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FLEURIEU LIVING

‘The Kelsey’ display home – 47 Sun Orchid Drive, Hayborough. Open: Mon-Wed-Sat-Sun and public holidays 1:00 to 4:30. Telephone South Coast Constructions on 8552 4444.

T H E B E S T O F S O U T H A U S T R A L I A’ S F L E U R I E U P E N I N S U L A A N D K A N G A R O O I S L A N D

FLEURIEU LIVING MAGAZINE

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SPRING 2015

Beyond, the perfect balance of sustainability, life and luxury. Stages 1-7 SOLD OUT • Stage 8 on sale now ‘off the plan’ • Large allotments of 550-950 sqm from $160,000 SA’s most sustainable and energy efficient development • Phone 0412 620 022 or email adam@beyondtoday.com.au.

www.fleurieuliving.com.au

Lifestyle and sustainability.

AU $8.95 SPRING 2015

Aldinga Rising Hippest destination in the south • Barn1890 The rebuild • Young Farmers A new crop • Winemaker of the Year Peter Fraser • Big Win for Southern Fleurieu Aquatic centre McLaren Vale Region · Goolwa · Victor Harbor · Yankalilla · Kangaroo Island


South Australia’s premium lifestyle magazine with a focus on the Fleurieu. BUY IT · READ IT · BE IN THE KNOW. Available at newsagents, cafés, restaurants, cellar doors and Qantas Club Lounges. ‘The Kelsey’ display home – 47 Sun Orchid Drive, Hayboroug Open: Mon-WedSat-Sun and public h. holidays 1:00 to Telephone South 4:30. Coast Constructi ons on 8552 4444.

FLEURIEU LIVINGFLEURIEU LIVING FLEURIEU LIVING

‘The Kelsey’ display home – 47 Sun Orchid Drive, Hayborough. Open: Mon-Wed-Sat-Sun and public holidays 1:00 to 4:30. Telephone South Coast Constructions on 8552 4444. Drive, Hayborough. home – 47 Sun Orchid ‘The Kelsey’ display 1:00 to 4:30. t-Sun and public holidays 4444. Open: Mon-Wed-Sa Constructions on 8552 Telephone South Coast

T H E B E S T O F S O U T H A U S T R A L I A’ S F L E U R I E U P E N I N S U L A A N D K A N G A R O O I S T LH AN E DB E

O ISLAND AND KANGARO EU PENINSULA A L I A’ S F L E U R I SOUTH AUSTR THE BEST OF

– in a dream location

| beyondtoday.com.au

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ISLAND

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Build your dream home

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AND KANGA ROO

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Build your dream

www.fleurieuliving.com.au

inability. Lifestyle and susta

Build your dream home – in a dream location | beyondtoday.com.au | southcoastconstructions.com.au

S FLEURIEU PENINSULA

FLEURIEU LIVING MAGAZINE

FLEURIEU LIVING MAGAZINE

FLEURIEU LIVING MAGAZINE

Lifestyle and sust

Lifestyle and sustainability.

ST OF SOUT H AUSTRAL I A’

Award Winning Home E-Bay Beach House

ip McLaren Vale townsh Rediscovered

KI Kaleidoscopic discovery

AU $8.95 AUTUMN 2015

Self drive tour of

SPRING 2015

WINTER 2015

Beyond, the perfect balance garden AU $8.95 Stages evolving 1-7 SOLD An of sustainability, OUT • Stage 8 life and SA’s most sustainabl sale now ‘off the SPRINGon2015 plan’ • Large allotments luxury. e and energy efficient developme of 550-950 sqm nt • Phone 0412 from $160,000 620 022 or email adam@beyondtoday .com.au.

· Victor Harbor · Yankalilla Beyond, the perfect balance of sustainability, life and luxury. Vale Region · Goolwa McLaren

· Kangaroo Island

y, life and luxury. Stages 1-7 SOLD OUT • Stage 8 on sale now ‘off the plan’ • Large allotments of 550-950 sqm from $160,000 balance of sustainabilit sqm from $160,000 Beyond, the perfect allotments of 550-950 SA’s most sustainable .au. and energy efficient development • Phone 0412 620 022 or email adam@beyondtoday.com.au. ‘off the plan’ • Large adam@beyondtoday.com • Stage 8 on sale now 0412 620 022 or email Stages 1-7 SOLD OUT development • Phone and energy efficient SA’s most sustainable

AUTUMN 2015

Coriole

AU $8.95 WINTER 2015

Aldinga Rising Hippest destination in the south • Barn1890 The rebuild • Young Farmers A new crop • Winemaker of the Year Peter Fraser • Big Win for Southern Fleurieu Aquatic centre

Tonto Homestead

Treasure in the

valley

The Luxurious Wilds

of Kangaroo Island

McLaren Vale Region

McLaren Vale Region · Goolwa · Victor Harbor · Yankalilla · Kangaroo Island

· Goolwa · Victor

Oliver’s Taranga

Still going strong

Mavericks

in the Vale

of the Vale

Harbor · Yankalilla

· Kangaroo Island

So when you say Fleurieu Peninsula, which regions are you actually including? This has changed over the years, but currently it’s considered to be the areas defined by the following four council regions: City of Onkaparinga, Alexandrina Council, City of Victor Harbor and the District Council of Yankalilla. Although not technically part of the Fleurieu, we also include Kangaroo Island (just so they don’t feel left out).

With everything from whale watching to wine tasting, white sandy beaches to sumptuous food, contemporary art galleries and craft breweries, the Fleurieu Peninsula is Adelaide’s playground. Fleurieu Peninsula is magic on your doorstep. www.fleurieupeninsula.com.au

www.fleurieuliving.com.au

FLEURIEU LIVING

MAGAZINE


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Key Personnel Petra de Mooy Petra is a publisher, an interior designer, a furniture maker and a devotee of good food, good design and good stories. After three years of producing FLM, Petra is grateful to everyone who has helped make the publication a part of this great community. Jason Porter Jason has worked as a graphic designer and creative director both locally and overseas for more than twenty five years. When not in the office, he can usually be found in the garage tweaking some kind of rare hi-fi component. Leonie Porter-Nocella After spending decades as a university editor, paid by one, pimped out to others – refining papers from Health, and Wound Management to Wine Marketing and – well, everything. Here the aim is to impart/increase style while decreasing errors and ambiguities. Perscia Maung After years of moonlighting as a blues singer and keeping rather anti-social hours, Perscia now enjoys her day job at FLM. This allows her to not only walk her Great Dane on the beach, but to properly take in the region she so adores.

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Featured Contributors Corrina Wright Corrina Wright has wine – and 174 years of family grape growing – flowing through her veins. Described by WBM Magazine as a ‘legend in the making’ and by James Halliday as being part of a ‘remarkable dynasty’, she’s treading a slightly different path among the vines that her forefathers planted in the Seaview sub-region of McLaren Vale with the creation of Oliver’s Taranga with her cousin Brioni Oliver. Passionate about her home, her vocation and local community she has also served on numerous industry boards and her commitment to the wine industry in Australia was rewarded with a position on the inaugural ‘Future Leaders- Succession for the Australian Wine Industry’ program. Above all else Corrina is a down to earth, hardworking and talented winemaker with a true sense of what she has inherited and what this means for the future. This is her first official writing gig, so be gentle with her.

Nina Keith Nina Keath grew up in Willunga but spent her adult years in Melbourne. She was lured home a few years ago by twelve green acres and some ocean views. Her background is in social research and policy development around sustainable water management and climate change. She is interested in understanding what drives us to make change both as individuals and also across large institutions and sectors. She is currently enjoying growing two young children, a house and a garden.


Publisher Information Bree May South Australian Bree May is best known for being crowned champion of Channel Seven’s ‘My Kitchen Rules’. Since winning the title in 2014, Bree continues to express her love and passion for food and cooking through bespoke catering, freelance food writing and recipe development, guest appearances, live cooking demonstrations and event hosting. She also has her own food blog and website: www.foodaccordingtobree.com as well as a range of hand-crafted ketchups. Bree is a fun-loving and energetic mother of two young girls. She enjoys spending time with her family, writing, travelling, volunteering, recipe creation and of course, doing what she loves best: cooking!

PUBLISHER Fleurieu Living Magazine is published four times a year by Fleurieu Living Pty Ltd. ISSN 2200-4033 PUBLISHING EDITOR AND MANAGING DIRECTOR Petra de Mooy petra@fleurieuliving.com.au EDITOR Leonie Porter-Nocella leonie@fleurieuliving.com.au ADVERTISING SALES Perscia Maung perscia@fleurieuliving.com.au ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Cathy Phillips GRAPHIC DESIGN AND ART DIRECTION Jason Porter jason@fleurieuliving.com.au PRINTER Graphic Print Group

Other contributing writers and photographers Helen Edwards, Pip Forrester, Robert Geh, Gill Gordon-Smith, James Howe, Nicole Leedham, Heidi Linehan, Angela Lisman, Mike Lucas, Mark Piovesan, Jasper Savage, James Small and Richard Souter.

DISTRIBUTION Integrated Publication Solutions SUBSCRIPTIONS www.isubscribe.com.au ALL ENQUIRIES Petra de Mooy petra@fleurieuliving.com.au POSTAL ADDRESS PO Box 111, Aldinga, South Australia 5173. ONLINE fleurieuliving.com.au facebook.com/FleurieuLivingMagazine twitter.com/FleurieuLiving instagram.com/fleurieulivingmagazine/ COPYRIGHT All content copyright Fleurieu Living Magazine Pty Ltd unless otherwise stated. While Fleurieu Living Magazine takes every care to ensure the accuracy of information in this publication, the publisher accepts no liability for errors in editorial or advertising copy. The views of the contributors are not necessarily endorsed by Fleurieu Living Magazine. Printed on paper from well managed forests using environmentally friendly vegetable-based inks.

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Call 13 13 01, visit sealink.com.au or your travel agent

12 Warne Street Victor Harbor SA 5211 www.hastingsdesign.com.au admin@hastingsdesign.com.au 8552 5955 5


Contents

20 FEATURED VENUE: Rebuilding Barn1890. FRONT COVER PHOTO: by Robert Geh.

FEATURED ARTISTS: Warren Pickering and Anna Small of A Small Art Factory.

FOOD & WINE

RETAIL THERAPY

54 Cooks and Chefs: Mel Amos of The Fleurieu Kitchen and Chef for Hire: Todd Steele of Chef Steele.

64 What to buy. Where to buy it.

26 Taste the Season: Rhubarb.

MARKETS & EVENTS

72 Peter Fraser: James Halliday’s Winemaker of the Year 2016.

10 Get out there and enjoy: Diary Dates to keep you in the swing this spring.

66 la Terre: A dream realised in Willunga.

88 The Classic Adelaide Rally returns.

18 Wine Tastings ... with a COMPETITION!

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60


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36 TOWN FEATURE: Aldinga Rising.

GREEN FEATURE: Young Fleurieu Farmers.

30 FEATURED DEVELOPMENT: Aquatic Centre at Beyond.

BOOKS & WORDS

PENINSULA PEOPLE

BEING SOCIAL

28 Mike Lucas offers a Spring reading list.

42 Mark Piovesan records Fleurieu ‘shack-culture’.

46 Trailblazer: d’Arry of d’Arenberg Wines. 70 Gerard Maung: Merchant Seafarer. 50 Nina Keath walks us through her dream build.

LIVING GREEN

WEDDINGS

74 Onkaparinga Gorge: Nothing short of a geographical wonder.

78 11 April 2015: Shari and Charlee Dare.

82 FLM gets out to see who was at the following events: · Love Local Fleurieu at Chapel Hill The Retreat · FLM third anniversary: A Solstice Soiree at Penny’s Hill · Kangaroo Island Fungi at the National Wine Centre · Tatachilla Year 12 Formal · Cellar Treasures: Langhorne Creek · Penny’s Picks: SALA exhibition at Penny’s Hill.

PHOTOGRAPHY

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ACKNOWLEDGES

A special thanks to the advertising partners that have made a long term commitment to FLM. GOLD PARTNERS

SOUTH COAST

SILVER PARTNERS

BRONZE PARTNERS

HASTINGS DESIGN

Fleurieu Renewables COMMERCIAL AND DOMESTIC SOLAR SPECIALISTS

DESIGNER CABINETRY

DESIGN | MANUFACTURE | INSTALLATION

victor harbor real estate

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Welcome to FLM Spring!

Letters to the Editor

After our very cold and wet winter we couldn’t be happier to herald in the Spring season with a fantastic issue of FLM.

Hi Jason, I recently managed to get hold of a couple of copies of the edition with the article about me and I wanted to pass on my thanks. It will always be something that is close to my heart and I can look back on as a vivid memory of this time. I loved the look of it too so please pass on my thanks and best wishes to Jasper ... the photo of the insects makes it seem like you are amongst them and they go on forever ... and the mix of the shadows and real insects give it a spooky feel like some strange graveyard (I guess it is). It reminds me of a Larson cartoon but real. And I loved being able to read a couple of the labels.

We are particularly pleased with the superb front-cover image produced by Mr. Geh. Barn1890 is indeed a special place. Full of rustic charm and vintage vibe: what a fabulous place to hold a celebration. Hidden in a Willunga back paddock means that you get privacy and views, along with a good measure of rural charm. This issue we also welcome some new writers. First we have legend-in-the-making, Corrina Wright of Oliver’s Taranga. Corrina meets up with d’Arry Osborn of d’Arenberg Wines to talk about ‘community’, his seventy-plus vintages ... and the building of an international brand. Adelaide blogger, Helen Woods from Recycled Interiors, looks into the beautiful Barn1890, while MKR 2014 winner, Bree May, bonds with the talented Mel Amos of The Fleurieu Kitchen. Owner/builder Nina Keath walks us through her dream build. You can check out this well-hewn home on page 50. Worth every ounce of love, sweat and tears! Nicole Leedham of Black Coffee Communication reveals the Love, Grunt and Sweat of Anna Small and Warren Pickering’s metal art at A Small Art Factory. Mark Piovesan combed the Fleurieu to find whatever vestiges still remain of the once-plenteous seaside beach shacks and ‘shack-culture’. Newcomers to Australia, Sandrine and Tarik Marco talk to Pip Forrester about how fate brought them to the doorstep of ‘for sale’ business, La Terre in Willunga ... just as they were thinking of opening a restaurant in the countryside. We are also really excited to be revealing some of the plans and artists’ impressions of the amazing, new Aquatic Centre being built at Hayborough. Please read on ... The FLM Team.

FYI, I recently sent one genus of fly (Anabarynchus) from my collection to the CSIRO with the upshot that we are about to write a manuscript describing five new species from the island! There is another one too but we need more material to describe it.  Thanks again and best wishes, Richard Glatz. Hello FLM, We just wanted to thank you for producing such a fabulous magazine. It never ceases to amaze with each issue revealing another hidden wonder in the Fleurieu. We are ‘poms’ and relatively new to South Australia and feel so lucky to live in such a beautiful part of the world. A busy Western Suburbs life means we can’t get down to the Fleurieu as much as we would like. FLM brings it that little bit closer and inspires us to get there more often. It has become our goal to make the Fleurieu our permanent home one day!  Kind regards, Simon & Sharon Kennerdale. iSubscribe review: Great magazine, highlights a wonderful area in South Australia – The Fleurieu Peninsula. Not being born or bred in South Australia I didn’t have the good fortune of spending my school holidays camping, fishing, swimming, hiking, and eating my way around the ‘Peninsula’. This magazine does a great job of introducing you to areas of great interest and wonderful natural beauty. Pointing out places off (and on) the beaten track you might not normally visit or see. Learn the local history and try out the suggested cafes and restaurants, markets, wineries, beaches, galleries, look for the architecture old and new, all within a stone’s throw from Adelaide, and you won’t be disappointed. A good read! James.

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MARKETS & EVENTS

Spring Diary Dates LOCAL MARKETS: Aldinga, McLaren Vale and Willunga

Market of Earthly Delights Held from 3pm at the Old School Building, Torrens Road, Victor Harbor on the first Sunday of each month. Bring and swap your surplus produce with other like-minded growers. Think home-grown fruit, vegetables, seedlings, flowers, honey, sauces, recipes, kindling, compost and more!

Aldinga Bay Art, Craft and Produce Market On the 4th Sunday of every month at the Aldinga Institute Show Hall from 8 - 1. Arts and crafts from local artisans, as well as fresh local produce.

COUNTRY MARKETS:

Willunga Farmers’ Market In the Willunga Town Square every Saturday from 8 - 12.30. You must go just for the Summer Fruits! Cherries, peaches, nectarines, blueberries – the freshest you’ll find! Don’t forget to buy a membership and receive discounts on all the fabulous local food!

Kangaroo Island Farmers’ and Community Markets Lloyd Collins Reserve by the beach at Penneshaw – first Sunday of the month from 9.30 - 1.00 – with Kangaroo Island’s top food producers selling a range of fresh local produce in a great village atmosphere. For special SeaLink Ferry fares, visit sealink.com.au

Willunga Quarry Market Adjacent to the Willunga Oval, every 2nd Saturday of each month, rain or shine! Come and browse an eclectic mix of everything, ranging from second hand tools to plants to craft. Always something new to see. 

