Page 1

Journal

Flint Journal / Cover Image Andreas Smetena /

Issue 02


Welcome to Flint Journal Issue 02

Jonathan May


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 5

Flint Journal is a creative outlet from the team behind Flint Sydney.

Flint is a Sydney based production company who work within photography, film and content creation. We are a group of dedicated producers and artists who believe in telling stories with our work.

Contents Page 6

Page 62

The Nullarbor

Desert Ink

Page 36

Off Spectrum

Page 68

Page 12

The Storm

Falling in Love Again

Page 44

Peter Harris

Page 14

Page 74

Hard Left: The Portraits

Brooklyn Whelan

Page 48

People of the Parting Rocks

Page 22

Page 80

To See

Contributors Editor & Creative Director Andrew Johnstone

Journal

Publisher Tim Berriman

Flint Journal / Cover Image Andreas Smetena /

Issue 02

ISSUE 02

Story Tellers Andreas Smetena, David Maurice Smith, Toby Dixon, Jon Bader, Jonathan May

Flint Sydney

e | tim@flintsydney.com

w | www.flintsydney.com p | +61 410 496 200

a | #6, 17-21 Bowden street, Alexandria, NSW 2015

Flint Journal is published by Flint Sydney. Opinions published are not necessarily those of the editorial team or publisher. Copyright remains the sole responsibility of the provider. No reproduction of any content is allowed without permission.

Without Darkness...

Page 54

Survivor

Page 28

The Remnants

Contributing Artists Brooklyn Whelan, Peter Harris

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 7

The Nullarbor By

David Maurice Smith

The first European to cross the Nullarbor was the English explorer Edward John Eyre in 1841. He described it as a “hideous anomaly, a blot on the face of Nature, the sort of place one gets into in bad dreams.”. Nullarbor literally means “no trees” in Latin. If you’re crossing Australia through the south, you have to pass across this region and most travel as quickly as possible, never hesitating to explore what lurks off the pavement. The place genuinely attracts a breed of people who are wired differently and it is an area where there seem to be more questions So it was just me, a caravan and than answers. the open road. For 12 days and 1,700 miles, making stops along the way, I saw incredible things and met people trying to find something, or get away from something, as everyone I met in the Nullarbor seemed to be.

ISSUE 02

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 9

The Nullarbor

David Maurice Smith

ISSUE 02

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 11

The Nullarbor

David Maurice Smith

ISSUE 02

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 13

Hasselblad X1D: Falling in Love Again By Andreas Smetena

The loss of analogue and increase in digital photography was not a big deal too me. It was a simple shift and an exciting one. The biggest loss for me was that I fell out of love with cameras. There was an underlying joy to handling the old film cameras; Hasselblad’s, Pentax 6/7, RZ Mamiya. For the last fifteen years I have worked with only the best cameras, but it is an unemotional relationship. While I own a lot of cameras I never feel that tingle inside me when I take one out of its case. I forgot the joy of holding a camera, working it… Until I got my fingers on the new Hasselblad X1D. The X1D is a small, medium format mirrorless camera. It sits in your hand like a baby, creates amazing file quality and is incredible functional. No, Hasselblad is not paying me for saying this. I grew up using Blad’s form the very beginning. I am amazed by what they can do, but they are still just a tool to me. I fell in love with the X1D though and finally feel I am working with a camera again rather then holding a computer in my hands.

ISSUE 02

So I decided to call up Hasselblad, profess my love and have a chat a with Ove Bengtsson. Bengtsson is part of the team who designed the X1D and as he told me ‘…..it is not a one man job’ I wanted to know if he or somebody in his team is a professional photographer. Andreas: Can I ask you, have you guys got professional photographers in your team? Ove: We are in regular contact with photographers and they regularly send in requests for this and that but we don’t have any photographers in the team that work purely as a professional photographer. We have people in the organisation that are close to professonals, talking and working with them a lot. I think it comes from our own love of photography, because you don’t have to be a professional photographer to really understand how a camera should works. Andreas: I particululary like how it is not filled up with too many options but only with items that are needed. Ove: Yeah. I think for a very long time we’ve been concentrating on photography and not the technology itself. We know for a fact, and it’s easy to understand, for a professional photographer the camera should not be in the way of making a great picture. It should help him create it.

