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front cover www.fleurieuliving.com.au

Your idyllic retirement is now sustainable.

T H E B E S T O F S O U T H A U S T R A L I A’ S F L E U R I E U P E N I N S U L A A N D K A N G A R O O I S L A N D

FLEURIEU LIVING MAGAZINE

CHITON RETIREMENT LIVING

back cover

FLEURIEU LIVING

Yala Yala Springs A family retreat at Back Valley

Corner of Port Elliot Road and Ocean Road, Hayborough.

Paeroa

Our innovative, sustainable village has homes uniquely designed to optimise warming winter sunlight and minimise summer heat gain.

Living off the grid in high style

Solar Energy and hot water supply, convenient underground tanks for

Electric Tractor

rainwater harvesting, double glazed windows and high levels of insulation provide a dramatic reduction in living costs and a level of comfort only

Retro chic by the reservoir

intelligent design can provide. Private outdoor living areas with external

Port Noarlunga

shading create beautiful indoor/outdoor relationships. Prices ranging from $359, 000 – $449, 000.

Treasure by the seaside AU $7.95 SPRING 2013 SPRING 2013

For more information visit www.chiton.com.au or call KeyInvest on 1300 658 904.

McLaren Vale Region · Goolwa · Victor Harbor · Yankalilla · Kangaroo Island

think outside the box consider the new innovative, affordable, modern method of getting your building project on the ground...


front cover www.fleurieuliving.com.au

Your idyllic retirement is now sustainable.

T H E B E S T O F S O U T H A U S T R A L I A’ S F L E U R I E U P E N I N S U L A A N D K A N G A R O O I S L A N D

FLEURIEU LIVING MAGAZINE

CHITON RETIREMENT LIVING

back cover

FLEURIEU LIVING

Yala Yala Springs A family retreat at Back Valley

Corner of Port Elliot Road and Ocean Road, Hayborough.

Paeroa

Our innovative, sustainable village has homes uniquely designed to optimise warming winter sunlight and minimise summer heat gain.

Living off the grid in high style

Solar Energy and hot water supply, convenient underground tanks for

Electric Tractor

rainwater harvesting, double glazed windows and high levels of insulation provide a dramatic reduction in living costs and a level of comfort only

Retro chic by the reservoir

intelligent design can provide. Private outdoor living areas with external

Port Noarlunga

shading create beautiful indoor/outdoor relationships. Prices ranging from $359, 000 – $449, 000.

Treasure by the seaside AU $7.95 SPRING 2013 SPRING 2013

For more information visit www.chiton.com.au or call KeyInvest on 1300 658 904.

McLaren Vale Region · Goolwa · Victor Harbor · Yankalilla · Kangaroo Island

think outside the box consider the new innovative, affordable, modern method of getting your building project on the ground...


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NBN, NBN Co, Powered by the NBN, Retail Service Provider of NBN Co, and other NBN Brands are trademarks of NBN Co Limited and used under licence.

designed for living


still dreaming about building?

our unique building options offer you a design for almost any situation at an Internet & Ho m e Phprice o n e affordable for only $9 from

34,000

$

9* per month!

parent or teenager retreats N withW fr& vanity om Montim• e studio retreat/officeE shower dia In ternet • granny the Better Choice Bu flats nd le includes: • man caves •A THE STUDIO

less $8,500 grant $ 25,500

DSL2+ with 250Gb •ahome or site offices nytime downloads • Home Phone Line Re•n2, ta3l or 4 bedroom family homes • Unlimited Local Ca • prices start at just $34,000 lls • Unlimited National • plus the $8,500 grant applies Calls • Unlimited Calls to M • 4 week build time obiles (within Austra lia) • Great service and s • 5 year structural warranty $44,000 upport! • 6 star energy efficiency THE RETREAT from

* Excludes any connec

one bedroom full feature flat

$ tion costs, hardw less grant are$8,500 and spe 35,500 cial calls such as 13/1300 & Internation

al

about systembuilt

A Systembuilt modular home is one of the most efficient ways to start living the life you want to, faster. With everything included from exterior finishes through to detail like tapware and cabinetry, a Systembuilt home simply needs to be connected to your property’s services and the good life begins.

telephone 1300 073 995 Montimedia Internet

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stop dreaming... start today...