Meadows Country Market Meadows Community Hall on the second Sunday of the month from 9.00 - 3.00. Local produce, crafts, collectibles, plants and bric-abrac. A true country market.

Willunga Artisans’ Market In the Willunga Show Hall (opposite the Willunga Farmers’ Market) on the second Saturday of each month. Local art and craft, with a little bit of something for everyone. A great place to buy a unique handmade gift! The Vale Market Held from 9am to 1pm at the McLaren Vale & Fleurieu Visitor Information Centre on the 1st and 3rd Sunday of each month. The market features locally-made produce and products, wine, art and craft as well as hand-made souvenirs. The Vale Market is family friendly and features buskers and local acts.

Goolwa, Port Elliot and Victor Harbor Goolwa Wharf Market The 1st and 3rd Sunday of every month from 9 - 3.30. With around 80 stalls there is a myriad of goods on offer. Bric-a-brac, collectibles, plants, books both new and old, and hand-crafted goods. Port Elliot Market At Lakala Reserve Port Elliot, on the 1st and 3rd Saturday of each month. A typical country market with plenty of fresh local produce on offer as well as a good mix of other goods, such as bric-a-brac, books, fishing gear – even a $2 stall! There is sure to be something for everyone. Victor Farmers’ Market At the Grosvenor Gardens, Victor Harbor every Saturday morning from 8 - 12.30. Over 32 stalls, with locally caught seafood, organic vegetables, seasonal fruit, local honey, mushrooms, fresh flowers, Fleurieu regional wines and much more. Well worth the visit. 10

Myponga Markets In the old Myponga Cheese Factory every Saturday, Sunday, and public holiday from 10 - 4. Enjoy browsing over 100 stalls offering produce, books, toys, Balinese imports, musical instruments, vintage collectibles and much more. Strathalbyn Markets In Lions Park, South Terrace, Strathalbyn. On the 3rd Sunday of the month from 8 - 2. Bric-a-brac, produce, coffee, pies, apples, plants, soaps, jewellery and much more in wonderfully historic Strathalbyn. Yankalilla Market In the Agricultural Hall, Main South Road, Yankalilla on the 3rd Saturday of each month. Craft and produce market featuring goods from the local area. You’ll be surprised at what you may find!


Above: Head down to the Western Fleurieu for the Lock In Lunch at Leonards Mill and watch the Classic Adelaide Rally as it swings through Second Valley.

FESTIVALS AND EVENTS: SEPTEMBER Wirrina Bluegrass Festival Bluegrass and acoustic music lovers will converge on the picturesque Wirrina Resort for the Wirrina Bluegrass & Acoustic Roots Festival. Bring your instruments and voices, warm your soul with great music and share with the community the brilliance this type of music can create. Where: Wirrina Resort & Conference Centre, Wirrina Cove When: 4th to 6th of September Cost: Adult Weekend Pass - $65 Youth (Under 18) - $30 wirrinabluegrass.com Child (Under 12) - FREE Aldinga Arts Eco Vilage Sustainable House Day Explore the Eco Village on Sustainable House Day and have the rare opportunity to tour some of the seven star energy rated homes. Talk to the owners who have worked on the design and build of these homes. Enjoy a stroll around the lovely wetlands, and gardens. Stop by the soup kitchen and have a soup or a coffee and cake. Where: Aldinga Arts Eco Village When: September 13th, from 10 am – 4 pm All welcome. Rock ’n’ Roll Festival The Rock ’n’ Roll Festival brings together a range of local Rock ’n’ Roll bands and a large display of classic cars. Check out the cars, enjoy the good vibes and a dance or two and feel free to bring the kids. Organised by the Historic Motor Vehicles Club of Victor Harbor. Where: Warland Reserve, Victor Harbor When: 19th and 20th of September  Cost: Free!

OCTOBER A Sparkling Symphony in the Vale As part of the 20th Anniversary Celebrations of the Southern Theatre and Arts Supporters (STARS) will be presenting the Adelaide Symphony Orchestra playing Bach, Beethoven and Strauss. Where: Tatachilla Lutheran College When: October the 3rd at 7 pm Cost: $45 includes a welcome drink. Tickets at www.stars.org.au – or at the McLaren Vale and Fleurieu Visitors Information Centre.

Yankalilla Show The 133rd Annual Yankalilla, Rapid Bay and Myponga Agricultural and Horticultural Society Incorporated Show will be held on the Saturday of the October long weekend. Highlights are expected to include an animal nursery, wine tasting and sales, with main stage entertainment. Where: Yankalilla Show Grounds When: October the 3rd Kangaroo Island Art Feast Here is a wonderful opportunity to experience the best of Kangaroo Island’s art and cuisine, as well as enjoying some great local music. Over 25 venues across the Island will be exhibiting art of every kind, while also selling local food, wine, ciders and spirits. Kangaroo Island truly comes alive for the October long weekend. It’s certainly a great time to visit! Where: at over 25 venues across the Island When: October the 2nd to the 5th Cost: Free entry to venues and exhibitions. More info: kangarooislandartfeast.org.au Fleurieu Friday Lock-in Lunch Leonards Mill is making the most of the road closure for the Classic Adelaide Rally Fleurieu leg by transforming their grounds into a village green. Join them for a long, lazy lunch on the deck as the Rally drives past to finish at Lady Bay. Where: Leonards Mill, Main South Road, Second Valley When: Friday the 16th of October. Road closure from 1pm to 4pm Guests must arrive before 12.30 pm Cost: $65 per person for food and entertainment (limited to 150 tickets) www.leonardsmill.com Fleurieu Folk Festival The Fleurieu Folk festival held in historic Willunga presents a weekend of music concerts and sessions, dance, workshops, bush poets, children’s entertainment, stalls and more. Discover your own talent at one of the many workshops, or just relax and enjoy the various local and interstate performers.  Where: Willunga  When: 23rd to the 25th of October  www.fleurieufolkfestival.com.au Serafino Melbourne Cup Charity Luncheon Watch the Melbourne Cup live on the big screen with beautiful Serafino food and wine while supporting the Asthma Foundation of SA. Where: Serafino Wines Cost $95 www.serafinnowines.com.au >

Image at left: The fashions on the field are fabulous at the Langhorne Creek Vignerons’ Race Day – 22nd November, 2015. 11


MARKETS & EVENTS

FESTIVALS AND EVENTS continued: Lake Breeze Picnic – Langhorne Creek Pack your deck chairs for a relaxed event on the lawns of Lake Breeze Wines. Activities for kids, live music and delicious food and wine. Where: Lake Breeze Wines Cellar Door – Langhorne Creek When: October the 25th www.lakebreeze.com.au

NOVEMBER Langhorne Creek Out of the Barrel Be the first to try some of the region’s newest releases, take a sneak peek of pre-release wines, or even try wines straight from the barrel! Broaden your wine knowledge with some ‘Out of the Barrel’ experiences on offer over the weekend. Where: Cellar doors throughout Langhorne Creek When: Saturday November 7th and Sunday November the 8th Cost: Free entry www.langhornecreek.com for more information Yankalilla Crusie Weekend Head to the Western Fleurieu for the Yankalilla Cruise with the main event: Sunday on the oval, featuring over 600 classic and hot rod cars, rock and roll. Where: Yankalilla Oval When: November the 13th to the 15th www.yankalillacruise.com Gorgeous Festival Gorgeous Festival consists of boutique music, food and wine; all to celebrate the flavours and creativity of our beautiful region. Where: Penny’s Hill, McLaren Vale When: Friday November the 27th and Saturday November the 28th Cost: check website for details – www.gorgeousfestival.com.au

Below: Light As Air. Eucalyptus diversifolia, Coastal White Mallee. Oil & alkyd on canvas. Image size: 91.5 W x 61cm D Artwork by Scott Hartshorne. Scott’s work (in addition to many others’) will be on show during Kangaroo Island Art Feast in October.

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Langhorne Creek Vignerons’ Race Day One of the most popular Sunday race days on the South Australian calendar, the Langhorne Creek Vignerons’ Day is more than just a horse race. Celebrating the best that the local region has to offer in the way of food and wine, the day is one the whole family can enjoy, taking in the atmosphere and excitement of the picturesque Strathalbyn Racecourse. Where: Strathalbyn Racecourse When: Sunday 22nd of November Time: Gates open 9:30am Cost: General Admission $20, with other packages available

ONGOING: Red Poles - Live Music Where: 190 McMurtrie Road, McLaren Vale. When: Every Sunday 12:30 - 3:30 Woodstock Wine Estate - Wood Oven Pizza Nights with Live Entertainment Where: Woodstock Wine Estate When: Every Friday Night Time: 6pm onwards Cost: $35 for adults and $20 for kids Join us for a little starter, selection of wood oven pizzas and something sweet to finish. Decant Each month Decant will feature a McLaren Vale winery, Fleurieu beer and fresh regional food. Come for after-work drinks and wind down from the week. Where: McLaren Vale Visitor Information Centre When: Last Friday of every month Time: 5-8 Cost: varies.


Feasting, feasting & feasting some more. Check out what Chef Steele is whipping up at our upcoming events. oliverstaranga.com/events Our girls had a bit of fun dressing up in this years national 'Game of Rhones' Forgive us Khaleesi.

Mr James Halliday toasts our M53 Shiraz a spectacular 96 points! Cheers James.

246 Seaview Road, McLaren Vale SA oliverstaranga.com | 08 8323 8498 /OliversTaranga /OliversTaranga /oliverstaranga


Nina Keith meets the new crop of

Young Fleurieu Farmers Photographs by Jasper Savage.


Previous page: Dirty little carrots. Above: Jay Kimber left, with step-brother Alex Steimanis at right.

As a child, if you had asked me to draw a farmer I probably would have depicted a middle-aged man in an Akubra hat, working a large, remote, rural property. And while I can’t vouch for the hat, it turns out that the other parts are pretty close to the truth. Farmers in Australia are generally men, they’re getting older (late fifties at last count), their farms are getting bigger and their range of produce is narrowing. However, here on the Fleurieu Peninsula, a growing band of farmers is well and truly bucking this trend. They’re young, predominantly women, and farming a diverse range of crops at a small, local scale. As a satisfied and fortunate customer of these young farmers, I was intrigued to understand what is inspiring this radical departure from the norm. While there are many drivers, part of the explanation can be traced to an innovative initiative of the Willunga Farmers Market – The Young Farmers’ Scholarship. Assistant Market manager, Billy Doecke, explains that many stallholders were approaching retirement and without a new generation of young farmers to fill their shoes the market faced a very real risk of empty stalls. More broadly, the

market managers were keen to increase the agricultural resilience of the already successful wine region by diversifying into areas such as market gardening, orchards and animal husbandry. The scholarship provides young farmers with $7,000 for start-up costs, $3,000 for mentors, and a stall at the market with six months free. It also gives a broad base of community support, which cannot be overvalued. Into its second year, with the call for 2016 Scholarship applications to be launched in October, the scholarship has already paid real dividends. Meet, for example, Jay Kimber (27), the co-winner of the inaugural Young Farmers’ Scholarship in 2014. With an unlikely background for a farmer, Jay explains, ‘I grew up in the suburbs, literally thinking that food came from the supermarket. We didn’t grow food in the backyard. We were a McDonalds and Pepsi drinking strict Christian family. I didn’t know much about the world.’ However, her world exploded in a good way when the family moved to Willunga and she attended a local school with a large vegetable garden. Despite being too old for gardening classes she was completely intrigued. Desperate to grow something herself, she cultivated a covert veggie garden over the back fence of the school; ‘I was a little renegade gardener!’ Ten years on, Jay has evolved from guerrilla gardener to full-time farmer with a loyal customer base at The Garden Farmers stall, where she does a roaring trade in her signature Green Smoothies and the fresh veggies grown on her lush one-acre farm. > 15


Top: Kate Washington (left) and Claudia Peoples (right). Above: Simply delicious greens.

Jay’s co-winner, step-brother Alex Steimanis (22), has his own thriving Clean Slate Produce stall, supplied by his abundant market-garden on Aldinga Road, Willunga. Assistant Market Manager, Billy, likes to joke that they got two-for-the-price-of-one when they awarded Jay and Alex. And the investment has clearly paid off for all involved: including us, the community, enjoying their outstanding produce. The 2015 scholarship winner is Kate Washington (32), who farms two acres on Sand Road, McLaren Vale. Her early career was spent developing agricultural policy for the federal government, giving her a unique insight into the limitations of the current broadscale approach to farming. Winning the scholarship was critical for enabling her to take the leap and put her ideas about sustainable agriculture into practice. Kate’s days, once spent writing policy at a desk, are now enjoyed out in the elements growing what she markets as Dirty Little Carrots, along with many other deliciously dirty baby heirloom veggies, which she will soon be selling from her stall at the Willunga Farmers Market.

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While the scholarship has been an important catalyst, there seem to be other forces at play, because young farmers are popping up like mushrooms all over the Fleurieu Peninsula. Take, for example, the new farming collective at the Aldinga Arts Eco Village. Calling themselves The Village Greens of Willunga Creek, Claudia Peoples (39), Nat Wiseman (30), Ellie Firns (41) and Lucy Chan (35) have found a creative way of fulfilling their farming aspirations. Using Crowdsourcing, they managed to raise $18,000 to help fund their start-up costs and now supply fresh, organic veggies from a stall at the Eco Village Car Park between 3.30-5.30pm on Fridays or online at www.villagegreens.com.au/orders. Farming, it seems, is undergoing something of a renaissance. Indeed, it turns out that just like cooking, farming has become fashionable! Who knew? Communities are seeking more connection with their food. They want to know where it comes from (no, not the supermarket) and who grew it; that it’s fresh; and increasingly, that it was grown free of pesticides and practices that damage us and the environment. Alex Steimanis tells me that he regularly has customers taking selfies with his bunches of Kale, which they proudly post on


Top: Nat Wiseman (left) and Lucy Chan (right). Above: The greenhouse at Bickleigh Vale Nursery is packed with goodness.

social-media. And I have seen t-shirts saying Farming is the new Rock and Roll. Well, if that’s the case, these young farmers are definitely the rock-stars. Each has thought deeply about the ways in which farming can make a meaningful contribution to society. These ridiculously well-read farmers approach their growing from a profound philosophical base that prioritises keeping their practices small, local and simple. Their farming methods are gentle, using innovative hand-tools and people power. Instead of seeing each other as competition, they have chosen to work collaboratively, meeting regularly as a small group to share ideas, inspiration and a laugh. They see farming as being about much more than just growing plants. For them, it’s also about growing healthy environments, communities and culture. And these young farmers are fortunate to be building on a farming culture that already has strong, healthy roots. They have been wholeheartedly embraced by members of the local farming, wine and business sectors, who have provided generous and highly valuable mentoring – along with access to land, tools and practical support. As Kate says: ‘Their presence and constant input in our

lives has been so important. They really are our elders.’ Special mention must go to Diana Bickford from Bickleigh Vale Nursery at McLaren Flat and Graeme and Annemarie Brookman from the Food Forest in Gawler, who, through their wisdom and generosity have given these young farmers the confidence to have a go. This strong local farming culture is enhanced by a broader network of growers in SA called the Local Gro Co who meet regularly for working bees and workshops to share knowledge, companionship and labour. With a current membership base of over two-hundred, and growing, the momentum behind small-scale, sustainable farming is certainly on the up. From this perspective it seems that the Willunga Farmers’ Market can rest assured that they will have full stalls for many years to come. But do you know the best part about it all for me? Now when I ask my six year old daughter to describe a farmer, she can tell me that the farmer is a young, articulate woman with a small farm just around the corner from where we live. The farmer grows a delicious range of organic, seasonal vegetables and my daughter can buy them directly from her at the market every week. And we can visit the farm any time we like! 17


Tastings Wine reviews by Richard Souter. 2012 Rusticana Durif Rusticana Wines cellar door is located on the flood plains of Langhorne Creek, next door to Newman’s horseradish farm – a surprising match that provides wines with a kick! Get a bird’s eye view over vineyards, fields of horseradish and Red Gum Swamp. Bring your own picnic and enjoy a fantastic glass of wine out on the deck while enjoying the picturesque views. Or just simply pop in to taste the wines and other products, including horseradish mustard, betroot dip, beetroot, crushed garlic, chilligarlic and crushed ginger. ‘Rusticana’ is named in tribute to the botanical name for horseradish (Amoracia Rusticana). Try the interesting blends of Rusticana wines. These vary from vintage to vintage and you will be pleasantly surprised. Open from 10am to 5pm – 7 days a week. The 2012 Rusticana Durif has had 20 months in a combination of French, American and Hungarian Oak. Dense, impenetrable purple, saturated with blackberry, liquorice and prune fruit. Rich and full of flavour, with fine tannins and length on the palate. Allow this wine time to breathe before serving and then choose to sip and savor; or pair it with a hearty stew or Rogan Josh. Drink now or cellar for up to 10 years. No wonder the Rusticana Durif has a cult following. Enjoy! www.rusticanawines.com.au Primo Estate La Biondina Colombard 2015 The Primo Estate story is an Australian journey with an Italian twist. With a passion for winemaking and a readiness to push a few boundaries, Joe Grilli has crafted a stable of very personal wines. The stunning Primo Estate cellar door in McLaren Vale has become a regional icon, combining ultra-modern design and architecture with Italian style. Here you can treat yourself to a sit-down JOSEPH

Experience tasting of ultra-premium JOSEPH wines paired with local bread, JOSEPH Extra Virgin Olive Oil and Italian Cheese. Weekend bookings are essential for the JOSEPH Experience. Cellar Door Sales – Open 7 days 11am – 4pm. The 2015 Primo Estate La Biondina Colombard has a bouquet of light, fresh passionfruit and citrus notes. The mouth-wateringly lively, exuberantly fruity palate with juicy passionfruit, melon and citrus flavours is the taste of summer all year round. There are many food matches for La Biondina. Whether it’s spicy Asian flavours or a simple salad, La Biondina is fine company. www.primoestate.com.au Sunset Wines Sparkling Shiraz Sunset Winery is an internationally renowned boutique winery near Penneshaw on Kangaroo Island. It has become a must see, must do destination for self-drive tourists to the island. The cellar door has been sited to capture the panoramic sea and coastal views overlooking the waters of Eastern Cove and beyond. Complimentary wine tastings await; or go for a light lunch featuring local and regional produce served on the Savoury Platter or the Dukkah Platter. And for the those with a sweet tooth, cappuccino and a range of cake options to go with a glass of wine on the deck are also available; so whatever your preference, take the time to enjoy the experience. The Sunset Sparkling Shiraz has intense juicy fruit flavours of raspberries and sweet strawberries, blackberries and a hint of spice. It has a vibrant palate with good balance of fruit sweetness and a fine elegant finish that is not too sweet. Enjoy by itself or with smoked bacon and eggs. But do yourself a favour and make sure you save a couple for the Christmas pudding www.sunset-wines.com.au

Enter and Win! Enter our new competition and you can win a case of 2012 Rusticana Durif or a JOSEPH Experience voucher for two.

