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Friday, January 13, 2020-

Capital High School

Volume 55, lssue 1

CHS FLIGHT

Performance~Responsibility~Integrity~Diversity~Excellence Bonfire Page 3

GSA Tye-Dye Page 5

Pantomime Page 9

Senior Night Soccer Page 13

Mountain Biking Page 13


Table of contents 3-4 ............................................. Bonfire 5-6 .....................................GSA Tie-dye 7-8 .....................JROTC Battalion BBQ 9-10 ..........................Theater Pantomime 11-12 ........................................KCHSTV 13-14..Senior Night Boys Varsity Soccer 15-16 ...................Mountain Biking Club

Job No.: 013084

Page No.

691

School Name: Capital High School

ID CC 2017 Windows TCID:PP


Flight Magazine Flight Magazine is a Student-Produced Publication Talon Media Group Web-master: Zachary Gilmore Assistants: Jonathan Lopez, Anna Gamel Advisor: Vicki Francis


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TOP LEFT: Senior Luca Serre, senior Moises Vasquez Viernes, Bonfire, Sept. 30. Photo by Hanna Hendrickson MIDDLE LEFT: Senior Trevor Hale, Bonfire, Sept. 30. Photo by Hanna Hendrickson BOTTOM LEFT: Senior Trevor Hale, Bonfire, Sept. 30. Photo by Hanna Hendrickson

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TOP RIGHT: Sophomore Matasyn Rybar watches the bonfire at the softball fields to celebrate after the Powder Puff game on Sept. 30. “This was a great way to have fun and make memories with friends,” Rybar said. Photo by Hanna Hendrickson TOP LEFT: 1994 Yearbook. Photo by Hanna Hendrickson

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ABOVE: Group of seniors, Bonfire, Sept. 30. Photo by Hanna Hendrickson

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Bonfire

TOP RIGHT: Sophomore Matasyn Rybar, Bonfire, Sept. 30. Photo by Hanna Hendrickson MIDDLE RIGHT: Junior Cagnie Miller, Senior Trevor Hale, Bonfire, Oct. 4. Photo by Matasyn Rybar

A bonfire was set up for Homecoming Week after the Powder Puff game. Any grade was able to come and enjoy. It was set up by Student Council on Monday, Sept. 30, 2019. It was the start of a great Homecoming Week. Student Council member, junior Cagnie Miller said that the bonfire showed school pride. Not a lot of schools do the bonfire, so it has started to represent the community at this school. “You definitely should go, it’s late at night on a Monday, but it’s worth it. It’s a fun experience to do for the school,” Miller said. Another important part of the bonfire was that it is held in the fall. It’s a perfect tradition to do in the fall since it’s not too cold and it’s a time to celebrate after the Powder Puff game. “You have to go to get the experience, it’s a super fun thing to watch and experience,” she said. Although the bonfire is extremely fun, it takes a lot of planning to make it right. It can take a lot of work from getting the wood pallets to getting the fire permit. “Make sure you do the fire permit because if you don’t the school could get fined and they also could not be able to do it,” she said. In the future, she hopes the bonfire will happen every year and will be a tradition. “It’s a tradition, it’s something Capital is kind of known for. A lot of other schools don’t have a bonfire on school grounds,” she said. Student Council member, sophomore Matasyn Rybar said someone that was very helpful in setting up the bonfire was Trevor Hale. He helped with getting the pallets across the fields and setting it all up. “He’s very helpful and if you need help with anything he is there,” Rybar said. Another part of the bonfire was the team effort. It took a lot of people to get the bonfire set up and many people took their time and resources to help. “We probably had the best group and it was really nice to have their help,” she said. The staff was a main part of the set up as well. It wouldn’t have happened if Mr. Alder hadn’t approved and helped the student council. “We have a very helpful staff. They want us to have fun and have a good high school experience,” she said. In the future student council plans on doing the bonfire every year with a few adjustments so they won’t have to do it twice again. “Come to the bonfire because it’s a lot of fun. It’s a time to hang out, it’s really cool,” she said. Hanna Hendrickson

BOTTOM RIGHT: Group of sophomores, Bonfire, Sept. 30. Photo by Hanna Hendrickson

BOTTOM LEFT: Bonfire, Sept. 30. Photo by Hanna Hendrickson Page Created by Hanna Hendrickson