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www.montimedia.com.au sales@systembuilthomes.com.au Phone 1300 79 49 69 systembuilthomes.com.au all prices aresupplier for base model and subject to change without notice Official of telephone and internet services to Fleurieu grant conditions apply pleaseLiving check forMagazine! eligibility

NBN, NBN Co, Powered by the NBN, Retail Service Provider of NBN Co, and other NBN Brands are trademarks of NBN Co Limited and used under licence.

designed for living


THE STUDIO

less $8,500 grant $ 25,500

studio retreat/office with shower & vanity

THE RETREAT

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from

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less $8,500 grant $35,500

one bedroom full feature flat

our unique building options offer you a design for almost any situation at an affordable price • parent or teenager retreats • granny flats • man caves • home or site offices • 2, 3 or 4 bedroom family homes • prices start at just $34,000 • plus the $8,500 grant applies • 4 week build time • 5 year structural warranty • 6 star energy efficiency about systembuilt A Systembuilt modular home is one of the most efficient ways to start living the life you want to, faster. With everything included from exterior finishes through to detail like tapware and cabinetry, a Systembuilt home simply needs to be connected to your property’s services and the good life begins.

telephone 1300 073 995

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less $8,500 grant $45,500

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designed for living 1


Key Personnel

2

Contributors

Petra de Mooy Petra is a publisher, an interior designer, a furniture maker and a devotee of good food, good design and good stories. She is also mum to Lucy!

Alexandra Paxinos Alexandra is a twenty-one year old marketing graduate and occasional blogger. Her position at Fleurieu Living exposes her to all the things she loves: food, fashion and social events.

Jason Porter Jason has worked as a graphic designer and creative director both locally and overseas for more than twenty five years. What he lives for most these days however, is having the house to himself so he can tinker with his hi-fi system.

James Potter Allegedly conceived in a hot-house, James believes all gardens are improved by a drink and a gentle dig. He works, sometimes, as a garden designer.

Leonie Porter-Nocella Leonie is a survivor of decades of academic editing and ghost writing. She quite fancies herself as a food, coffee and wine connoisseur and an animal rights advocate. Editing FLM brings a little light into her life after all those mind-numbing PhDs.

emme jade After first picking up a camera in high school, emme decided that a creative career in photography was for her. With a love of fashion, travel and art, she captures the true essence of everything she photographs.

Perscia Maung After years of moonlighting as a blues singer and keeping rather anti-social hours, Perscia now enjoys her day job at FLM. This allows her to not only walk her Great Dane on the beach, but to properly take in the region she so adores.

Heidi Linehan Heidi owns ‘heidi who? photos’ and specialises in location photography. Photographing everything from compost bins to glamorous five star resorts. She is based on the Fleurieu, South Australia, but works across the globe. She is also mum to Belle and Ashton.

Robert Geh Robert Geh can’t remember who to blame for his descent into photography, but he has been a purveyor of fine commercial photography servicing many clients both large and small over the last two decades.

Ainsley Roscrow Bachelor of Arts. Bachelor of Education Early childhood. Advanced Dip. Montessori Studies. Managing Director Montessori Rose Pty Ltd. Mother of four and active local community member. Passionate and genuine advocate for early childhood education.

Grant Beed Grant has recently moved to Port Willunga with wife Lisa and their four boys. After working in the film and television industry in Sydney for over ten years, they have now opted for a wholesome beach side existence on the Fleurieu.

Heather Millar Heather arrived on the Fleurieu Peninsula eight years ago, by way of London, Melbourne and Hobart. She runs a freelance editorial consultancy from Willunga, and enjoys the spoils of life amongst the sea and vines. www. zestcommunications.com.au


Publisher Information Merenia Vince Merenia is a New Zealander who has wandered far afield to Sydney, London and now Adelaide where she is raising her small children. She loves writing, cooking and her husband. In her spare time she is also an occupational therapist. Mike Lucas The right side of Mike’s brain has enabled him to be a children’s author and owner of Shakespeare’s Bookshop in Port Noarlunga. His left side has qualified him as an engineer. He is cognitively ambidextrous. Stephanie Johnston Stephanie Johnston is a former book publisher turned town and country planner. She is interested in how good planning and design can harness and enhance the ‘core drivers’ of a community – culture and commerce. Louise Pascale Louise is a journalist and producer based in Adelaide. Her love of the Fleurieu began years ago when her parents bought a property in Carrickalinga. Louise takes every opportunity to head south where her mobile is out of range and only her mum knows how to find her. Mike Rushby Mike has been Creative Director of several Adelaide advertising agencies and a founding partner of his own (agency). The recipient of many local and national awards, Mike, or Hunta as he is more widely known, is now a freelance creative consultant living at Sellicks.