Simply go online to fleurieuliving.com.au/flm/winwine and fill in your details. Competition closes 5 pm on November 30 and is open to Australian residents only. Must be over 18 years of age. Winners will be contacted via mobile phone and announced on our Facebook page: Facebook.com/FleurieuLivingMagazine. Good luck!


Rebuilding

Barn1890 Story by Helen Edwards.


Previous page: The views from around the property are stunning snippets of all we love about where we live: vineyards, the sea, the hills, and a pristine rural landscape. Above: The rustic aesthetic and beauty of the old stone walls offset by lovely honey colored timber window frames. Photographs by Heidi Linehan.

You can live somewhere forever yet never really see it. Discovering the hidden gems of your own region reinvigorates your passion and reminds you why you settled there in the first place. The people who make up a community are the ones who share its stories – and the act of rebuilding Barn1890 was certainly a labour of local love for Colin Elmer and his partner Lee Widdison. One of my favorite parts of the drive from Adelaide to the Fleurieu Peninsula is just past Sellicks Hill. It is one of our state’s most beautiful vistas. The way the road starts to open up ... and suddenly you are hit with the cliffs and a wide expanse of ocean on one side, with the rolling green hills on the other. It takes your breath away. Just before you get to this point, turn left towards the foothills of Willunga, and you will be transported instantly into a serene

countryside vignette. Green hills and vines stretch out as far as your eye can see, with white clouds and the sparkling sea at your back. You are instantaneously relaxed and excited by the view, and feel as though you are miles away from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. It is down one of these country roads that you will discover the charming property of Colin Elmer and Lee Widdison, jam-packed full of South Australian history and stories. Colin bought the property in 1992 and lived there himself until he travelled overseas in the mid-1990s. It now houses the Sea and Vines Cottage Bed and Breakfast retreat, and the newly renovated Barn1890. Colin is a man of many talents: a skilled musician who has lectured for over twenty years at Adelaide University, and travelled overseas as part of the musical, Wicked. He is full of passion for his local area and the stories it tells. Listening to him speak about the resurrection of the barn captures your imagination and inspires you to want to know more about the history of the buildings, set as they are in an area once called McRae country after the pioneering family who built the cottage and owned the land for many years. > 21


Above: The north side of the barn captures fantastic natural light dappled by the lovely old trees of the surrounding property. Photograph by Heidi Linehan. Next page: The gorgeous vintage interiors are filled with character, texture and charm, complete with a raised bar area and large indoor fireplace. Photograph by Rob Geh.

As you enter the long driveway and glance across to the Barn, it is hard not to be infected by the place, with its lofty stone and iron building to your left, set in a lush natural bush garden. In 1997, after some encouragement from friends, Colin and Lee undertook extensive renovations to the cottage and turned it into the Sea and Vines Cottage Bed and Breakfast, a retreat where people could get away from everything and indulge in the peace and quiet of the local area. Colin and Lee have now brought their historic stone barn back to life, and in the process created a communal space to complete the picture of the original property. Renovating both buildings was a process of hard work and good planning, with a strong adherence to the heritage aspects of the region and a passion for vintage, recycling and preservation of place and time. The charming two-bedroom cottage oozes history and warmth – from its divine large scale local-slate floors, which are spectacularly beautiful and discovered underneath 1970s shag-pile carpet, to the original deep window sills, and the names of the nine McRae children etched into the bricks outside – which Colin will show you with great delight. These touches connect you to the immense importance of preserving buildings like this across South Australia and sharing them with the rest of the world. The front garden of the cottage and surrounding views will make you fall even more in love as you sit down in a wicker chair with a hot cup of tea, and look across the neighbouring vines and lush cottage garden, right down to the sea. You are instantly brought to a state of peace and relaxation, and may never want to leave. The design of the B&B is simple and reflects the history of the cottage, with a modest but functional kitchen, beautifully renovated bathroom complete with a claw-foot bath, and all the trimmings you would expect in this type of accommodation. The property consists of three acres of stunning natural bush and orchards. The large stone barn, originally used for horses by the McRae family – and later 22

Renovating both buildings was a process of hard work and good planning, with a strong adherence to the heritage aspects of the region and a passion for vintage, recycling and preservation of place and time. to house sheep – collapsed in 1994 due to damage of the stone walls. It sat there for over a decade due to lack of time or funds to renovate. A large gum tree near the Barn has played host to local weddings styled by Lee, and there are numerous fruit, olive and nut trees, along with plentiful native bush. There is a sense of being detached from people or civilisation, making it the perfect retreat; yet the tourist hot spots of the region are just a hop skip and a jump away. Despite no real plans for the reconstruction of the barn, the couple knew that one day they would restore it back to its former glory. After working overseas in 2011, Colin returned with enough funds to start the renovations. They spent five years gradually rebuilding with local stone, which they eventually ran out of and used the clever concept of ‘up-cycling’ materials from the original property, using large iron sheets across the front of the building. There are also quirky touches, such as old sheep troughs and iron wheels dotted around the place, which create a blend of rustic vintage and give a lovely nod to the original use of the barn. The project was supported by local council through some small heritage grants, enabling Colin and Lee to complete the building, and to hold their own wedding there in November 2014. This was an important part of the journey as a couple and as business people, as they both have personal passions for vintage and recycling. >


Top left: The barn before it was lovingly restored. Above left: The large indoor fireplace is a welcome feature on chilly evenings. Photograph by Heidi Linehan. Above right: The owners have collected many vintage items to add that old world character to the spaces. Photograph by Heidi Linehan.

Lee operates a vintage wedding hire and styling business (Vintage Exchange) and Colin has a ‘thing’ for Kombi Vans, turning his hand at renovating them and hiring them out for weddings (Kombi Cruise). Lee has styled Barn1890 beautifully, with natural flair, blending upcycled rustic and quaint vintage pieces to create a perfect setting for a range of events. The light-fall in the Barn provides the perfect backdrop and creates softness against the stone walls and polished concrete floors. When you first walk in there you can really feel the love that has gone into this unique local restoration. The main driver behind the rebuild was simply to get this piece of history back up and enable it to stand for another hundred years, giving it new life and purpose while completing the picture of this historic property. All plans were drawn up and completed to fit with the strict heritage guidelines of council. Just for fun, Lee decided to document their journey on a Facebook page, also to share the process to inspire other people. But even online, the rustic aesthetic and beauty of the place captured people’s hearts and imagination and even while still building they began to get requests from followers about holding their own wedding and events there! And so began the journey of this collapsed horse-barn to the delightful vintage-styled space it is today. 24

The Barn has a large open space downstairs with that beautiful natural light, stone, polished concrete floors, and a mezzanine at either end. A bar has been built with up-cycled materials and there is a small working kitchen. The sheltered outdoor area is to be turned into an extensive open-air seating space. The atmosphere inside is warm and inviting, and draws you in to linger for a while. Colin is keen to encourage ‘value added’ commercial activities that support local primary production – such as using local food and catering businesses, local produce, and the promotion of local business and cultural tourism and events – like food and wine tastings, product launches, workshops, weddings and parties, exhibitions and musical performances. For now, Colin and Lee are delighted and excited just to be able to stand and look at this beautiful building and feel proud of their achievements. Once you visit you will also fall under the spell of this place, built by hand over a century ago, and rebuilt again by hand through the passion and determination of this local couple; you will stand alongside them in their vision to once again allow this beautiful Barn to have a working life among the vines … with that pretty view down to the sea.


Above: The large scale locally quarried slate tiles are lovley in the very solidly built Sea and Vines Cottage. Below: The property boasts a lovely garden, with large mature trees, a pond – and terrific views of the sea and vines. Photographs by Heidi Linehan.

The main driver behind the rebuild was simply to get this piece of history back up and enable it to stand for another hundred years, giving it new life and purpose while completing the picture of this historic property.

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Photo Compliments of K. Waller for the Willunga Farmers Market.

TASTE THE SEASON:

Rhubarb

(or, if you prefer, a combination of the Ancient Greek rha and barbarum) Story by Leonie Porter-Nocella. Rhubarb qualifies for Taste the Season since it is usually harvested in spring – but it can also be grown in hothouses, which will produce a brighter red, more tender and sweeter-tasting stem than outdoor rhubarb will ... and of course it also lengthens the season. While rhubarb has been used for medicinal purposes by the Chinese for thousands of years, commerce in it did not become securely established until Islamic times. During Islamic times, it was imported along the Silk Road, and was considered extremely valuable. In traditional Chinese medicine, rhubarb roots have been used as a laxative for several millennia. Rhubarb also appears in medieval Arabic and European prescriptions. It was one of the first Chinese medicines to be imported to the West from China. Rhubarb is grown primarily for its fleshy stalks, technically known as petioles. The use of rhubarb stems as food is a relatively recent innovation. This usage was first recorded in 17th-century England after affordable sugar became available to common people, since rhubarb’s characteristic tartness really needs sugar to modify the taste. The colour of rhubarb stalks can vary from the commonly associated crimson red, through speckled light pink, to simply light green.

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Creamy Meringues with Vanilla-spiked Rhubarb vanilla bean, split 1/2 cup caster sugar 1 bunch (12 stalks) rhubarb, trimmed, cut into 8cm lengths 1/2 cup double cream Meringues 2 egg whites 1/2 cup caster sugar Method Preheat oven to 150°C/130°C fan-forced. Line a large baking tray with baking paper. Mark out four 9cm circles, 5cm apart, on paper. Using an electric mixer, beat egg-whites until stiff peaks form. Gradually add sugar, beating well after each addition. Beat for four minutes or until sugar has dissolved. Place mixture in a piping bag fitted with a 1cm plain nozzle. Pipe mixture onto paper circles to create nest shapes. Bake for 20 minutes or until firm. Turn off oven. Cool in oven with door slightly ajar. Using a sharp knife, scrape seeds from vanilla bean. Place seeds, bean, sugar and 1 cup warm water in a frying pan over medium heat. Cook, stirring, for 2 minutes or until sugar has dissolved. Bring to the boil. Reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer for 3 minutes or until slightly thickened. Add half the rhubarb. Simmer for 6 minutes, or until rhubarb is tender but holds its shape, turning halfway through cooking. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to a plate. Repeat with remaining rhubarb. Bring vanilla mixture to the boil. Simmer for 2 minutes or until thickened. Transfer to a bowl. Remove vanilla bean. Set aside to cool. Place meringues on plates. Divide whipped cream between meringues. Top with rhubarb. Drizzle with vanilla mixture. Serve.


BOOKS & WORDS

Book Reviews by Mike Lucas.

Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee

Published by Penguin Random House UK ISBN 9781785150289 $45.00 How often does a book reviewer get a chance to lay down a paragraph on a work of fiction written over fifty years ago by one of the most widely studied authors in the history of English literature? Turning the pages there is a distinct sensation of travelling back in time, of viewing a secret that has remained hidden. This is not connected to the story itself; instead, it is a feeling derived from a lost narrative style and the mood that would be so challenging to capture in a novel written today. This is the original novel by Harper Lee, written before To Kill a Mockingbird and rejected by the publishers at the time. It sees Scout as a grown woman, now living in New York, returning to her home town of Maycomb, Alabama, to find that many things have changed, much to her horror and confusion. There has been controversy over the publication of this book and controversy over the portrayal of a character within it. But though this will never be another

Mockingbird, there can be no argument that it is a magnificent piece of work by an author who never, until now, published a second book.

The Boy at the Top of the Mountain by John Boyne

Published by Doubleday ISBN 9780552573542 $19.99

Gutenberg’s Apprentice by Alix Christie

Published by Headline Publishing Group ISBN 9781472220158 $19.99 The print within Fleurieu Living Magazine and every other publication owes its existence in some degree to a group of individuals, who, in the middle of the Fifteenth Century, risked their lives and reputations to produce one hundred and eighty identical volumes of the Bible. Until this time, an army of scribes around the world was tasked with copying manuscripts from the great philosophers and religious masters: an arduous task deemed to be in the name of God. This ‘factional’ book follows the real young Peter Schroeder as he is summoned from Paris to Mainz in Germany summoned by his stepfather to be apprenticed to Johannes Gutenberg, an established, demanding entrepreneur. 28

There he finds himself tasked with creating the moulds with which the first printed manuscript will be made under secrecy from the Guild, the Council and, most importantly, the Church. At a time when the west was under threat from the Turks, when the Pope held total authority, and when anything that heralded scientific advance was viewed as blasphemy or witchcraft, this epic tale of persistence and obsession captures the political and religious upheaval caused by the simple printed letter that we take for granted today.

When John Boyne wrote The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas there was confusion. Was this a children’s novel or an adult’s? In a way, it pushed the boundaries of both. Having read his latest novel, due for release in October, it has to be said that he has done it again. The Boy at the Top of the Mountain is another unforgettable tale of the effect of war on the naivety and


innocence of childhood. After his French mother and German father die in separate circumstances, seven year old Parisian, Pierrot, is sent to a local orphanage. From there ends up living with his estranged aunt in a large mansion, the Berghof, where she serves as maid to the house’s master, Adolf Hitler. It is 1935. Through the tumultuous years leading up to, and through, the Second World War, John Boyne follows Pierrot as his loyalties to his friends and family are challenged as one boy becomes another. Disturbing in its fictional truth, heart stopping in its ongoing tension, this story promises to be another of John Boyne’s novels that will be held up as an example of a ‘must read’ book for older children and adults alike. Prepare to be moved.

rescue and salvation that flows along as beautifully and as effortlessly as the waters that wash around the main protagonists, Tim and Maud. From when Maud suffers a traumatic injury while renovating a boat, through Tim’s need to care for her and their subsequent relationship, which eventually blossoms into family life, this tale is a steady stream of events that must inevitably flow into the torrent of catastrophe. Maud is an island at times, hard and unmoving, while Tim, like the sea, adapts to hold and embrace her. But Maud is as an island capable of standing alone, with no dependence on those around her, one that will turn only to herself when tragedy strikes. And when it does, the relationships of all involved – family and friends – are tested to the limits and beyond. The traumatic event which separates this book of two halves changes everything for the couple and sends Maud on a journey across the ocean that will challenge her and change her forever. A must for book groups in 2015 and for anybody who enjoys their contemporary literary fiction.

The Natural Way of Things by Charlotte Wood

Published by Allen and Unwin ISBN 9781760111236 $29.99

The Crossing by Andrew Miller

Published by Sceptre ISBN 9781444753509 $29.99 Booker shortlisted novelist, Andrew Miller, has created a majestic, poetic novel of

and the human ability to revert to the basic needs of survival. The mystery of the reason for their imprisonment and who is responsible are question marks placed at every turn of events, and the women’s hope for rescue burns its way into every chapter. This book is never still, its theme always serious, its characters driven and desperate. If you want a light read, don’t pick up this book. If you want a captivating, intense novel, you won’t be able to put it down.