Andreas: What were the biggest difficulties you had to overcome to design the camera? Ove: I think the most difficult part was to make it as small as it is, as compact. When it comes to the styling or the design, the external design. To fit all the stuff inside, in such a small box and be able to get the ergonomics right. I think that was the main difficulty. Andreas: How long did it take to create the X1D? Ove: The X1D, when we launched it in June last year, it was the first mirror-less, medium format camera and was also the best camera on the market. We had worked on the camera for eighteen months, which is by normal standards a very, very short time. But adding the extra year that we have had since then I think that adds up to thirty months.

Shot on Hasselblad X1D Images below - Andreas Smetena

Andreas: What is the next step? How much better can it get? Ove: I think performance wise we can improve. With new firmware we can add more features while keeping it simple. Hopefully we’ll be able to increase performance and add features in a way that is different to the traditional Japanese manufacturers. Find the features that are required both by serious amateurs and professional photographers because I think this camera needs to fit both categories. We have to make sure that we don’t lose the magic that is in this camera.

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 15

Hard Left: The Portraits By

Toby Dixon

Following on from Flint Journal Issue 1, these portraits form part of the series, ‘Hard Left’, A Night at The Speedway, which was exhibited in July 2017 at Special Group Studios in Sydney. Showcasing the entire gamut of characters that frequent the track each Saturday night, from the drivers, mechanics and punters, they were photographed using a mobile studio created in the pit area of Valvolene Speedway during the races.

ISSUE 02

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

Hard Left: The Portraits

ISSUE 02

PAGE 17

Toby Dixon

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

Hard Left: The Portraits

ISSUE 02

PAGE 19

Toby Dixon

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

Hard Left: The Portraits

ISSUE 02

PAGE 21

Toby Dixon

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 23

To See By

See - verb gerund or present participle: seeing.

Andreas Smetena

1. perceive with the eyes; discern visually. “in the distance she could see the blue sea” synonyms: discern, perceive, glimpse, catch/ get a glimpse of, spot, notice, catch sight of, sight. It is fascinating for me to see things, and even more fulfilling to have the time and headspace to really ’see’ things. We all know that feeling. Unfortunately in the daily business life of shooting stills and motion it becomes more commonplace to ‘ talk’ about an image. You then create it in front of the lens and shoot it. Somewhere towards the end you start to ‘see’ it. This series of simple shots of tyre tracks on concrete was a moment of ‘seeing‘ something. I loved it.

While shooting a job for a Tyre company in China, we ended up with this massive area of tracks. While the team worked on clearing the gear I was wandering around the open concrete field, the smell of burned rubber in my nose, amazed at the surreal textures. I remember picking up my camera and shooting images over a period of 40 minutes . I remember being so exited about what I could see on my viewfinder. There was such sincere joy with what my eyes could see. Something as simple and unnatural as black rubber lines on concrete gave me such joy and energy, and the enjoyment of seeing. It was a reminder to appreciate this great gift that we all have.

ISSUE 02

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 25

To See

Andreas Smetena

ISSUE 02

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 27

To See

Andreas Smetena

ISSUE 02

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 29

A scout troupe set By out exploring the Australian outback. Escaping the scorching heat, they ventured into a cave. Emerging, they come to a sober realisation: an airborne virus has wiped out most of humanity. They would have to survive in the wilderness alone, armed with nothing but their wits, courage and their scout skills. 

Jonathan May

Growing up my favourite movie was “Stand By Me”. I loved the sense of freedom and adventure it embodied and I’m guessing I watched it over 100 times. Most of my work is shot on location, and I wanted to work on something personal in my studio, so The Remnants series was born. I came up with the concept and sketched out various characters, each having a skillset to help the group. I worked closely with Rebecca Riegger on the styling and the brief was “Lord of The Flies” meets “Moonrise Kingdom”. Each character had to be specifically styled to their personality

ISSUE 02

and skills. A warrior, a nurse, a look-out, a fisherman, an animal whisperer and a botanist made up the crew. The children were all specifically cast for their roles and were shot in studio. On reflection of the imagery while it ticked the studio/lighting/styling boxes it was missing the main ingredient that inspired the concept in the first place....Freedom and adventure. I decided to load up my car and did a 3000km camping trip to shoot specific background plates for each character. It was the peak of summer and I was out in Mungo national park and Broken Hill area. Ideally I would always shoot the talent before the background but due to the way this project evolved I had no choice.