PUBLISHER Fleurieu Living Magazine is published four times a year by Fleurieu Living Pty Ltd. ISSN 2200-4033 PUBLISHING EDITOR AND MANAGING DIRECTOR Petra de Mooy petra@fleurieuliving.com.au EDITOR Leonie Porter-Nocella ADVERTISING SALES Perscia Maung perscia@fleurieuliving.com.au EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Alexandra Paxinos GRAPHIC DESIGN AND ART DIRECTION Jason Porter jason@fleurieuliving.com.au PRINTER Graphic Print Group DISTRIBUTION Integrated Publication Solutions SUBSCRIPTIONS www.isubscribe.com.au ALL ENQUIRIES Petra de Mooy petra@fleurieuliving.com.au POSTAL ADDRESS PO Box 7, Sellicks Beach, South Australia 5174. ONLINE www.fleurieuliving.com.au www.facebook.com/FleurieuLivingMagazine COPYRIGHT All content copyright Fleurieu Living Magazine Pty Ltd unless otherwise stated. While Fleurieu Living Magazine takes every care to ensure the accuracy of information portrayed in this publication, the publisher accepts no liability for errors contained in editorial or advertising copy. The views of the contributors are not necessarily endorsed by Fleurieu Living Magazine. Printed on paper from well managed forests using environmentally friendly vegetable-based inks.

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Contents

18 FEATURED HOME: Yala Yala Springs at Back Valley. FRONT COVER: Photographed by Robert Geh.

28 FEATURED ARTIST: Dana Kinter – Hope is the thing with feathers.

FOOD AND WINE

MARKETS & EVENTS

HEALTH AND WELLBEING

82 Cooks and Chefs – Cameron Clarke serves up a super starter and Lucy Dalston dishes up a delicious dessert.

10 Diary Dates and Events to keep you busy this winter.

40 Dental Health – Not just a vain cosmetic indulgence.

26 Vale Cru – 5th anniversary tasting event at the Victory Hotel.

42 Gen Me – The pitfalls of parenting with too much praise.

COUNTRY LIFE

SHOPPING LOCAL

38 Yaringa Alpacas.

88 What to buy. Where to buy it.

70 Eden at the Races – 20th anniversary of the Langhorne Creek Vignerons’ Day.

14 Electric Tractor – Retro chic by the reservoir.

64 Penny’s Hill celebrates 25 years. 52 All Fired Up over pizza.

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54

44

77

FEATURED DESIGN: Paeroa – Living off the grid in high style.

FEATURED TOWN: Port Noarlunga – Treasure by the sea.

FEATURED PRODUCER: Smiling Samoyed – Brewing up a storm at Myponga.

LIVING GREEN

BOOKS

BEING SOCIAL

33 The Dirt – James describes how to measure the true coming of Spring.

24 Book Reviews – Great picks for Spring reading.

93 FLM gets out to see who was at the events: · FLM First Anniversary Party · Australia’s Biggest Afternoon Tea at Alexandrina Cheese · Hortas: Big Fiesta Night · Edinburgh Great Shiraz Challenge · Sea & Vines Festival 2013.

48 Eco Tourism – More than meets the eye.

WEDDINGS

PENINSULA PEOPLE

90 Louise Reeves and Steve Padmore 23 February, 2013.

68 Irina Santiago – From Salvador to McLaren Vale.

GROWERS & PRODUCERS 77 Smiling Samoyed – Brewing up a storm at Myponga.

74 Anna Fenech – Exploring details in the landscape. 62 Julia Henning – Unearthed.

HISTORY 34 Sellicks – The bad old days.