A mysterious and provocative tale of physical and emotional endurance, comparable to Lord of the Flies, but definitely not for children. Written by Charlotte Wood, the scene is set somewhere in the middle of the Australian outback. Several young women, each the victim, or the willing partner, of a public scandal, find themselves imprisoned with no idea of how they arrived at wherever they are. Their captors, brutal and amateur in their ignorance, appear to be not too much wiser in the knowledge of their predicament. As time passes, food grows scarce, seasons change, the women evolve and the character dynamics shift. This is a relentless, hostile novel of adaptation 29


Big Win for the Southern Petra de Mooy talks to the Wright family about the new Aquatic Centre project at Beyond.

Above: This artist’s impression illustrates how the pool itself will have very clean, modern, light-filled interiors offset outside by rammed earth walls and surrounded by a large green plaza that creates usable spaces both inside and out. It also offers a lovely transition between interior and exterior.

When the Wright family purchased their Hayborough property for the development of a seven-star-energy-rated residential community, surely they did not realise the scale and scope of what was to come – nor the legacy they would create in the process. As community members the Wrights had long been aware that the local council areas of Alexandrina and Victor Harbor had been ruminating on the idea of an Aquatic Centre to be developed. But where? And with what funds? As individual councils the project was too big, but when the Wrights stepped in with the offer of donating part of their land at Hayborough (which happens to border both council areas) it seemed to have really kick-started a much more serious effort to get this project off the ground – as a dual council project. After numerous public surveys, site surveys, council meetings, successful applications for State and Federal funding, designs, budget and cost analysis, the final papers were signed and ground was broken in July of this year with a projected finish date of March 30

2017. In the final analysis it was about seven years in the making, but the culmination of all these efforts is now set to be a benchmark development, not only for South Australia but Australia-wide … and a destination will be created. In the process of all of this analysis the Wrights also began to look at alternative and complementary uses for the land adjacent to the Aquatic Centre site, so in addition to this fantastic asset, the development will now be complemented by a world class ‘health and wellbeing’ precinct. This will include allied health services, a GP Facility and a Dependent Living Facility. Sounds risky, but the undertaking of feasibility studies regarding the growth patterns of the ageing population on the Southern Fleurieu indicates that the project along with all of the complementary facilities will be well needed, and indeed well used, with the ever-increasing health service demands of the region. The main stipulation the Beyond development made regarding their donation of the land and all of the site development and planning, was that the entire site be maintained in keeping with their current sevenstar energy rating. All design within the precinct will adhere to, and maintain energy efficiency – with passive solar design, good airflow


Fleurieu

and sound thermal properties of all the buildings. This integrated design will be supported by solar power, stormwater harvesting, low maintenance and indigenous planting within the landscape, as well as the retention of a very old pear and fig tree in the layout of the new car park. For the Beyond development itself, this development increases the overall value of the entire complex and supports the elders already living within their community at the Chiton Retirement Village, which is part of the current development. Chiton residents Carol and Alan Charlesworth concur, and believe the addition of the aquatic centre and Beyond’s health and wellness precinct, including the planned dependant living facility, not only add value to their investment, but gives them peace of mind going forward.

After numerous public surveys, site surveys, council meetings, successful applications for State and Federal funding, designs, budget and cost analysis, the final papers were signed and ground was broken in July of this year with a projected finish date of March 2017.

‘We’ve always dreamed of retiring by the sea in a sustainable and modern village like Chiton,’ Alan Charlesworth said. ‘We’ve been here a number of years now and feel very much part of the fabric of a growing and like-minded community. These additions mean we will soon have everything we need on our doorstep – and that’s especially comforting as we grow older.’ The ultimate goal is to create a real health hub that will address the > 31


Top: Another artist’s impression shows how the large green spaces and an outdoor water play area will be incorporated into the landscape design. Above: The site of the Aquatic Centre still captures that semi-rural feeling with the hills and bush of the surrounding landscape.

needs of the ageing population, but also the general health-needs of the public, while creating a lifestyle enhancement for all living in the two council areas with access to a great pool, kids’ play areas, a café, and a general meeting place. Catchment areas via large roof expanses will deliver water to the Beyond wetlands, and dry creek beds will become beautiful water features when the water flows are heavier. The harvested water will then be channeled to toilets and green spaces. Native grasses and ground covers will be selected based on the indigenous climate and soil type to be water wise for the drier months and drought times. Walking trails will be extended from the existing development, but buffered by large, green spaces. Planning has been sensitively handled so that current residents do not feel as though they are going from a low traffic, quiet development to a more commercial one. The residential area and Aquatic Centre will be joined, but at the same time separate enough to have little or no impact on their current environment. The unique character of the Beyond site has always been in the way the housing has been integrated into the landscape design and the wetlands. Creek beds and wetlands have become habitat for an 32

amazing array of native birds, with all properties enjoying an outlook onto beautiful dams, green spaces and a spacious landscape design – complete with bike trails and walking trails linking to the beach and the town. The new development will be handled in the same way and there are plans in place to create a community vegetable garden, which once established, could be used for food in the dependent living facility, or possibly even the café. The ideal scenario, however, will be to establish links within the community itself by creating opportunities for activity and community engagement – via the shared garden space. Local elders will be given the opportunity to get involved and be active in the garden, while those who are not able can still be engaged by watching or having a little meeting place and green space to sit, eat a carrot, and have a chat. Either way, there have been plenty of studies to prove the health benefits when these links within a community are created. The main construct of the Aquatic Centre building has been designed by dwp|suters architects in partnership with local architects, Hames Sharley. The selection of the architects was made based on their experience with the building of other aquatic centres around the country.


Top: An artist’s impression of the interior. Above left: The Beyond development incorporates lovely wetlands and native flora. Above right: This artist’s impression shows a bird’s eye view of the plaza and surrounding development.

As dwp|suters’ Sports & Leisure leader, Mike McGrath explained, ‘the new Fleurieu Regional Aquatic Centre is designed by architects |suters with Hames Sharley to provide the wider Fleurieu community with a new focus for recreation, fitness and leisure. With sustainability at the core of the design, extensive modelling was undertaken to ensure that the sun-shading and building fabric used will provide optimum comfort for visitors, while minimising energy requirements.

with large double-glazed windows that help create interiors that are enriched by the landscape outside. Orientation and airflow have been thoughtfully considered to maximise energy efficiency and to help bathe the interiors with beautiful, natural light. The café in the main building will be oriented towards the pool, thereby creating another link between social spaces and active spaces, while the outdoor water-play area will be sheltered from the wind to lengthen the seasonal use of this area.

The design was influenced by the local indigenous story of ‘Kondoli the whale’, where Kondoli and his friends disappeared below the waves to re-emerge as sea creatures. Finally the materiality of the design is inspired by the surrounding landscape, with extensive use of rammed earth sourced from within the Fleurieu Peninsula, and the extensive outdoor deck areas protected from the sun by shade structures, similar to those used to great effect in the wineries of the wider region.’

For those currently living in the areas around this development I suspect there is a great deal of anticipation regarding the completion date and the potential for lifestyle enhancement. I, for one, will be putting it on the calendar as the place to be, come March 2017!

The pool itself will have clean, modern light-filled interiors offset outside by rammed earth walls, surrounded by a large green plaza to create usable spaces inside and out with seamless transitions between interior and exterior. The building will have a long, low profile 33


Fleurieu Film Festival

5th & 6th Feb 2016 N l to ew Yor e v

Over $10 ,

Film Makers Wanted

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www.fleurieufilmfestival.com.au Friday 5th of February 2016 from 7:30pm

$49

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Saturday 6th of February 2016 from 6pm

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The Old Vine, 22 Old Coach Road Aldinga

McLaren Vale Visitor Information Centre, 796 Main Road, McLaren Vale

Complimentary glass of Fox Creek wine. Scrumptious cocktail cuisine from the Chefs of the Old Vine. A selection of Fox Creek wines available for purchase. Music by Mike Bevan. Entertainment from the ‘Mad Poet’.

Photography and art exhibition by Peter Thurmer, Hugh Freytag and Louise Vadasz. Live music by Mike Spyker & Marty, dance by JamaeRaw. Film Festival opened by Mayor Lorraine Rosenberg. 9pm Screening and presentation of winning entries who will take home over $10,000 in prizes. Followed by award winning South Australian Feature film ‘Touch’ by Christopher Houghton and starring Leena Walsman, Matt Day and Greg Hatton.

9pm screening of the best of the Fleurieu Film Festival. Finalists will be selected and announced and YOU get to vote on the ‘Peoples Choice Award’!

$49 per person – tickets online www.fleurieufilmfestival.com.au

Film Makers -

Rules for submitting content • The 2016 theme is ‘Landscapes’. • Films must be under 10 minutes. • Entries close 5.00 pm 20/12/2015. • Entries are open to all people and genres of film. • For full details see website

Food and beverages available to purchase. Bring a picnic basket, blanket and chairs. Note: No BYO alcohol.

www.fleurieufilmfestival.com.au

MORE INFORMATION www.fleurieufilmfestival.com.au Email: fleurieufilm@bigpond.com


Discover the Murray River Take an unforgettable 3, 4 or 7 night cruise on the majestic paddlewheeler, PS Murray Princess Discover the spectacular and awe-inspiring Murray River, its unique flora and fauna, the rich legacy of old riverside ports and indigenous culture aboard the PS Murray Princess. Cruise in comfort and style with private cabins and staterooms, ensuites, spa and sauna, gym, bar, dining and two-storey lounge looking out over the paddlewheel. The on-board atmosphere is relaxed and informal and our wonderful crew and chefs will spoil you with their great service, entertainment and meals. Exciting cruises and discounts include Early Booking Saver Fares, Winter & Summer Sales, Christmas in July, New Year’s Eve and Loxton Cruises.

Call 1300 729 938, visit murrayprincess.com.au or your travel agent

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Aldinga Rising James Howe investigates the recent good fortunes of Aldinga, the one-time ghost town that’s fast becoming the hippest destination in the south. Photographs by Heidi Linehan.

Above left and right: There is always a buzz at the Home Grain bakery and the cheery staff always greet you with a smile.

Today, it’s widely acknowledged that the opening of the bakery was the moment things started to turn around for Aldinga; but there’s more to it than that. New owner of the Old Vine, Rob Kolencik, who previously owned Blessed Cheese in McLaren Vale, puts words to it. ‘The thing that I’ve noticed here — probably more than McLaren Vale — is the business community spirit,’ he says. ‘Like, they’re really keen to get things happening here. It’s exciting.’

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When Rundle Street icon Miss Gladys Sym Choon opened a store on Old Coach Road in Aldinga, Cara West shed real tears. It was the moment of realisation that her and husband Toff’s dream was really coming true. Three years after they’d opened the Home Grain bakery on the strip the Downtown Aldinga transformation was running on its own engines. ‘It felt to me like someone else finally got it, that someone else saw the potential in the area, without Toff and me saying ‘it’s a great space’! This is what it could be like! Imagine imagine imagine! Today, you need to imagine — or have a good memory — to picture what Downtown Aldinga looked like four years ago. To get the picture, I ask Kelly Slater (bubbly Aldinga mother of two – not US surfing legend), who brings me a coffee at the Home Grain Bakery. Having been coming to the area since childhood, she’s been able to chart the change over time. ‘As a kid, I used to love coming to the general store — it had a good feel. You’d finish at the beach, then you’d go and get your chips and your mixed lollies and ice cream’,


Above left and right: The selective providore items at The Old Vine are fantastic when you need to put together a lovely little platter; but stay and relax because the food is divine – and Rob makes a fantastic coffee!

she says. ‘Moving back here (11 years ago), I was really disappointed at what had happened to the general store. It was really dark inside, and not that many people came to the street. It didn’t have the vibe.’ Travellers from the city would stop to get petrol, then move on. In 2011, like the last spark of life sputtering out, the general store closed. Then, something remarkable happened. Like a Phoenix rising from the ashes of a tired, burnt-out town, Downtown Aldinga began to come back to life. First came Home Grain, breathing a new soul into the beautiful but run-down general store building. Today, it’s widely acknowledged that the opening of the bakery was the moment things started to turn around for Aldinga; but there’s more to it than that. New owner of the Old Vine Rob Kolencik, who previously owned Blessed Cheese in McLaren Vale, puts words to it. ‘The thing that I’ve noticed here — probably more than McLaren Vale — is the business community spirit,’ he says. ‘Like, they’re really keen to get things happening here. It’s exciting.’

Maxwells’ owner Lisa Eigenwillig can talk about community spirit, and the excitement of raising something — quite literally — from the ashes. In the early days of Aldinga’s revival, Lisa was a stay-athome mum eager to get moving on a business plan. ‘Being at home for two years with a baby, my mind just got really busy’, she says. Busy, as it were, with ideas for an organic and local produce grocery store. ‘I found I was having to drive to the city, or McLaren Vale, or the Willunga Market. And I just kept asking myself, ‘why isn’t there an organic store in Aldinga’? Her partner, Rich Maxwell, was equally keen to start a cafe selling good coffee and burgers made from quality, local ingredients. One day, Lisa found herself at a gym doing step-ups alongside Cara West. Cara and Toff had recently dived headlong into their dream for Downtown Aldinga, buying a fire-destroyed Autopro next door so they could fill it with quality tenants who would help bring business to the street. As Lisa talked, in between breaths, about her >

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Above left and right: Maxwell’s specialise in local and organic food and produce, but also have a selection of lovely raw deserts and fresh juices. They also make a fantastic burger (meat or vegetarian)!

Today, if you happen to drive through Aldinga on a Saturday morning, you’ll be compelled to stop. The former near-ghost town with its boarded-up general store is now alive, swarming with wanderers. But it’s not just a break on the journey: Aldinga is fast becoming the destination.

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Above left and right: Miss Gladys on Sea brings a lot of street cred and style to the strip. The shoes are divine!

dream to open an organic grocery store it struck Cara that this was exactly what the street needed. Although the cafe component would compete with Home Grain, she felt it would be a step toward the greater goal of turning Aldinga into a destination. Maxwells, with its cafe and organic and local artisan products ranging from tea to soap, was an immediate hit, creating what other Aldinga business owners describe as a ‘critical mass’ on the street. That critical mass is progressing to fission. Today, if you happen to drive through Aldinga on a Saturday morning, you’ll be compelled to stop. The former near-ghost town with its boarded-up general store is now alive, swarming with wanderers. But it’s not just a break on the journey: Aldinga is fast becoming the destination.  Helping to drive this status, besides the ever-expanding food scene, are the quirky fashion boutiques that have sprung up on the strip. Unpacking a box of new dresses in the former Hart’s Temperance Hotel, Miss Gladys owner Joff Chappel wonders at how Aldinga has changed. ‘We have driven past this building forever. ‘Miss Gladys

on Sea’ has been a little line that we’ve aspired to for a long time, but it didn’t seem possible until recently,’ he says. The opening of Maxwells convinced them to take the plunge. Joff has been blown away by the response to the new shop, with locals even turning up with plants for the garden. Perhaps, the success comes down the niche Miss Gladys on Sea occupies in the local market. ‘The reception in the neighbourhood has been unbelievable’ says Joff. ‘The line that I constantly hear is “I’ve always loved your shop in town, but I never go to town anymore.’’’ Beyond the Old Vine, at the northern end of the strip, is Boho Chic. The store taps into the global ‘slow fashion’ movement, offering vintage and ethically-made clothes. It was brought to Aldinga by sisters Jenni Connellan and Lucinda Gooden, who feel the town — with its heritage buildings and increasingly bustling footpaths — is an ideal home for their brand. ‘It’s really hip and happening’ says Lucinda. ‘Since the Home Grain bakery came in things have been getting more interesting, and we just add to that spice, to that culture of the area.’ > 39


Above left and right: At the northern end of the strip, is Boho Chic. The store taps into the global ‘slow fashion’ movement offering vintage and ethically-made clothing.

Beyond the Old Vine, at the northern end of the strip, is Boho Chic. The store taps into the global ‘slow fashion’ movement, offering vintage and ethicallymade clothes. It was brought to Aldinga by sisters Jenni Connellan and Lucinda Gooden, who feel the town — with its heritage buildings and increasingly bustling footpaths — is an ideal home for their brand.

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The bohemian vibes are helped along by two pop-up vintage shops, and Zion Roots Cafe, another newcomer which now occupies the other half of the former Hart’s Temperence Hotel. Owner Babi Watt, who based her cafe around a peace-loving reggae philosophy, launched a mid-week open mic and jam session. She has been thrilled by the response from local people, 20-30 of whom turn up every session. There’s more in the pipeline, too. Although plans are yet to be finalised, preliminary Council drawings for an Old Coach Road upgrade show widened footpaths, lawned areas, new trees, heritage walls and timber fencing. I ask Cara West what she thinks Aldinga will look like in five years. ‘It’s really really crazy to think about’, she says. ‘Because three years ago it looked nothing like it looks now. I can’t even begin to imagine!’


Y

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WELL 11 Old FLMadSpring2015.pdf Coach Road, Aldinga. Wed4:48 to Sun 1 Trading 30/07/15 PM 8am to 5pm.