The Remnants

Working with Ian Connor from Visual State for the post, the most complex aspect was the integration of the studioshot talent into the hero backplates. All of the costumes were very intricate and it was important to maintain the natural edges of the clothes, props and hair. As well as enhancing the lighting of both the talent and landscapes, the main focus was developing a striking cinematic grade that would help compliment the images and overall concept of ‘The Remnants’.

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

The Remnants

ISSUE 02

PAGE 31

Jonathan May

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

The Remnants

ISSUE 02

PAGE 33

Jonathan May

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

The Remnants

ISSUE 02

PAGE 35

Jonathan May

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 37

Off Spectrum By

Jon Bader This series of images pays homage to the photography and photographers of the mid 19th century, who’s new medium, born out of chemistry and physics, peered for the first time into an invisible world hitherto populated by the spirits and indescribable forces of 18th century metaphysical thought. These images produced by the ‘dispassionate observation’ of the camera were not only astounding to a world in the throws of an industrial and scientific revolution, they challenged spiritual and religious ideals as they stripped away the shrouds surrounding the workings of the earth, the night sky and the human body. They were also beautiful to look at and it was these images that first ignited the discussion as to whether photography was an art or a science.

ISSUE 02

As photography gained notoriety (primarily due to Queen Victoria’s fascination with the medium), society would struggle to reconcile this exposing of nature with the prevailing religious teachings of the day. These photographic images of forces and frequencies would be interpreted as having captured and revealed the spirit world or the hand of God, spawning a craze for Aura and Kirlian photography as well as elaborate fakes of fairies ‘captured’ at the bottom of the garden.

It was with these thoughts in mind that I ventured into the studio armed with magnets, sound generators and a 10,000 volt transformer. My hope was to step briefly into the shoes of these pioneers and maybe make some interesting images along the way. What I discovered was the absolute joy of capturing these invisible forces - The exhilaration of never knowing what would appear in front of me or when I processed the film, drove me on and eventually culminated in this collection of works.

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 39

Off Spectrum

Jon Bader

ISSUE 02

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 41

Off Spectrum

Jon Bader

ISSUE 02

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

Off Spectrum

ISSUE 02

PAGE 43

Jon Bader

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 45

Artist Profile:

Peter Harris From Toronto, Canada Site www.peterharris.ca Social @peterdharris Peter Harris is an artist currently working and living in Toronto, Canada. A talented painter, Harris’s work focuses on the architecture and objects of modern urban environments. He uses the colours of modern man-made lighting to create paintings full of subtle and sensual colours. Glowing yellows, bright reds and the grey and brown of the dissapearing beams of street lights. Harris has won several awards for his continuing series of urban inspired landscape paintings and his work can be found in private collections in Canada, the United States and Europe. He is represented by the Mira Godard Gallery in Toronto.

School Bus Reverie - 2014

ISSUE 02

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 47

Artist Profile: Peter Harris

Crosswalk at Night - 2014

7Eleven at Midnight - 2014

The Okonomi House - 2014

ISSUE 02

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 49

People of the Parting Rocks The Canadian First Nation’s community of Attatawapiskat

By

David Maurice Smith Home to the Swampy Cree First Nations people, the rural Canadian community of Attawapiskat in Ontario reached a tragic tipping point in 2016. Nestled on the winding banks of the Attawapiskat river, the town of approximately 2,000 residents declared a formal state of emergency in response to an overwhelming surge of attempted suicides, momentarily grabbing the attention of the Canadian people. With the support of a grant from the Pulitzer Centre on Crisis Reporting, photographer David Maurice Smith traveled to Attawapiskat with the intention of exploring the crisis within a broader cultural context, one that could help

ISSUE 02

Canadians understand more about the lives of the town’s residents. The serious challenges facing First Nations towns like Attawapiskat have essentially become the narrative, leading to an erosion of empathy from outsiders and a lack of appreciation of “If we continue to the richness and resiliency stereotype Native of these communities. communities as lost Properly understanding the causes, we perpetuate serious issues facing First a divide,” says Smith. Nations people requires “It is damaging to a re-contextualising—a focus on only the most shared focus not only on destitute and deplorable the struggle, but also on conditions for the sake the culture and universal of furthering a narrative human values of the that does not tell the Attawapiskat Nation. whole story and leaves little room for healing.”