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ACKNOWLEDGES

A special thanks to the advertising partners that have made a long term commitment to FLM. GOLD PARTNERS

designed for living

SILVER PARTNERS

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BRONZE PARTNERS


Welcome to FLM In the northern hemisphere, this season brings on a hormonal surge and growth spurts in both the human and the plant population. After months of deep freeze, snow and darkness, meaning that most of the fresh fruit and veg has to be shipped from hundreds, if not thousands of kilometres away, people embrace spring like a cat on catnip: jumping up in the air and often awkwardly attempting something vaguely acrobatic. Spring Fever was a term definitely born in a more extreme climate. We here on the Fleurieu experience the transition from Winter to Spring in a more measured way: revelling in the odd warm day and complaining that we want winter to be over ... when the temperature has plummeted from 21 to 17! How spoiled are we? Our winter fruit is the orange, and even in the depths of winter we still have that odd balmy day. Some of the brave among us even venture into the chilly ocean. In preparation for Spring, the top of the list is often clearing the sour sobs from the garden beds, or pruning away all the winter overgrowth on the vines. The balmy Spring weather that vacillates from warm to cool can go on for a little bit longer than some would like, and then we get that odd day in October when it is suddenly hits 30. We panic, because some of us remember that we do not like it when it is too hot. Tough. Enjoy the Spring for what it is – one of the most bearable climates in the world! It’s ours … and Spring is usually just one beautiful day after another.  The FLM team

Letters to the Editor “Special thanks to Louise, Petra and everyone at wonderful Fleurieu Living Magazine for the excellent winter edition article “The Ocean Watchdog”. Very much appreciated and we really enjoyed Louise’s company on KI Dolphin Watch Survey 136 to North Cape in April. We look forward to your return, in hopefully better conditions! Thank you so much! “ Kangaroo Island Dolphin Watch “Hi Petra, We’re absolutely bowled over! The article is so beautiful, thank you to you and your team. I can’t believe how much feeling and fact Merenia wove into the words and Grant’s photography had me thinking “wow, that’s our place!?!” Thank you for the invitation to your First Anniversary Party, we are looking forward to it. And thanks again for the beautiful article.” Catherine Christie “Hi Petra, Congratulations on the winter edition; grabbed a glance the other day and looks brilliant. Have a great night celebrating; the team deserves all credit for the hard work and commitment. Hopefully the readers are appreciating all the special treasures you’re showcasing. We definitely feel it’s a special part of the world.” Carolyn Woods “Hi Petra I am already on my second read through (you never know what you missed out on in the first sitting!) The Fleurieu has a special spot in my heart, we first started holidaying at the Clifton Guest House, which is now pretty much where KFC and the petrol station is at Woolies Victor Harbor. Over the years my father then progressed to caravans and we would stay at the council caravan park Victor Harbor, but then he discovered a tiny park behind Franklin Parade, just near the general store! Now my parents have a house at Middleton, how times change. I love your magazine and am so glad my sister gave me the subscription; I can’t believe I was not aware of the magazine. Anyway, to you and all your contributors: well done on a much loved and anticipated magazine.” Karyn Cotter

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LIVE THE ADVENTURE!

Fleurieu Peninsula, the place to be! Stunning natural scenery of rolling hills and vineyards, broken only by picturesque beaches and rugged coastlines. If your interest is in food, wine, culture, nature and wildlife - the Fleurieu Peninsula provides a fantastic backdrop.

Culture. Adventure. Life.

So much to do, so much to see! Just 45 minutes from Adelaide, the Fleurieu Peninsula offers a tapestry of experiences showcasing the best of South Australia. For more information, please go to www.fleurieupeninsula.com.au

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MARKETS & EVENTS

Diary Dates Markets, Festivals and Events.

Markets: Willunga Farmers’ Market In the Willunga Town Square every Saturday from 8am to 12.30pm. The Farmers’ Market has a real buzz, is wonderful for regional produce — and you just know that all the diehards will be there each week, come rain or shine. Willunga Artisans’ Market In the Willunga Show Hall (opposite the Willunga Farmers’ Market) on the second Saturday of every month. Local art and craft, with a little bit of something for everyone. Victor Farmers’ Market At the Grosvenor Gardens, Victor Harbor every Saturday from 8am to 12.30pm. Over 32 stalls, with locally caught seafood, organic vegetables, seasonal fruit, local honey, mushrooms, fresh flowers, Fleurieu regional wines and much more. Well worth the visit. Goolwa Wharf Market Goolwa Wharf — every first and third Sunday of the month from 9am to 3.30pm. With around 80 stalls there is a myriad of goods on offer. Bric-a-brac, collectibles, plants, books both new and old, and hand-crafted goods.

