on display in September during 9318 Dave Bindernagal theHomecoming. West Coast /to Halifax in HMCS (à gauche) et 3237 Mothersilland montrent qui était utilisée lors des New John Waterford spentla masse the winconvocations au Collège Royal Roads. Cette masse était ter of 1959/60 in themilitaire Gunnery School. exposée septembre lors du weekend On 15enJuly 1960,dernier Hosaqami was de la rentrée.

embarked in HMCS Kootenay for pasat RRMC for cadets scheduled to enter sage to Portsmouth and his new homeboth on RRMC and RMC. Closure of While RRMCHosaqami had been would attempted Whale Island. be a at least twice (in the 1970s 1989). On Feb. 1994, when Dr. Mothersill was at uniqueand gift;inthe ceremony for9,its presentathe Victoria was Hotel Uganda, after completing a tionLake to Excellent to in beEntebbe, equally unique research project onFifteen lakes Victoria and Albert, he received a phone and memorable. RCN members call LGenancestry (Ret`d) Michael Caines (CMR 1970), the whofrom were8241 of Indian volunteered Commandant of RRMC, that there to form a special escort advising for Hosaqami. It was a rumour about possible Unfortunately, confirmation came on Feb. 22, was this closure. escort and the “informal” presen1994, the federal budget tation in ceremony which was toannouncement. add so much Although this was afun very timeand for the cadets, faculty to difficult the occasion to underscore the and staff of the College, the situation was handled very professionally for the last friendly and professional relationship 18 months until final closure on Aug. 31, 1995. When Royal between the—two Navies. Roads opened, Mothersill TheUniversity escort gathered inDr. Halifax for thecontinued his research activities. with the RRMC “family” endured over first timeHis in connections mid-July. Seven members the the Vancouver flewensuing in fromyears the through West Coast while the Island Ex-Cadet Club and luncheseight with came formerfrom faculty, by serving on the Military remaining theand Atlantic Heritage Committee brought the mast, Command. the Westthat Coast to Halifax in the ship’s bell, and the College back toand thespent Hatley HMCS Newmace Waterford thePark win-site. — E3161 Victoria Edwards ter of 1959/60 in the Gunnery School.

fortement encouragé la création d’un programme préliminaire combiné académique-militaire de cinq semaines, qui a été lancé en 1991 au Collège militaire Royal Roads et était destiné aux élèves-officiers voulant entrer à ce Collège et au Collège militaire royal du Canada. On avait déjà tenté à deux reprises de fermer le Collège militaire Royal Roads (dans les années 1970 et en 1989), sans succès. Cependant, le 9 février 1994, alors que M. Mothersill était à l’hôtel du lac Victoria à Entebbe, en Ouganda, après avoir achevé un projet de recherche sur les lacs Victoria et Albert, il a reçu un appel téléphonique du lgén (retraité) Michael Caines (CMR, 1970), commandant du Collège militaire Royal Roads, l’informant d’une rumeur d’éventuelle fermeture du Collège. Malheureusement, cette rumeur fut confirmée le 22 février 1994, lors de l’annonce du budget fédéral. Bien que ce fut un moment très difficile pour les élèves-officiers, les professeurs et le personnel du Collège, la situation a été gérée de manière très professionnelle durant les 18 derniers mois du Collège, jusqu’à sa fermeture définitive le 31 août 1995. Après la fermeture du Collège et l’ouverture de l’Université Royal Roads, M. Mothersill a poursuivi ses activités de recherche. Ses liens avec la « famille » du Collège se sont maintenus au cours des années qui ont suivi, par l’intermédiaire du Club des anciens élèves-officiers de l’île de Vancouver et de déjeuners avec d’anciens professeurs, ainsi qu’en siégeant au Comité du patrimoine militaire qui a ramené le mât, la cloche du navire et la masse du Collège au site du parc Hatley. — E3161 Victoria Edwards ■ WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

17


Congratulations and best wishes

to all those responsible for publishing the fall 2011 edition of Veritas.

Félicitations et meilleurs vœux Gold/Or Gold Sponsors:

à tous ceux qui ont participé à la publication du numéro d’automne 2011 de Veritas.

Commanditaires or :

Canso Investment Counsel — 11623 John Carswell, 15673 Joe Morin, 22350 Nicolas Desjardins CIMC Investment Advisor Wellington West — 15008 David Morgan, BEng (rmc), MSc, FMA 12192 Tom Lawson The Crew of the 2011 Chasse-Galerie 15946 Jill Carleton Lorna Thorburn

7301 Earle Morris 16955 Pat Dray

Silver/Argent Silver SponsorS:

Commanditaires argent : Jackie Cowley + Tony O’Keeffe

7076 John van Haastrecht

14274 Alan Howard

24048 Sugumar Prabhakaran

7637 Ches (DOC) Brown

Bronze

Bronze Sponsors: Commanditaires bronze : Anonymous / Anonyme

9889 Bob Benn

21443 Cheng Hsin Chang

8765 Claude Tasse

12046 Pierre Ducharme

15012 Tom Norris

9318 Dave Bindernagel

9143 Bruce McAlpine

5780 Bernie Laliberté

M0058 Marc Drolet

6776 Tim Sparling

19307 Dave + Jacqueline Benoit

5611 Gerry Stowe

7776 Chris Lythgo

M0517 Bryan Righetti

16455 Tim Lannan

12059 Jaques Gagné

24659 Stephen Paish

M0361 T.J. Winchester Fran Gaudet

4459 Ed Murray

7669 Bob Jones

23439 Kayne Carr

22807 Michelle Whitty

VERITAS 18

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS


Graduation!

Choose this ideal gift to mark the occasion. * Nickel-plated basket of Canadian artillery officer’s full-size sword. * Nickel-plated basket of Canadian cavalry officer’s full-size sword.

* Gold-plated basket of Royal Canadian Air Force officer’s full-size sword.

* Nickel-plated basket of Canadian infantry officer’s full-size sword.

* Gold-plated basket of Royal Canadian Navy officer’s full-size sword.

All swords are crafted by WKC of Solingen, Germany, to British MOD specifications using tools and dies of the former Wilkinson Swords Ltd. of England.

In Kingston: available at RMC Alumni Shop and the C&E Museum For a full line of products, visit www.guthriewoods.com

Quality products. Quality service. P.O. Box 554 Stittsville, ON K2S 1A6 • Tel: (613) 831-6115 • Fax: (613) 831-6234 sales@guthriewoods.com


Roll Call:

L’appel :

A unique RMC Club tradition

Une tradition unique au Club des CMR

By/par H3550

By/par H3550 Murray Johnston Murray Johnston

N

owhere, except at RMC Club dinners, do you see members standing up in succession and calling out their college numbers. This is our Club’s tradition of Roll Call. It is unique and, if done well, forms an enjoyable part of Club dinners. In the 55 years since I graduated from RMC, I have observed several different ways of conducting Roll Call. Some changes were intentionally made to improve it or to emphasize certain things. Sometimes variations happened because of a difference of opinion on how to conduct one. I suspect that most ex-cadets are unaware of the origins and purpose of this tradition. I note that today it is being used less and less at Club functions and, hence, may be in danger of being discarded and lost. Do we want that? Probably not. After all, it is our unique tradition. My search for the origins and purpose of RMC Club Roll Call resulted in one reference, a sentence in the Old Brigade Booklet 1990, “The host conducts Roll Call commencing with the oldest and ending with the CWC.” “Roll Call, stand by your doors” was a daily ritual at 22:00 hours at RMC in the years just before the Second World War. All cadets in the dormitories were required to stand by their doors as the Battalion Orderly Corporal or Sergeant moved down the hallways, taking the names of those not standing by their rooms. The practice of calling the roll was a part of army life a century ago. It was likely a part of life at RMC in its early days, too. In those days, soldiers were regularly paraded and their names were called out in succession as listed in the unit’s nominal roll. Those present responded when their name was called. After the roll had been called,

N

ulle part, sauf pendant les dîners du Club des CMR, n’a-t-on la coutume de voir les membres se lever pour donner leur numéro de collège. C’est la tradition de l’appel du Club. Elle est unique et, si elle est bien faite, elle constitue une partie agréable des dîners du Club. J’ai vu plusieurs façons d’effectuer l’appel au cours des 55 ans qui ont suivi la remise de mon diplôme au CMR. À l’occasion, des variantes ont été intentionnellement introduites pour l’améliorer ou souligner certains événements. Certaines variantes sont apparues suite à une différence d’opinions quant à la façon d’effectuer l’appel. Je soupçonne que c’est devenu une tradition dont la plupart des anciens ignorent l’origine et le but. Je note qu’aujourd’hui on l’utilise de moins en moins lors de nos rencontres et qu’il y a un danger de voir disparaître l’appel. Est-ce ce que nous voulons? Probablement pas. Après tout, c’est une tradition unique. J’ai trouvé une référence lors de mes recherches sur les origines et le but de l’appel; une phrase dans l’Old Brigade Booklet 1990 qui dit : « L’hôte effectue l’appel en commençant par le plus âgé et en terminant par le commandant d’escadre. » Toutefois, « l’appel du soir » à 2200 heures était une pratique quotidienne au CMR dans les années qui précédaient de peu la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Tous les élofs dans les dortoirs devaient se tenir debout à la porte de leur chambre pendant que le caporal ou le sergent de service du bataillon parcourait les couloirs en notant les absences. La pratique de l’appel faisait partie de la vie militaire il y a un siècle et, probablement, au CMR à ses

WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

21


Roll Call can be looked upon as symbolizing the record of sacrifice and faithful service to Canada. / L’appel peut être considéré comme symbolisant le sacrifice et le service à la nation. those in charge had an accurate count of exactly who was present and, most importantly, who was absent. This was particularly important after a battle because it revealed who had been lost — killed, hospitalized or taken prisoner. The names of those missing would have evoked strong emotions of loss and sacrifice to home and country. For example, at the start of the Second Battle for Ypres, the 16th Battalion of approximately 800 men attacked the Germans the night of April 22, 1915, in an effort to stabilize the line around St. Julien. When a roll call was taken at dawn the next day, only 268 answered. Among those missing was 820 Lieutenant A.L. Lindsay, who was killed in that battle. As another example, on the night of June 5, 1944, the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion parachuted into France as part of the British/Canadian force protecting the eastern flank of the Normandy D-Day landings. Two brothers, 2803 Lieutenant J.P. Roussseau and 2650 Lieutenant J.M. Rousseau, and 2712 Lt. H.M. Walker were members of the Battalion. All three were killed in action in Normandy and are buried in the Canadian Military Cemetery at Rainville. Their names are engraved on Memorial Arch. These same emotions were reflected in Club Roll Call at dinners in the immediate post-war years, when many of the numbers not called out would have belonged to those whose names were engraved on the Arch. Those names, plus the names of those attending the dinners, i.e., the Roll Call, can be looked upon as symbolizing the record of sacrifice and faithful service to Canada by the long line of cadets who have passed through the Canadian Military Colleges. It is this record that gives RMC its value to the nation, a point strongly made by RMC’s Commandant, E6107 Brigadier-General Jocelyn Lacroix, at the Ottawa Branch’s annual dinner in November 2005. In that sense, Roll Call is indeed a very worthy tradition. In the 1960s, when I first started attending Club annual dinners, Roll Call was conducted very simply in sequential order from the lowest college number to the highest. Some time later, ex-cadets began to be asked to rise by class and call their numbers in sequence within classes. This

22

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS

débuts. À cette époque, les soldats étaient régulièrement rassemblés et leur nom était lancé à partir de la liste nominative de l’unité. Ceux qui étaient présents répondaient en entendant leur nom. Après l’appel, les responsables avaient un décompte précis de ceux qui étaient présents et, surtout, de ceux qui étaient absents. Cela était particulièrement important après une bataille, car on pouvait savoir qui avait été perdu au combat — tué, hospitalisé ou fait prisonnier. Le nom des personnes disparues évoquait de fortes émotions suite aux pertes et aux sacrifices dans les familles et au pays. Par exemple, au début de la seconde bataille d’Ypres, le 16e bataillon composé d’environ 800 hommes a attaqué les Allemands dans la nuit du 22 avril 1915, dans un effort visant à stabiliser le front autour de Saint-Julien. Quand l’appel nominatif a été effectué le lendemain à l’aube, il n’y avait que 268 répondants. Parmi les disparus figurait 820 lt A.L. Lindsay, tué durant l’attaque. Dans un autre exemple, trois membres du Premier Bataillon aéroporté canadien, parachuté en France la nuit du 5 juin 1944 au sein de la force britannique/ canadienne protégeant le flanc oriental du débarquement en Normandie, périrent au combat. Ils sont enterrés dans le cimetière canadien de Rainville. Il s’agissait de deux frères : 2803 lt J.P. Rousseau et 2650 lt J.M. Rousseau, ainsi que 2712 lt H.M. Walker. Leurs noms sont gravés sur l’Arc. L’émotion était visible lors de l’appel au cours des dîners du Club dans les années d’après-guerre, alors que plusieurs numéros non appelés étaient déjà gravés sur l’Arc. Ces noms, ainsi que le nom de ceux qui assistent aux dîners, c.-à-d. l’appel, peuvent être considérés comme symbolisant le sacrifice et le service à la nation de la « longue lignée d’élèves-officiers » qui sont passés par les collèges militaires canadiens. C’est le fondement de la valeur du CMR pour le pays; un argument bien soutenu par le commandant du CMR, E6107 bgén Jocelyn Lacroix, au dîner annuel du chapitre d’Ottawa en novembre 2005. Dans ce sens, l’appel est en effet une digne tradition. Dans les années 1960, quand j’ai commencé à assister aux dîners annuels du Club, l’appel se faisait tout simplement dans l’ordre du plus petit numéro jusqu’au plus élevé. Plus tard, on a invité les anciens à se lever par promotion et à donner chacun leur numéro de collège dans l’ordre. Cette façon de procéder était devenue nécessaire parce que les groupes étaient maintenant plus grands et il était devenu difficile pour les membres attablés de démêler entre eux la séquence correcte. Il était également devenu difficile pour


arrangement was needed because classes had become larger and it was difficult for class members, while at their tables, to sort out among themselves the sequence of their numbers. It had also become difficult for those conducting the Roll Call to keep the calling of numbers in sequence and without gaps. A decade ago, Roll Call had become locked into being conducted by classes. One cannot escape the observation that the original convenience of conducting Roll Call by classes had become de rigueur and, as a result, Roll Call’s focus on the long line of cadets shifted to which class had the largest representation at the function. We had three Colleges of entry for nearly 40 years and the closure of two of them in the mid-1990s saddened all of us. So in 2005, as an initiative to remember our former colleges, Roll Call at the Old Brigade dinner was conducted by classes and within each class by College of entry. Roll Call’s focus was shifted further to College of entry. In looking to the future, another point to keep in mind relates to the changing nature of the Canadian Military Colleges. Until the past 30 or so years, the student body comprised only cadets who were enrolled in residential undergraduate programs. Now RMC has other programs and its student body includes non-cadet and non-residential students. All non-cadet graduates of the Colleges are eligible for Club membership. In addition, the Club’s honourary, associate and honourary life members include non-cadets, some of whom are not associated with a specific class. Hence, there are many types of College numbers. The question is, “Is it now too difficult and too complicated to organize a Roll Call for RMC Club functions?” It may be so for large Reunion Weekend events, except for a shortened Roll Call for, as an example, those celebrating entry 60 years ago or more. Full Roll Call is probably doable for branch dinners and certain functions at the College, such as the graduating class’s final dinner and the smaller annual mechanical-aeronautical engineering dinner. Roll Call at RMC Club functions has always inspired me to think for a moment about classmates and others from Canadian Military Colleges who are no longer with us. An example of this is a new tradition at dinners at the Kingston Branch when, during Roll Call, widows of deceased ex-cadets rise with their late spouses’ class and give their numbers. Is that not a tradition worth keeping? What do you think?

ceux qui effectuaient l’appel de conserver une séquence correcte sans erreurs. Il y a une dizaine d’années, la procédure de l’appel devint organisée en fonction des promotions. On ne peut que convenir que cette pratique, adoptée par nécessité, était devenue la norme et que la « longue lignée des élèves-officiers » s’était transformée pour déterminer quelle promotion était la mieux représentée à l’événement. Nous avons eu trois collèges d’entrée pendant près de 40 ans, et la fermeture de deux d’entre eux au milieu des années 1990 nous a tous attristés. Ainsi en 2005, afin de nous remémorer nos anciens collèges, l’appel du dîner de la Vieille Brigade fut fait par promotion subdivisée par collège d’entrée. L’appel était donc davantage axé sur le collège d’entrée. La nature changeante des collèges militaires canadiens sera déterminante à l’avenir. Jusqu’à il y a 30 ans, le corps étudiant était composé uniquement d’élèves-officiers inscrits dans programmes d’études universitaires de premier cycle. De nos jours, le CMR offre d’autres programmes, et son corps est aussi formé d’étudiants qui ne sont pas en résidence et qui ne sont pas des élèves-officiers. Tous ces nouveaux diplômés peuvent devenir membres du Club. En outre, les membres honoraires, associés et honoraires à vie, incluent des gens qui n’ont pas été élèves-officiers et dont certains ne sont liés à aucune promotion en particulier. Par conséquent, il existe de nombreux types de numéros de collège. Nous sommes en droit de nous demander s’il est maintenant trop difficile et trop compliqué d’effectuer un appel lors d’événements du Club des CMR. C’est probablement le cas pour les grands événements du weekend de rencontre, à moins d’effectuer un appel réduit comme celui de ceux admis il y a 60 ans ou plus. Il est certainement possible d’effectuer l’appel lors d’un dîner de chapitre et de certains événements au collège, tel le dernier dîner des finissants ou lors du dîner annuel des diplômés en génie mécanique-aéronautique. L’appel aux rencontres du Club des CMR me fait toujours penser à mes camarades de classe et aux autres de la « longue lignée d’élofs » qui sont passés par des collèges militaires canadiens et qui ne sont plus avec nous. Par exemple, nous avons une nouvelle tradition aux dîners du chapitre de Kingston qui permet aux veuves d’anciens de se lever avec les membres de la promotion de leur conjoint décédé et de donner son numéro. N’est-ce pas une tradition qui mérite d’être conservée? Qu’en pensez-vous? ■

WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

23


Canso Investment Counsel Ltd. has managed the investment portfolio of the RMC Foundation for several years without charge. The Foundation is honoured to recognize this ongoing, outstanding contribution of effort and expertise in support of our Royal Military Colleges.