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Markets + Street Food + Music learn more: www.facebook.com/fridaysafter5aldinga

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Mark Piovesan has created a photographic record of some of his favorite beach-side relics and recounts some of his time spent in

Fleurieu Shacks

Beach shacks are modest, humble dwellings made up of only a few rooms with second-hand furnishings and mismatched crockery. They may just have the basics but are packed full of soul, character and cherished memories. They are where children learn to become adults and adults act like children.

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Shacks on the Fleurieu Peninsula come in many shapes and sizes. Most are fibro-clad or built from cheap material of the era. They have unassuming simplistic design many of us have now grown to love. A lot have no aircon or mod cons to keep you inside – so adults and kids alike escape to indulge in outdoor pleasures. Shacks provide layers of memories and usually some of the best of times life has to offer. My Shack experience started with being crammed in the car filled with every beach toy imaginable and driving to Myponga Beach. Within minutes I would be donning a wetsuit, spearfishing with my new best mate, a random kid from a few shacks down and my older brother. Later we would cop a splattering of ink after hooking squid from the kayak. We would search the rocks for crabs; skim any flat


rock we could find. Then by late arvo as the tide started to fill, we would surf down the line of a few knee high peelers while dodging the rocks in the shallows. By sunset we would walk back to the shack to the smell of snags or squid cooking on the BBQ. Peeling off a wet suit, leaving behind the imprinted seam lines down arms and legs, the long days finished lying on the top bunk sharing stories of the adventures we had and ones we planned to have. While shooting this series along the Fleurieu coast I listened to many a tale with some familiar recollections. Rough but rewarding days in the tinny followed by scaling the haul on the outside stand-alone sink, getting covered in scales. Memories from games of Trivial Pursuit that ended in the wee hours of the morning, midnight runs

to the outdoor toilet to family barbies that turned into all-welcoming street parties. The original shacks are now fading into extinction and being replaced by grand, elaborate holiday houses filled with all the modern conveniences. Would we go back to those basic shacks, or do we now need the reverse air, flat screens and Wi-Fi connection to make our holiday stay complete? Here are a few of the classics left standing, shot between Myponga and Goolwa along the Fleurieu coast. The Photographic Montage Fleurieu Shacks can be purchased from my website; markpiovesanphotography.com.au or Artworxs Gallery, Goolwa, where it is currently on display.

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Fleurieu Renewables COMMERCIAL AND DOMESTIC SOLAR SPECIALISTS

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THIS MULTI AWARD-WINNING TEAM WORKS TO ENSURE THE BEST OUTCOME FOR YOU.

If you are thinking of selling – call the SouthCoast Specialists. Gayle Foster : 0410 484 376 John Dennis : 0412 965 407 Shelley Bezuidenhout: 0468 383 747

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Call for a Free Market Appraisal. CENTURY 21 SouthCoast

 Phone: 08 8556 6001



The Fleurieu Regional Aquatic Centre will provide south coast communities with a modern sport and recreation facility. The project is a joint iniative of the Alexandrina Council and City of Victor Harbor with funding support from the Federal and State governments. Construction of the aquatic centre has now commenced, and the facility is expected to be operational by March 2017. For the latest project news or to subscribe to receive monthly updates direct to your inbox visit

fleurieuaquaticcentre.com.au

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PENINSULA PEOPLE

Fleurieu Trailblazers:

The world according to d’Arry Story by Corinna Wright. Photograph by Jasper Savage. Francis d’Arenberg Osborn (d’Arry to his friends ... actually, d’Arry to everyone) and I have the same daily schedule. We were born on the same day 47 years apart and we are effectively neighbours, with our vineyards sharing a common border. We have a morning chat at the bustling centre of gossip and community that is the McLaren Vale Post Office. We collect the mail for our respective businesses; we shoot the breeze with numerous other locals, and then head back down Oliver’s Road to start our day’s work. Those little chats at the post office each day are very special to me. There have been many times when this quick word ended up being just what I needed to hear at that particular moment. His reassuring voice of some 73 vintages’ experience has helped calm my brain and gain perspective many times in the midst of a frantic harvest or challenging weather event. He has connections with numerous generations of my family, and I feel like McLaren Vale wouldn’t be what it is today without the likes of him. So when the chance arose to have a longer discussion with the legend that is Francis d’Arenberg Osborn OAM, I jumped at it. What I really wanted to chat to d’Arry about is the (soon to be notso-secret) secrets to his success – the keys to building d’Arenberg Wines into one of Australia’s most iconic wine brands. With my own wine brand being singularly a fledgling by comparison, I admit that perhaps this direction of questioning was slightly self-serving. But what I discovered is that the d’Arenberg story has relevance not just for business, but for a life well lived in general. In d’Arry’s opinion, one of the pillars behind the success and strength of the brand is that of being ‘memorable’. This has manifested itself in many ways in the d’Arenberg story; from the myriad of wines with kooky names, the entertaining back labels and matching cartoons, to d’Arrys son Chester and his legendary brightly coloured shirts. In fact, the current d’Arenberg catch cry is ‘The Art of Being Different’. But nothing has cemented d’Arenberg in our collective memory more than its iconic diagonal red stripe across the label. In the early 1960s, tastes in Australia swung from predominantly fortified wines into red table wines. d’Arry, having taken over the winery after the untimely death of his father in 1957, was one of the first to produce the historic half-gallon flagons of red wine. After years working predominantly within the bulk-wine market, this move to the consumer market required the development of a brand. d’Arry took advice from designer friends, poached the red stripe from his old school tie, 46

fashioned up a family crest, and an icon was born. At their peak in 1978 d’Arenberg flagons accounted for 75% of all flagon sales in Australia. If you were one of the new wave drinking red in the 1960s, it is more than likely that your first experience with wine had a red stripe on the label. I know I still remember my first wine. Fast forward 50+ years, and the d’Arenberg team is about to take it to the next level. The rumoured $11m ‘d’Arenberg Cube’ is in the early stages of construction. Best described as a four-storey glass building in the shape of a rubix-cube mid-turn, with a bit falling off into the vines, looking like it is floating above the vineyard!! By the time it’s completed I expect memorable will be something of an understatement. Another pillar of success, d’Arry will humbly tell you, is making sure you surround yourself with experts in their field. A technically untrained winemaker, d’Arry’s list of winemaking and business mentors is a roll-call of the great names of Australian wine: Dr Bryce Rankine, Cud Kay, Ben Chaffey, Len Evans, Doug Collett, Wolf Blass, Jim Ingoldby and Penfold legend himself, Max Schubert. Leaning on their skills and experience, d’Arry created wines that scooped a myriad of awards, including the much sought after Jimmy Watson Trophy in 1969. It wasn’t just in the winemaking sphere that d’Arry surrounded himself with the best in the business: from export specialists and marketing gurus, finance guns and advertising whizz-kids, right through to gold star chefs and fine artists; he has always been open to advice. The final key element in the success that d’Arenberg has enjoyed, d’Arry sums up with the word, ‘civic-mindedness’. This strikes a chord with me in a number of ways, as I have a strong belief in contributing to the community, region, industry or country in some way. From playing sport for the region and becoming involved in the inaugural McLaren Vale Bushing Festival, to contributing on an industry level. In 1958, d’Arry became part of the Wine & Brandy Association, contributing as president, vice-president and treasurer over many years. Outside his industry, d’Arry was a councillor on the South Australian Chamber of Commerce for 28 years. It was for these many tireless contributions that he was awarded an OAM in 2004: d’Arry strongly believes that his community works had a massive impact on his brand. Sure, his commitment required plenty of his time and energy, but ‘You get out what you put in’, he says with a smile. Such a remarkable man who’s created a remarkable brand, while shining a light on McLaren Vale, South Australia, Australia and the world, d’Arry has been more than ably assisted by his equally legendary next gen – Chester and Jackie – and the brilliant team they have gathered around them. Here’s hoping that the iconic red stripe is around for generations to come. If you will excuse me now, I’m off to be as memorable, civic-minded and surrounded by experts as I possibly can. And I hope you are too.


THIS COULD BE YOUR DREAM HOME

EXCLUSIVE AND OOZING WITH RUSTIC CHARM An amazing architectural treasure, circa 1990, built by a local builder, Virgin K.L. & Sons as their residence on a beautiful location set high amongst the tree tops, surrounded by native trees and flora with views of the hills. This amazing home features three bedrooms, study, two bathrooms, ground floor family room and entrance hall, workshop, garage, cellar or storage area, double carport and space for caravan or boat. The upper floor takes your breath away with raked ceiling, sunken lounge with jarrah floor, family and dining with slow combustion heater and spacious well laid out kitchen. Master bedroom has walk-in robe, French doors leading to the balcony and country style bathroom with beautiful claw bath. Though tucked away in the hills of Victor Harbor, it is only minutes to amenities, shops, schools, cafes, restaurants and the beach, the two storey residence combines a blend of Tasmanian dressed sandstones, natural timbers and rendering with selected building materials sourced from the old Port Adelaide Woolsheds dating back 150 years including substantial hard wood timber support beams and pillars which make this a stunning residence on the Fleurieu Peninsula – a real treasure. Smart Video Tour – Text VIDEO221 to 0418 322 878.

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Nina Keath walks us through her

Dream build Photographs by Jasper Savage.

Above: At their mostly-complete home in Willunga, Nina Keath and Eddie Banks take a little time out with their children – and Bilbo the dog.

My partner Eddie and I are building a house in Willunga, and people sometimes joke that we should be on the television show Grand Designs, which profiles the highs and lows of everyday people attempting to build their dream home. I used to laugh at this suggestion, but three years into our build I can now see that we would have been UK host, Kevin McCloud’s, dream-build. If you’re a fan of the show you’ll understand why: we’ve completely under-estimated the timeline; we’re over budget; we decided to get pregnant and have a baby mid-build; Eddie is working full-time, 50

building on weekends and evenings and trying valiantly to fit in family time; and here’s the part that would have really excited Kevin – our windows were three months late, it was coming into winter (feel the drama building) when two-out-of-three pallets of expensive, custommade windows were smashed in transit. I won’t tell you what season it was when we received the replacement windows or how many tries it took the company to cut the glass to the right size. ... As I said earlier, Kevin’s dream-build! Thankfully, despite even more trials and tribulations, it’s our dreambuild too. I had a moment recently when I was walking through the house and realised that l really quite liked it. This feeling came as a surprise because I hadn’t expected to enjoy it so fully. And then the obvious dawned on me – of course I like it! We designed it (with the help of our architect, Alvyn Williams). It is an expression of Eddie and me and the things we value – simplicity, beauty, nature, people, reverence and connection. It was indeed a happy moment.


Above (top and bottom): The home features raked ceilings and lovely wooden windows, capturing the beautiful northern light and views.

The house is constructed primarily from lime-rendered straw-bale and Victorian Ash timber and wherever practical, we have opted for natural materials. It makes use of solar-passive design principles, so it is oriented north allowing maximum winter sun to heat our polished concrete slab keeping us toasty and warm. In summer, doubleglazed windows, eaves and thick straw-bale insulation provide outstanding thermal comfort. The design provides a lovely interplay between expansiveness and cosiness. High, curved timber ceilings and extra-wide doorways and halls allow you to see all the way from one end of the house to the other (well, it will when it’s finished. We currently have half the house sealed off while we finish building). Deep, generous window seats and low-slung ceilings above intimate nooks offer more human-scale spaces to hide away in. Broad timber stairs are places for climbing and playing as well as sitting and dreaming into views of sky and ocean.

We have taken the build slowly which has allowed us to involve our nearest and dearest in the process, many of whom have come for a cuppa and ended up wielding a hammer. Eddie and I look forward to repaying these acts of kindness with long lunches cooked in our (yet to be built) kitchen! While building our home has been a dream-come-true, it has sometimes veered precariously close to the nightmarish. You would have thought that with all my Grand Designs-viewing I would have been prepared by seeing so many couples come so close to breaking point. But there is a world of difference between knowing something intellectually and the actual, lived experience! Some of our friends, having seen our experience, have decided to postpone building until they have enough money to pay someone else to manage their build. This may well be prudent. Our architect believes that owner builders are much more likely to go over time > 51


Previous page: The design provides a lovely interplay between expansiveness and cosiness. High, curved timber ceilings and extra-wide doorways and halls allow you to see all the way from one end of the house to the other. Above left: The house is constructed primarily from lime-rendered straw-bale and Victorian Ash timber. Above right: Natural material and solid wood feature in both the building and the interior finishes.

and budget. He explains that a project manager will keep clients on track because they have contractually-agreed budgets and timelines and they know how much is enough. Owner builders, on the other hand, harbour a deep personal commitment to the project and must fight the constant urge to spend more time researching to find the ‘perfect’ product, or more dollars to gain a better finish. Over time, several seemingly small variations to time and cost can add up to many thousands of extra hours and dollars. This is illustrated in the example of Eddie’s brother who started building around the same time as we did, but engaged a project manager. His house is now complete while we are still building three years later with the kitchen and living room still on the to-do list. This may sound as though I’m promoting project-managers over owner-builders. And I must admit that sometimes that option has definite appeal! But in truth we’ve both dreamed about building since we were kids and have derived a deep pleasure from doing it ourselves. We have limitless time to research the best products. If we want to spend the extra money, we can wait and save. If we

think something needs improving, we can tear it down and start again (and believe me, we have). We are building for longevity and sustainability and it seems fitting that a house we hope will last, will take some time to build. The house feels like a living thing. We have shaped it with our heads, hands and hearts (and a fair few power tools too). There is no doubt that building your own home can take up all of your life energy (plus a little bit more) and if you have children, a demanding job or other commitments, it can cause strain. In spite of the challenges, or perhaps because of them, I feel as though my relationship with Eddie, and indeed my own sense of self, has been forged into something stronger. As a friend who recently completed a build with her partner reflected, ‘If we can survive building a house, I feel like we can get through anything!’ And before you worry too much about Eddie and me, we’re doing pretty well. We still like each other (quite a lot) and we have two happy, free-range kids who have joined us in building a place of beauty, form and function. Now we just have to finish that darn kitchen! 53


Above: Mel Amos from Fleurieu Kitchen flaunting her delicious macarons.

Bree May meets Mel Amos, who says:

Let them eat cake! Photographs by Heidi Linehan.

There’s something so alluring about beautifully crafted pastries. Like a sugarcoated magnet it draws you in; it’s an accessible opulence you can infinitely justify to yourself. Even those of us with a savoury tooth can admire and appreciate a flawless, imaginative dessert. When I recently met Mel Amos, the bubbly and energetic owner of The Fleurieu Kitchen, I was in awe. Not just because I was greeted with the most divine Berry and French Vanilla Crème Tart, or because after fifteen minutes I’d already decided we should be friends. She’s admirable, a true natural talent. She’s inspiring and sincere, and she makes sweets so gorgeous that even a cheese-plate devotee like me would bypass the blue to eat them. Mel found her calling later in life, which I found remarkable considering her level of skill. Growing up she was surrounded by food and always loved to cook; however desserts, and making them professionally, was something she’d never entertained as a career until recently. She described the enlightening, life-changing holiday she spent with her husband in Paris. Exploring the city, she was completely taken with the beauty of the French patisseries and it left an indelible mark on her. She returned to Australia from Europe with a new-found dream and purpose. The Fleurieu Kitchen began three years ago as a Facebook page by a woman on a mission. With two young children and a supportive husband in tow, Mel set about creating her trademark macarons and selling her luxe rainbow offerings at local markets. She admits the early days had their trials. Macarons are not as easy to create as she first imagined. ‘One stir too many, they fail. One stir too few, they fail’, she explained ‘I made many batches that failed, but I refused to be beaten by them.’ A self-confessed perfectionist, it’s this determination and ability to evolve that has brought success to Mel.

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An avid learner, she has completed numerous courses at Melbourne’s Savour Chocolate and Patisserie School. She counts Pierre Hermè among her culinary heroes and gains inspiration from her extensive library of cookbooks, especially her favourite, Ladurée Sucré. Interestingly, her personal tastes are mainly focused on alternative whole foods, which she has begun exploring professionally by introducing raw cheesecakes into her range (available at Maxwell’s Grocery in Aldinga). She is, however, adamant that this will never be her main focus, as she gains more pleasure from creating naughtier desserts – and she really loves chocolate – a lot. So, what does the future hold for this wonder woman of the Fleurieu dessert world? Mel’s next step is to take her home-based Fleurieu Kitchen and turn it into a shop-front, with aspirations of owning her own patisserie in the not too distant future. ‘If you never try, you’ll never know’ she declares. ‘Opening a patisserie is something I need to do. I’ve just been waiting for the planets to align so I can take the final leap.’ And I have absolutely no doubt the planets will align for this incredibly talented woman. Because if you dream big and believe in yourself enough, who says you can’t have your cake and eat it too?