Willunga Quarry Market Adjacent to the Willunga Oval, every second Saturday of each month, rain or shine! A real gem, from fantastic coffee, tarot readings to that hard to find plant and local produce — it’s not to be missed.

Kangaroo Island Community Markets Lloyd Collins Reserve, by the beach at Penneshaw — first Sunday of the month from 9.30am to 1.00pm — with Kangaroo Island’s top food producers selling a range of fresh local produce in a great village atmosphere.

Port Elliot Market At Lakala Reserve Port Elliot, on the first and third Saturday of each month. A typical country market with plenty of fresh local produce on offer as well as a good mix of other goods such as bric-a-brac, books, fishing gear — even a $2 stall! There is sure to be something here for everyone.

Meadows Country Market Meadows Community Hall on the second Sunday of the month from 9.00am to 3.00pm. Local produce, crafts, collectibles, plants and bric-a-brac. A true country market.

Aldinga Bay Art, Craft and Produce Market 8am to 1pm on the fourth Sunday of every month at the corner of Aldinga Beach Road and Pridham Boulevard. Arts and crafts from local artisans and fresh local produce.

The Original Open Market Beach Road, Christies Beach first and third Sunday of the month from 9 to 2pm. Bric-a-brac, second-hand goods, fruit, vegetables — they have the lot!

Little Berry Vintage and Artisan Markets At the Rosemount Estate Cellar door on the first Sunday of every month. Browse the local vintage and artisans’ stalls with a glass in hand, or grab a bite to eat and enjoy some tunes by the crackling fire. There’s always something for the kids here too!

Strathalbyn Market In Lions Park, South Terrace, Strathalbyn. On the 3rd Sunday of the month from 8am to 2pm. Bric-a-brac, produce, coffee, pies, apples, plants, soaps, jewellery and much more in wonderfully historic Strathalbyn. Yankalilla Market In the Agricultural Hall, Main South Road, Yankalilla on the third Saturday of each month. Craft and Produce Market featuring goods from the local area. You’ll be surprised at what you may find!

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Myponga Markets In the old Myponga Cheese Factory every Saturday, Sunday, and Public Holiday from 10am to 4pm. Enjoy browsing over 100 stalls offering produce, books, toys, Balinese imports, musical instruments, vintage collectibles and much more. Market of Earthly Delights Held at the Encounter Centre in Victor Harbor on the first Sunday of each month from 1pm to 4pm. Bring and swap your surplus produce with other like-minded growers. Think home-grown fruit, vegetables, seedlings, flowers, honey, sauces, recipes, kindling, compost and more!


Festivals and Events: Art Exhibition: The Spirit of the Child: For Earth’s Sake. An exhibition of art works on nature and creation themes by Galilee Catholic School students. Opening night Friday September 6 at 5pm. When: September 6 until October 4. Open Saturdays 9-12 pm Where: Willunga Uniting Church, Corner of St Jude’s and St. Andrew’s Streets Willunga. Cost: By donation.

Langhorne Creek Writers’ Wordshop Come along to hear some great guest-speakers talk about varying writing styles and topics; then stay for lunch as well as the anticipated Writing Competition Awards Presentation. When: 6th – 8th September Time: 10am – 3pm Cost: $60 (includes lunch). Bookings essential.

Wirrina Bluegrass Festival The Yankalilla Acoustic Music Group presents the second annual Bluegrass Festival in Wirrina Cove. The Festival caters for everyone whether young, old, musicians, non-musicians, locals and those from further afield. Whether you come to play non-stop, pick a few tunes and have a drink, or just want to get away for a weekend and do something different, the Bluegrass Festival makes for a great weekend. Where: Wirrina Resort & Conference Centre, Wirrina Cove When: 6th – 8th September Cost: Day passes up to $35 and weekend passes up to $45 (children free).