We specialize in security selection for Canadian and global investment portfolios. Our discipline and proprietary research avoids investment trends or fashion and creates long-term value for our portfolios.

T. 905.881.8853 | www www.c ansofunds. sofund com sofunds.


EX-CADETS • Les ANCIENS

OLD BRIGADE NOTES

I

will start this column by thanking those members who sent money to help with the operation and administration of the Old Brigade. I sincerely hope that I do not have to ask such a favour of you again. At the annual general meeting of the RMC Club on Oct. 1, 2011, article 14.6 of the constitution, dealing with membership in the Old Brigade, was amended to include as members those persons who participated in the University Training Plan for Non-Commissioned Members, the University Training Plan for Officers, and the Post-Graduate Programme 50 years from date of entry into a Canadian military college or upon attaining the age of 67, whichever comes first. On your behalf, I welcome them, one and all. We have just finished two excellent reunions at RMC Saint-Jean and at RMCC in Kingston. (The current abbreviation is RMCC for Royal Military College of Canada; frankly, I liked it better when we used CMR for the college in Saint-Jean, and RMC for the college in Kingston, but we change with the times and go with the flow.) Your Assistant Adjutant, 6116 Claude Archambault, managed the Saint-Jean reunion, and his contribution to this column follows. I had the Kingston reunion to worry about, but I need not have worried because everyone chipped in and did

their part, so all events were very successful and enjoyable. The Class of ’66 Old Brigade recruits were here in strength, as was the Class of ’61 enjoying their 50th anniversary of graduation. Our grilled chicken dinner at Zorba’s Banquet Facility in Kingston was, to all reports so far, a success. The two classes, augmented by several ex-cadets from the Class of ’56, presented coins to the tired, muddy and wet firstyear cadets after the obstacle race, and reported having a good time doing so in spite of the cold rain. (It is supposed to rain during the obstacle race, is it not?) The Class of ’66 gave the Old Brigade $3,500 to cover the cost of the coins, and to mark their participation in the event. I hope to see the Old Brigade recruit classes in the future to follow their example. The badging parade on Saturday was a very cool and windy affair, but the Cadet Wing was as impressive as ever. The badging of the first year by the Old Brigade is becoming a privilege sought by more than we can accommodate; all members professed to feeling proud and excited to be a part of it. The first-year cadets also appreciate the gesture by their elders. Sunday’s parade to the arch for the memorial service was done in the rain and wind, and the ex-cadets on parade made a fine impression on the current cadets. As I told them in my post-

5611 Gerry Stowe, Old Brigade Adjutant, addresses ex-cadets. 5611 Gerry Stowe, adjudant de la Vieille Brigade, s’adresse aux anciens.

parade remarks, “We have still got it.” When we were done, the parade square was filled with cadets and ex-cadets mingling, talking and sharing college numbers. The Ottawa Branch of the RMC Club has a tradition that other branches may wish to emulate. In early September, the Ottawa Branch holds an Old Brigade luncheon, during which they hand out Old Brigade ties to the branch’s recruit class. I attended this year’s luncheon at the invitation of Branch President, 5276 Digger MacDougall, and watched while about a dozen recruits in the Class of ’66 were inspected by 4860 John de Chastelain before being presented with their ties. I think this is a great way to welcome the new members of the Old Brigade in the

branches, and I invite other branches to copy the Ottawa example. I’m sure that Digger will be glad to share the routine with others. There seems to be an impression afoot that the Old Brigade dinner is for reunion classes only, and I want you all to know that this is definitely not the case. This year’s dinner was attended by about 230 people, and there was room for about 100 more. All members of the Old Brigade are welcome every year, not just every five years on your milestone anniversaries. In closing, I wish all of you the best of the festive season and happiness in the new year. Two Colleges, One Club, One Old Brigade, One Family — 5611 Gerry Stowe, Adjutant WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

25


EX-CADETS • LES ANCIENS

NOTES DE LA VIEILLE BRIGADE

A

vant tout, j’aimerais remercier les membres qui, par leur contribution monétaire, m’ont aidé à maintenir les opérations de la Vieille Brigade. J’espère ne pas avoir à demander une telle contribution à nouveau. À l’assemblée générale annuelle du Club des CMR tenue le 1er octobre 2011, l’article 14.6 de la constitu-

Nous venons de conclure deux réunions très bien réussies au CMR Saint-Jean et au CMRC Kingston. (En passant, l’abréviation CMRC correspond au Collège militaire royal du Canada. Franchement, j’aimais mieux utiliser CMR pour le collège de Saint-Jean et RMC pour le collège de Kingston, mais les temps ont changé et il faut s’adapter). L’adjudant

La remise des écussons aux élèvesofficiers de première année est un privilège fort recherché par les membres de la Vieille Brigade et malheureusement, nous ne pouvons assurer la participation de tous. tion du Club ayant trait à l’admissibilité des membres de la Vieille Brigade a été modifié. Les personnes qui ont participé au Programme de formation universitaire — Militaires du rang (PFUMR), au Programme de formation universitaire — Hommes (PFUH), au Programme de formation universitaire — Officiers (PFUO) ou au Programme d’études supérieures (PES) deviendront membres de la Vieille Brigade 50 ans après la date d’entrée dans un collège militaire du Canada ou lorsqu’ils atteindront l’âge de 67 ans, selon l’événement qui surviendra en premier. Je leur souhaite à tous la bienvenue. 26

adjoint de la Vieille Brigade, 6116 Claude Archambault, s’est occupé de la réunion de Saint-Jean et vous pouvez lire son article publié à la suite du mien. Je me suis occupé de la réunion de Kingston, mais je n’avais pas à m’inquiéter car tous ont fait leur part de façon à ce que toutes les activités soient réussies et agréables. Les nouvelles recrues de la Vieille Brigade, à savoir la promotion de 1966, étaient présentes en grand nombre, tout comme les membres de la promotion de 1961, qui fêtaient le 50e anniversaire de leur remise des diplômes. Le dîner de poulet rôti dans la salle de banquet chez

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS

Zorba fut, selon les dernières nouvelles, fort apprécié de tous. Les membres des deux promotions, avec l’appui de membres de la promotion de 1956, ont présenté les pièces commémoratives aux élèvesofficiers de première année ayant complété la course à obstacles. Ceux-ci, couverts de boue, étaient fiers de leur exploit malgré la pluie et le froid. (Il est censé pleuvoir lors de cette course, n’est-ce pas?) La promotion de 1966 a fait un don de 3 500 $ pour défrayer le coût des pièces et souligner ainsi leur participation à cet événement. J’espère que les promotions se joignant à la Vieille Brigade à l’avenir suivront cet exemple. La remise des écussons du Collège a eu lieu le samedi matin, par un temps froid et pluvieux, mais l’escadre des élèves-officiers était comme toujours impeccable. La remise des écussons aux élèves-

officiers de première année est un privilège fort recherché par les membres de la Vieille Brigade et malheureusement, nous ne pouvons assurer la participation de tous. Ceux qui ont participé, membres de la Vieille Brigade et élèvesofficiers, ont grandement apprécié cette cérémonie. Le défilé vers l’Arc pour le service commémoratif le dimanche s’est également déroulé sous un temps froid et pluvieux. Les membres de la Vieille Brigade ont encore une fois fait bonne figure auprès des élèves-officiers, ce qui m’a fait dire après le défilé que nous n’avions rien perdu malgré les années. Ensuite, le terrain d’exercice s’est rempli d’anciens et d’élèves-officiers échangeant numéros de collège et anecdotes. Le chapitre d’Ottawa du Club des CMR maintient une tradition que d’autres chapitres aimeraient peut-être suivre. Au début septembre,


EX-CADETS • Les ANCIENS

ce chapitre tient un déjeuner de la Vieille Brigade au cours duquel on remet une cravate de la Vieille Brigade aux nouveaux membres. J’ai assisté à ce déjeuner cette année, à l’invitation du président 5276 MacDougall et j’ai vu une douzaine de nouvelles recrues de la promotion de 1966 subir l’inspection par 4860 John de Chastelain avant de recevoir leur cravate. Ceci est une bonne manière de souhaiter la bienvenue aux nouveaux membres de la Vieille Brigade. J’invite les autres chapitres à suivre l’exemple du chapitre d’Ottawa. Je suis certain que M. MacDougall sera très heureux de partager son expérience avec vous. Il semble que plusieurs ont l’impression que le dîner de la Vieille Brigade est réservé aux promotions célébrant un anniversaire, et je veux vous assurer que ce n’est pas le cas. Cette année, près de 230 personnes ont participé et il y avait de la place pour une centaine de plus. Tous les membres de la Vieille Brigade sont invités, pas seulement ceux qui célèbrent un anniversaire. Pour terminer, je vous transmets mes meilleurs vœux pour les Fêtes et vous souhaite beaucoup de bonheur pour la nouvelle année. Deux collèges, un Club, une Vieille Brigade, une famille — 5611 Gerry Stowe, Adjudant ■

Providing financial support and security for our officer cadets to soar! Soutien financier et sécurité pour permettre à nos élèves-officiers de prendre leur envol!

Life Insurance • Financial Planning • Financial Counselling • Financial Education • CF Personnel Assistance Fund Assurance vie • Planification financière • Counselling financier • Éducation financière • Caisse d’assistance au personnel de FC

1-800-267-6681 • www.sisip.com WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

27


John Plant

Royal Military College CollÈge militaire royal PAR 5119 LE CAPTC (RET.) BILL SHEAD Traduit par 6426 Serge Arpin

3

948 Lt (N) RCN John Plant was posted to Royal Military College upon completion of his Ph.D. in 1965. While he had not intended to become an academic, he was not displeased. He found a patriarchal and relaxed environment — one where afternoon tea at the Senior Staff Mess was a mainstay of the daily routine. The academic wing was led by those who had reopened the college after the war: Colonel Sawyer (Principal) and Tom Gelley (Registrar), among others. The college environment was quite different from today as there were no female cadets or faculty and the French language was barely spoken. With only 450 cadets, however, the teaching environment was particularly rewarding. Dr. Plant became Head of Electrical Engineering in 1967 and in 1970, when his service obligations were complete, he accepted a professorship at RMC and, at the same time, was promoted to Commander (E). Soon after, he was invited to attend the National Defence College — a great experience of travelling, meeting interesting people and debating ideas. On his return

3

948 lt John Plant (Marine) est arrivé au Collège militaire royal du Canada (CMR) en 1965, après avoir obtenu un doctorat. C’était assez étonnant, car il n’avait jamais eu l’intention de devenir un universitaire. Il a toutefois été heureux de découvrir un environnement patriarcal et détendu — où le thé l’après-midi au mess des officiers faisait partie de la routine quotidienne. L’aile académique était gérée par ceux qui avaient rouvert le Collège après la guerre, notamment le colonel Sawyer (recteur) et Tom Gelley (secrétaire général). L’enseignement était très agréable. Le milieu collégial était très différent d’aujourd’hui, car il n’y avait pas de femmes parmi les élèves-officiers, ni au sein du personnel académique, et presque personne ne parlait français. Par contre, l’environnement d’enseignement était très enrichissant, car il n’y avait que 450 élèves-officiers. En 1967, M. Plant est devenu chef du département de génie électronique. En 1970, lorsque ses obligations de service envers la Marine royale canadienne ont pris fin, il a reçu une offre de poste de professeur au CMR ainsi qu’une promotion au grade de capitaine de frégate (E). Peu de temps après avoir accepté l’offre au CMR, il a reçu une invitation du Collège de la Défense nationale. Il s’agissait là d’une excellente expérience de voyage, et c’était une occasion de rencontrer des gens intéressants et d’échanger des idées. À son retour au CMR, il est devenu doyen des études supérieures et de la recherche, et a profité de to RMC, he became Dean of Graduate Studies and Research, cette occasion pour recruter des étudiants de 2e et de 3e cycle an opportunity he used to recruit graduate students and assist et aider les membres de la faculté à trouver le financement nécesSadly HMS Excellent is no more – saire(Hosaqami) pour leurs recherches. sentation of a totem pole to faculty members obtain funding for their research. having been closed by the in theprocélate partie de la direction à une époque où leRN Collège HMS Excellent the RN Faire training facility Dr. Plant’s years at RMC were particularly satisfying due– to 1980s. As tragic, Hosaqami is “returnd’enrichissements a été particulièrement in Portsmouth England. the number of enrichments that took place during his tenure — dait à un certain nombre ing iltoythe in a rockyduoutcropping gratifiant. Tout d’abord, a euearth” l’instauration bilinguisme. was anwas initiative of the Gunthe first being the introduction of bilingualism.This The second near des theétudiants Chiefs &adultes Petty dans Officers Mess Ensuite, il y extract a eu l’arrivée le cadre du Branch. The following is an the arrival of mature students as part of the nery University Training in Esquimalt, B.C.militaire Although Hosaqami Programme formation universitaire du rang, dirigé from mydirected Junior by Officer’s Journal de about Plan for Non-Commissioned Members, a program remained on public display on Whale, it le CEMD. Ces étudiants adultes apportent beaucoup au Colthe event written whilepar serving in HMCS the CDS; these students continue to give much to college life. was severely damaged in a major storm. lège. M. Plant a eu le plaisir d’établir ce programme lorsqu’il était Croix inDr. thePlant summer of 1960. As “Acting Dean, Canadian Forces MilitarySt. College,”

‘Afternoon tea at the Senior Staff Mess was a mainstay of the daily routine.’ / « Le thé l’après-midi au mess des officiers faisait partie de la routine quotidienne. »

28

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS


I

l y as 50 ans un groupe de marins autochtones se sont portés volontaires pour participer à une manifestation pour fêter les 50 ans de l’association de la MRC avec la Royal Navy. En tant que jeune (et très junior) officier de marine, je commandais le groupe qui formait l’escorte pour la présentation d’un mât totémique (Hosaqami) au HMS Excellent – le centre de formation de la RN à Portsmouth en Angleterre. C’était une initiative de la division des canonniers de la MRC. Ce qui suit est un extrait de mon journal d’officier subalterne au sujet de l’événement écrit à bord du NCSM St. Croix à l’été de 1960. Malheureusement HMS Excellent n’est plus – ayant été fermé par la RN à la fin des années 1980. De manière tout aussi tragique, Hosaqami est en train de « retourner à la terre » sur un affleurement rocheux près du mess des chefs et maîtres mariniers à Esquimalt, en Colombie-Britannique. Bien que Hosaqami soit resté exposé au public sur Whale Island (où était situé le HMS Excellent), il a été gravement endommagé lors d’une sévère tempête qui a ravagé le RoyaumeUni après la fermeture d’Excellent. the West Coast to Halifax in HMCS New Waterford and spent the winter of 1959/60 in the Gunnery School. On 15 July 1960, Hosaqami was embarked in HMCS Kootenay for pasenjoyed the task of setting this program. sage to Portsmouth and hisup new home on In 1983, Principal Don Tilley resigned to illness andbe Dr.a Plant was appointed Whale Island. Whiledue Hosaqami would Acting while the search for a new Principal proceeded. uniquePrincipal gift; the ceremony for its presentaDr. was appointed Principal 1984. tionPlant to Excellent was to be equallyinunique third important enrichment came with the inclusion of andA memorable. Fifteen RCN members women in the Cadet Wing and in faculty. A particular high-water who were of Indian ancestry volunteered mark for aDr. Plantescort was hiring the first female faculty member, to form special for Hosaqami. It Dr. Creber. wasCathy this escort and the “informal” presenBeing Principal of RMC was wonderful tation ceremony which was to adda so much experience for Dr. Plant. withand seven Commandants fun toWorking the occasion to underscore the was always fine and the Committee of Deans, chaired by the Principal, was always friendly and professional relationship productive. Principal between theAtwo Navies.continually seeks a “safe port” for his institution. However, such safety isfor difficult, The escort gathered in Halifax the if not impossible, for institutions owned by the government; first time in mid-July. Seven membersconsider, for example, Royal Roads Military College, thewhile Royal the Canadian Navy and, curflew in from the West Coast rently, Atomic Energy Canada But the best moorings are remaining eight cameoffrom theLtd. Atlantic quality and values suchCoast as putting students Command. the West to Halifax in first. The New Faculty Association (RMC,the CMR HMCS Waterford and spent win-and RRMC) unionized early Dr. Plant’s and after long periods of extremely ter ofin1959/60 in tenure the Gunnery School.