TOP: Senior Keegan Archuleta, GSA Tie-Dye, Oct. 9. Photo by Kadence Cribbs MIDDLE: Senior Zoe Patino, GSA Tie-Dye, Oct. 9. Photo by Kadence Cribbs BOTTOM: Senior Brianna Myrick, senior Zoe Patino, GSA Tie-Dye, Oct. 9. Photo by Kadence Cribbs

TOP: Sophomore Jeremiah Brooks, senior Keegan Archuleta, senior Brianna Myrick Tie-Dying shirts behind the school to team build Oct. 6. “It let us kinda all meet each other as well as get to know each other,” Myrick said. Photo by Kadence Cribbs

TOP: GSA Tie-Dye, Oct. 9. Photo by Kadence Cribbs BOTTOM: GSA Tie-Dye, Oct. 9. Photo by Kadence Cribbs


GSA Tie-Dye The GSA club tie-dyed white shirts behind the school as a bonding activity on Oct. 2nd Sophomore Zoe Patino said the GSA tie-dyes shirts helped them to get to know each other. They wanted to do something creative outside, and now they have something they can cherish forever. “It was something fun to do with friends,” Patino said. Patino said how it was lots of fun. She liked to joke around with friends and mix up colors on a blank canvas. “Whatever you want to do, go for it! Try new things,” Patino said. Patino also said it was good to get to know new people. She said there was a colorful array of interesting people. “If you want to get to know someone, go out and do it, and don’t be afraid,” Patino said. In the future Patino would love to have more people join, she wants the club to just be a safe space for anyone. “If you want somewhere to go eat lunch and get to know new people, why not come here? There’s always some very enthusiastic and happy people,” Patino said. Sophomore Lucy Reynolds said it was fun to connect with new people. She learned that she had many things in common with the other members, like RPG and which musicals they liked. They also talked about their own opinions. “they have very interesting viewpoint on the world, it’s a very pacifist environment, so no fighting, but a lot of opinions being thrown back and forth,” Reynolds said. Reynolds also liked getting to know everyone. They ended up shared all their individual coming out stories, Reynolds said that the best way they got to know each other. “It’s a very personal experience, that you shouldn’t mock, you have to accept that people are different when it comes to personal experiences,” Reynolds said. They also sorted out their upcoming schedule. They decided they wanted to watch funny LGBTQ related videos, discuss different issues, have a movie night, go to pride, and many other things. “It was cool to hear other people’s schedules and their priorities,” Reynolds said. In the future, Reynolds wants the club to just be an open and accepting group of friends. “GSA is important for social reasons, it’s important for people to be themselves, and grow into themselves,” said Reynolds.

TOP: GSA Tie-Dye, Oct. 9. Photo by Kadence Cribbs

Page created by Kadence Cribbs

TOP: Senior Zoe Patino, sophomore Lucy Reynolds,GSA Tie-Dye, Oct. 9. Photo by Kadence Cribbs MIDDLE: Senior Zoe Patino, senior Brianna Myrick, GSA Tie-Dye, Oct. 9. Photo By Kadence Cribbs BOTTOM: Sophomore Lucy Reynolds, GSA Tie-Dye, Oct. 9. Photo by Kadence Cribbs


JROTC Battalion BBQ JROTC held an event where people from Alpha, Bravo, and Charlie company as well as battalion staff were all having a battalion BBQ. This took place at Borah High School Sept. 28. The

TOP: Freshmen and seniors team two, JROTC BBQ, Sept. 20. Photo by Francisco Cruz MIDDLE: Freshmen and seniors team one and team two, JROTC BBQ, Sept. 20. Photo by Francisco Cruz

purpose of that event was for people to know everyone in battalion staff as well as chain in command, and anyone from other companies. Sophomore Sierra Curtis said the most important thing about JROTC is how it teaches the fundamentals of leadership, It is also able to teach how to be a leader and not just another follower. “If you join the program it could help you get a leadership position and it’s good for the