Goolwa Alive Goolwa Traders shut their doors and close their main street for the annual street festival showcasing local produce, businesses and talent. Bring the family and enjoy a day of food and wine, live music, pony rides, face painting and much more. Where: Main Street, Goolwa When: 6th October Cost: Free

Rock ’n’ Roll Festival The Rock ’n’ Roll Festival brings together a range of local Rock ’n’ Roll bands and a large display of classic cars organised by the Historic Motor Vehicles Club of Victor Harbor. Check out the cars, enjoy the good vibes and a dance or two and feel free to bring the kids. Where: Warland Reserve, Victor Harbor When: 14th – 15th September Cost: Free!

Fleurieu Folk Festival The Fleurieu Folk festival in historic Willunga presents a weekend of music concerts and sessions, dance, workshops, bush poets, children’s entertainment, stalls and more. Discover your own talent at one of the many workshops, or just relax and enjoy the various local and interstate performers. Where: Willunga When: 25th – 27th October Cost: $60 for the entire weekend (children free) >

Open Everyday 6:30am -4:00pm 13 Old Coach Road Aldinga, South Australia

The Taste of Spring

www.facebook.com/HomeGrainBakery


MARKETS & EVENTS

Out of the Barrel Get a sneak peak of barrel samples and various pre-release wines from the 2013 vintage. Stay for lunch and make a day out of it. Where: Cellar doors throughout Langhorne Creek When: Saturday 9th November Time: 10am – 7pm Cost: Free entry Gorgeous Festival Gorgeous Festival consists of boutique music, food and wine, all to celebrate the flavours and creativity of our beautiful region. This year the festival will be held as a debut two-day event on the 22nd – 23rd of November, with headlining acts John Butler Trio and Eskimo Joe. Where: Serafino Winery, McLaren Vale When: 22nd – 23rd November Cost: check website for details – www.gorgeousfestival.com.au Art Feast The annual Art Feast is a 10-day celebration of the art, food and wines of Kangaroo Island, and now boasting 34 venues across the Island. Over 150 local artists, chefs and winemakers come together to showcase the gourmet produce of Kangaroo Island, making for a fantastic culinary experience. More info: kangarooislandartfeast.org.au Where: Various venues across the Island When: 4th – 13th October Christmas Concert Just in time for Santa! Come along and see Australia’s oldest police band in action. Enjoy their repertoire of classic carols and singalongs and get into the Christmas spirit ahead of the festive season. Where: Centenary Hall, Goolwa When: 30th November Time: 2 – 4pm Cost: $19/Adult, $15/Group 6+ and $15/18 and under. Fleurieu Art Prize Festival The Fleurieu Art Prize is the world’s richest landscape painting prize, culminating in a rich combination of fine art, great wine, fine food and the beautiful vistas of McLaren Vale and Fleurieu Peninsula. Where: Various locations throughout McLaren Vale, Goolwa, Strathalbyn, Victor Harbor and Willunga. When: 26th October – 25th November 2013 Cost: (if applicable) Exhibitions are free More info www.artprize.com.au Art Exhibition: On Track An exhibition by photographer Suzanne Laslett and printmaker Julia Wakefield exploring the diverse environments and buildings surrounding the Steamranger railway line. Part of the Fleurieu Art Prize community program. Where: Settlement Wines, Lot 101 Seaview Rd McLaren Vale When: October 26 – November 25. Launch November 3 @ 2.30pm Times: Mon to Fri 10am – 5pm, Weekends 11am – 5pm. 12


Retro chic

by the reservoir Heather Millar meets Pascale Johnstone, one of the drivers of Electric Tractor, a furniture store specialising in relics from the 20th century at the Myponga Market. Photographs by Grant Beed.

As you enter the Electric Tractor – a retro and vintage furniture store at the Myponga Markets, owned and staffed by Luke, Pascale and Adam Johnstone – you notice the funky signage above the front desk. Pascale explains: ‘Luke, my husband, got this old sign from somewhere, which said “Electrical Contractor”. Luke and [his brother] Adam were sitting around one night thinking about names for the store, and they were looking at this sign. They suggested chopping off the ends of it and there it was – Electric Tractor.’ Their store opened in Myponga Market – located on the edge of the Myponga Reservoir and in front of the Myponga Brewery – in October 2012, after Luke happened upon the space on a visit to see Adam, who lives near Cape Jervis. Luke, who runs his own furniture removal company in the city, was taking the kids for a weekend visit, and they stopped at Myponga Markets on the way. He found that the market had new owners, and some empty space, and that’s when inspiration hit. 14