3948 John Plant says a particularly highwater mark for him was hiring the first female faculty member. / John Plant a été particulièrement fier d’avoir embauché la première femme au sein de la faculté.

« doyen par intérim du Collège militaire des Forces canadiennes ». En 1983, le recteur, Don Tilley, a dû démissionner pour des raisons de santé, et a été remplacé par le recteur par intérim John Plant alors qu’on recherchait un nouveau recteur. En 1984, M. Plant a été nommé recteur. L’inclusion de femmes parmi les élèves-officiers et au sein de la faculté a constitué un troisième enrichissement important. M. Plant a été particulièrement fier d’avoir embauché la première femme au sein de la faculté — Mme Cathy Creber. Pour M. Plant, être recteur du CMR fut une expérience merveilleuse. Il aimait travailler avec les différents commandants (sept se sont succédé lors de ses années au Collège), et le travail avec le comité des doyens, dont le recteur était président, était toujours productif. Un recteur est toujours à la recherche d’un « havre sûr » pour son institution. Par contre, une telle chose est rare dans une institution gouvernementale; mentionnons par exemple la Marine royale canadienne, le Collège militaire Royal Roads, ou aujourd’hui EACL. Toutefois, les meilleurs ancrages sont la qualité et les valeurs, comme mettre le bienêtre de l’étudiant en premier. L’association des facultés (les trois collèges) s’est syndiquée au début de la période pendant laquelle M. Plant était recteur et, après une longue période marquée par des sessions de négociation collective extrêmement ennuyeuses avec le Conseil du Trésor, la lutte alla à l’arbitrage. Les questions non résolues étaient la paye et la liberté académique, cette dernière étant le concept le plus difficile à comprendre pour la bureaucratie. C’est à ce WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

29


Academic freedom was the most difficult concept for the bureaucracy to understand. / La liberté académique est le concept le plus difficile à comprendre pour la bureaucratie. boring and unsuccessful collective bargaining sessions with the Treasury Board, the struggle went to arbitration. The unresolved issues were pay and academic freedom. Academic freedom was the most difficult concept for the bureaucracy to understand. It was at this time that Dr. Plant first met John Cowan, the arbitrator selected to resolve the impasse. Under Dr. Cowan’s guidance, arbitration was mercifully swift and satisfactory. The recession of the 1990s influenced many government decisions, one of which was to close RRMC and CMR. This meant a new and different RMC with a revision of academic programs and the transfer of faculty and research activity to RMC from CMR and RRMC. In addition, the task of arranging buyouts for RMC faculty whose positions would be filled by a transferee was undertaken. It was clear that the Armed Forces Council was beginning to take RMC more seriously as evidenced by the ministerial selection of a Board of Governors and the appointment of the Withers’ Study Group. College management was able recommend to this committee an academic expert, Dr. John Cowan. The recession produced “squeeze them until they squeak” cuts in funding, and we eventually “squeaked.” The Somalia incident led to a policy requiring Canadian Forces (CF) officers to have a university education. This was an opportunity for RMC to play a larger role in support of creating a better CF through education. Deans Jim Barrett and Ron Haycock were assigned the task of finding a way to help serving military pursue part-time studies toward an RMC degree. They did a fantastic job and provided yet another meaningful enrichment to “back up mooring line.” Their creation of the Continuing Studies Division grew rapidly and continues to be a major service to serving personnel and spouses today. Alongside the emerging Continuing Studies Division, two other notable enrichments took place during Dr. Plant’s tenure: the Graduate Studies and Research Division underwent amazing growth under the inspired leadership of Dr. Ron Weir, and Dr. Wayne Kirk oversaw the repatriation of the Canadian Land Forces Technical Staff Course. Dr. Plant retired from RMC in 1999 with a total of 46 years of service in National Defence. He is extremely grateful to have been associated with this world-class military university over four and a half decades. He will complete a nineyear post-retirement term on the board of the RMCC Club Foundation this fall. — H3948 John Plant 30

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS

moment-là que M. John Plant a rencontré pour la première fois M. John Cowan, arbitre choisi régler l’impasse. Heureusement, sous l’influence de M. Cowan, l’arbitrage fut rapide et satisfaisant. La récession des années 1990 a influencé de nombreuses décisions gouvernementales, dont une était la fermeture d’un CMR et du Collège militaire Royal Roads. Cette décision a entraîné la création d’un CMRC nouveau et différent. Il était nécessaire réviser les programmes académiques et de transférer des membres de la faculté ainsi que des projets de recherche du CMR et du Collège militaire Royal Roads au CMRC. De plus, il fallait aussi racheter les contrats des membres de la faculté du CMR qui allaient perdre leur poste au profit des membres transférés. Le conseil des Forces armées a commencé à prendre le CMRC plus au sérieux. Le ministre a choisi un Conseil des Gouverneurs et a nommé le comité Withers. La direction du Collège a été en mesure de recommander un expert universitaire au comité, M. John Cowan. La récession a aussi fait qu’une attitude « pressons-les jusqu’à ce qu’ils crient » a été adoptée pour effectuer les compressions budgétaires et, éventuellement, le CMRC a « crié ». L’incident en Somalie a fait qu’une politique obligeant tous les officiers des Forces canadiennes à avoir un diplôme universitaire a été adoptée. Ceci a donné au CMRC l’occasion de jouer un rôle plus important dans le soutien de meilleures FC grâce à l’éducation. Les doyens Jim Barrett et Ron Haycock ont reçu pour tâche de trouver une façon d’aider les militaires déjà en service à pouvoir poursuivre des études à temps partiel afin d’obtenir un diplôme du CMRC. Ils ont fait un travail fantastique et ont apporté encore un cinquième enrichissement renforçant l’ancrage. La division des études permanentes nouvellement créée a pris rapidement de l’expansion et continue de fournir d’importants services aux membres actifs et à leurs conjoints. Deux autres enrichissements ont eu lieu durant le mandat de M. Plant : la division des études supérieures et de la recherche a connu une incroyable croissance sous le leadership inspiré de Ron Weir; et le rapatriement du Programme d’état-major technique de la Force terrestre a eu lieu sous la supervision de Wayne Kirk. Heureux d’avoir été associé à cette université militaire de calibre mondial, M. Plant a pris sa retraite en 1999 après 46 ans de services au sein de la Défense nationale. Cet automne, il terminera un mandat de neuf années après retraite au sein du conseil de la Fondation CMRC. — H3948 John Plant ■


Cumulative Class Giving Our Top 10 Classes based on Lifetime Donations

1965 $1,700,503

1963 $553,585

1966

$821,891

1962 $543,388

1953

$644,776

1938 $522,024

1969

$638,812

1936 $435,700

1924

$615,039

1964 $353,939


2011

Reunion WEEKEND

32

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS


Royal Military College of Canada

R

eunion weekend 2011 was ushered in with rain and gusting winds, coupled with rather unseasonable temperatures. However, the inclement weather failed to dampen the spirits of the current cadets and ex-cadets of Royal Military College of Canada or those of the parents, dignitaries and other visitors to the activities. The highlight of the weekend was, of course, the completion of the wet and muddy obstacle course for the first-year cadets and their subsequent badging ceremony on Saturday morning. In one of the finest RMCC traditions, the excadets of the “Old Brigade” badged the new cadets — the final step in their becoming full members of the Cadet Wing. The stands were full as many endured the cool and blustery climes to witness the coming together of five generations of cadets and ex-cadets for such an auspicious ceremony. Another challenging weekend activity was the hearty paddling of the Chasse-Galerie 12, who braved the “chop” on Lake Ontario after five days of travelling along the Rideau Canal Waterway from Ottawa. Their arrival coincided with the Class of ’71 bicycling in from Ottawa. Other physical exploits included Red and White sports such as rugby, soccer and basketball, where many ex-cadets discovered that their bodies were still willing — if only briefly. In the end, the ex-cadets carried the day … even if it was at the expensive of a normal functioning body Monday morning. What were we thinking? Remembrance ceremonies were key during Reunion Weekend. Three ex-cadets were added to the RMCC Wall of Honour: William Stewart, the first chief hydrographic surveyor of Canada; Air Commodore Leonard Birchall, the “Saviour of Ceylon;” and Lieutenant Colonel (Honorary) Jean Ostiguy, banker and philanthropist. From the parade led by the Old Brigade to the Arch Ceremony to the awarding of the Captain Nichola Goddard and Captain Matthew Dawe Swords in remembrance of two RMCC graduates who made the ultimate sacrifice in Afghanistan, these events were staunch reminders to all of the significant role that RMCC maintains within the very fabric of Canadian society. Amid the pomp and circumstance of the parade, cere-

19307 Dave Benoit and 9660 Cameron Diggon lay a wreath (above) at Memorial Arch. Opposite: March to the Arch (top); Members of the Old Brigade badge cadets from the Class of 2015 (bottom).

monies and social activities, the RMC Club executed its governance events welcoming both old and new volunteers to oversee the Club through the next year. Of note, a new President, Marc Drolet, took over from Dave Benoit, who masterfully presided over the Club in what was considered an extremely busy year. Both Marc and Dave, among others, can be congratulated for the fine work they have done in ushering in a renewal of the Club and laying the foundation for a prosperous future. If you were looking close enough, you might have spotted the Club staff working diligently in the background at all reunion events. In particular, Mary Darlington and Linda Mathieu ensured that all visitors to Panet House were served at an outstanding level. Despite the weather, the feedback from the 2011 reunion was a huge thumbs-up by a vast majority of the visitors. — 14356 Michael Rostek ■

WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

33


Royal Roads University

T

hey came back in droves, some of them for the first time in 40 years. What awaited them on their return to campus was a weekend of merriment and memories, and a renewed connection to place as Royal Roads University continued to celebrate its history with Royal Roads Military College during its 11th annual Homecoming, Sept. 9 to 11. For ex-cadet Bill Sutherland, returning to campus was an act he purposely avoided for many years. The memories from his time at the military college were so strong, he didn’t want to tarnish them, he said. He’s not worried about that anymore. “I’ve been very reassured over the last few years and pleased with the willingness to embrace the military history,” Sutherland said. That willingness is evident in the return of historical artifacts to campus and an active military heritage committee to honour the presence of the Royal Roads Military College on campus from 1940 to 1995. The college’s ceremonial mace and a replica of Lord Nelson’s quote were returned to campus for Homecoming. The quote, which used to hang over the entrance to the Grant Building, reads “Duty is the great business of a sea officer: All private considerations must give way to it however painful it is.” The weekend was as rich in entertainment as it was in history. More than 200 university and cadet alumni spent a day on the water with the HMCS Regina, as the DND-

34

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS

RRMC alumni join the parade and festivities during the 11th annual Homecoming at Royal Roads University in September.

sponsored Day Sail kicked off Homecoming. Scavenger hunts on campus, formal dinners, and a dance that had music streaming out the quarterdeck windows late into the evening rounded out the event. On the final day of Homecoming, a formal ceremony was hosted to unveil the heritage paver stone project. Spearheaded by the military heritage committee, the project resulted in nearly 600 paver stones laid at the mast site on campus. For a $200 donation to the military heritage fund, the bricks display a name, number and class year. They purposely left off ranks, titles and decorations. It is a way of connecting back to individuals as they were when they first arrived at the college, said committee member Dave Wightman. “I’m not sure I understood this at the beginning, but I am astounded at how it just starts to trigger the memories and starts a conversation,” he said of the stones. Those conversations saw people reliving the parades, training, pranks and socializing that were part and parcel of cadet life. They worked hard, but it was a wonder they got anything done with the beautiful setting, Sutherland joked. “The camaraderie was impressive,” said ex-cadet Steve Lucas. “ [The turnout to Homecoming] speaks to how close we were.” — Paul Longtin, RR Staff


Collège militaire royal de Saint-Jean Royal Military College Saint-Jean

S

ous un soleil radieux, et grâce au solide appui des autorités du Collège et à la participation enthousiaste d’un grand nombre d’anciens, cette réunion fut un grand succès. Le tout a débuté vendredi soir au Vieux Mess, activité à laquelle ont participé plus de 150 anciens. Les membres de la promotion d’entrée de 1961 furent présentés aux participants, puis il y eut le traditionnel appel des promotions. Samedi matin, le Défilé des anciens fut le grand moment de la fin de semaine. En présence de l’escadre des élèves-officiers et de notre invité d’honneur, le 23350 Cpt Simon Mailloux, l’adjudant adjoint de la Vieille Brigade a accueilli officiellement les membres de la promotion d’entrée de 1961 dans la Vieille Brigade. Les pièces commémoratives du Club furent alors présentées aux nouveaux élèves-officiers par les nouveaux brigadiers. Une photo de groupe fut prise au Monument des anciens pour commémorer l’événement. La fin de semaine de réunion pour l’année 2012 aura lieu du 7 au 9 septembre. Nous célébrerons alors le 60e anniversaire de l’ouverture du CMR. Nous vous invitons à venir célébrer en grand nombre ce moment historique. Au plaisir de vous revoir en septembre 2012! — 6116 Claude Archambault

U

nder a great blue sky, with excellent support from the College and the enthusiastic participation of ex-cadets, the reunion weekend at RMC SaintJean was a great success. The events began at the Vieux Mess Friday evening with more than 150 participants. Members of Entry Class 1961 were presented to all, followed by the call of the classes. The Défilé des anciens on Saturday morning was the highlight of the weekend. In the presence of our guest of honour, 23350 Captain Simon Mailloux, and the Cadet Wing, the Assistant Adjutant of the Old Brigade officially welcomed members of Class 1961 into the Old Brigade. Club coins were then presented to the new officer cadets by the new brigadiers. A group photo was taken at the Memorial Arch to commemorate the event. The 2012 Reunion Weekend, Sept. 7 to 9, will mark the 60th anniversary of the opening of the College. You are all invited to join us to celebrate this historic moment. Looking forward to seeing you next September. Cheers! — 6116 Claude Archambault ■ Badging ceremony and parade at Reunion Weekend at Royal Military College Saint-Jean. / Remise des écussons et défilé lors du weekend de rencontre au Collège militaire royal de Saint-Jean.

WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

35


Continue to Make a Difference...

part-time and casual opportunities available!

For more than a decade, Calian has been providing simulation training to the Department of National Defence. Calian is a principal provider of the command and staff training for the Canadian Army by developing and delivering world-class training events at six simulation centres across Canada. This is an opportunity to impart your knowledge and experience by contributing to the training and mentoring of today’s Canadian Forces. • Part-time and casual opportunities available • Join over 300 ex-military personnel that are helping to train today’s CF • Opportunities to contribute no matter where you live For more information about these opportunities please contact one of our site managers. CFB Edmonton • Tom Putt • Thomas.Putt@forces.gc.ca • (780)973-4011 x5830 CFB Gagetown • Rob Amos • Rob.Amos@forces.gc.ca • (506)422-2000 x4359 CFB Kingston • Chuck Oliviero • Chuck.Oliviero@forces.gc.ca • (613)541-5010 x4386 CLFCSC Kingston • Doug Labrie • Doug.Labrie@forces.gc.ca • (613)541-5010 x2229 CFB Petawawa • Al Peterson • Al.Peterson@forces.gc.ca • (613)687-5511x6493 BFC Valcartier • Gratien Lamontagne • Gratien.Lamontagne@forces.gc.ca • (418)844-5000 x7733

www.calian.jobs Calian - Veritas 7.5" x 5" (W x H) 1/2 page - no bleed Full colour

Until March 2012 * O.A.C. On the CANEX No Interest Credit Plan

30 September - 31 December, 2011

www.canex.ca

avant mars 2012

Avec le Plan de crédit sans intérêt de CANEX * S.A.C.