expe-

rience,” Curtis said. Another important thing about JROTC is the opportunity that it opens up. The JROTC program goes out to help with volunteer work which could lead to meeting army recruiters to help with their future. “Take the opportunity and go out there to help your country and make a name for yourself,” she said. Another thing that JROTC can do is help teach others to take care of themselves. The program teaches them how to be organized, how to look professional, and to take pride in themselves. “The program does boost your confidence as well as helps you be ready for interviews and with teachers or older adults,” she said. In the future of JROTC, she hopes that they get more involved with competition and creating their own teams such as Raiders and the Honor Guard. “We’re going places and if you join now you get to experience of what we do with us,” she said. Sophomore Ian Velvick said that the first most important thing about JROTC was the opportunities it opens up. If someone were to ever join any branch of the Army after basic training, they would get promoted to a higher rank than their peers, getting better pay and leadership position. “If you join you can learn how to be a good leader as well as traveling to different places” Velvick said. Another important JROTC program called JCLC. Teaches how to free fall from planes, from the sides of buildings, as well as basic training, and LRC (leadership recrutement center). “It’s a program teaching you the basics of the army and what it’s like,” he said. Another important thing that JROTC did was the Rifle team/Honor guard, where a team of 5-6 people all march with rifles and they do the basic rifle drill and inspection to compete against other schools. “If you join the program, you join in on other teams such as Raiders, Rifle, Honor guard and many more,” he said. In the future for JROTC he was looking for eyes that are bright for the program and looking for people who get themselves involved with community service and national competition making a name for themselves. “The program is definitely amazing and fun as we do more and more to give back to our country, we also do a lot more to better ourselves,” he said.

Francisco Cruz

BOTTOM RIGHT: Sophomores Ian Velvick and Daniella Rosas, JROTC BBQ, Sept. 20. Photo by Francisco Cruz LEFT: Sophomore and seniors, Honor Guard, JROTC BBQ, Sept. 20. Photo by Francisco Cruz


TOP: Senior Elye Trescott, JROTC BBQ, Sept. 20. Photo by Francisco Cruz MIDDLE: Freshmen and sophomore River Rankin and Sierra Curtis, JROTC BBQ, Sept. 20. Photo by Francisco Cruz BOTTOM: Sophomore Ian Velveck, JROTC BBQ, Sept. 20. Photo by Francisco Cruz

ABOVE: JROTC Battalion picture from 1968 MIDDLE: Sophomore and seniors Honor Guard, JROTC BBQ, Sept. 20.Photo by Francisco Cruz

Daniella Rosas,

ROTC BBQ, Sept.

ABOVE: Freshmen and seniors team one, JROTC BBQ, Sept. 20. Photo by Francisco Cruz

Page created by: Francisco Cruz


THEATRE

TOP: Sophomore Summer Baker, Theatre Pantomime Project, Oct. 9. Photo by Mesa Ambrose MIDDLE: Junior Blake Savitz, Theatre Pantomime Proj-ect, Oct. 8. Photo by Mesa Ambrose BOTTOM RIGHT: Senior Zoe Pantino, Theatre Panto-mime Project, Oct. 8. Photo by Mesa Ambrose BOTTOM LEFT: Sophomore Connor Hankel, Theatre Pantomime Project, Oct. 8. Photo by Mesa Ambrose

PANTOMIME PROJECT The Theatre class did a project on pantomime on Oct. 9 to further understand and learn about the way of performing called pantomime. Senior Dan Diviney said that having no dialogue was very important as in panto-mime words are not allowed. Expressing emotions without words is difficult. “Show, don’t tell,” he said. Diviney talked about blocking, a very important part of the acting process. Blocking is practicing the movements in the performance. “Action is important, but it feels silly,” Diviney said. Hunger is apparently a problem that many a mimer face while performing their pieces. Miming a barbecue makes you wonder how it tastes and what it would actually feel like to hold a burger in your hands. “It all makes you kind of hungry,” he said. In the future Diviney does not plan to continue performing pantomime or acting aside from plays in college. “I don’t recommend stage acting, it’s a dying art,” Diviney said. Sophomore Ruby Carnell said that acting without words is one of the most important parts of pantomime. She said that it is difficult to get a point across without speaking. “Be creative, think outside the box,’’ she said. Carnell said that facial expressions are another critical part of pantomime. You have to get to know how the character would react to every situation and how to properly express their emotions.