Blueberry and Lemon Tart (serves 10-12) Ingredients: Sweet Almond Pastry (makes 480g of dough) 130g unsalted butter, very cold and chopped into small pieces 85g pure icing sugar, sifted 35g ground almonds (almond meal) pinch of sea salt 1/2 vanilla bean, scraped (or 1/2 tsp vanilla paste or extract) 1 egg 190g plain flour, sifted Lemon Cream Filling 220g lemon juice 180g caster sugar


240g pouring cream 6 eggs 7.5g gelatine leaf, titanium strength (1.5 leaves) 160g unsalted butter, softened Garnish 2 x punnets of fresh blueberries (you can use frozen but they will weep a little) edible flowers, such as violas Method: First prepare your pastry dough. Place the butter in the bowl of a stand mixer (fitted with the paddle attachment). Mix the butter until smooth and then add the following ingredients (one at a time, ensuring each ingredient is fully incorporated before adding the next): icing sugar, ground almonds, sea salt, vanilla and egg. Once combined, add the flour and work it just until the dough comes together (do not overwork the dough otherwise it will lose its crumbly, biscuity texture). Form the dough into a disc and wrap in cling wrap. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours before using (or freeze for 30 minutes if you’re in a hurry). If possible let it rest overnight (this is not essential, it will just make the dough easier to roll out). Butter a 25cm loose-bottomed tart pan or cake ring and place on a baking tray. On a floured work surface roll the dough out to 2-3mm thick and press into the pan or ring. The dough is quite sticky so you may find it easier to roll between 2 sheets of baking paper. Refrigerate for 1 hour. Preheat oven to 170C. Remove dough from the fridge and prick the surface with a fork (this stops it from puffing up while baking). Line the inside of the tart shell with baking paper, carefully pressing into the corners and working up the sides. Place pastry weights (or dried beans etc) on top and spread them out evenly.

Bake for approximately 25 minutes until lightly golden. Take tart shell out of the oven and carefully remove the pastry weights and baking paper. Return the tart shell to the oven for 5 minutes to finish baking and deepen in colour. If the bottom still looks pale and underdone leave it in for a few more minutes more (you do not want a soggy bottom!) Remove from oven and allow to cool. Once cool remove from tart pan and put aside until ready to fill. Now prepare your filling. Soak the gelatine leaf in cool water for 15 minutes while you make the lemon cream. In a heavy-based saucepan whisk together the lemon juice, caster sugar, cream and eggs. Place over a low-medium heat and gently bring up to a simmer, stirring constantly to ensure the cream does not catch on the bottom of the pan. Once thickened (it should have the consistency of thickened cream and coat the back of a spoon) remove from heat. Add the drained gelatine and whisk until fully incorporated. Transfer the cream to a bowl and allow to cool to approx. 50˚C. Gradually whisk in the softened butter until fully incorporated and lump free. Pass the cream through a sieve to ensure there are no lumps of cooked egg or un-melted butter. Cover with cling film (make sure the cling film is sitting directly on top of the cream to avoid developing a skin) and refrigerate until cool and semi-set. Assembly Remove the lemon cream from the fridge and whisk until smooth. Using a large spoon (or you can use a piping bag), fill the tart shell with the lemon cream and smooth over the top. Return the tart to the fridge and allow to set (for around 3-4 hours). Just prior to serving, garnish your tart by placing fresh blueberries all over the top. Dot with a few violas and it’s ready to serve. It is perfect just as is, or for a little more decadence serve with some vanilla icecream or double cream.

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Image courtsey of Heidi WHO photos. On location at The Dunes, Little Sahara, Kangaroo Island.

Taken an amazing photo on the Fleurieu lately? Upload it to our Facebook page and you could see your handiwork in print. Each month we’ll choose the best image(s) and publish them right here in the pages of FLM. facebook.com/FleurieuLivingMagazine

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Aldinga Central Shopping Centre is located on Aldinga Beach Road and a short walk to the beach. We have two supermarkets and 30 specialty shops – something for everyone. Visit us on our website or like us on Facebook to find out more; aldingacentral.com.au facebook.com/AldingaCentral

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www.ninoscafe.com.au

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FLEURIEU FOOD & WINE

Leonie Porter-Nocella meets Todd Steele, the man behind

Chef Steele Photographs by Heidi Linehan.

Todd Steele, the man behind Chef Steele, was born and bred on the Fleurieu Peninsula and is really passionate about good food ... which is to be hoped for and expected. But somewhere along the line he’s also morphed into a much sought-after wedding planner! This may not seem quite so incongruous to those who’ve never seen him, but once having laid eyes on him you’d under no circumstance imagine him as ‘your wedding planner’. Not unless your idea of a wedding planner is seven-feet of lean, mean, footy machine! Football has loomed large in Todd’s life: he was playing for Willunga when they took out the premiership in ’98 ... and later for the South Adelaide League team. During his eight years as Head Chef at the Victory Hotel at Sellicks, Hotelier Doug Govan (he of the legendary wine collection/cellar) worked the roster around Todd’s football timetable, allowing him to work as Head Chef and pursue his all-important footy career. A most generous gesture.

Above: Chef Steel photographed on location at Oliver’s Taranga.

Sometimes simply prepared food makes for the tastiest meals. Here is Todd’s Porchetta enhanced with fresh, local and seasonal ingredients – made much more delicious with just a few little twists ... and fail-safe crackling.

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Todd’s interest in food was set in motion when he and his hungry brothers would get into the kitchen to prepare food for themselves before their parents got home from work. Another brother became a chef as well, so at the age of fifteen Todd got a job as a ‘dishie’ in his brother’s kitchen ... then began an apprenticeship at sixteen. From there he worked in various hotel kitchens around the traps. However, working as a Chef for Hire makes it even easier to tailor your work around your private life – which now includes three young ‘Willunga born and bred’ children. Living and working in the heart of the Fleurieu means Todd is spoilt for choice when it comes to using fresh local produce in his catering business. Think squid from Sellicks, snapper from Aldinga, lamb from Normanville, and of course, wine from the McLaren Vale – along with all the other wonderful wine regions in the area – and these are just a few of the star ingredients he sources from the Peninsula. Todd now caters for all size functions, corporate or private. Whether it is a business lunch for a few or a wedding reception for many, Todd listens to requests and customises your catering to suit your event style and budget. (He caters for the renowned and highly sought after Porchetta and Lamb barbecues held at Oliver’s Taranga.) And if you aren’t sure what style event you want, or where you will hold it, Todd can help with venue selection, themes and layout. This is where the ‘wedding planner’ title comes in. The happy couple has usually had no wedding experience at all. Todd has had loads of wedding experience ... and given that if the couple is hiring him they’ve usually spurned the stock-standard, conventional model and opted for something like a winery or beach wedding, or even a forest wedding where there is usually no, or next to no catering facilities. Any location and nothing too hard is his catch-cry.


Sometimes simply prepared food makes for the tastiest meals. Here is Todd’s Porchetta enhanced with fresh, local and seasonal ingredients – made much more delicious with just a few little twists ... and fail-safe crackling.

Porchetta with soft polenta, broccolini, apple and baby radish Ingredients: 2kg porchetta – Marino’s in the Central Market or Ellis the butcher in McLaren Vale can supply 800ml Fleurieu Milk 50g polenta 50g semolina 40g butter 40g grated parmesan 2 bunches broccolini 1 Gala apple 100g baby radish or substitute shaved radish, cress, herbs, etc.

Method: Pre-heat oven to 220˚, score and rub pork with olive oil and salt into the skin. Roast for 1.5 hours, and then rest for half an hour. For polenta, bring milk to simmer, mix polenta with semolina and rain it into the milk while whisking constantly for ten minutes. It should be creamy with the granules cooked out. Season well and stir in butter and parmesan. Blanch broccolini in boiling salted water for twenty seconds. Then julienne the apple, mix with the baby radish and dress with some local olive oil to serve. Slice pork, serve on polenta and broccolini, then top with the apple and baby radish salad. Fresh apples in season, broccolini and some of the more unusual herbs can be purchased fresh at your local farmers’ market. Enjoy!

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Nicole Leedham chats to Anna Small and Warren Pickering about their artwork:

Made With Love, Grunt and Sweat

This page: ‘Fleur de la Mar’ by Anna Small. Opposite page: ‘Wall Mandala’ by Anna Small. Photographs by Jack Small.

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this diversity is vital for success. ‘I love doing the commissioned pieces. They are a great way to bring my creativity to the fore. But it is the smaller pieces, especially the jewellery and garden stakes, that puts food on our table regularly.’ Anna’s artistic life began as a small child. She was the middle of five siblings, and when she was born in Alice Springs in 1968, her parents already had their hands full with two toddlers. So her mother kept them all occupied with crayons and scrap paper. Later, at the North Adelaide School of Art, Anna struggled to find her niche. ‘I went from department to department until I found a teacher who could teach me skills while I was learning the process of conceptual development.’ That teacher was Don Ellis, lecturer in the jewellery department of the School. Therefore Anna studied jewellery, and began her creative career by exhibiting in galleries and selling her pieces at the East End Markets. Over time people started to ask for larger sculptures, so Anna took a leap of faith into the garden and wall art that she soon became identified with. The sculptures, inspired by nature, grew bigger and bigger. Now though, several years later, she has come full circle and her catalogue now includes the jewellery and smaller wall and garden art as well as the larger pieces.

Behind an unassuming fence in the beachside suburb of Moana, artists Anna Small and Warren Pickering create their trademark metal sculptures – inspired by the natural environs that help make the Fleurieu Peninsula so unique. Their partnership – in art and in life – has led to numerous awards and recognition, and they have now become that rare breed of artist able to support themselves and their children through their art. Anna credits their success to the simple fact that they have found that delicate balance between creativity and business acumen, without sacrificing either. ‘While Warren has plenty of artistic vision, not to mention the physical ability to bend and beat the metal into shape a bit further than I can, I run the business side of things: including marketing, budgets, planning and all that other dull, but necessary stuff. I also do all the computer drawing and CAD designing, and manage the relationships with suppliers and customers.’ The couple’s work ranges from jewellery through to garden and wall art, right up to one-of-a-kind commissioned pieces. Anna believes

While Anna was always destined to be an artist, Warren came across his passion and talent by accident – quite literally. He began studying design at an art school in London, but left to travel the world. By the time he and Anna met and married, he was painting and working on photography but making a living as a builder. Fast forward to 2011, when a workplace accident led to a dislocated knee followed by months of physical therapy. Bored and frustrated, he went back to his first love: art – and was soon creating the seaweed sculptures that saw him win the Brighton Jetty Classic Emerging Artist award the following year. In 2013 Anna and Warren competed against each other for the Oz Minerals Copper Sculpture SALA Award – and most amazingly, won equal first prize. Although they both work with the same raw materials, Warren’s end-pieces tend to be more organic ‘He imagines how the seaweed might move through the sea’ … while Anna leans towards the decorative, surprising the audience with creative and amusing touches (like a small bee crawling up a flower stem, or a bird perched on the leaf). For most couples, living and working together is the stuff of nightmares, but for Anna and Warren it is an artistic ‘dream come true’. ‘When we design together we are able to critique and give feedback. Both of which is very helpful to an artist. And we have successfully separated the personal and professional. >

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Above: Anna and Warren. Photograph by Cath Leo. Below: Madge Sexton McLaren Vale Kindegarten Gazebo by Anna Small.

There might be some creative arguments, but we never bring them into our marriage.’ Nowadays the couple also balances their work with raising two primary-school aged children. ‘Therefore one of us might be in the shed beating and bending a sculpture into submission, while the other is managing homework and meal preparation. In fact, Warren’s artistic talents are often seen in the kitchen as well as the shed!’

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The couple hopes to one day run their own gallery, showcasing local art and supporting local artists. But for now they are happy exploring the natural environment and translating it into unique and charming art work that warms the heart and charms the soul.


Abocve left: Curly Gumleaf copper sculpture. Above right: Copper gumleaf table sculpture by Warren Pickering. Below: Flower Landscape by Anna Small. Photographs by Jack Small.

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RETAIL THERAPY

What to buy. Where to buy it. SUNSHINE ICEBLOCKS Delicious, all natural ice blocks made from local, seasonal produce. Available at: Willunga Farmers Market - Willunga The Green Room on High Street - Willunga Maxwell’s Grocery - Aldinga Jelly the General Store - Port Elliot www.sunshineiceblocks.com.au

WILLUNGA GALLERY Artists Tread and Pedals. Sustainable design for him, her & home. Cassette desk clock $65 Willunga Gallery 29 High Street, Willunga. 0433 033 455

BLONDIES LIFESTYLE Floral Tunic by Sadie Fashion Shop 5 Aldinga Central Shopping Centre Aldinga Beach (08) 8557 7838

I AM TALL POPPY Fabulous fashion made of bamboo fibre offers many benefits for your skin. Once you try bamboo clothing it makes it hard to wear anything else. I am Tall Poppy Shop 1, 1 Aldinga Road, Willunga. (08) 8556 2665 iamtallpoppy.com.au

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Our local boutique shops, markets and galleries are chock full of amazing finds. Unique and high quality items are available on your doorstep.

CHARNELLE COLLECTION Boom Shanker Honey Dress $89 Available at Charnelle Collection 20 High Street, Willunga. Saturdays 10 til 4pm or by appointment 0402 909 859 www.charnellecollection.com.au

MCLAREN VALE FLORIST Bridal bouquet / Floral designers for all occasions McLaren Vale Florist 136 Main Rd Mclaren Vale . (08) 8323 8555 www.mclarenvaleflorist.com.au

CHRISTOPHER GREEN JEWELLERS In need of something TRULY special? We design and hand craft the highest quality bespoke jewellery in South Australia. First Floor, 55 Gawler Place, Adelaide. (08) 8231 6464 www.christophergreen.com.au

FLEURIEU GIFTS Succulent Heart Centrepiece Hand-made with living succulents for love that lasts. $49.95 plus postage from Fleurieu Gifts online store www.fleurieugifts.com.au info@fleurieugifts.com.au 0405 109 685 65


Pip Forrester visits

A dream realised in Willunga Photographs by Jasper Savage.


Previous page and above: On the high end of the High Street in Willunga you will find a little piece of France on the Fleurieu – La Terre (translated The Earth).

This story is about people, courage, family, passion and dreams. The Fleurieu Peninsula is a beautiful environment to live in or to visit. But in so many cases it is the people who make our region so unique. Tarik and Sandrine Marco are among the newer arrivals. The story of how they came to find the region and to purchase the cute Willunga café that we know as La Terre is delightful. Listening to them filled me with joy and even a little bit of pride. Tarik, originally a human resources executive from Arles in Provence, moved to Paris to train as a chef at the prestigious Alain Ducasse School. This was his first step to creating a working life in a field he was passionate about and that he hoped, in the long term, would give him the opportunity to have a family-friendly business. Graduating from the Ducasse School, Tarik worked for ten years in restaurants in Paris – including Ducasse’s own, famed Plaza Athenée. The financial crisis in Europe in 2008 frustrated the plans he and Sandrine had to finding an opportunity to own a restaurant in rural France. This promoted thoughts of where else in the world they might be able to settle and work for a while.