Du 30 septembre au 31 décembre 2011


John Scott Cowan Royal Military College CollÈge militaire royal

D

espite episodic involvement with DND going back to the ’60s, I didn’t know much about RMC until 1994. Since I was living a mostly university life as a scientist and administrator, I knew where it was and what it did — sort of, until I became one of the arbitrators engaged to settle the long-running impasse between Treasury Board and the academic faculty. Even though I was the Treasury Board nominee on the arbitration board, it was pretty clear to me that the profs were mostly in the right, and I ended up drafting a bunch of the provisions in their contract, including the one guaranteeing academic freedom. Then in the fall of 1997, I was appointed to the Withers’ Study Group on the future of RMC. (By then, I had moved from the University of Ottawa and was Vice-Principal of Queen’s University.) The premise underlying the launching of that study was that RMC somehow needed fixing; we found out really quickly that mostly it didn’t (fine tuning at best), but the links between it and the Canadian Forces (CF) sure needed some repair. When the report was done (1998), it required a new core curriculum for the officer cadets; even though I was still at Queen’s, the Board of Governors (BOG) asked me to chair that process. I did, and enjoyed working with the Deans and Principal at RMC; the Core Curriculum Report I wrote is still, I think, on the BOG part of the RMC website, and still a useful read. When I arrived at RMC as Principal in July 1999, I knew a fair bit about RMC, but not enough, so I immediately set out to interview every single faculty member and language teacher, plus a bunch of other folk, in their own offices. Spending about 40 minutes with each, it took a good bit of the working day for three months. I did the rest of my job at all hours, but I learned lots, including the fact that among the couple of hundred faculty at RMC were at least two dozen who were the best in the world in their particular area, but in many

M

algré une participation occasionnelle avec le MDN remontant aux années 1960, je connaissais très peu le CMR avant 1994. En tant que chercheur et administrateur universitaire, je savais plus ou moins où il était et ce qu’il faisait, jusqu’à ce que je sois nommé l’un des arbitres engagés pour régler l’impasse de longue date entre le Conseil du Trésor et le corps professoral. Même si j’étais le représentant du Conseil du Trésor au conseil d’arbitrage, il était assez clair que les professeurs avaient raison sur presque toute la ligne, et j’ai fini par rédiger plusieurs dispositions dans leur contrat, y compris celle garantissant leur liberté d’enseignement. Puis, à l’automne 1997, j’ai été nommé membre du Groupe d’étude Withers sur l’avenir du CMR (j’avais quitté l’Université d’Ottawa pour devenir vice-recteur de l’Université Queen’s). La prémisse sous-jacente au lancement de cette étude était que le CMR avait en quelque sorte un problème, mais nous avons très vite découvert qu’en général, cela ne correspondait pas à la réalité (il avait besoin d’être peaufiné, tout au plus), mais que ses liens avec les FC avaient besoin d’être revus. Lorsque le rapport fut publié en 1998, il fallait un nouveau programme de base pour les élèves-officiers. Même si j’étais encore à Queen’s, le Conseil des Gouverneurs (CdG) du CMR m’a demandé de présider ce processus. J’ai accepté, et beaucoup aimé travailler avec les doyens et le recteur du CMR. Le rapport sur le tronc commun que j’ai préparé est encore, je pense, sur la page Web du CdG du site du CMR, et vaut encore la peine d’être lu. Quand je suis arrivé au CMR en tant que recteur en juillet 1999, je connaissais assez bien le Collège, mais pas suffisamment. J’ai donc entrepris d’interviewer pendant 40 minutes chaque membre de la faculté et chaque professeur de langues, en plus d’une foule d’autres gens, dans leur propre bureau. Cela a représenté une bonne partie de ma journée de travail au cours

‘The place had an inappropriate inferiority complex because it was small. Its strength in research was the country’s best kept secret.’ « Le Collège souffrait d’un complexe d’infériorité inapproprié, simplement parce qu’il était petit. Sa force au niveau de la recherche était le secret le mieux gardé au pays. »

WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

37


By 1999, RMC had granted about six earned Ph.D.s. Today, the number is more like 100-plus. En 1999, le CMR avait accordé environ six doctorats. Aujourd’hui, ce nombre atteint un peu plus de cent. cases they didn’t know it. The place had an inappropriate inferiority complex, because it was small. And its strength, at the undergraduate and graduate level and in research, was the country’s best kept secret. Together, over the subsequent nine years, we fixed a lot of the isolation, misconceptions and access issues. There was the multi-year effort to get the faculty paid fairly. In 1999, a decade of crisis had put them at 80 percent of what university faculty in a good small university in Canada usually earn. Now they are in the pack, and we again recruit top faculty easily. Then there was the struggle to get RMC access to research support from the various federal research granting councils, despite the apparent barrier of being part of the federal government. We won that battle too, and today RMCC faculty can hold such research support, and sit on grants committees for such agencies as the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. RMCC has also been awarded some half-dozen Canada Research Chairs, and for many years, has been rated either the top or near the top of small research universities. In research intensity, it beats out even some universities with medical schools. And yet, 90 percent of RMCC research is defence-relevant (remember the core mission). While continuing to improve the core officer cadet fulltime undergrad programs (ROTP, RETP, UTPNCM), the College grew its graduate school and outreach. In that nine years, the numbers of grad students enrolled at any given time tripled, to about 850, and the number of part-time and distance students, including reservists and others with defence links, increased by more than 10-fold, to more than 7,000. Some came from OPME, the RMC courses that officers who did not come through RMC must take later. Others were all types of CF members completing part-time degrees. The increases also came from new programs, like the Master of Defence Studies (MDS) run by RMC at Canadian Forces College in Toronto. And grad studies was not just master’s degrees. By 1999, RMC had granted about six earned Ph.D.s. Today the number is more like 100-plus, and the total number of graduate degrees granted greatly exceeds 1,000 and is added to at a rate of about 175 a year. At the same time, important changes were implemented for 38

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS

des trois mois qui ont suivi ma nomination, et j’ai accompli mes autres tâches à toute heure du jour et de la nuit. J’ai beaucoup appris, notamment le fait que parmi les quelque 200 professeurs du CMR, il y en avait au moins deux douzaines qui étaient les meilleurs au monde dans leur domaine particulier, mais qui dans de nombreux cas ne le savaient même pas. Le Collège souffrait d’un complexe d’infériorité inapproprié, simplement parce qu’il était petit. Et sa force, tant au niveau du premier cycle que des cycles supérieurs et de la recherche, était le secret le mieux gardé au pays. Au cours des neuf années qui suivirent, ensemble, nous avons éliminé les préjugés, l’isolement ainsi que les problèmes d’accès. Il a fallu plusieurs années d’efforts pour que la faculté soit rémunérée équitablement. En 1999, une décennie de crise avait réduit les professeurs à un salaire équivalant à 80 % de ce que les professeurs d’une bonne petite université canadienne gagnaient. Aujourd’hui, ils ont rejoint les autres, et le Collège peut à nouveau facilement recruter les meilleurs professeurs. Puis il y a eu la lutte pour obtenir l’accès au soutien à la recherche des divers conseils subventionnaires fédéraux, malgré la barrière apparente de l’appartenance au gouvernement fédéral. Nous avons eu gain de cause et aujourd’hui, les professeurs du CMR peuvent profiter d’un tel support et siéger à des comités de subventions tels que ceux du Conseil de recherches en sciences naturelles et en génie du Canada et du Conseil de recherches en sciences humaines du Canada. Nous avons également obtenu une demi-douzaine de Chaires de recherche du Canada. Depuis plusieurs années, le CMR se classe parmi les meilleures petites universités de recherche, et pour ce qui est de l’intensité de recherche, il devance même certaines des universités ayant une école de médecine. Et pourtant, 90 % de la recherche au CMR concerne la défense (souvenez-vous de la mission de base). Tout en apportant des améliorations au cœur des programmes de premier cycle des élèves-officiers (PFOR, PFIR, PFUMR), le Collège a élargi son école d’études supérieures ainsi que sa sphère d’influence. Au cours de ces neuf années, le nombre d’étudiants inscrits au deuxième cycle a triplé, pour atteindre environ 850. Le nombre d’étudiants à temps partiel et à distance, y compris les réservistes et d’autres étudiants ayant des liens avec la défense, s’est décuplé pour atteindre plus de 7 000. Certains de ces


John Scott Cowan arrived at RMC as Principal in July 1999. / John Scott Cowan est arrivé au CMR en tant que recteur en juillet 1999.

officer cadets. Second-language achievements now earn academic credit, encouraging higher attainment than just the minimum in bilingualism. A new degree in psychology became available. Graduate degrees all were accredited through the Ontario Council on Graduate studies, scoring as high as any Ontario university, and today a similar process for undergrad degrees is ongoing. And, after years of frustration with the formation to which RMC used to report (CFRETS), a new Canadian Defence Academy was formed almost a decade ago. Housed on the grounds of RMC, it is designed to be much more sympathetic to RMC’s mission than CFRETS was. (Of course, we hope it stays that way.) I retired on July 31, 2008. Today, I still serve on the board of the RMC Foundation, and I’m also President of the Conference of Defence Associations Institute and Chair of the Defence Science Advisory Board of Canada, as well as Hon LCol of the PWOR. So I’m still very much involved with defence. But my time at RMC was special. It was the most fun anyone can have as a university administrator in Canada. — H24263 John Scott Cowan

étudiants étaient inscrits au Programme d’études militaires professionnelles (PEMPO), que les officiers qui ne sont pas passés par le CMR doivent suivre plus tard. D’autres sont des militaires complétant un diplôme à temps partiel. Une partie de l’augmentation est due aux étudiants inscrits au programme de maîtrise en études de la défense (MDS), géré par le CMR au Collège des Forces canadiennes à Toronto. Le programme d’études supérieures ne se limite pas à la maîtrise; en 1999, le CMR avait accordé environ six doctorats. Aujourd’hui, ce nombre avoisine la centaine, et le nombre total de diplômés en études supérieures dépasse largement le millier et augmente d’environ 175 par an. Parallèlement, d’importants changements se sont produits pour les élèves-officiers. Les réalisations en langue seconde procurent désormais des crédits, motivant ainsi l’atteinte d’un niveau de bilinguisme plus élevé que le minimum requis. Il est maintenant possible d’obtenir un diplôme en psychologie. Tous les diplômes d’études supérieures ont été accrédités par le truchement du Conseil ontarien des études supérieures, se classant aussi bien que ceux de toute autre université en Ontario. Aujourd’hui, un processus similaire pour les diplômes de premier cycle est en voie d’instauration. Suite à plusieurs années de frustration à l’égard du Service du recrutement, de l’éducation et de l’instruction des Forces canadiennes (SREIFC) qui gérait le CMR, une nouvelle Académie canadienne de Défense a été formée il y a presque dix ans, logée sur le campus du CMR, et conçue pour être beaucoup plus favorable à la mission du CMR que SREIFC ne l’était. (Bien sûr, nous espérons que cela continuera.) J’ai pris ma retraite le 31 juillet 2008. Aujourd’hui, je siège encore au conseil d’administration de la Fondation pour le CMR, et je suis également président de l’Institut de la Conférence des associations de la Défense et président du Conseil consultatif sur les sciences appliquées à la défense du Canada, ainsi que lcol honoraire du Princess of Wales’ Own Regiment. Je continue donc à participer à la défense. Mais je dois avouer que le temps passé au CMR était spécial. Je ne crois pas qu’il pourrait être plus agréable d’administrer une université au Canada. — H24263 John Scott Cowan ■ WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

39


Gentlemen and Scholars Gentlemen et universitaires

Three RMC grads continue giving back long after retirement Trois diplômés du CMR continuent à redonner aux FC longtemps après avoir pris leur retraite.

T

he poet Robert Burns coined the phrase “a gentleman and a scholar;” this popular compliment best describes a unique group of retired general and flag officers, all RMC graduates, who are currently shaping the next generation of national security professionals attending the National Security Programme at the Canadian Forces College in Toronto. The National Security Programme is an intense, 10-month, residential course that prepares selected military, public service, international and private sector leaders for future strategic responsibilities within a complex and ambiguous global security environment. The program is designed to shape future leaders in strategic thought and to prepare them to excel in joint, interagency and multinational settings across the spectrum of national security policy and strategy. Above (from left): 6541 Fraser Holman, 9267 Greg Maddison, 6014 Fred Sutherland. / Ci-dessus (de gauche à droite) : 6541 Fraser Holman, 9267 Greg Maddison, 6014 Fred Sutherland.

C

’est le poète Robert Burns qui a le premier utilisé l’expression « un gentleman et un universitaire ». Ce compliment populaire décrit parfaitement un groupe unique d’officiers généraux et d’amiraux commandants à la retraite, tous diplômés du CMR, qui contribuent actuellement à la formation de la prochaine génération de professionnels de la sécurité nationale inscrits au Programme de sécurité nationale (PSN) du Collège des Forces canadiennes de Toronto, au Canada. Le PSN, un programme intensif d’une durée de 10 mois, est donné en résidence. Il prépare certains leaders des Forces armées, de la fonction publique et du secteur privé à remplir leurs futures responsabilités stratégiques au sein d’un environnement complexe et ambigu de sécurité globale. Il est conçu pour inciter les futurs leaders à se servir de la pensée stratégique et les préparer à exceller dans la gamme complète de contextes interarmées, interorganisationnels et multinationaux de la stratégie et de la politique en matière de sécurité nationale. Le Collège des Forces canadiennes bénéficie de l’expérience d’officiers généraux et d’amiraux commandants à la retraite, qui WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

41


The Canadian Forces College benefits from the experience of retired general and flag officers to act as Senior Mentors to the students throughout the duration of the program. I had the pleasure of sitting down with the three Senior Mentors — 6014 LGen Fred Sutherland (Class of ’65), 9267 VAdm Greg Maddison (’72) and 6541 MGen Fraser Holman (’65) — who oversaw this past year’s National Security Programme through to its graduation in June 2011. I asked them about life after the Canadian Forces (CF), their roles as Senior Mentors, and words of wisdom they may have for future leaders. dr Guy Parent: It is quite unique to have three RMC graduates here at the Canadian Forces College acting as Senior Mentors for the National Security Programme (NSP). All of you have had very distinguished careers in the Canadian Forces and have since retired. What is the greatest benefit about being retired from the CF? LGen Fred Sutherland: I guess the biggest advantage for me is to have the time to explore new employment opportunities outside of the CF. While in the military, my career was very much guided by the senior leadership. Since retirement, I have had the opportunity to undertake several different roles and responsibilities. Being a Senior Mentor for the NSP is one such opportunity. Vice Admiral Greg Maddison: Simply, I can now do what I want, when I want and where I want. That kind of flexibility is a welcomed change. MGen Fraser Holman: I would agree with both of my colleagues that having the time to pursue interests is a great advantage to retirement from the CF. Cdr Parent: What has been your greatest challenge after CF life? Sutherland: There are no more “gimmes” on the golf course; therefore, making those difficult short putts on the golf green. Seriously, though, perhaps the most difficult aspect of retirement from an organization such as the Canadian Forces is suddenly being distanced from that sense of family, which is the hallmark of the military. Although you never really lose that connection, it is not the same as what it was when you were in uniform. Maddison: I agree; the most challenging aspect has been the lack of daily interaction with the excellent personnel serving in the Canadian Forces. The camaraderie that is inherent to life in the military is a void that is difficult to fill. Holman: This is true, it just means that we have to find it elsewhere and that is where becoming an associate member of the local Officers’ Mess or joining organizations such as the Legion or the Royal Canadian Military Institute helps in bridging that gap. Maddison: I would also like to say that the skills you gain in the CF, such as communication, people, and organizational skills, are all formidable and they will assist in the transition to the civilian community. Cdr Parent: What motivated you to become a Senior Mentor for the National Security Programme? Sutherland: It was a great way to reconnect with the military community and to give back. I firmly believe that future senior leaders of both the military and private/government sectors need mentorship and this is one way that I can contribute. Maddison: As a naval officer, I always had a mentor as I pro42