“You can still use your body, the chest is really important,’’ Carnell said. Doing pantomime is really fun and has many opportunities to work as a group. Group pantomimes are easier to do because you can work off of other people. “If you get stuck, ask for help, and be yourself,” she said. In the future Carnell plans to continue acting and would do pantomime again. “Just think about the expressions,” Carnell said. Mesa Ambrose


TOP: Junior Blake Savitz, sophomore Jeremiah Brooks, Theatre Pantomime Project, Oct. 9. Photo by Mesa Ambrose MIDDLE: Sophomore Cassidy Phipps, Theatre Pantomime Project, Oct. 9. Photo by Mesa Ambrose BOTTOM: Theatre Pantomime Project, Oct. 9. Photo by Mesa Ambrose

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TOP LEFT: Thespians and Drama Club, 1966. TOP RIGHT: Sophomores Connor Hankel and Katelynn Horton perform their skit for the Theatre Arts Pantomime Project, Oct. 10. “We got to do any idea we wanted, but had to keep it simple,” Horton said. Photo by Mesa Ambrose

TOP: Junior Joel Mata, junior Katherine Kitsinger, Oct. 9. Photo by Mesa Ambrose BOTTOM: Sophomore Wren Wurschmidt, Theatre Pantomime Project, Oct. 8. Photo by Mesa Ambrose

Page Created by Mesa Ambrose


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In The Studio! TOP: Senior Mark Muench, KCHSTV, Oct. 10. Photo by Malorey Gafford MIDDLE: Senior Micheal Shumaker, KCHSTV, Oct. 10. Photo by Malorey Gafford BOTTOM: Outfits and ties waiting for use on the daily announcements show, KCHSTV, Oct. 10. Photo by Malorey Gafford

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TOP LEFT: Capital Student, 2013 Yearbook, Photo by Vicki Francis TOP RIGHT: Senior Micheal Shumaker records video announcements in the studio for KCHSTV on Oct. 10.“It’s kind of nerve wrecking and difficult being recorded but it can also be lots of fun. I also just like representing KCHSTV,” Shumaker said. Photo by Malorey Gafford

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Lights, Camera, Action! KCHSTV KCHSTV was recorded and edited in Video Production teacher Gabe Garcia’s Room 209. This is where all of the video announcements took place. Live streams for school sports were also a new part of KCHSTV. To be a part of video announcements students must have participated in Video 1 before moving on to Video 2 and 3. Every announcement was recorded the school day before they were aired. A large crew was needed to record and edit the videos that they made. Junior Hannah Stone talked about the different video classes for KCHSTV and why they are important. When talking about the Video 1, she said that they overall just go over the basics of editing. She also said that it’s really fun because they were able to do the live streams for games. “It’s a really fun class and I think anyone should join. It will really teach you a lot about editing,” Stone said. Next, Stone talked about the Video 2 class and its role in KTCHSTV. She said that in this class, things get a little more complex and stressful. She said that when making announcements they always have to double check and make sure things are in order. “Overall it’s a really great class but it can be very stressful and hectic at times,” Stone said. Stone went on to talk about the third and final class, Video 3. She said that out of all three classes, this is the class for the more advanced students. She also said that you really have to know your way around technology and editing to be in this class. “Most people in Video 3 are really just back-ups in case Video 2 messes up on something but they are still really talented and good at their work,” Stone said. In the future, Stone said that KCHSTV is planning on working with PBS and they are even working towards a “High School Emmy”. She also said that her teacher, Mr. Garcia is trying to get their class a “mobile studio”. “We have a couple of upcoming projects and some of them are really exciting. I do encourage people to join this class because it’s really exciting to be a part of the big projects we do and it’s a really fun experience,” Stone said. Sophomore Macenzie Krakowski said that one of the most important things about KCHSTV was the announcements that they do. She said that the way it works is they receive emails from teachers on upcoming events. Then they immediately get to work on making the videos for the announcements. All hands are on deck to make the videos. “It’s a really fun experience but it takes a lot of time and effort. You have to be professional and stay involved,” Krakowski said. Krakowski said that another important part to KCHSTV was the live streams at games. She said that her and her team were always there, ready to roll, before the game even started. She also talked about how they live stream the games on YouTube so anyone can watch it. “We always like to say that it’s sort of like “internet on the go”. Also just know if you join KCHSTV, you have to do at least two live streams,” Krakowski said. Krakowski went on to say that once you look past the hard stuff, the class is actually really fun. However, she does say that even when having fun they still have to stay professional. “It’s really fun to make skits and mess around but you have to know the “limit”. You have to stay on task,” Krakowski said. In the future, Krakowski said that they are planning on improving their equipment and that they are planning on doing a new video project that’ll take place in the Egyptian Theatre. “I can’t say any more about the project because it’s a surprise, but I think people should join KCHSTV because it’s a fun thing to be a part of. It’s also cool because not a lot of other schools have the opportunity to do this kind of stuff,” Krakowski said. Malorey Gafford