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

People of the Parting Rocks

ISSUE 02

PAGE 51

David Maurice Smith

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

People of the Parting Rocks

ISSUE 02

PAGE 53

David Maurice Smith

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 55

Survivor By

Andreas Smetena

Survivor - noun 1. A person who copes well with difficulties in their life

2. The remainder of a group of people or things. Shooting portraits is something I have always enjoyed. As cliche as it sounds, I love that moment of connection with another person. Sometimes it happens easily, other times it takes time, and I always feel it was a missed opportunity if it does not happen at all. Connection was a must when shooting this portrait series of Survivors. I was nervous and I believe some of the subjects also were. I photographed each person with dignity to show their quiet strength. Not as victims but as survivors.

ISSUE 02

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

???

ISSUE 02

PAGE 57

Andreas Smetena

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

???

ISSUE 02

PAGE 59

Andreas Smetena

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

???

ISSUE 02

PAGE 61

Andreas Smetena

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 63

Desert Ink By

Desert Ink is a tale of 8 Mexican tattoo artists from the wrong side of the tracks, who following their love of art and ink found the will to change.

Jonathan May

With identities forged in street furnaces of gang-banging, bullet wounds, drug dealing and jail time, this band of men crafted new identities, forming a new type of gang, united by art and their determination to earn a decent living, , rising from the trappings of their nefarious past lives. It all started in a kitchen in West Hollywood over breakfast with my good friend, William Taylor. His mother had just passed away and he started talking about getting a tattoo done to honour her. The design he wanted was praying hands with a rosary, and the tattoo artists that he had to have were Chip and the crew from Art and Ink. Billy told me that the guys at Art and Ink were Mexican gang members who had seen the error of their ways and found a more enlightened path. He wanted to do a reality show on them. I cancelled my agency meetings in LA and drove straight down to meet them.

ISSUE 02

Their story is redemption through art and tattooing, so I decided to turn up without a camera on our first meeting. Instead I had my photography portfolio to show the guys and connect with them through my own art, and ended up spending the weekend with them and building a solid rapport. This is one of the most underrated aspects on documentary photography. I knew from before the first frame fired that I wanted to shoot this project in black and white, the Mexican tattoo style is black and grey and it was very fitting to not show any colour. Black and grey tattooing started in Mexican prisons in the ‘70s, when inmates had limited access to materials. They resorted to using guitar strings for needles and cigarette ash and pens for ink. Because it was a single needle they were able to apply the tattoo with amazing detail and that is where the portrait style graphic imagery was born. It was all shot on the Leica M9P, giving me the intimate access I needed with the guys and helping them to relax.

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

Desert Ink

ISSUE 02

PAGE 65

Jonathan May

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

Desert Ink

ISSUE 02

PAGE 67

Jonathan May

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 69

The Storm By

Toby Dixon

In the winter of 2015, the east coast of Australia saw some of the most devastating storms on record over three days of king tides. On it’s departure, the true damage was revealed. Entire beaches, sand banks and residential property were removed from their footings and pulled back into the sea. It was a spectacular thing to watch but yet another reminder that nature really is the one in control. I went down to my local Coogee Beach to watch it being bashed about like it was a small kids pool. The destruction of the storms were so intense, they’re still rebuilding the concrete infrastructure two years on.

ISSUE 02

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

The Storm

ISSUE 02

PAGE 71

Toby Dixon

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

The Storm

ISSUE 02

PAGE 73

Toby Dixon

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 75

Artist Profile:

Brooklyn Whelan

Short Range Mover C - 2016

From Sydney, Australia Site www.brooklynwhelan.com Social @brooklynwhelan Born and raised in Sydney, Brooklyn Whelan is one of Australia’s leading emerging contemporary artists. Working primarily with acrylics on canvas, his style is heavily influenced by weather patterns and futurism. His work has been called ethereal, but at the same time minimal and modern. “As a painter, I work to develop paintings that speak about the beauty and power that exists within weather patterns. I constantly find myself staring into oncoming storms. I do not merely want to capture the image with my painting; rather, with strong bold strokes, I want to give it life and energy, also the sense of fantasy that one might see in an 80’s sci fi - Powerful electricity, but with a tone of grace, softness and movement.”