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS

jouent le rôle de mentors principaux auprès des stagiaires tout au long du Programme. J’ai eu le plaisir de m’entretenir avec les trois mentors principaux (6014 lgén Fred Sutherland, promotion de 1965 du CMR, 9267 vam Greg Maddison, promotion de 1972 du CMR, et 6541 mgén Fraser Holman, promotion de 1965 du CMR) qui ont supervisé les candidats du PSN cette année jusqu’à la remise des diplômes en juin 2011. Je leur ai demandé de parler de leur vie après le service dans les Forces canadiennes ainsi que de leur rôle à titre de mentors principaux. Je leur ai également demandé s’ils avaient quelques conseils à donner aux futurs leaders. apf Guy Parent : Il est très particulier d’avoir trois diplômés du CMR ici, au Collège des Forces canadiennes, qui agissent à titre de mentors principaux auprès des candidats du Programme de sécurité nationale (PSN). Vous avez tous eu une brillante carrière au sein des Forces canadiennes et êtes présentement à la retraite. Quel est le plus grand avantage d’avoir quitté les FC? Lgén Fred Sutherland : J’imagine que le plus grand avantage que j’en tire est d’avoir le temps d’explorer de nouvelles occasions d’emploi à l’extérieur des FC. Dans les FC, ma carrière a été grandement guidée par le leadership supérieur. Depuis mon départ à la retraite, j’ai eu l’occasion de jouer différents rôles et de remplir diverses responsabilités. Devenir mentor dans le cadre du PSN fait partie de ces occasions. Vam Greg Maddison : Je dirais simplement que je peux maintenant faire ce que je veux, quand je veux et où je veux. Ce genre de souplesse est un changement bien accueilli. Mgén Fraser Holman : Comme mes deux collègues, je conviens que le fait d’avoir du temps pour faire ce qui nous intéresse est un grand avantage de la retraite des FC. Capf Parent : Quel a été votre plus grand défi après la vie militaire? Sutherland : Il n’y a plus personne pour vous dire « Faites-le » sur le terrain de golf. Par conséquent, plus de pression pour réussir ces courts coups roulés difficiles sur le vert! Sérieusement, la chose la plus difficile quand on quitte une organisation telle que les Forces canadiennes est probablement de perdre soudainement ce sens d’appartenance qui caractérise la vie militaire. Bien qu’on ne perde jamais vraiment ce lien, il est tout de même différent de celui qui existe quand on est en uniforme. Maddison : Je suis d’accord, le plus grand défi repose sur le manque d’interaction quotidienne avec le personnel exceptionnel des Forces canadiennes. La camaraderie inhérente à la vie militaire est un vide difficile à combler. Holman : C’est vrai, cela veut simplement dire que nous devons le trouver ailleurs. C’est la raison pour laquelle le fait de devenir un membre associé du mess des officiers local ou de joindre des organisations telles que la Légion royale canadienne ou le Royal Canadian Military Institute aident à combler ce vide. Maddison : Je voudrais également ajouter que les compétences acquises dans les FC, notamment en communication, en relations humaines et en organisation, sont remarquables et contribuent à la transition à la vie civile. Capf Parent : Qu’est-ce qui vous a incité à devenir un mentor principal dans le cadre du Programme de sécurité nationale?


gressed throughout my career. I had been exposed to the Canadian Forces College while serving and after my time in the CF, so I was familiar with the institution. When I was approached to act as a Senior Mentor for the National Security Programme, I welcomed the opportunity. Holman: I always planned to work after my time in the Canadian Forces and that is why I retired in Toronto. I have been involved with the Canadian Forces College extensively over the past 20 years and so I was very happy to continue working there as part of the National Security Programme. Cdr Parent: What is the greatest advantage to the relationship between the Senior Mentor and the students on the National Security Programme? Maddison: I completed the National Defence College program in Kingston, which, at the time, was the equivalent to today’s NSP. We did not have mentors back then and I can assure you that I would certainly have benefitted from a mentor. On this program, the students are exposed to the geo-strategic and political levels of thought and as a retired flag officer, I can pass on my experience to them. At this level, people work in the “grey” and that is where mentorship really pays off. It allows us to show these future strategic leaders how we approached problems and identified solutions in this complex world. Sutherland: It is a wonderful way of contributing to the growth of the next generation of strategic leaders. I enjoy the idea that as a Senior Mentor, I can share my experiences and, therefore, assist

Sutherland : C’était une bonne façon de rétablir le lien avec la communauté militaire et de lui redonner quelque chose. Je crois fermement que les futurs leaders supérieurs des FC, du gouvernement et du secteur privé ont besoin de mentorat, et c’est une façon pour moi de contribuer. Maddison : En tant qu’officier de la Marine, j’ai eu un mentor tout au long de ma carrière. J’ai eu à faire avec le Collège des Forces canadiennes durant ma carrière militaire et après celle-ci, donc je connaissais l’institution. Lorsqu’on m’a demandé de devenir mentor principal dans le cadre du Programme national de sécurité, j’ai saisi l’occasion. Holman : J’ai toujours prévu travailler après ma carrière dans les Forces canadiennes et c’est pourquoi je me suis installé à Toronto lorsque j’ai pris ma retraite. J’ai beaucoup participé aux activités du Collège des Forces canadiennes au cours des vingt dernières années, et j’ai donc été très heureux de continuer à y travailler dans le cadre du Programme de sécurité nationale. Capf Parent : Quel est le plus grand avantage de la relation entre le mentor principal et les stagiaires du Programme de sécurité nationale? Maddison : J’ai suivi le programme du Collège de la Défense nationale à Kingston qui, à ce moment-là, était l’équivalent du PSN d’aujourd’hui. Nous n’avions pas de mentors à l’époque et je peux vous assurer que j’aurais certainement profité d’une telle présence. Dans le cadre du PSN, on montre aux stagiaires les niveaux de pensée politique et géostratégique; en tant qu’amiral commandant à la retraite, je peux leur transmettre mon


with the development of these talented professionals. By doing so, we help show them the way to becoming true practitioners of the profession. The relationship between the Senior Mentor and the student is an informal, but very positive, one in which frank and honest discussions can occur without judgment. Therefore, it fosters a tremendous learning environment. Holman: The relationship is dynamic; it promotes stimulating thought through the exchange of experiences and dialogue. It is very satisfying and rewarding for both myself and the students. Cdr Parent: Do you think that leaders have changed in the Canadian Forces? If so, in what manner? Maddison: Absolutely. The Canadian Forces have changed significantly from 20 years ago. Today’s military leaders are better educated, more aware of the importance of a united Canadian Forces and the importance of a whole-of-government approach to solving problems especially in operations. Sutherland: I agree. The officers of today are better prepared for strategic thought due, in large measure, to the professional military education that they receive — a program that is second to none. By the time they become general and flag officers, they possess the experiential and intellectual capacity to deal with today and future challenges. Holman: They certainly have a great range of skills. Today’s officers are sophisticated, they are collaborative and they understand the importance of relationship building. I am very optimistic on the future of the next generation of leaders in the Canadian Forces. Cdr Parent: As a last question, what parting words of wisdom would you like to pass on to future leaders who may be reading this article? Maddison: As corny as it may sound, if you follow Truth, Duty, Valour in your endeavours you will never go wrong in your career or in life. Sutherland: Value-based leadership is key to success. With a strong sense of values, you will be well prepared for any personal or professional challenges that may confront you. Holman: As you learned when you were a cadet at military college, relationships are instrumental in order to succeed. Foster and cherish your relationships with others and they will be everlasting and rewarding. Cdr Parent: Thank you gentlemen. — 16891 Cdr Guy Parent (RMC ’89) is the Programme Officer for the National Security Programme at the Canadian Forces College in Toronto

Wilson Golf Balls

(RMC full coloured crest/Écusson du CMR de couleur)

!

Special

Sale ember Non-M .00 $28 rs Sale Membe 0 $23.0

Spécial

Aubain e

www.rmcclub.ca Boîte de 5 emballages de 3 balles Box/5 Sleeves (Regular/régulier : $33) (Member Price/Prix aux membres : $30)

44

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS

!

non-me mbres $28,00 Aubain e mem b $23,00 res

expérience. À ce niveau, les gens travaillent dans une « zone grise » et c’est là que le mentorat prend toute sa valeur. Il nous permet de montrer à ces futurs leaders stratégiques de quelle façon nous avons traité les problèmes et trouvé des solutions dans ce monde complexe. Sutherland : C’est une merveilleuse façon de contribuer au perfectionnement de la prochaine génération de leaders stratégiques. J’aime savoir qu’à titre de mentor principal, je peux partager mon expérience et, par conséquent, aider au perfectionnement de ces professionnels talentueux. Ce faisant, nous aidons à leur montrer comment devenir de véritables praticiens de la profession. La relation entre le mentor principal et le stagiaire est informelle, mais très positive, et nous permet d’avoir des discussions franches et honnêtes sans peur d’être jugé. Par conséquent, cela favorise un remarquable environnement d’apprentissage. Holman : La relation est dynamique, elle stimule la réflexion grâce à l’échange d’expérience et au dialogue. C’est très satisfaisant et gratifiant, tant pour moi que pour les stagiaires. Capf Parent : Croyez-vous que les leaders ont changé dans les Forces canadiennes? Le cas échéant, de quelle façon? Maddison : Absolument. Les Forces canadiennes ont grandement changé au cours des vingt dernières années. Les leaders militaires d’aujourd’hui sont mieux formés et plus conscients de l’importance d’avoir des Forces canadiennes unies ainsi que de celle que revêt une approche pangouvernementale concernant la résolution de problème, en particulier au cours des opérations. Sutherland : Je suis d’accord. Les officiers d’aujourd’hui sont mieux préparés à réfléchir de façon stratégique, en grande partie grâce à l’instruction militaire professionnelle qu’ils reçoivent – un programme sans égal. Lorsqu’ils deviennent des officiers généraux ou des amiraux commandants, ils possèdent l’expérience et la capacité intellectuelle nécessaires pour relever les défis d’aujourd’hui et de demain. Holman : Ils possèdent assurément une vaste gamme de compétences. Les officiers d’aujourd’hui sont avertis, ils collaborent et comprennent l’importance de l’établissement de relations. Je suis très optimiste quant à l’avenir de la prochaine génération de leaders des Forces canadiennes. Capf Parent : Une dernière question : avez-vous des conseils à donner aux futurs leaders qui lisent cet article? Maddison : Aussi cliché que cela puisse paraître, si vous appliquez les principes de la Vérité, du Devoir et du Courage dans vos entreprises, vous ne ferez pas fausse route dans votre carrière ni dans votre vie. Sutherland : Un leadership fondé sur les valeurs est la clé du succès. Grâce à un solide sens des valeurs, vous serez bien préparés à relever tous les défis personnels ou professionnels qui se trouveront sur votre route. Holman : Comme vous l’avez appris lorsque vous étiez élèvesofficiers au Collège militaire, les relations sont essentielles au succès. Favorisez et maintenez les relations avec les autres et ces relations seront indéfectibles et gratifiantes. Capf Parent : Je vous remercie, messieurs. — Le Capf Guy Parent 16891 (promotion de 1989 du CMR) est l’officier responsable du Programme de sécurité nationale du Collège des Forces canadiennes à Toronto ■


Book reviews • Compte rendu de LIVRE

Gilles Lamontagne: Sur tous les fronts

I

n Gilles Lamontagne: Sur tous les fronts, or “On all fronts,” the historian Frédéric Lemieux tells us about the fascinating life of a man who marked the Canadian and Quebec life of the twentieth century. The very appropriate title helps us discover all facets of Mr. Lamontagne’s life. Born in Montreal in 1919, he is the youngest child of a successful French Canadian family involved in manufacturing paint. In 1931, instead of joining the family enterprise and perpetuating the tradi-

tion, Mr. Lamontagne joined the Royal Canadian Air Force. As a bomber pilot, his aircraft was shot down in March 1943, and he spent 26 long, deprived months in Nazi prisoner camps. This is the first time his terrifying experience has been covered in a Canadian publication. From 1965 to 1977, Gilles Lamontagne was the Mayor of Quebec City, and this period occupies a central place in the manuscript for good reason. During those 12 years, he reformed and governed a city full of transformation, as it

entered modernity. These chapters are essential to understanding the importance of Gilles Lamontagne in the development of the capital of the province of Quebec. Following this period, Mr. Lamontagne became a Liberal Member of Parliament in Ottawa and a minister in the Cabinet of Pierre Elliot Trudeau during one of the most eventful times in Canadian politics. As Postmaster General, Mr. Lamontagne faced a very difficult labour conflict before being appointed Minister of National Defence. There, the Cold War and the atomic threat marked his mandate, as well as the purchase of the controversial fighter aircraft F-18 and the 1980 referendum on the sovereignty of Quebec. Finally, Mr. Lamontagne completed his career as LieutenantGovernor of Quebec. This book marks the first time that the fascinating life of Gilles Lamontagne has been told in full and thorough detail. The life of his family, and especially his wife Mary Schaeffer, a forward-thinking woman, adds a much more intimate side to his life. “Gilles Lamontagne: On all fronts” is introduced by Regis Labeaume, the current Mayor of Quebec City, and he reveals the great esteem and affection held for Mr. Lamontagne, who is still referred to in Quebec as “Mr. Mayor.” I highly appreciate the literary style of Frédéric Lemieux; it is lively, simple

Frédéric Lemieux. Gilles Lamontagne : Sur tous les fronts Del Busso Editor, 2010, 669 pages. $36.95

and direct. He does not hesitate to expose the darker side of some political decisions Mr. Lamontagne made, especially when he was Mayor of Quebec City. The book reads like a novel and includes close to 150 photographs, which makes it very attractive and dynamic. I highly recommend this book to read and include in one’s library; we can truly appreciate Gilles Lamontagne, who is now 92 years old, and his life. Thank you, Frédéric Lemieux, for this great book. Get a copy at a special price by contacting the author at frederic@fredericlemieux.com. — M0058 Marc Drolet

D

~

ans Gilles Lamontagne : Sur tous les fronts, l’historien Frédéric Lemieux raconte la vie fascinante d’un homme qui a marqué la vie québécoise et canadienne du 20e siècle. Le titre, bien choisi, nous fait WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

45


Book reviews • Compte rendu de LIVRE

effectivement découvrir toutes les facettes de la vie bien remplie de Gilles Lamontagne. Né à Montréal en 1919, il est le benjamin d’une famille canadienne-française de manufacturiers de peinture. Plutôt que de commencer à travailler pour l’entreprise et de perpétuer la tradition familiale, M. Lamontagne s’engage dans l’Aviation royale canadienne en 1931. Pilote de bombardier, il est abattu en mars 1943 et passe 26 longs mois de privation dans les camps de prisonniers de l’Allemagne nazie. C’est la première fois qu’un ouvrage canadien raconte cette terrible expérience. L’époque suivante, où M. Lamontagne est maire de Québec (1965-1977), occupe une place centrale dans l’ouvrage, et pour cause. Pendant 12 ans, M. Lamontagne réforme et gouverne une ville en pleine transformation, qui entre dans l’ère moderne. Ces chapitres sont essentiels pour comprendre l’importance de ce maire dans le développement de la capitale du Québec. M. Lamontagne devient ensuite député libéral à Ottawa et ministre dans le cabinet de Pierre Elliott Trudeau, à une époque mouvementée de la vie politique canadienne. Ministre des Postes, M. Lamontagne affronte une très dure grève avant d’être nommé ministre de la Défense. La guerre froide et la menace atomique marquent son mandat, tout comme l’achat d’avions F-18, qui a prêté à 46

controverse, et le référendum sur la souveraineté du Québec de 1980. Enfin, M. Lamontagne termine sa carrière en tant que lieutenant-gouverneur du Québec. C’est la première fois que toute la vie fascinante de M. Lamontagne est racontée en détail dans un ouvrage historique rigoureux. La vie de sa famille et surtout de son épouse, Mary Schaeffer, une femme avant-gardiste et chaleureuse, ajoute un côté plus intime au livre. Gilles Lamontagne : Sur tous les fronts est préfacé par le maire de Québec, Régis Labeaume. Cette préface témoigne de l’affection et de l’estime dont jouit à Québec celui que l’on appelle encore « Monsieur le Maire ». J’ai apprécié au plus haut point le style d’écriture vivant, simple et direct de Frédéric Lemieux. Ce dernier n’hésite d’ailleurs pas, en toute honnêteté, à exposer les côtés moins reluisants de certaines décisions politiques de M. Lamontagne, spécialement en tant que maire de Québec. L’ouvrage se lit comme un roman et compte près de 150 photographies qui le rendent très attrayant. C’est un livre à lire absolument pour apprécier le parcours d’un homme aujourd’hui âgé de 92 ans. Merci, M. Lemieux, pour ce livre formidable. Obtenez un exemplaire à prix spécial en communiquant avec l’auteur, à frederic @fredericlemieux.com. — M0058 Marc Drolet ■

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS

When you need to add to your winning team...