Page Created by Malorey Gafford

TOP: Junior Hannah Stone, sophomore Macenzie Krakowski, KCHSTV, Oct. 10. sPhoto by Malorey Gafford MIDDLE: Junior Hannah Stone, sophomore Macenzie Krakowski, junior Dante Marinelli, KCHSTV, Oct. 10. Photo by Malorey Gafford BOTTOM: Senior Patrick Taylor, KCHSTV, Oct. 10. Photo by by Malorey Gafford

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Top: Senior Alec Ward, Rocky Mountain game, 2012 yearbook. Photo by Cristina Catalan Top Right: Senior Richard Brarajas kicks a soccer-ball at N-Milwaukee park, Senior Night, Oct. 2, 2019. “When you have the chance, show no mercy,” Barajas said. Photo by Jonathan Lopez Left Top: Senior Branden Johanson, Boys Varsity Soccer Senior Night, Oct. 2. Photo by Jonathan Lopez Left Middle: Senior Patrick Moes, Boys Varsity Soccer Senior Night, Oct. 2. Photo by Jonathan Lopez Left Bottom: Senior Brennan Gaffney, Boys Varsity Soccer Senior Night, Oct. 2. Photo by Jonathan Lopez

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TOP: Senior Boys Varsity Soccer Senior Night, Oct. 2. Photo by Jonathan Lopez LEFT: Senior Venessa Corza, Boys Varsity Soccer Senior Night, Oct. 2. Photo by Jonathan Lopez


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Top: Senior Ryan Morris,Boys Varsity Soccer Senior Night, Oct. 2. Photo by Jonathan Lopez Middle: Senior Andrik Guerrero, Boys Varsity Soccer Senior Night, Oct. 2. Photo by Jonathan Lopez

Boys Varsity Soccer

Senior Patrick Moes said Senior Night was very emotional. It was his very last home game. “It was very hard to embrace the moment,” he said. Moes said that in the last minutes of the game, he was just reminiscing about the past games he had throughout his high school career. ”I was glad to have all of my friends with me,” Moes said. He said his team fought for him. He could tell when they started losing that every person was pushing their limits to get a goal back for him and the other seniors but unfortunately they never got the goal. “I am grateful that they fought for me,” he said. Moes believes in the future, that if they come together as a team they can accomplish anything “We have so much potential,” Moes said. Senior Richard Barajas said the team stuck together until the end even when they were losing, It was like a motto. “In a team sticking together will always be a team a small family no singling out,” Barajas said. Barajas said that his last year being on CHS soccer has been amazing. It’s sad knowing that he won’t come out next year to play again. he won’t see some of these team mates again, but there’s a high possibility he won’t ever get to play with them again. “Have fun, enjoy the moment, the longest as you can because that day will come, becoming a senior, as long as you’re playing, have fun,” he said. Barajas said scoring against Rocky on Senior Night felt amazing. It was a big event during Senior Night, scoring gave them a great feeling. “Scoring against them gives you adrenaline,” Barajas said. In the future, Barajas would like to be a pro soccer player, because he has a dream of becoming one, if he doesn’t make it here. He could go to Mexico. He has connections to make him a pro soccer player. They told him when high school is over he should come back and try out. “Always have a second plan but if you want it really bad, no matter what it’s never too late you’re still young,” Barajas said “Barajas learned a lot from every single player from the team & coaches,” he said. Jonathan Lopez