A sister in Darwin and the need for a holiday drew them to Australia in August, 2013. Sandrine had thoroughly planned their visit. It started in South Australia and included Victor Harbor. Although they loved the landscape of the Fleurieu Peninsula, the weather in August was not so attractive, so they ventured north and ended up in sunny Brisbane. As luck would have it, Tarik met someone who offered to sponsor him and give him a job as a chef. Travelling came to a halt and the Marco family – Tarik, Sandrine, Alexandre and baby Anastasia settled in Queensland. But in October 2014 South Australia lured them down for a holiday. This time they based themselves in Adelaide and enjoyed the culinary delights of the city and the close-by wine regions – including our favourites on The Fleurieu. They loved the city, and as Tarik says, ‘it was big, but quiet’, but the countryside still beckoned. On the last day of their holiday they ventured south to the historic town of Willunga. Their arrival coincided with market day. The bustling Willunga Farmers’ Market was a happy find for this culinaryoriented family. Already seduced, a stroll up the High Street brought them across a sign advertising a French-sounding business – La Terre. Fate was about to step in. They discovered a little café located in a quintessential South Australian cottage in a picturesque township with an obviously vibrant food-producing and >

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Above left: The food at La Terre is prepared with simplicity and care using fresh locally sourced ingredients. Top right: The cafe has a lovely earthy charm. Bottom right: Sandrine and Tarik Marco.

loving community. It was for sale. The holiday was over and the job in Brisbane was waiting, but Sandrine and Tarik followed their heart and their dreams and decided to buy the La Terre business. As Tarik explained, on their first visit they met the landscape and loved it and now they were about to meet the people. Taking over the business in February, 2015 they hit the ground running. They were, in the parlance of the industry, slammed. It was summer and there were a lot of customers. Tarik had to get used to an unfamiliar kitchen and menu. For Sandrine the challenges were a foreign coffee machine and a new space to manage. However, they found the locals to be patient; in fact, more than patient. They were overwhelmingly friendly. By way of welcome they were presented with flowers for Sandrine and fresh garden produce for Tarik. They were thrilled and a little surprised at the generosity of the welcome and the kindness of the locals. So, Willunga is now enriched by another skilled chef who has a strong philosophy on the importance of using the best local, in-season ingredients prepared with simplicity and care to present to his customers. Although his training under one of France’s most renowned chefs gives Tarik the ability to produce dishes involving highly intricate skills, his goal is to create a menu of delicious, approachable dishes. Sandrine, a Parisienne by birth, is the front of house face of the team. Her background in business management, including that of 68

her own fifteen-person beauty salon, furnishes her with the perfect set of skills and experience to complement those of her husband. According to Tarik, she is the driving force in the partnership. She is the one who makes things happen and keeps everything on track – even Tarik. He says she is the captain of the boat. It is important to them that they can operate in a way that nurtures their family, especially their two children now aged ten and three. After less than six months in their new business, the Marcos are in the swing of things. Winter has given them a breather and they are about to introduce a new menu, have adjusted their operating hours – now opening for breakfast and lunch from Wednesday to Sunday – and have plans for special events in the future. The new lunch menu is a happy mixture of regional French dishes, like Burgundy snails, Foie gras and other classics: Aged steak, Carpaccio of salmon and Coquille St Jacques. In the coming months they plan to hold regular regional dinners – a chance for us to take a culinary journey around France. This story of dreams, adventures and happenstance is uplifting. It is thrilling that they gave the Fleurieu Peninsula a second chance. They have taken a leap of faith to realise their goal, albeit in a very different country to the one they’d envisaged. This tale it is all about people, their stories and their dreams. It is they who make the Fleurieu so unique and who continue to create interest and fun for all of us and for our visitors.


ism and g in travel, tour in lis ia ec sp y; ph

lifestyle.

ra Location photog AN HEIDI LINEH er ing Photograph nn AIPP Award Wi

6 t. Â 0402 716 40 ho.com e. heidi@heidiw m .co ho iw id he w. heidiwhophotos gram / twitter. facebook / insta

taking concreting to the next level industrial and residential projects call Aaron Oliver for a quote on 0407 710 651 based in McLaren Flat e: oliverconcrete@bigpond.com facebook.com/OliverConcreteConstruction

Explore the unknown and hidden beauty where other tours do not go ‌ Benjamin Neville: 0423 725 409 www.offpistetours.com.au

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My calling

Jason Porter gets to know Gerard Maung, merchant seafarer.

For some reason I had it in my head that merchant seafarers were a rough and tumble bunch. Big, burly blokes engaged in lots of cursin’ and drinkin’ … and all manner of other ‘uncouth stuff’. And then I met Gerard. Don’t get me wrong, Gerard is certainly a big and burly bloke, but he’s also very laid back, well-spoken and gentlemanly. (Clearly I was way out of touch.) Being a merchant seafarer or IR (which stands for Integrated Rating) … or able bodied seaman … requires constant training and upkeep of skills and qualifications. I quickly learned that this job requires a diverse skill set (and an equal amount of physical strength and endurance). Essentially Gerard and his fellow crew-mates work in the middle of nowhere and need to be able to handle any situation that may arise. The entire crew is trained to respond to all emergency situations. This could be mechanical, medical – even environmental. The crew is charged with the maintenance and upkeep of the vessel, along with (among a million other things) loading and unloading of all cargo at each research facility. For the last eight years Gerard has been employed by P&O Maritime Services that operate the Aurora Australis ice breaker. This vessel is contracted to the Australian Antarctic Division (AAD) to supply and re-supply the three research bases in the Antarctic – Davis, Casey and Mawson. So three or four times a year Gerard heads down to the Antarctic. These trips can last for months, especially if they get stuck in the ice (not an altogether uncommon occurrence)! By his account though, this is a truly spectacular part of the world. The dramatic landscape and abundance of wildlife that thrives in this environment is a constant source of amazement. Gerard says ‘The sheer scale of the icebergs and brilliant colour of the waters just can’t really be captured in photographs.’ When not on duty Gerard does get the opportunity to take in the sights. He’s toured the research facilities – and field training officers at Davis station conduct tours to the penguin rookeries. The immense amount of birdlife in these remote locations is amazing. Of course there is no shortage of seals and whales in the waters down south either. Interestingly, Gerard says he sees more and more whales each year. ‘Penguins are naturally inquisitive and not really frightened of humans at all.’ He tells a story of being in a fast rescue craft out near an iceberg retrieving a mooring, when a very curious Adélie penguin jumped up into their boat. It just wanted to see what they were up to. When it

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Above: Gerard Maung (sporting Movember-inspired facial hair) taking time out in the Antarctic to chat with the locals.

realised they weren’t hiding a caché of fish, it just hopped back into the water and went on its way. ‘There are plenty of interesting people to meet on these trips too. There’s always an excitement in the air on each trip down as new scientists and researchers head down for a stint.’ Apparently the bridge is always open and offers a place to interact with new people. When I asked Gerard what drew him to this career, I learned his father was also a seaman. And while he did actually start a mining engineering degree, he realised his heart wasn’t in it. After a few years of working in a hardware store, he eventually followed in his father’s footsteps and at 22, headed to sea. Over the years Gerard has worked on other vessels, including bulk cargo carriers, but he’s pretty happy to be on the Aurora Australis. It doesn’t sound as though it ever really gets boring. Although he does point out that it requires spending a lot of time away from his family. So, as much as he enjoys his work, as I’m sure his family will attest, getting back home to Moana always feels long overdue.


Discover the fine mix of food, wine, art and ale! Red Poles Restaurant / Cellar Door / Art Gallery / B&B

S C A R PA N TO N I SERIOUS REGIONAL WINES MADE BY SERIOUS FAMILY WINEMAKERS. Scarpantoni Estate wines are classically ‘McLaren Vale’ in style, particularly the reds - being generous, mouth-filling, full of ripe fruit flavours and regional characteristics. Our range of wines covers a wide spectrum, from crisp, dry sauvignon blancs, chardonnays and rosé, to full bodied shiraz, cabernet sauvignon and fortified wines. Over the past three decades the wines have amassed an enviable collection of well over 500 wine show awards, including ‘The Jimmy Watson Memorial Trophy’ at the Royal Melbourne Wine Show in 2007.

Delight all your senses and also embrace live music, and an art gallery amongst lawns, gardens and vineyards! The cellar door for Brick Kiln wines and Vale Ale craft beers is set in an ambient courtyard. Open Wednesday to Sunday from 9 to 5 190 McMurtrie Road McLaren Vale Phone: 08 8323 8994 / 0417 814 695 redpoles@redpoles.com.au | www.redpoles.com.au

Tel:(08) 8383 0186, Scarpantoni Dr, McLaren Flat SA 5171, Web: www.scarpantoniwines.com

Friday Tapas at Anchorage Enjoy a Spanish Vibe in the relaxed Anchorage Café on Friday nights from 4pm. Delicious Tapas plates, Estrella Beer on tap, Spanish wines and Sangria. Cosy log fire and Chalk board specials as well. Tapas menu available every day.

PH: 8552 5970 21 Flinders Parade Victor Harbor. www.anchorageseafronthotel.com 71


Gill Gordon-Smith CSW sees Peter Fraser’s

Dreams Come True

Above: James Halliday’s Winemaker of the Year 2016, Peter Fraser, among the 69 year old bush vines

James Halliday is the Grand Master of Australian wine, and the prestigious wine awards that bear his name have given the ultimate accolade in winemaking – Winemaker of the Year 2016 – to a local winemaker, Peter Fraser from Yangarra Estate: a truly deserved honour for a somewhat quiet achiever. Peter Fraser is a passionate and talented winemaker who has followed his instinct and his dreams to create, with his team, one of the most stunning wine estates in Australia, producing a portfolio of wines that reflect sense of place and uncompromising standards. He is a local boy, growing up in the Vale with an agricultural background and love of horses that could have led him into agriculture or veterinary science. A stint in the Army reserves during this time, where he was introduced to some classic Australian wines in the officers’ mess encouraged Peter to pursue a winemaking career. 72

Peter was mentored during his first vintages by wine legends Stuart Blackwell and Bob McLean at St Hallett and credits his time there with shaping his winemaking style. He finished his degree at the end of 1997 and became the assistant winemaker at Normans Clarendon Winery. After the departure of the winemaker two months into his tenure, Peter found himself thrown into the deep end of a 2000 tonne vintage in a 1000 tonne winery. The self-described ambitious, focused and cocky young winemaker somehow pulled it all together, creating wines that gained him attention and the chance to consult on projects in Spain, and a study tour through France. This experience shaped the way he thought about wine and the wines he wanted to make. On his return he was created Chief Winemaker at the ripe old age of 26. It was at Normans he met the Jackson family and began a close and ongoing relationship with them that culminated in the creation of Yangarra Estate.


He is a local boy, growing up in the Vale with an agricultural background and love of horses that could have led him into agriculture or veterinary science. A stint in the Army reserves during this time where he was introduced to some classic Australian wines in the officers’ mess encouraged Peter to pursue a winemaking career.

Above: Wines with corresponding soil samples at the Yangarra cellar door.

Yangarra Estate. Yangarra estate was initially developed to produce wines for the USA, so for the first ten years flew slightly under the radar. Peter’s mandate from the Jacksons was to find the best vineyards in the region, so when the Norman-owned, 1946 old vine Grenache vineyard (planted by the Smart family) came on the market, he recognised the potential immediately. This treasured vineyard became the cornerstone of Yangarra, with Grenache and Rhône varieties the chosen focus. During this time Peter was also given the opportunity to work vintages in California for the Jackson family, working with people who knew how to create a world-class estate. The Jacksons’ belief in Peter’s vision on the potential of the McLaren Vale led to a purposebuilt, state of the art winery in 2010 with a beautiful cellar door that could showcase the effort and innovation coming out of the vineyards. In 2012 the family purchased the stunning Hickinbotham Clarendon Vineyard. Openness to new ideas such as bio-dynamics, sustainable viticulture and an investment in innovative winery equipment, have been

embraced and explored, but not used as a marketing tool. The wines speak for themselves with uncompromising, quality winemaking the key, and the vineyard at the core. The vineyards are now certified organic and Bio-dynamic. Peter calls himself ‘Chief Interferer’ and is involved in all aspects of the business, leading a passionate and dynamic team of professionals whose expertise and skill is evident in the wines they produce. Vineyard manager Michael Lane has worked with Peter for seventeen years and winemaker Shelley Torresan for ten years. The two are instrumental in bringing all of Peter’s wild ideas together; and just recently, winemaker Charlie Seppelt has been a welcome addition. The vineyard workers, cellar door staff and sales team all play an important part in achieving the common goal. Peter has a long-term commitment to the company – and Yangarra is his home. By slow and deliberate growth of the brand, paired with strategic, thoughtful decisions, he’s advancing his dream of building an iconic family estate closer to reality.

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The hidden gorge James Howe goes bush and discovers nothing short of a geological wonder.

Above and next page: The gorge offers magnificent vista and for the braver amongst us - some excellent rock climbing challenges. Photo above courtesy Natural Resources Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges. Photo next page: Jasper Savage.

As ranger Steve Johnson’s 4X4 jolts along muddy wheel ruts in the grass, a mob of kangaroos fans out ahead of us, bounding through the she-oaks. The hillside we’re crawling down gradually narrows, until it forms a grassy ridge with steep drops to the front and on both sides. To our left, the omnipresent olive trees have been crudely hacked back to reveal the view. Beneath us, the Onkaparinga River sweeps in a great, arcing curve. Monolithic, lichen-covered cliffs soar from one bank, and the dark maw of a cave opens on the other. The river itself descends in a series of waterfalls, white streaks against the dark water. There are no signs, no barrier, no tourists — just the olive tree stumps and this amazing view. So it goes in the Onkaparinga River National Park. Despite its abundant flora and fauna — and its extraordinary natural beauty — the park is still remarkably under-developed and little known about. Working to isolate the gorge is the fact that the public roads don’t get close enough to catch a glimpse of it and there are few signs to flag its presence. Although some sections of the park — such as the rock climbing sites in the northeastern corner — are regularly visited, others remain the preserve of only the most ardent bushwalkers and adventurers.

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Now, there’s a push to get more visitors through the gates. The theory, explains Steve, is that more people coming to the park will mean more opportunities to protect its fragile natural assets. But it’s a difficult tightrope to walk. ‘It’s counter-intuitive — it’s all pressure on the environment,’ he says. ‘Anytime you put a walking trail through, you’re creating fragmentation and disturbance. But, more people means more people caring for it, means more people willing to contribute to conservation.’ Following the course of the Onkaparinga River between Clarendon and Old Noarlunga, most of the 1544 hectare park was purchased by the state government in the 1970s as a way of preserving the natural environment and providing space for recreation. But, not all of it was paid for. In 1972 a sizeable parcel of the land surrounding the present-day Sundews Lookout was gifted to the Field Naturalists Society by accountant Arthur Cockington, who had bought the land as a hobby farm in the early 1940s. Arthur’s son Dudley Cockington, now 77, says his father, a keen amateur naturalist, was anxious to preserve precious remnants of natural bushland in the area. ‘He was always a bit concerned that the land was being cleared everywhere, and he made it his aim that wherever there was a bit of virgin scrub he would approach the owner and ask them if they would leave it to the Field Naturalists Society,’ says Dudley. ‘It was unusual in his time — everyone was clearing land, and dad was trying to save it.’ Thanks to the Gorge’s rugged geography, patches of natural habitat survive that would surely have disappeared in more accessible country. The park’s remnant stands of grey box — a rough-barked eucalypt — are particularly rare, says Steve. ‘Grey box is good timber,


so the early settlers focussed in on it,’ he says. There are other more showy plant communities too, with abundant wildflowers ranging from orchids to garland lilies. Even the rocks are significant enough to be listed on the National Heritage Register. The Gorge originates from fault-lines created sixhundred million years ago, explains geologist Jeff Oliver. ‘About fifty million years ago, Australia and Antarctica split and Australia started to drift northwards,’ he says. ‘That reactivated the north-east-southwest fault lines.’ Movement associated with these fault lines created escarpments and low-lying areas called embayments. The flow of water towards the Noarlunga embayment brought about erosion, which ultimately resulted in the present-day Onkaparinga Gorge. The geology of the park tells some remarkable stories — for example, the Sturt tillite found seven kilometres upstream from Old Noarlunga. ‘They’re big boulders that have been deposited by melting glaciers,’ says Jeff. ‘It’s the rock that a glacier grinds off both the floor of the valley and walls of the valley. Most of the granite rocks come from down near Victor Harbor.’ These geological assets, as with the park’s fragile ecosystems, rely on healthy bushland to prosper, and it’s Steve’s job to identify and manage threats to it. Feral deer and goats — which abound in the park — are checked by shooting, vehicle access is carefully controlled to manage the spread of deadly root-rot fungus, and weeds are continually targeted. Of the various weed species in the park, the olive — thousands of the species dot the hillsides within the park boundaries — is public enemy number one. >

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Previous page: The Onkaparinga river winds its way through the Gorge. Enjoy a day out in style and comfort with Off Piste 4WD Tours – exclusive tour operator in the Gorge. Photographs by Jasper Savage. This page top:The Gorge is full of beautiful flora and fauna. Bottom: Ranger Steve Johnson says they are keen to get more people into the park as more people means more people caring for it and helping with conservation. Photos courtesy Natural Resources Adelaide and Mount Lofty Ranges.

‘Unchecked, they’re a weed of national significance, because they’re so invasive,’ says Steve. ‘They’re just prolific in the way they spread, and they can infiltrate good-quality bush.’ Compounding this is the fact that they are extremely difficult to kill. ‘Just under the ground they have this massive lignotuber, which is a big, bulbous root system which just stores energy. To kill them, you’ve got to inject herbicide into that lignotuber — we call it drill and fill,’ says Steve. It’s an ongoing battle, waged primarily by the formidable volunteer group, Friends of Onkaparinga Park. Comprising more than one hundred volunteers, it’s a force to be reckoned with. And a hardworking one: the organisation holds three working bees every week, each one drawing seven to twelve people for weeding and revegetation work, among other projects. Friends’ Secretary Treasurer, Andy McKinnon, says the volunteers are motivated by the social aspect and their mutual love of the Gorge. ‘Once you get to see various areas of it, and see how scenic it is, that’s when people really become interested in it,’ he says.

Like Steve, Andy would like to see more people visiting the park. ‘Better signage and trail markers would be a good start’, he says, as would encouraging nature-based tourism operations. There have been various proposals over the years — years ago I think they even had camel tours through parts of the park,’ he says. A more contemporary version is the four-wheel-drive tour of the Gorge operated by Ben Neville, owner of Off Piste 4WD Tours. Ben, who has been given special access to the park, capitalises on its stellar location in the middle of one of South Australia’s premier food and wine regions. Ben says his customers, who include local, interstate and international visitors, are frequently blown away by the unexpected splendour of the Gorge, especially when the views are paired with local wine and hot takeaway packs from The Salopian Inn. ‘It was without doubt my assumption that coming into this was going to be a real jewel in the crown — having that food and wine offering built into it just puts the icing on the cake,’ he says.