Trust Commissionaires for your employment verification needs. Get a clear picture of those you let into your premises and on your payroll. Let Commissionaires give you the edge by assisting you in screening your candidate employees to ensure they are who they say they are. Commissionaires is the trusted choice for all your employment verification needs with locations coast to coast. We offer competitive prices and friendly, reliable, local service for: > Digital fingerprinting > Police clearances (CPIC) > Background screening > Mobile security services

www.commissionaires.ca


A year to remember in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu

T

he first 50 homes were flooded as early as April 23, 2011, when significant rainfall and high winds from the south caused Quebec’s Richelieu River to break its banks. The rain continued relentlessly for days and the river rose to its highest level in 150 years. Before the waters finally began to recede in mid-May, some 3,500 homes in 20 different municipalities had been damaged, 800 soldiers from Quebec had filled 80,000 sandbags, 2,000 volunteers from all over the province had pitched in to clean up, and more than $1 million had been distributed to families in need by the Quebec government. It was a spring that will never be forgotten in the Montérégie region, and it is likely to take years to put a final price tag on the damage caused by the flooding. For those at Royal Military College Saint-Jean, the physical damage was restricted to the Commandant’s residence and the sports fields. The academic buildings and dormitories were not in danger, although as the river continued to rise, the risk of damage to the electrical system increased; if the buried cables got wet, the system would shut down completely. When the rain finally stopped, the river continued to rise and the risk was reassessed daily. In this mix was the fact that Wednesday, May 4, signalled the start of final exams for the officer cadets. If they were going to be evacuated, it was thought best to do it right away so they could settle into

exam routine. On Thursday, the water levels had not receded and the Commandant, 14154 Col Guy Maillet, decided that the cadets had to leave, and the College would go to minimum manning and begin emergency response measures. But where would they go? 16536 LCol Ross Ermel, the Commandant of the Canadian Forces Leadership and Recruit School at the Saint-Jean Garrison, welcomed the cadets into the Megaplex and suitable exam locations were found and set up. By Friday, everyone had settled in and the exams began. The cadets weathered the upheaval very well and were able to move back into their own quarters within a week. End-of-year activities, including the consecration of the new College Colours by the Governor General, went off without a hitch on the long weekend in May, even though the grounds surrounding the parade square and library were still soggy. Two weekends in June were dedicated to the cleanup of areas along the riverbanks. More than 2,000 volunteers showed up to help empty sandbags and clear out the debris that the flood waters had left behind. The damage to some famers’ fields and to homes that were flooded with contaminated water will never be repaired. Over 100 homes had to be demolished and only time will tell if the land can be rehabilitated. — M0472 Barbara Maisonneuve WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

47


Une année mémorable à Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu

L

es 50 premiers foyers ont été inondés dès le 23 avril, lorsque d’importantes précipitations et des vents forts du sud firent déborder la rivière Richelieu. Une pluie incessante qui dura des jours fit monter la rivière à son plus haut niveau en 150 ans. Avant que les eaux ne commencent à se retirer à la mi-mai, quelque 3 500 foyers dans 20 municipalités avaient subi des dommages, 800 soldats du Québec avaient rempli 80 000 sacs de sable, 2 000 bénévoles venus de partout dans la province avaient prêté main-forte pour le grand nettoyage et plus de 1 million de dollars avaient été distribués aux familles dans le besoin par le gouvernement du Québec. La Montérégie n’est pas près d’oublier le printemps 2011, et il est probable qu’il faudra des années pour évaluer les dommages causés par les inondations de cette année. Dans le cas du Collège militaire royal de Saint-Jean, les dégâts matériels se sont limités à la résidence du commandant et aux terrains de sport. Le complexe académique et les dortoirs n’ont pas été en danger, même si les risques de dommages au système électrique augmentaient avec le niveau de l’eau. Si les câbles enfouis avaient été mouillés, tout le système serait tombé en panne. Lorsque la pluie s’est enfin arrêtée, le niveau de la rivière a continué de monter et les risques étaient évalués quotidiennement. Venant compliquer cette situation déjà confuse, le mercredi 4 mai 2011 signalait le début des

examens de fin d’année pour les élèves-officiers. S’ils devaient être évacués, on pensait qu’il fallait le faire le plus tôt possible afin qu’ils puissent se mettre dans la routine des examens. Le jeudi, le niveau de l’eau n’avait pas baissé et le commandant, 14154 col Guy Maillet a conclu qu’il fallait évacuer les élèves-officiers, que seul le personnel essentiel resterait au Collège et qu’on instaurerait les mesures d’intervention d’urgence. Mais où irait tout ce monde? 16536 lcol Ross Ermel, commandant de l’École de leadership et de recrues des Forces canadiennes à la Garnison de SaintJean, a accueilli les élèves-officiers dans le « Mega », et des salles d’examen appropriées ont été trouvées et préparées. Dès le vendredi, tout le monde était installé et les examens ont pu commencer après un report d’une seule journée. Nos élèves-officiers se sont très bien acclimatés à la tourmente et ont pu réintégrer leurs quartiers au bout d’une semaine. Les activités de fin d’année, y compris la consécration du nouvel étendard du Collège par le gouverneur général, se sont déroulées sans accroc au cours du long weekend de mai, même si les terrains entourant la place d’armes et la bibliothèque étaient encore détrempés. Deux weekends en juin ont été consacrés au nettoyage des zones le long des berges de la rivière. Plus de 2 000 bénévoles se sont présentés pour aider à vider les sacs de sable et ramasser les débris laissés par la crue. Les dommages causés à certaines terres cultivées et à quelques maisons inondées avec de l’eau contaminée ne seront jamais réparés. Plus de 100 maisons ont dû être démolies et seul le temps nous dira si la terre peut être remise en état. — M0472 Barbara Maisonneuve ■

La Montérégie n’est pas près d’oublier le printemps 2011, et il est probable qu’il faudra des années pour évaluer les dommages causés par les inondations de cette année. 48

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS


Ex-cadets lead Forces

response to Manitoba Flood

Des anciens dirigent la réaction des FC lors des inondations au Manitoba

T

he Canadian Forces (CF) have on a number of occasions assisted the province of Manitoba in responding to flooding, most famously in 1997 during the Flood of the Century and, most recently, this past summer during the “Flood of the Millennium.” Leading the Forces response (dubbed Operation LUSTRE) this year were a number of ex-cadets, including the overall Commander of Joint Task Force West (FOI Ouest) and all Land Forces in Western Canada, Brigadier-General Paul Wynnyk (Class of ’86), as well as Colonel Omer Lavoie (Class of ’89), LCol Shane Schreiber (’88), Bill Fletcher (’95), and Mike Wright (’94). Since 2010 had seen significant overland flooding and total ground saturation in Manitoba, the 2011 flood season was anticipated, and the provincial authorities appeared to have the situation well in hand until an unfortunate confluence of events conspired to undermine their best laid plans. A record wet winter and spring, several vicious spring storms, and a broken flood gauge brought about water flows along the Assiniboine River that had not been seen in more than a century — in fact, in more than three centuries. With little time to brace for the onslaught, Premier Greg Selinger made known his intent to request CF assistance to shore up crucial Assiniboine dikes and protect homes along the waterway on the evening of May 8; less than 10 hours later, on the morning of May 9, elements of the JTFW IRU based on the Second Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (2PPCLI) in Shilo, Manitoba, commanded by Shane Schreiber and reinforced by 50

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS

À

plusieurs reprises dans le passé, les Forces canadiennes (FC) sont venues à l’aide à la province du Manitoba lors d’inondations, notamment lors de « l’inondation du siècle » en 1977 et plus récemment, l’été dernier, lors de «  l’inondation du millénaire  ». Aux avantpostes de l’opération de cette année (surnommée Opération LUSTRE), on retrouvait un certain nombre d’anciens élèvesofficiers, y compris le commandant en chef de la Force opérationnelle interarmées de l’Ouest (FOI Ouest) et de toutes les Forces terrestres dans l’Ouest canadien, le bgén Paul Wynnyk (promotion de 1986), ainsi que le col. Omer Lavoie (promotion de 1989), les lcol Shane Schreiber (1988), Bill Fletcher (1995), et Mike Wright (1994). Comme il y avait eu d’importantes inondations et une saturation du sol importante au Manitoba en 2010, on s’attendait à une saison d’inondations en 2011. Les autorités provinciales semblaient toutefois avoir la situation bien en main jusqu’à ce qu’une combinaison d’événements fortuits sape leurs beaux plans. Un hiver et un printemps anormalement pluvieux, plusieurs grosses tempêtes de printemps et une jauge d’inondation brisée ont provoqué des débits d’eaux sur la rivière Assiniboine qui n’avaient pas été observés depuis plus d’un siècle — en fait, depuis plus de trois siècles. Ayant peu de temps pour se préparer à la débâcle, le premier ministre Greg Selinger fit connaître dans la soirée du 8 mai son intention de demander l’aide des FC pour consolider les digues cruciales de l’Assiniboine et protéger les résidences le long de la rivière. Moins de 10 heures plus tard,


Chief of Defence Staff, General Walter Natynczyk (left), and Defence Minister Peter MacKay (far left) help soldiers load sandbags into a truck during the Manitoba Flood. / Le général Walter Natynczyk, Chef d’état-major de la Défense (à gauche), et le ministre de la Défense nationale, Peter MacKay (à l’extrême gauche), aident des militaires mettre des sacs de sable dans un camion lors des inondations au Manitoba.

other 1 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group Units, were already at work shoring up flood protection in the area of Portage La Prairie. Provincial officials were amazed and relieved at the rapid response, and Premier Selinger later stated that “the timely CF deployment and intervention likely prevented a catastrophic uncontrolled release of water in the Portage municipality.” 2 PPCLI were joined a few days later by other elements of 1 CMBG, commanded by Colonel Omer Lavoie, including 1 PPCLI, commanded by LCol Bill Fletcher. Soldiers of 1CMBG were joined by Army Reservists from 38 Canadian Brigade Group (whose COS is LCol Mike Gagne, Class of ’89), the Naval Reserve, and even Air Force volunteers from the Flight Training School in Portage La Prairie, commanded by LCol Rob Kamphius. Leading the troops on the line were other ex-cadets, including among others Lts Ben Wong, Pat Brown, (Class of 2009) and Dan Rixen, and Tyler Riches (2010). For days, the troops worked tirelessly hauling sandbags and building dikes to contain the flooding, while others worked to patrol the dike system to ensure its integrity. On May 25, with the crest having passed, and with the water control system reinforced, the worst of the crisis was deemed to be over, and the provincial authorities released the CF assets to get on with their normal duties. Unfortunately, a rainstorm and surge in late June once again caught the province of Manitoba by surprise. This time, LCol Mike Wright led elements of 2 PPCLI to support municipal authorities in the town of Souris, Manitoba. Again, a rapid and organized CF response (this time dubbed Operation LYRE) help to stabilize the situation, and after only a few days, with the flood protection reinforced and the threat having passed, 2PPCLI was once again released back to its busy season of summer tasks. The CF’s rapid response in both Op LUSTRE and Op LYRE — with mere hours from request to actual employment — was impressive but, more importantly, it was effective. The CF response was, in the words of the Op LUSTRE post operational report, “a resounding success, and should prove to be a positive example of how the CF can respond in a ‘no-notice’ Domestic Operation.” Having built on experiences from past domestic operations, the CF was able to rapidly and effectively support and protect Canadians in Canada. And RMC ex-cadets, from the CDS to the platoon commanders, played a key leadership part in this crucial mission for the CF. — 16591 Shane Schreiber

le 9 mai au matin, des éléments de l’Unité d’intervention immédiate de la FOI Ouest, logée au deuxième bataillon du Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry (2e PPCLI) à Shilo, au Manitoba, commandée par Shane Schreiber et renforcée par des éléments du 1er Groupe-brigade mécanisé du Canada (1er GBMC), étaient déjà au travail dans la région de Portage La Prairie. Les fonctionnaires provinciaux ont été surpris et soulagés de voir la réaction rapide, et le premier ministre Selinger déclarait plus tard que « le déploiement et l’intervention rapides des FC ont probablement empêché un débordement catastrophique et incontrôlé de l’eau dans la municipalité de Portage ». Le 2e PPCLI fut rejoint quelques jours plus tard par d’autres éléments du 1er GBMC, commandé par le col Omer Lavoie, et le 1er PPCLI, commandé par le lcol Bill Fletcher. Les soldats du 1er GBMC reçurent des renforts des réservistes du 38e Groupebrigade du Canada (dont le chef d’état-major est le lcol Mike Gagné de la promotion de 1989), de la Réserve navale, et même de volontaires de la Force aérienne de l’école de pilotage à Portage La Prairie, commandée par le lcol Rob Kamphius. Il y avait d’autres anciens à l’œuvre, dont les lt Ben Wong, Pat Brown (2009), Dan Rixen et Tyler Riches (2010). Les soldats ont travaillé pendant plusieurs jours sans relâche, transportant des sacs de sable et construisant des digues pour contenir les inondations, tandis que d’autres patrouillaient le réseau de digues afin d’assurer son intégrité. Une fois la crête passée, et le système de contrôle de l’eau renforcé, le pire de la crise semblait être passé et les autorités provinciales libérèrent les soldats. Ceux-ci reprirent leurs tâches habituelles le 25 mai. Malheureusement, des pluies imprévues accompagnées d’une nouvelle crue des eaux à la fin de juin prirent la province de court. Cette fois, ce fut le lcol Mike Wright qui dirigea les éléments du 2e PPCLI afin d’appuyer les autorités municipales de la ville de Souris, au Manitoba. À nouveau, une réaction rapide et organisée des FC (cette fois baptisée Opération LYRE) aida à stabiliser la situation. Après seulement quelques jours, une fois la protection contre les inondations renforcée et la menace passée, le 2e PPCLI a de nouveau pu reprendre les tâches de sa saison bien remplie de l’été. La réaction rapide des FC lors des opérations LUSTRE et LYRE — à peine quelques heures entre la requête et le déploiement — a été impressionnante, mais fait plus important encore, elle fut efficace. La réaction des FC a été, selon les termes du rapport postopérationnel de l’opération LUSTRE, «  un succès retentissant, qui devrait se révéler un exemple positif de la façon dont les FC peuvent réagir sans préavis à une situation nationale ». En utilisant les leçons apprises dans le passé, les FC ont été en mesure de soutenir et protéger rapidement et efficacement les Canadiens au Canada. Des anciens du CMR, du CEMD jusqu’aux commandants de peloton, ont joué un rôle de premier plan dans cette mission cruciale pour les FC. — 16591 Shane Schreiber ■ WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

51


RIGHT TIME, RIGHT PLACE AU BON MOMENT, AU BON ENDROIT

I

t was 1998 when the Withers’ Study Group recommended changes to the educational and academic focus of the Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC), and to the way in which Canadian Forces (CF) officers were prepared for their role within the "profession of arms,” one which emphasizes service before self and acceptance of a contract of unlimited liability. In accepting the recommendations of the study group, the Defence Minister at the time acknowledged that this commitment was greater than RMCC itself, and needed to be nested within the overall training and education ethos of the CF, one with an underlying focus on a commitment to success in operations. It was recognized that training and education require an approach to professional development that addresses the needs of all ranks, and, therefore, almost 10 years ago, the Chief of the Defence Staff established the Canadian Defence Academy (CDA). Nestled in a row of historic townhomes on the edge of the RMCC campus, CDA has embraced its role to integrate the training and professional development needs for all members of the CF. Most recently, on June 23, 2011, Major-General Pierre Forgues assumed command of CDA following three years at North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) in Colorado Springs. In accepting the role as Commander of CDA, MGen Forgues spoke to the role of the CF in preserving and maintaining freedoms, and welcomed the challenge to ensure the “professional development of the personnel that will be called upon to discharge this awesome responsibility.” He went on to speak to the need to make appropriate investments in professional development. In May 2011, just prior to his taking leadership of CDA, the Armed Forces Council approved the CF Individual Training and Education Modernization Strategy. Working closely with the Army, Navy, Air Force and other stakeholders, the CDA developed the strategy for the way forward to enable the CF to 52

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS

E

n 1998, le Groupe d’étude Withers recommandait que l’on modifie l’orientation de l’éducation et des programmes d’études au Collège militaire royal du Canada (CMRC) ainsi que la façon dont les officiers des Forces  canadiennes  (FC) sont préparés à leur rôle au sein de la « profession des armes », rôle qui est axé sur le service avant soimême et l’acceptation d’un engagement de responsabilité illimité. En acceptant les recommandations du Groupe d’étude, le ministre de l’époque reconnaissait que cet engagement ne concernait pas uniquement le CMRC, mais devait s’inscrire dans la philosophie liée à l’instruction et à l’éducation des membres des FC, elle-même axée sur l’engagement envers la réussite des opérations. Il a été reconnu que l’instruction et l’éducation doivent reposer sur une approche du perfectionnement professionnel répondant aux besoins des militaires de tous les grades. C’est pourquoi, il y aura bientôt dix ans, le chef d’état-major de la Défense a fondé l’Académie canadienne de la Défense (ACD). Installée dans une série de maisons historiques en rangée en bordure du campus du CMRC, l’ACD entreprend d’intégrer les besoins de tous les membres des FC en matière d’instruction et de perfectionnement professionnel. Le 23 juin 2011, le major-général Forgues a pris le commandement de l’ACD après une affectation de trois ans

‘ The strength of the officer corps lies in the synergy of mixing officers of various entry programs and various educational and operational experiences.’ / « La force du corps des officiers réside dans la synergie créée par la combinaison d’officiers issus de divers programmes d’admission… »


Major-General P.J. Forgues, Commander, Canadian Defence Academy, at the badging parade during RMCC’s Reunion Weekend. / Le Mgén P.J. Forgues, commandant de l’Académie canadienne de la Défense, à la remise des écussons lors du weekend de rencontre du CMRC.