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Bottom: Senior Patrick Moes, Boys Varsity Soccer Senior Night, Oct. 2. Photo by Jonathan Lopez Left: Senior Boys Varsity Soccer Senior Night, Oct. 2. Photo by Jonathan Lopez

Page Created by Jonathan Lopez


Mountain Biking Club

TOP: Sophomore Kyleigh Cook, Jug Mountain Bike Race, Sept. 26. Photo by Jeannie Mickelson MIDDLE: 7th grader Katelyn Cook, Jug Mountain Bike Race, Sept. 26. Photo by Shawn Densmer

Students from Capital High School, who are on the Capital Mountain Biking Team, went to various mountains in Idaho to participate in mountain biking races. Sophomore Kyleigh Cook, admires the way that each grade level, from 6th to 12th grade, participates in the mountain biking club get along. “The way everyone Interacts with each other is really cool,” Cook said. She also commented on how helpful the coaches are especially with all the parents that volunteer. “Our coaches push us and do everything they can to help us improve,” she said. Cook likes going to practice even when its hard. “It is more fun when you do well and practice helps you do that,” she said. She is excited about being able to participate in Varsity her senior year. “I’m looking forward to the next few years with the team,” she said. Sophomore Caleb Mickelson thinks that time with the team and practices are lots of fun. “It’s just lots of fun,” Mickelson said. Mickelson really likes the coaches and how involved they are with the kids. “The coaches try to make each practice fun and challenging,” he said. He enjoys taking what would normally just be a hobby and making it a competition. “Competitive mountain biking is a lot more laid back compared to other sports,” he said. Mickelson thinks that the mountain biking team will grow and become more popular in the future. “ I will keep doing the mountain biking team till I graduate,” he said. Abigayle Ellsworth

LEFT: Junior Neil Scanlon and senior Natalie Woodard race during the Jug Mountain Race on Sept. 26. “I’m sad to call this my last race but can say that this year has been a lot of fun,” Woodard said. Photo by Jeannie Mickelson RIGHT: Senior Brennon Gaffney, Galena Mountain Bike Race, Sept. 12. Photo by Jeannie Mickelson

FALL

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Club Races

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TOP: Team directors Rob Dickinson, Michelle Densmer, Holly Cook, Mandy Cook, Kelli Ellsworth, Gelena Mountain Bike race, Sept. 12. Photo by Jeannie Mickelson MIDDLE: Sophomore Avery Gaffney, Jug Mountain Bike Race, Sept. 26. Photo by Shawn Densmer BOTTOM: Sophomore Elliot Dickinson, Galena Mountain Bike Race, Sept. 12. Photo by Jeannie Mickelson

FIRST row: Coach VanOverbeke, Rowan Probst, Elliot Dickinson, Mason VanOverbeke, Joshua Ellsworth, Naiya Cook, Body Packer, Avery Gaffney SECOND row: Colt Featherstone, Ava Ogden, Benjamin Woodard, Benjamin Borof, Zachary Aston, Simon Densmer, Coach Packer THIRD row: Coach Probst, Laci Gibson, Charles Thomas, Lily Gaffney, Maya Kadyan, Kyleigh Cook, Natalie Woodard, Katelyn Cook, Spencer Seelinger, Abigayle Ellsworth, Coach Woodard, Coach Woodard, Coach Borof FOURTH row: Coach Gaffney, Coach Aston, Coach Cook, Will Beauvais, Calvin Probst, Dante Marinelli, Caleb Mickelson, Coach Densmer, Coach Cook, Coach Ellsworth, Brennon Gaffney NOT PICTURED: Maggie Scanlon, Neil Scanlon Photo by Jeannie Mickelson

MIDDLE: Coach Woodard and Sophomore Caleb, Jug Mountain Race, Sept. 26. Photo by Jeannie Mickelson BOTTOM: 8th Grader Simon Densmer, Jug Mountain Race, Sept. 26. Photo by Shawn Densmer

Page Created by Abigayle Ellsworth

Mountain Biking

Profile for Capital High School Newspaper-Flight-Archive

2020 January Flight Magazine  

2020 January Flight Magazine