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Fleurieu Weddings On April 11th 2015, Shari (nee Virgin) and Charlee Dare were married at the Whalers Inn Resort at Victor Harbor. Photographs by Kate Elmes.

Above: The beach-side setting of Eat at Whalers – a great spot for a kiss.

Shari grew up in Victor Harbor, while Charlee spent a lot of time down on the Coast pursuing his love of surfing, so it seemed an obvious choice to marry on the Fleurieu Peninsula. They met through mutual friends while they were both studying at Adelaide University and found that they shared many things in common; like a love of travel, snow-boarding/snow-skiing, water skiing, good food and wine – always a good omen! After almost nine years together Charlee proposed on Christmas Eve 2014. He spent all day decorating the couple’s courtyard with fairy lights, candles and flowers and cooking a three-course meal. Just before dessert Charlee surprised Shari with diamonds that were later 78

made into her engagement ring by Christopher Green Jewellers, who later fashioned their wedding rings. After a three-month engagement they wed on a beautiful day at Shari’s parents’ home at Knight’s Beach, after which everyone set off to the nearby and delightful Eat@Whalers for the reception, which started with drinks and nibbles on the glorious balcony above the outlook of a tranquil sea and resting pelicans, followed by a sit down three-course gourmet meal prepared by the Whalers’ chefs. Shari’s dress was by made by Alli Lynch from Betrothed and topped off with her mother’s veil, while the bridesmaids’ dresses were made at Ana’s Fashion Studio, Goolwa.


Top: The wedding party. Centre left and right: The dining hall at Eat at Whalers has loads of atmosphere and the food is sublime. Above: The wedding PARTY!

The flowers were provided by Allira Florist of Victor Harbor; hair styled by Beach Cuts of Middleton; makeup by Lacey Bell, Fleurieu; the ring cushion handmade by the Groom’s mother, Rosemary Dare with the cake made by Natasha Fairhurst (the Bride’s cousin … and Bridesmaid). Jono Stokes was Best Man, Ben Ide the Groomsman, Lara Spriggs the Maid of Honour and Natasha Fairhurst the Bridesmaid. The Ring Bearer was Charlie Kiely. The boys had prepared themselves at Whalers Resort while the girls got ready at the Bride’s parents’ home overlooking Knight’s Beach,

right next door to the garden where the ceremony was to be held. So there was no excuse for the bride to be late! The acoustic music at the ceremony was provided by local musician Luke Dunkerley, while the acoustic music and DJ-ing at the reception was provided by Daniel Cameron. Guests amused themselves in a photo booth. Guests travelled from overseas, interstate as well as from South Australia. Shari and Charlee wish to thank their parents Janice and David Virgin and Rosemary and Denis Dare, along with the rest of their family and friends for helping to make the day so special.

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The Local Ad Page Willunga Gallery signage 03June2014.pdf

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studio If you love art, visit John Lacey’s contemporary gallery/studio and meet this award winning artist. Originals and prints. Open most days 11am - 5pm. 41 Woodcone Rd Mt Compass. T: 8556 8388 M: 0419 823 708 W: johnlacey.com.au

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Supporting Australian Artists and Craftspeople Paintings, Prints, Jewellery, Giftware, Aboriginal Art, Ceramics, Textiles, Glass, Homewares, Children’s Toys and Cards. Open Friday, Sunday and Monday 11-4, Saturday 10-4 29 High Street, Willunga, South Australia 5172 contact@willungagallery.com.au willungagallery.com.au

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Morning tea from 11am and lunch from midday Wednesday to Sunday. Dinner Friday and Saturday. Two new spring menus and bar snacks – a culinary journey.

Bookings: 8598 4184 www.leonardsmill.com.au 7869 Main South Road, Second Valley

McLaren Vale Garden Centre

wants to inspire you to achieve something special in your garden 174 Main Road McLaren Vale Phone 8323 8440 www.goodgarden.com.au

“First for fruit trees on the Fleurieu”

Solo, duo & trio performances. Cellar doors, restaurants, private & corporate functions. Specialising in weddings on the Fleurieu. Sample a local brew, live music and lunch with a view. Meet resident Samoyeds Mia, Cooper & Hoppy.

Contact us today:

Smiling Samoyed Brewery 46 Main South Rd Myponga Fri Sat Sun 11-6 Most public holidays Weekend wood oven pizza t: 8558 6166.

Or find us on Facebook:

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shannonlloydacoustic.com Shannon Lloyd Solo Acoustic


Graphic design and art direction for print and web. Preferred supplier to FLM Telephone: 8132 1223 www.threefiftyseven.com

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SOCIAL PAGES

Being Social: Love Local Fleurieu On July the 3rd the lovely ladies of Love Local Fleurieu convened at the stunningly beautiful Chapel Hill Retreat. This growing community is all heart, supporting, connecting and celebrating local Fleurieu women in business. A gorgeous late afternoon, with equally gorgeous women opening their hearts and creating opportunities. Photos courtesy of Angela Lisman.

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01: Ellen Wundersitz, Penelope Carrick , Susanne Bailey and Vicky Flannigan 02: Love Local Fleurieu ladies 03: Meg Carr writing down her aspirations 04: Claire Byrt, Sonya Martin and Heidi Wolff 05: The group listen intently 06: Charlene Darmadi, Sarah Scott and Courtney Stephen 07: Hannah Georgeson and Kristin Nelson.

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Being Social: Penny’s Hill for SALA 2015 On July the 31st FLM headed out to SALA Exhibition: Penny’s Pick curated by John Lacey. The works were set against the Penny’s Hill Cellar Door and Restaurant backdrop. An outstanding and eclectic exhibition, with work from the venerable Dridan, the emerging watercolorist, Thompson, plus the brilliance, expression and abstraction of Kellett, Lacey, Newman, O’Callaghan, O’Malley and Riley, the exhibition was a real standout.

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Being Social: Kangaroo Island Fungi On August the 2nd FLM headed out How do we Love Thee? Let us Count the Ways … at The National Wine Centre. Work by awardwinning, established artists, as well as emerging artists, explored the theme of fungi in a vast array of styles and media. The exhibition was curated by Fleur Peters of Fine Art Kangaroo Island.

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01: Anthony Whaite and Irene Dougan 02: Max Mason and Jo Locke 03: Tom and Kate O’Callaghan with John and Lydia Lacey 04: Sam Thompson and Susie Riley 05: Meme Thorne and Evelyn Roth 06: Gail Kellett Brown , Karen and Des Commerford and Lesley Redgate 07: Peter and Lisbeth Moritz 08: Garry and Velli Algate 09: Greg Pladson and Catrin Ehle 10: Anne Dyson, Fleur Peters, Sue Arlidge and Rubina Carbon 11: Rod Dolling and Chris Luscombe 12: Dr William Tam, Fred Peters and Feng Tam.

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SOCIAL PAGES

Being Social: Tatachilla Year Twelve Formal Friday the 3rd of July was a night of glitz, glamour and a well-earned celebration for over one hundred Year 12 students from Tatachilla Lutheran College. The evening was celebrated in style at the Stamford Grand Hotel at Glenelg and was a fitting occasion for the Class of 2015 in this, the 20th Anniversary of the College.

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Being Social: Langhorne Creek Cellar Treasures Hundreds of visitors flocked to Langhorne Creek on the 8th and 9th of August to uncover some hidden gems at the Cellar Treasures weekend. This two-day cellar door event offers a chance to try and buy rare museum wines, normally unavailable to the public. Rare wines were enjoyed, along with locally sourced regional produce to complement them.

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01: Jessica Tingey, Zoe Ingoldby-Craig, Poppy Fitzpatrick, Ailish Ling, Chelsea Camm, Maddie Goldsmith, Karri Nott, Letitia Downes and Ashlee Mooney. 02: Ashlee Mooney, Isaiah Turner, Edan Garner, Nathan Deliveyne, Luca Baker, Isacc Freeman and Jurad Blanusa. 03: Jessica Simkin, Sarah Jeynes and Amber Maslin. 04: Glenn Dunbar, Brayden Theil and Tyru Fawcett. 05: Maddie Goldsmith, Ailish Ling and Chelsea Camm. 06: Sarah Raper, Madeleine Beveridge, Molly Schiffmann and Jaimie Thompson 07: Andrea Upton, Ramona Turner, Kelly Ward and Jenny McFeat 08: Anne McLennan and Bri Potts 09: Keith Tew and Dee Rowlands 10: Elaine and Graham Witt, Michael Bruer, and Brian and Lucy McLaughlin 11: Jason Duffield and Brenton Faehrmann 12: Kate Cooper from Lake Breeze serving Hamish, Darren and Amity. 84


Being Social: FLM Solstice Soirée at Penny’s Hill On Friday June 19th a great crowd gathered at Penny’s Hill Cellars to help us celebrate our third anniversary with ‘A Solstice Soiree’. Fabulous donations of local food and wine enabled us to create a great community atmosphere and help raise funds for the Willunga Farmers’ Market Young Farmers Scholarship. Photos courtesy of Angela Lisman.

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01: Lesa Farrant and Kim Thompson 02: Georgina Molly Lightowler and Cara West 03: Don and Carolyn Bailey 04: Judy Hoey & Raylene Joy Main 05: Lyall Anderson and Nicky Connolly 06: Dan Procter and Sam Hage 07: Warren Pickering, Prue Young and Campbell Haig 08: Audery Watson, Nadia Haddrick, Leonie Giles, and Arora Lumsden 09: Mia Maglieri & Vivienne Carey 10: Laurie Gutteridge, Emma Holdsworth, Claire and Connor Byrt.

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Best known for being crowned champion of Channel Seven’s ‘My Kitchen Rules’, proud South Australian Bree May continues her love and passion for food and cooking through her bespoke catering and cooking classes.

ANGELA LISMAN PHOTOGRAPHY Freelance Photographer with a passion for Food, Wine and Events.

T: 0409 738 297 E: angela@angelalismanphotography.com.au W: angelalismanphotography.com.au

Food According to Bree can cater a private gourmet dining experience for a small group, to a party of 200 or more. www.foodaccordingtobree.com

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The Local Ad Page

Luxury boutique hotel adjacent Goolwa Wharf. Chef-prepared breakfasts – delivered discreetly. Total privacy. Daily room servicing. Concierge. Onsite is The Australasian Dining Room. www.australasian1858.com

wellness spa Bring your skin back to life! With our ‘O Cosmedics’ special offer Purchase a Skin Prescription box for $99 and receive a Pro Derma Peel valued at $95 FREE. Contains a cleanser, exfoliator, serum & cream.

wellness . massage . skin health 31 Saltfleet Street, Pt Noarlunga Telephone: 8384 5005 www.wildindigo.com.au info@wildindigo.com.au

ALIGN REVIVE THRIVE chiropractic podiatry massage yoga Shop 3/48 Main Rd Normanville SA 5204 Ph: 8558 3834 www.thechiropracticworks.com

BLUE DOOR

STUDIO Unwind at DeeVine Every Saturday 11am-1pm. The doors are open to the community to come in and meditate, practice, relax and unwind. All welcome – optional donation. 38 High Street Willunga SA 5172 M: 0419 035 344 E: deevine@chariot.com.au W: deevinestudio.com.au Dee Vine Studio

27 High Street, Willunga

Let’s talk hearing. Healthy aging is very dependent on good hearing. We risk our social skills if we cannot communicate. A hearing test is simple yet informative. Mary Trowbridge Audiologist 187 Main Rd Mclaren Vale M: 0411 779 916 mary@fleurieuhearing.com.au www.fleurieuhearing.com.au

(08) 8556 2379 Delicious & skilfully prepared seasonal menus with fresh, local produce using classical French technique by chef/owner Shane Horsley. Thurs 6pm-9pm Friday 12pm-9pm Saturday 8am-9pm Sunday 8am-4:30pm W: altarbistro.com F: facebook.com/AltarBistro

IBIS HAS THE LOT! Plants, Water Lilies, Aquatic Plants, Statues, Goldfish and Aquarium Accessories, Stock Feed, Honey, Apiary Gear and Gifts.

Licensed cafe Carnevale coffee Breakfast and Lunch

We are at the Corner of Kessell Rd and Cadell St Goolwa SA. Ph: 08 8555 1311

48 Main Road Normanville SA 5204 Phone: 5885 2537

Open every day from 7:30am

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Classic Adelaide Rally: October 16–17 South Australia has a rich motoring heritage and boasts one of the largest memberships for a car club in all of Australia: the Sporting Car Club of SA. Driving through magnificent countryside, sharing in the camaraderie that occurs when driving together with friends or a group, is an activity that we see quite a bit in SA. Whether it is classic, modern or vintage – for racing or for leisure – each of us is sure to find a niche and a club to fit in SA. It is beautiful driving country and has indeed gained a reputation internationally as being a world class destination for the motoring enthusiast. In October of this year the Sporting Car Club of SA and Adelaide will again play host to the Adelaide Motorsport Festival, including a revival of the Classic Adelaide Rally. Cars of different classes and vintages will participate in a range of events, including parades and parties, where the general public can get involved and enjoy the festivities while admiring the polished steel and chrome of some consummate vehicular porn. The race itself will encompass two main tour legs: Sealink Fleurieu Friday; and the Adelaide Hills on Saturday. The forty-two kilometre Fleurieu leg is one of the longest tour stages hosted in the Southern Hemisphere. It will see road closures and even a LOCK IN LUNCH at Leonard’s Mill Restaurant in Second Valley. Revellers who are lucky enough to get in and get a ticket for the ‘lock in’ party will have the best seats in the house for this stage of the tour. The team at Leonards Mill will be showcasing the best of the Fleurieu and offering 88

an array of outdoor and open-fire dining experiences. Closed roads and interference of general traffic flow can be avoided and enjoyed by just submitting to it and getting involved. Rally sponsor, Sealink, has even rescheduled some of their sailing times out of Cape Jervis on the Friday to aid with the road closures – and to embrace the fun. At the end of the day this event is a major sporting event for SA – it is good for tourism and for the profile of the state – and as Ken Messenger (one of the organisers of the event) says, ‘It is good to share the countryside and this motoring paradise that we have here in SA.’ For further information go to: www.classicadelaide.com.au Book in for the Lock in Lunch: www.leonardsmill.com If you want to get a closer look at the cars head over to the Yankalilla Lunch Stop at the oval starting from about noon on October 16.


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valley

The Luxurious Wilds

of Kangaroo Island

McLaren Vale Region

McLaren Vale Region · Goolwa · Victor Harbor · Yankalilla · Kangaroo Island

· Goolwa · Victor

Oliver’s Taranga

Still going strong

Mavericks

in the Vale

of the Vale

Harbor · Yankalilla

· Kangaroo Island

So when you say Fleurieu Peninsula, which regions are you actually including? This has changed over the years, but currently it’s considered to be the areas defined by the following four council regions: City of Onkaparinga, Alexandrina Council, City of Victor Harbor and the District Council of Yankalilla. Although not technically part of the Fleurieu, we also include Kangaroo Island (just so they don’t feel left out).

With everything from whale watching to wine tasting, white sandy beaches to sumptuous food, contemporary art galleries and craft breweries, the Fleurieu Peninsula is Adelaide’s playground. Fleurieu Peninsula is magic on your doorstep. www.fleurieupeninsula.com.au

www.fleurieuliving.com.au

FLEURIEU LIVING

MAGAZINE


FLEURIEU LIVING

‘The Kelsey’ display home – 47 Sun Orchid Drive, Hayborough. Open: Mon-Wed-Sat-Sun and public holidays 1:00 to 4:30. Telephone South Coast Constructions on 8552 4444.

T H E B E S T O F S O U T H A U S T R A L I A’ S F L E U R I E U P E N I N S U L A A N D K A N G A R O O I S L A N D

FLEURIEU LIVING MAGAZINE

Build your dream home – in a dream location | beyondtoday.com.au | southcoastconstructions.com.au

SPRING 2015

Beyond, the perfect balance of sustainability, life and luxury. Stages 1-7 SOLD OUT • Stage 8 on sale now ‘off the plan’ • Large allotments of 550-950 sqm from $160,000 SA’s most sustainable and energy efficient development • Phone 0412 620 022 or email adam@beyondtoday.com.au.

www.fleurieuliving.com.au

Lifestyle and sustainability.

AU $8.95 SPRING 2015

Aldinga Rising Hippest destination in the south • Barn1890 The rebuild • Young Farmers A new crop • Winemaker of the Year Peter Fraser • Big Win for Southern Fleurieu Aquatic centre McLaren Vale Region · Goolwa · Victor Harbor · Yankalilla · Kangaroo Island

Profile for Fleurieu Living Pty Ltd

Fleurieu Living Magazine Spring 2015  

Published quarterly, Fleurieu Living Magazine features the best in food and wine, homes and gardens, growers, producers, accommodation and d...

Fleurieu Living Magazine Spring 2015  

Published quarterly, Fleurieu Living Magazine features the best in food and wine, homes and gardens, growers, producers, accommodation and d...

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