proactively revitalize and transform the Individual Training and Education system, making it more agile — resulting in training that is more engaging, immersive and integrated. Using the history of the Withers’ Study and its focus on academics as a vision for the CF, the challenge for MGen Forgues will be to draw upon his background to help create the momentum necessary to modernize CF individual training and education, at a time when the defence team is working hard to find savings and efficiencies as part of the federal government commitment to returning the country to a balanced budget by 2014-15. Within the context of the Academy, the modernization of individual training and education is the number one priority for the Commander as it touches upon all elements and recognizes that training has a significant impact on CF success in operations. Speaking to this challenge during a recent interview, MGen Forgues remarked that “the strength of the officer corps lies in the synergy of mixing officers of various entry programs and various educational and operational experiences. I think my operational background, coupled with my graduate studies background, enables me to lead a strong team of CF members, defence employees and academics in the continued development and execution of the CF professional development system.”

au Commandement de la défense aérospatiale de l’Amérique du Nord (NORAD) à Colorado Springs, aux États-Unis. Lors de son discours d’intronisation à titre de commandant de l’ACD, le mgén Forgues a déclaré que le rôle des FC consistait à préserver et à maintenir les libertés et qu’il avait hâte de relever le défi d’assurer le «  perfectionnement professionnel des militaires qui seront appelés à assumer cette impressionnante responsabilité. » Il a ajouté qu’il fallait faire des investissements appropriés dans le perfectionnement professionnel. Juste avant que le mgén Forgues accepte le commandement de l’ACD, le Conseil des Forces armées approuvé, en mai 2011, la Stratégie de modernisation de l’instruction individuelle et de l’éducation des FC. En collaboration étroite avec l’Armée, la Marine et la Force  aérienne ainsi que d’autres intervenants, l’ACD a élaboré la stratégie de la voie à suivre par les FC pour assurer la transformation et le renouvellement proactifs du système d’instruction individuelle et d’éducation afin d’améliorer sa souplesse — et de donner ainsi une instruction plus participative et intégrée, faisant davantage appel à l’immersion. S’inspirant des conclusions du Groupe d’étude Withers et de l’importance accordée aux études afin de formuler une vision pour les FC, le mgén  Forgues devra tirer profit de son expérience pour aider à donner l’impulsion nécessaire à la modernisation de l’instruction individuelle et de l’éducation des FC alors que l’équipe de la Défense s’efforce par tous les moyens de réaliser des économies dans le cadre de l’engagement du gouvernement fédéral à rétablir l’équilibre budgétaire d’ici 2014-2015. WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

53


Modernizing the training and education system within the CF is recognition that adjustments are necessary to meet the demands of a changing world. How you learn, what you learn and where you learn are being examined at CDA within the context of the approved strategy to ensure that the right Individual Training and Education programs are delivered to the right people, at the right time, in the right place, and in the right format. With its partners, CDA is working on innovative approaches that fuse modern methodologies with the proven technologyenabled solutions that will be leveraged to accelerate learning, improve retention, encourage critical thinking and enable easy access to realistic learning at the point of need. These innovative opportunities to modernize will see RMCC as “a key engine for professional development of both officers and NCMS,” says MGen Forgues. “The military college clearly fits into the future planning of the CF. Its strength in supporting academic foundations, along with the ability to leverage the creative minds of new members of the CF will be critical to a culture of continuous improvement.” Under such strong leadership, the future is inevitably bright for all members of the CF, be they sailors, soldiers, airmen or airwomen. With a collaborative approach to learning, the young leaders of today will experience learning opportunities using modern technology that will help to enable operational success in the CF in our communities, within our national borders and around the world. — Melanie Rushworth

54

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS

À l’Académie, la modernisation de l’instruction individuelle et de l’éducation est la priorité absolue du commandant puisqu’elle a une incidence sur tous les éléments et que ce dernier reconnaît les répercussions considérables de l’instruction sur le succès des FC durant les opérations. Au cours d’une récente entrevue, le mgén Forgues a parlé de ce défi et a fait observer que la force du corps des officiers réside dans la synergie créée par la combinaison d’officiers issus de divers programmes d’admission, dont les études et les expériences opérationnelles sont différentes. Il est d’avis que son expérience opérationnelle, conjuguée à ses études universitaires, lui permettra de diriger une équipe solide, composée de membres des FC, d’employés de la Défense et d’universitaires, afin de poursuivre l’élaboration et la mise en œuvre du système de perfectionnement professionnel des FC. La modernisation du système d’instruction et d’éducation au sein des FC indique qu’on reconnaît la nécessité d’apporter des modifications afin de répondre aux exigences d’un monde en constante évolution. Le mode d’apprentissage, ainsi que le contenu et le lieu de cet apprentissage sont examinés à l’ACD dans le contexte de la stratégie approuvée afin de s’assurer que des programmes d’instruction individuelle et d’éducation appropriés sont offerts aux personnes voulues, et ce, au bon moment, au bon endroit et de la bonne façon. L’ACD travaille avec ses partenaires à élaborer des approches novatrices combinant des méthodes modernes et des solutions technologiques éprouvées, qui serviront à accélérer l’apprentissage, à améliorer la mémorisation, à favoriser l’esprit critique et à faciliter l’accès à un apprentissage concret, là où on en a besoin. Selon le mgén Forgues, ces occasions innovatrices de modernisation feront du CMRC un « vecteur clé du perfectionnement professionnel des officiers et des militaires du rang. Le collège militaire s’inscrit clairement dans la planification future des FC. Sa capacité d’appuyer les piliers universitaires et de mettre à profit la créativité des nouveaux membres des FC sera essentielle à une culture d’amélioration permanente. » Avec un leadership aussi solide, l’avenir est certainement prometteur pour tous les membres des FC, que ce soit les marins, les soldats ou les membres du personnel navigant. Grâce à une approche collaboratrice de l’apprentissage, les jeunes leaders d’aujourd’hui pourront apprendre à l’aide de la technologie moderne, ce qui favorisera la réussite des opérations des FC dans nos collectivités, au pays et dans le monde entier. — Melanie Rushworth ■


Alumni

Class News

O

n Aug. 6, there was a short reunion of the Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, Summer Twig, following a gig by The Yarmouth Shantymen at the Farmers’ Community Market: resident and Shantyman 7809 Eric Ruff (Barbara), visiting former resident and Shantyman 5472 James Colbeck (Lori), and summer resident 3918 Al Roberts (Cynthia). 5276 J.R. Digger MacDougall (1961), President of the Ottawa Branch, and his wife Nancy have enjoyed living and fishing at their lake home for seven months and have moved to Rockland, ON. He volunteers on six boards, serves as a volunteer interpreter at the Canadian War Museum, and is Chair and CEO of www.SingCanadaHarmony.ca, which is building a better Canada through vocal music.

5604 Ken Smee (1962) went on a vacation to Syria in March. (Yes, good timing!) He found the people friendly and welcoming, and is now concerned about their welfare — not only their jobs in the tourism industry, but their lives.

11165 Hugh “Zeus” Wilzewski (1977) and Jill Singleton were married at Esquimalt Spit, BC, on March 26, 2011 with his sons, Garrett and Lucas, and her daughters, Kimberley and Nicola, attending. The sun shone, Royal Roads gleamed in the distance, and a pair of swans swam across Esquimalt Lagoon for the occasion. Some decades previous, in 1974, Hugh and Jill had attended the graduation ball at RRMC. The reunited couple celebrated with a day cruise aboard the HMCS Regina during the RRMC homecoming in September. Following a honeymoon trip to Ottawa, they planned to attend their 37th reunion at RMC and take a day sail on the HMCS Oriole in October. The Wilzewski-Singleton new home is in Saanichton, BC.

11756 Les Chapman (1978) retired from the Royal Navy in 1997 and now lives in southern England and works in London. He and Susan have recently become empty nesters as their son George is in his second year at Coventry University. If you are in the UK, please get in touch: LesChapman1@aol.com

18329 Bill Foster (1992) and 18866 Eva Martinez (1993) are delighted to announce the arrival of Willa Martine Foster born July 4, 2011 at Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital, weighing 9 lbs., 7 oz. Willa joins her 6-year old sister, Emi, and 20-month old brother, Ken.

19894 Erin O'Toole (1995) and his wife Rebecca were blessed with the birth of their second child, Jack Grant O'Toole, on June 22, 2011. Earlier this year, Erin left his role as corporate counsel at Procter & Gamble to return to private practice as a lawyer with Heenan Blaikie LLP in Toronto. Erin can be reached at eotoole@heenan.ca.

22403 Capt Erin White (nee Johnson, 2002) and Capt Michael White are proud to announce the birth of their son, Liam Raymond Patrick, on July 27, 2011. First grandchild for 8825 Tom (RMC 1971) and Liz Johnson; fifth grandchild for Ken and Pauline White. Nephew for 21476 Maj Matthew Johnson (1999) and WO Stephanie Cyr, 21364 Maj Jeremy Hansen (1999) and Dr. Catherine Hansen, and Kevin White. ■

WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

55


5 Military th

World Games

T

his past summer, 204 Canadian Forces athletes and staff from across Canada participated in the 5th Military World Games/Jeux mondiaux militaries du CISM in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Held every four years, this showcase event has consistently grown since its inception in 1995. The fifth edition was a huge success with almost 7,000 athletes, coaches, officials and staff from more than 100 countries participating in 23 different sports. We checked the list of 204 Canadians and spotted the following individuals with a military college connection, either as an ex-cadet, staff member (coach), or family member of an ex-cadet. We apologize if we missed anyone. â–

56

College #

Rank

Last Name

First Name

Sport

Athlete/Staff

N/A

Mr.

James

Scott

Basketball

Asst Coach

23773

Capt

Krajcik

Brad

Basketball

Athlete

23104

Capt

Anderson

Grant

Basketball

Athlete

23419

Capt

Bentley

Matthew David

Basketball

Athlete

23131

Capt

Carreiro

Jonathan

Basketball

Athlete

25129

Ocdt

Cooke

Nicolas

Basketball

Athlete

24419

Lt

Gosselin

Michel Joseph David

Basketball

Athlete

15566

Maj

Grodzinski

Helga

Fencing

Team Manager

A134

Ms.

Howes

Patricia

Fencing

Coach

N/A

Mr.

Howes

David

Fencing

Coach

24823

2Lt

Guertin

Michelle

Fencing

Athlete

23502

Capt

McRae

Sarah

Fencing

Athlete

24052

2Lt

Rogers

Sarah

Fencing

Athlete

23705

Capt

Jones

Natalie

Fencing

Athlete

24446

Lt

Power

Jacklyn

Fencing

Athlete

24424

OCdt

Kilburn

Brendan

Fencing

Athlete

24679

OCdt

Sapera

Nicole

Fencing

Athlete

23022

Capt

Lafortune

Marilyne

Fencing

Athlete

24934

OCdt

Castellani

Eric

Fencing

Athlete

25840

OCdt

Densmore

Tucker

Fencing

Athlete

21773

Lt(N)

Sargeant

Andrew

Sailing

Athlete

11914

LCol

Markewicz

Alan

Shooting

Athlete

Daughter of 7808 Dave Rooke

Civ

Rooke

Laura

Soccer

Team Manager

24878

NCdt

Gray

Laura

Soccer

Athlete

23963

Lt

Ross

Melanie

Soccer

Athlete

G4232

LCdr

Harding

Sharlene

Soccer

Athlete

23471

Capt

Jupp

Melanie

Soccer

Athlete

24230

Capt

Perry

Andrea

Soccer

Athlete

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS


College #

Rank

Last Name

First Name

Sport

Athlete/Staff

23442

Capt

Flaherty

Lauren Michelle

Soccer

Athlete

25003

Ncdt

Beckett

Samantha

Soccer

Athlete

24665

Lt

Pessotto

Erica

Soccer

Athlete

22807

Capt

Whitty

Michelle

Swimming

Team Manager

23983

Capt

Bigelow

Stephanie

Swimming

Athlete

24990

Lt

Palmer

Serena

Swimming

Athlete

22888

Capt

Thomson

Dugald

Swimming

Athlete

21909

Maj

Boland

Joseph

Running

Athlete

23326

Capt

Greeley

Craig

Running

Athlete

24927

Ocdt

Best

Celine

Running

Athlete

24055

Lt

Setlack

Matthew

Running

Athlete

19870

Lcdr

Lawton

Jason

Triathlon

Team Manager

20733

LCdr

Davies

Trevor

Triathlon

Athlete

25005

Ocdt

Bradley

Aaron

Triathlon

Athlete

23626

Capt

Lacombe

David

Triathlon

Athlete

19791

Maj

Birgentzlen

Nathalie

Taekwondo

Team Manager

24169

Lt

Jeganathan

Nirmalan

Taekwondo

Athlete

23179

Capt

Kim

John

Taekwondo

Athlete

N/A

Ms.

Lupton

Kelly

Volleyball Women

Team Manager

A141

Ms.

Welden

Carolyn

Volleyball Women

Coach

N/A

Ms.

Mazerolle

Kara

Volleyball Women

Asst Coach

23126

Capt

Bristow

Jill

Volleyball Women

Athlete

23412

Capt

Andrews

Brenda

Volleyball Women

Athlete

23940

Lt

Gratton

Emmanuelle

Volleyball Women

Athlete

25419

OCdt

McCoy

Melissa

Volleyball Women

Athlete

22461

Maj

Bramma

Claire

Volleyball Women

Athlete

23818

Capt

Rantz

Julia

Volleyball Women

Athlete

21796

Maj

Johnston

Craig

Volleyball Men

Coach

23209

Capt

McMullen

Tom

Volleyball Men

Athlete

23777

Capt

Lucas

Jon

Volleyball Men

Athlete

24228

Lt

Lorrain

Matt

Volleyball Men

Athlete

23547

Capt

Verreault

Nick

Volleyball Men

Athlete

24880

Ocdt

Hartzell

Robert

Volleyball Men

Athlete

22756

Capt

Tremblay

Guillaume

Volleyball Men

Athlete

23807

2Lt

Hanly

Peter

Volleyball Men

Athlete

22968

Lt(N)

St-Pierre

Michael

Volleyball Men

Athlete

15130

LCol

Kenneally

Martin

Referee

Taekwondo

M0885

Capt

Palavicino

Chris

Referee

Soccer

10967

BGen (R)

Martin

David

Chief of Delegation

N/A

Mr.

Gaboury

Denis

Chief of Mission

12287

RAdm

Greenwood

Richard

D/CoM

12529

Capt (N)

Eldridge

Mark

D/CoM

Widow of 15708 Michael Allen

Col

Allen

Frances

D/CoM

N/A

LCol

Vezina

Elizabeth

PCSC

17226

Capt (R)

Nicol

Peter

Ops

Swimming

WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

57


Obituaries • NÉCROLOGIE

. S . O . S S.O.S. 5065

Roland Daviau ('61)

June 21, 2011

Les Cèdres, QC

10232

LCol (Ret) John Feller, CD ('74)

June 24, 2011

Kamloops, BC

S105

Doctor James Murray Beck

June 30, 2011

Halifax, NS

3150

Ken McMillan ('53)

July 3, 2011

California

13775

Lt (N) Jonathan Oliphant ('82)

July 9, 2011

Vancouver, BC

2551

Col Douglas Wurtele, CD ('36)

July 29, 2011

Ottawa, ON

2653

LCol (Ret) Patrick Styles, CD ('38)

July 30, 2011

Victoria, BC

A154

LCol (Ret) Pierre Labelle, CD

August 4, 2011

Outremont, QC

2646

LCol (Ret) Ronald Newton, CD ('38)

August 24, 2011

Peterborough, ON

10364

Geoffrey Baker ('75)

September 4, 2011

Crossfield, AB

9231

LCol (Ret) Rick Douglas, CD ('72)

September 9, 2011

Amherst, NS

19009

Lt Peter McQuinn ('93)

Spetember 20, 2011

Ottawa, ON

Obituaries • NÉCROLOGIE 33388 John Fletcher Webster

J

ohn Fletcher Webster was born in Picton, ON, on Aug. 3, 1931, and died in Ottawa on June 7, 2011, surrounded by his family. He was predeceased by his dearly beloved wife Kathryn (Kathy) and is survived by his three chil-

58

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS

dren, Brian, Lorraine and Bruce, as well as two brothers, Robert and David, and several greatly loved grandchildren. Before entering RMC in 1951 as an aspiring Air Force navigator, John studied aeronautical engineering for a year at the University of Toronto. During his first three years as a cadet at RMC, John lived in the Stone Frigate. He was

enrolled in the mechanical engineering program, and was well regarded as a mature, quiet and studious classmate, who willingly helped others with their academic studies. During his first two summers, John undertook training as a Tech AE (Aeronautical Engineering) officer, but the appeal of flying was irresistible, and he switched to navigator train-