Heavy Roller - 2016

ISSUE 02

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 77

Artist Profile: Brooklyn Whelan

Southerly Shift A - 2016

ISSUE 02

Southerly Shift B - 2016

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 79

Artist Profile: Brooklyn Whelan

Short Range Mover A - 2016

ISSUE 02

Large Neon Nights - 2016

www.flintsydney.com


FLINT JOURNAL

PAGE 81

Without Darkness There is no light(show)

What began as a career in photography, with a side dalliance in architecture, combined with the kind of mind that solves spatial problems most people don’t even know exist; projection artist Giles Westley has created an international portfolio of work based in light projection. With over 15 years working with light, sound, architecture and storytelling, Westley has projected onto some of the worlds most unique landmark structures from the iconic Sydney Opera House, a mountain range in Central Australia to a variety of buildings around the world. But for Westley, the show itself is almost the epilogue to a much more complex series of conceptual and ethereal dilemmas, which need to be considered and explained through the language of light.

and the impact of the building at different times of the day. The consideration for “lighting the building” is taken in terms of how it will showcase the building at night.

“Everything starts in the same place. It starts in the dark. For without the absence of light, there can be no show at all.”

Ambient light has to be negotiated, of which there is a lot in any urban setting. There is the matter of where will people stand to watch the show.

His work is magical, the illusionary transformation of objects through the use of light. Lyrical interpretations of archetypal stories exposed on the face of buildings. Façade upon façade.

Suitable buildings, where ambient light is controllable that also provide a sizeable viewing area are uncommon. There are permissions and crowd logistics.

Behind the scenes, the shows become a very controlled environment. There is an abundance of stunning architecture available but these buildings are built for daylight. Architects obsess over the path of the sun, the play of shadows

ISSUE 02

And then there is the placement of the projectors and associated production equipment. Also, the weather… The shows themselves have intricacies of their own; the way a story is told and the audience engaged. By default, large public events must appeal to the public at large. The narrative must be known widely enough to be told through imagery and implication.

“In a sense, I have to tease the concepts and ideas for story from the building itself. From its history and its location, not only in the physical realm but where it lives in the minds of the people who watch the shows. Sometimes the idea of transforming an object, be it a building or a landmark using certain images can be challenging to people – others can miss the nuances altogether. It is like a quest to find a deeper connection between place, story and ceremony.” The story has to become the unifying point, which draws people in from different geographic and cultural places and unites them with the theme of the show. The medium of 3D mapping is progressing, from its early days of candy colours and graphic tricks and buildings falling over: to an opportunity to engage in a new art form with singular power for storytelling and emotive capabilities, the visual repercussions of which can follow the viewer through to their morning commute down familiar pathways that only last night were transformed. With a show like the Lights of Christmas, using the spirit of giving and kindness, peace and unity to guide the essence of the

story gives each interpretation of St Mary’s Cathedral an appeal and depth that goes beyond religion and harks back to the sense of human celebration and connection that commercialisation has taken away. Incorporating sound is another layer to these experiences. Westley has worked with soundscape artists as well as live musicians to create experiences that are part art, part animation and part live concert. Engaging multiple senses offers a deeply immersive experience and can transport the audience onto the experience, rather than them being purely observers of a ‘show’. “These collaborations become their own entity. There is a creative chemistry that happens and it can take over; the audience feel something quite unique is happening.” Further immersion in the experience of light shows is becoming more achievable. Technological advances in live rendering capabilities means light installations can become interactive and audience driven. While it is still a guided experience, there is an element of freedom of expression as if the crowd could take over entirely.

Live data visualisation can now be incorporated directly into very large-scale projection shows with data fields displayed at upwards of 10000 x 10000 pixels with live warping and image manipulation. As the technology moves ahead new opportunities arise and the balance between art and the method transforms in a myriad of directions, the art-form transforms itself rather than the objects it lives upon. While public events require time to mature, measured in years and are the antithesis of the instant gratification generation (which we are all part of ), the potential for location based branded content is huge. The sophistication of data analysis in conjunction with crowd-driven large format projection promotion is a field yet to be explored. For Westley both the beauty and tragedy of his work is the ephemeral nature of the medium. Once the lights go out, there is no tangible trace it happened at all.

www.flintsydney.com


We Hope You Enjoyed Flint Journal

David Maurice Smith


Flint Journal

Flint Journal 2  
Flint Journal 2  
Advertisement