Obituaries • NÉCROLOGIE

ing. In his final year, as the Cadet Wing Sports Officer, he held the rank of Cadet Squadron Leader, and was a member of Cadet Wing Headquarters residing in Fort LaSalle. John and his high school sweetheart Kathy, who was then a student at Queen’s University, married in the fall of 1955, and John graduated from Queen’s with a degree in mechanical engineering in 1956. Having opted into the newlycreated Regular Officer Training Plan, he went on to serve in the Canadian Forces for more than 20 years. His initial posting was with 436 Air Transport Squadron, primarily navigating in the Arctic, followed by several years flying worldwide as an air navigation instructor for Air Transport’s Operational Training Unit. In 1962, John and his family moved to Los Angeles, where he served with the USAF Space Systems Division as a systems engineer. He returned to Canada in 1966 to attend Staff College and was subsequently posted for five years to RMC, where he was simultaneously the Air Force Staff Officer and a post-graduate student. Following his RMC tour, he was posted to Summerside, PEI, as a navigator with 413 Search and Rescue Squadron. His last five years of military service were spent in Ottawa in staff and planning positions at NDHQ. This was not the end of his service to the country, however; for the next twelve years, he worked in the Public Service, the most memorable being several years with the Space Branch of the Ministry of State for Science and Technology. John was a loyal and respected member of the RMC Class of 1955 and faithfully attended our class reunions. He will be sadly missed. John’s ashes are now inurned in Picton beside those of his beloved Kathy. — 3387 Jeff Upton — 3342 Craig Moffatt

10232 John Francis Feller

L

ieutenant-Colonel John Francis Feller passed away peacefully on June 24, 2011. He was a loving husband, father, grandfather and brother. He is survived by his wife Vicky, daughter Sonja Tremblay (Chris), granddaughter Caitlyn, sons David and Adam, and granddaughter Nova. Also left to mourn him are Vicky’s sons Eli (Liz) and Adrian and daughter Clara, his brother Ted (Trudy), along with his nieces and nephews, and his former wife Marguerite. John was predeceased by his mother, father and beloved brother Joe (Pat). John was born in the Netherlands, May 14, 1952, immigrated to Canada with his parents and younger brother before his second birthday, and grew up in Lethbridge, AB. He was involved in military service to his country for most of his life starting with the Navy League Cadets, then enrolling in the Canadian Forces in 1970. John attended Royal Roads Military College in Victoria, BC, and Royal Military College in Kingston, ON, graduating in 1974 with a degree in civil engineering. John pursued a military career with postings with 1 Combat Engineer Regiment and various bases in Canada. He was seconded to the British army in 1980 and served in the United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark and Austria, including a stint as an instructor at the Royal School of Military Engineering. On his return to Canada in 1984, John was posted to National Defence Headquarters in Ottawa. Among his responsibilities, he developed an airfield damage repair capability for the Canadian Forces in Europe. During this period, he also trained at the United States Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal School and

participated in exercises in the United States, Germany and Norway. John retired from the regular force in 1991. From 1991 to 2004, John was Director of Facilities Services for Cariboo College, now Thompson Rivers University. He began a second career with the Army Reserves, when he joined the Rocky Mountain Rangers in 1992. He served as the Deputy Commanding Officer and then as the regiment’s Commanding Officer from 1994 to 1999. Following his appointment as Commanding Officer, John served with the 39 Canadian Brigade Group Headquarters in Vancouver, as well as the Land Force Western Area Headquarters in Edmonton. He returned to full-time service as an army reservist in 2004, serving as Transitional Planning Officer and as liaison to Joint Task Force Pacific. In 2007, John was appointed Commander Task Force Freetown in the Republic of Sierra Leone, Africa. Upon returning to Canada, he was involved in the support of the 2010 Olympic Games, and he took command of The Rocky Mountain Rangers for a second time in 2009 until his passing. John will be greatly missed by his family and friends, by his military and civilian colleagues, and by all members of his beloved regiment. Funeral services were held July 3 at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Kamloops, BC, followed by a procession from the church, and a reception at the Rocky Mountain Rangers Armoury. Donations in John’s memory to the Royal Inland Hospital Foundation (www.rihfoundation. ca), 311 Columbia Street, Kamloops, BC, V2C 2T1 will be gratefully appreciated. Condolences may be expressed at www. schoenings.com.

WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

59


Obituaries • NÉCROLOGIE

23550 Matthew Walsh

C

aptain Matthew “Matt” Walsh started his military career at the age of 12, when he joined the local 374 Air Cadets Squadron. Natural athleticism and charisma enabled Matt to excel at cadet team activities including basketball, shooting, drill and band. The cadet hall became his home away from home and was his inspiration and reason for applying to the Royal Military College. Matt was accepted to RMC and shipped off to Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, in the summer of 2002, where he underwent his basic officer training. Over the course of that summer, Matt began lifelong friendships with his 2 Platoon comrades and soon found himself marching through the arch at RMC. While at RMC, his good-natured demeanour earned him many friends. Pursuing his degree in military and strategic studies, Matt embraced the military lifestyle with passion and zest. He loved the culture and esprit de corps of the Canadian Forces, and thrived under the dedicated professors and military leadership he encountered on campus. In first year, he demonstrated rare abilities and commenced leading the RMC Pipe Band as the Drum Major. He could spin a mace like few others and did so representing the College at West Point, Annapolis, and on the Rick Mercer Report on national television. He was also an animal lover and an active member of the equestrian club, and played a key role in the planning of an RMC Humane Society fundraiser. Matt always attacked his numerous hobbies full force, and could often be found hiking or strumming his guitar with friends in the shacks. His years in Kingston were some of the happiest of his life.

60

fall/automne 2011 VERITAS

Matt’s career progression was temporarily delayed in the fall of 2005, when he was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL). Over the next few years, he was able to beat the disease into remission and finish his academic degree. With a clean bill of health, Matt headed back to the Artillery School where he completed his artillery officer training. With his career well underway, he was posted to Gagetown, NB, in summer of 2008. However, before the move was complete, Matt’s cancer returned. His posting was redirected to Halifax, where he could be closer to his family while starting another round of treatment. Matt required a bone marrow transplant and, with a stroke of luck, his brother was a match. With the second round of treatment complete and in remission, Matt miraculously returned back to work at the Land Force Atlantic Area Headquarters, intent on eventually returning to his artillery role in the field. He always believed that his cancer did and would continue to make him a better person. In the spring of 2010, Matt was involved in a severe motorcycle accident that left him with a broken foot, arm, and collarbone. While tending to his injuries, doctors found that his ALL had come back for the third time. After the accident, Matt battled through a third round of chemo and a second bone marrow transplant, beating the cancer back into remission, while also recovering from his injuries. Throughout these events, Matt’s compassion toward others always overshadowed his concerns for his own health. He was great at mailing cards during holidays, keeping in touch with friends, taking care of his beautiful dogs, and throwing great uglyChristmas-sweater parties. In March of

2011, Matt’s cancer returned for the last time and on May 5, he passed away, peaceful in the comfort of his own home in Shearwater, NS. Matt will be remembered for always making the most out of an everyday situation and bringing the best out in everyone. His affinity for the College stemmed from his unrelenting belief in the RMC program. His fierce pride in the values of the College and his loyalty to his uniform were unwavering. He even hung the RMC flag in his hospital room in Halifax. Matt was a son, brother, uncle, true friend, and proud Canadian solider to the very end. Donations can be made to the Canadian Cancer Society or to the 374 Air Cadets.

13775 Jonathan Andrew George Oliphant

W

ith sadness we announce the sudden passing of Jonathan Oliphant, beloved husband and father, on July 9, 2011. Jonathan is survived by his wife Verena, children Tora, Aidan, and Ian, as well as his brother Geoffrey, sister Helen, Uncle Nigel, and countless other cherished family and friends. Jonathan was born June 14, 1960, in London, England, and immigrated to Canada at age two. He spent most of his childhood years in North Vancouver, and then attended Royal Roads Military College. Upon graduation, Jonathan served four years in the Navy, acquiring a lifelong thirst for adventure and travel. In 1986, he enrolled in law school in Vancouver, and clerked for the BC Supreme Court for a year prior to completing his articling. The majority of Jonathan's legal career was spent work-


Obituaries • NÉCROLOGIE

ing as a Crown Prosecutor, passionately serving the public in both Kamloops and Vernon, BC. Jonathan and Verena were married in 1989, and children Tora, Aidan, and Ian followed in 1995, 1998, and 2001. Jonathan marvelled at the development and accomplishments of his three children. He dearly wanted to pass on to the family his great love for the outdoors, and did so by involving them in camping, hiking, biking, cross-country skiing, and all manner of sports activities. He himself tackled multiple marathons, triathlons, and even competed at the World Masters Cross-Country Skiing Championships last year. Jonathan derived a wicked satisfaction from pushing others into crazy athletic endeavours, creating enduring friendships with many people, and celebrating their accomplishments over good food and wine. Many will remember Jonathan for his patient and unfailing encouragement of all beginner athletes, especially those he taught as a volunteer ski or soccer coach. Jonathan loved learning, and seemed unfazed by beginning new things. Most recently, he added the arts to his menu of abilities, leading him to pursue playing the guitar, singing, and ballroom dancing. A growing faith and curiosity also led Jonathan to study theology. Above all, Jonathan was a genuine friend. Never content with a simple “How are you?” Jonathan got up close and personal with everyone almost immediately. He wielded a killer combination of irreverent wit, sassy boldness, and pure affection, and often turned a surprised stranger into a friend in record time. Jonathan was a noble fighter. He battled his illness the way he ran a mara-

thon, with gritty determination and feisty language, pouring everything he had into the next hill. We are grateful for every day we have shared with this remarkable man.

~ A154 Pierre Labelle

C

’est avec grande tristesse que nous annonçons le décès soudain de M. Labelle, le 4 août 2011, à l'âge de 63 ans, à quelques semaines de sa retraite du mouvement des Cadets, qu’il avait joint suite à une longue carrière au sein du Royal 22e Régiment. Enrôlé le 1er octobre 1965 dans le Corps École des Officiers canadiens (CEOC), contingent de l’Université Laval, il a rejoint le Royal 22e Régiment le 13 septembre 1971. Outre son passage dans les trois bataillons au Canada, en Allemagne et lors d’une mission à Chypre, M. Labelle a entre autres été commandant d’escadron au Collège militaire royal de Kingston, chef de cabinet du Commandant Général des Forces canadiennes en Europe, chef de l’administration à la Base de Montréal, et G1 du Secteur Québec de la Force terrestre. De 2003 à 2010, il a occupé avec un grand enthousiasme le poste de chef d'état-major de l’Unité régionale de soutien aux Cadets, Région de l’Est, à Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu. Sous sa gouverne, l’unité a été transformée de façon importante. En octobre 2010, il a été nommé commandant par intérim de la même unité, et ce, jusqu’au 30 juillet 2011.  Au début de l’été, il s’était porté volontaire pour être commandant de l’École de musique des Cadets de la région de l’Est, poste qu’il occupait au moment de son décès. M. Labelle était un ardent défenseur des collèges militaires

canadiens. Au sein du mouvement des Cadets, il avait accepté d’emblée de laisser les autorités des collèges militaires faire la promotion de cette voie au sein des unités de cadets et plus particulièrement lors des camps d’été dans la Région de l’Est. Ses confrères de Régiment se rappelleront de lui pour son érudition, acquise par sa soif de culture au fil de multiples affectations de prestige en Europe, notamment à l’Institut royal supérieur de Défense de Belgique, et au siège de l’OTAN à Bruxelles, entre autres;   son léger accent britannique en anglais acquis lors de son affectation en échange au Royal Welsh Fusiliers; sa démarche distinguée, d’un abord qui pouvait paraître impérieux, apparence rapidement contredite par la chaleur de son sourire et la profonde humanité de ses rapports interpersonnels; son affection pour les eaux de toilette et les lavallières; son ardente passion pour la langue française, exprimée notamment par son aide bénévole  et fort appréciée à titre de traducteur pour la revue Véritas; et, par-dessus tout, son indéfectible engagement envers l’encadrement et le mentorat de la jeunesse, d’abord auprès de ses propres enfants, neveux et nièces, puis des élèves-officiers du Collège militaire royal de Kingston, puis enfin auprès des cadets et cadettes. M. Labelle, le lieutenant-colonel au cœur d’or, nous manquera. À Renée, son épouse, ainsi qu’à ses enfants, sa famille et ses amis, nous tenons à témoigner l’expression de notre plus profonde sympathie. Je me souviens. — 10030 Michel Reid, 12364 Normand Comeau, 12944 André Durand ■

WWW.RMCCLUB.CA

61


The New 18 Society Our Top 18 Individual Donors for 2010 2652 Britton Smith 3150 Kenneth McMillan 3346 Joseph Howard 4887 William Comstock 5337 Bob Carr 5533 Glenn Allen 5586 Ian Mottershead 5868 Scott Clements 6282 Michael Miller

6575 Lawrence Taylor 6604 James Carruthers 6757 Mike Potter 7076 John van Haastrecht 7924 Robert Bradshaw 9660 Cameron Diggon 11623 John Carswell H24263 John Cowan Mr. Graham Keyser


“ My group rates saved me a lot of money.”

« Mes tarifs de groupe m’ont permis d’économiser beaucoup. » – Bianca Drapeau

– Miika Klemetti

Cliente satisfaite depuis 2008

Satisfied client since 2008

See how good your quote can be.

Des soumissions qui font jaser.

At TD Insurance Meloche Monnex, we know how important it is to save wherever you can. As a member of the Royal Military Colleges Club of Canada, you can enjoy preferred group rates and other exclusive privileges, thanks to our partnership. At TD Insurance, we believe in making insurance easy to understand so you can choose your coverage with confidence.

Chez TD Assurance Meloche Monnex, nous connaissons l’importance d’économiser autant que possible. En tant que membre du Club des collèges militaires royaux du Canada, vous pourriez profiter de tarifs de groupe avantageux et d’autres privilèges exclusifs, grâce à notre partenariat. Nous sommes convaincus que nous pouvons rendre l’assurance d’une simplicité sans égale afin que vous puissiez choisir votre protection en toute confiance.

Get an online quote at

Demandez une soumission en ligne au

www.melochemonnex.com/rmcclub or call 1-866-352-6187

Lundi au vendredi, de 8 h à 20 h. Samedi, de 9 h à 16 h.

Monday to Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Insurance program recommended by

www.melochemonnex.com/rmcclub ou téléphonez au 1-866-352-6187

Programme d’assurance recommandé par

TD Insurance Meloche Monnex is the trade name of SECURITY NATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY which underwrites the home and auto insurance program. The program is distributed by Meloche Monnex Insurance and Financial Services Inc. in Quebec and by Meloche Monnex Financial Services Inc. in the rest of Canada. Due to provincial legislation, our auto insurance program is not offered in British Columbia, Manitoba or Saskatchewan. *No purchase required. Contest ends on January 13, 2012. Each winner may choose the prize, a 2011 MINI Cooper Classic (including applicable taxes, preparation and transportation fees) for a total value of $28,500, or a cash amount of $30,000 Canadian. Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries received. Skill-testing question required. Contest organized jointly with Primmum Insurance Company and open to members, employees and other eligible persons belonging to all employer and professional and alumni groups who have an agreement with and are entitled to group rates from the organizers. Complete contest rules and eligibility criteria available at www.melochemonnex.com. Actual prize may differ from picture shown. MINI Cooper is a trade-mark, used under license, of BMW AG, which is not a participant in or a sponsor of this promotion. ®/ The TD logo and other trade-marks are the property of The Toronto-Dominion Bank or a wholly-owned subsidiary, in Canada and/or other countries.

TD Assurance Meloche Monnex est le nom d’affaires de SÉCURITÉ NATIONALE COMPAGNIE D’ASSURANCE, laquelle souscrit le programme d’assurances habitation et auto. Le programme est distribué par Meloche Monnex assurance et services financiers inc. au Québec et par Meloche Monnex services financiers inc. dans le reste du Canada. En raison des lois provinciales, notre programme d’assurance auto n’est pas offert en Colombie-Britannique, au Manitoba et en Saskatchewan. *Aucun achat requis. Le concours se termine le 13 janvier 2012. Chaque gagnant a le choix de son prix, entre une MINI Cooper Classique 2011 (incluant les taxes applicables et les frais de transport et de préparation) d’une valeur totale de 28 500 $, ou un montant d’argent de 30 000 $ canadien. Les chances de gagner dépendent du nombre d’inscriptions admissibles reçues. Le gagnant devra répondre à une question d’habileté mathématique. Concours organisé conjointement avec Primmum compagnie d’assurance. Peuvent y participer les membres ou employés et autres personnes admissibles appartenant à tous les groupes employeurs ou de professionnels et diplômés qui ont conclu un protocole d’entente avec les organisateurs et qui, par conséquent, bénéficient d’un tarif de groupe. Le règlement complet du concours, y compris les critères d’admissibilité, est accessible sur le site www.melochemonnex.com. Le prix peut différer de l’image montrée. MINI Cooper est une marque de commerce de BMW AG utilisée sous licence qui n’est pas associée à cette promotion et ne la commandite d’aucune façon. MD/ Le logo TD et les autres marques de commerce sont la propriété de La Banque Toronto-Dominion ou d’une filiale en propriété exclusive au Canada et(ou) dans d’autres pays.

Veritas | Fall 2011 Automne  

Reunion Weekend

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you