‘He thought, well maybe we could try something on the weekends here’, says Pascale. ‘It’s something we’ve always wanted to do – but especially Luke; he’s always had “doing a shop” in the back of his head.’ Pascale, who was born in Marseille and works as a French teacher at WEA in the city, met Luke when they were both backpacking in North Queensland. ‘Luke had been travelling in Europe and the Caribbean, and decided that Cairns would be a nice place to stay for a while; and we met at the hostel. We stayed together; he was doing a bit of part-time crewing on big yachts, and we sailed to New Zealand for the America’s Cup there. We had a ball, and stayed on in New Zealand after that. We got married there.’ ‘We came back to Adelaide to settle – and then the kids arrived and we bought a house.’


‘Luke, my husband, got this old sign from somewhere, which said “Electrical Contractor”. Luke and [his brother] Adam were sitting around one night thinking about names for the store, and they were looking at this sign. They suggested chopping off the ends of it and there it was – Electric Tractor.’ Previous page: Electric Tractor at the Myponga Markets. This page top: Retro wares to wear. Left: Pascale Johnstone.

The family lives in Hawthorndene in a 60s house Luke found when he went there to move some furniture. ‘He just loved the place – the stone work around the chimney, the wood and the glass. He said to the lady who was there “I LOVE this house” and she said he could buy it if he wanted! It wasn’t on the market or anything, but we found a way to get a deposit together to buy it.’

The store has a mix of industrial, retro furniture, curious and vintage pieces –1960s coffee tables, couches, table lamps, retro bars, church pews, Danish/teak retro furniture, funky lights and more. Luke and Adam both customise some of the pieces as well, such as distressed finishes on chests of drawers and wardrobes. They also hire out furniture and odd pieces such as 1960s waterskis and the barber’s chair from their home.

Today, the house is decked out with the couple’s 60s and 70s furniture and eclectic pieces like a barber’s chair. ‘We love the feeling of stuff that you grew up with – pieces that evoke childhood memories. We have a shed-full of furniture at home, which helps to supply the Electric Tractor,’ says Pascale. They find ‘stuff’ all over the place – at the auction houses in the city, deceased estates, and people’s houses when Luke is working. ‘It’s constantly evolving’, Pascale explains, ‘and every item is hand-picked. We focus on the unusual, exotic, collectable and simply beautiful.’

‘Initially, we thought we would just test the water, it wouldn’t cost too much, and we’d see how we go’, says Pascale. ‘We thought it might be a bit of a risk – would Myponga be too far for people to come? But it’s turned out we’ve had a really good response. ‘There are retro stores up in town, but not so much down here, so we get people coming down from Aldinga Beach, Sellicks, the whole area. But also people who are coming down to Normanville and Yankalilla for the weekend; they will stop at the markets, just to see what’s in there. It’s handy also that we have a truck so we can deliver pieces.’ > 15


Above: An eclectic mix at Electric Tractor in the Myponga Markets.

The new owners of the market have plans for a few changes over the coming months. While still retaining the character of the building, they plan to upgrade by panting throughout, and adding new rear entrances, facilities for the disabled and an outdoor eating area. There will be new stalls featuring fresh local produce, an artist’s gallery, and of course, the new outdoor eating area. The café at the centre of the market will also get a facelift, with Electric Tractor providing the retro tables and chairs which visitors can use and then buy if they wish! Electric Tractor also now has a Facebook presence, a website and a blog. ‘We will also set up a little shop on eBay. That is our next step – once we find the time to do it!’ laughs Pascale.

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Yala Yala Springs

A family tradition of holiday farms on the Fleurieu continues into a third generation. Story by Merenia Vince. Photography by Drew Lenman.


When city-boy Paul Neighbour married Helen Lowrie he was quickly inducted into country life, as a direct result of the Lowrie family’s passion for the Inman Valley. Inspired by tranquil breaks at their holiday farm, Paul came to love being ‘in the middle of nowhere’. Although he’d always imagined a holiday house at the beach, he was now converted. Helen and Paul subsequently bought their own property, a 25-hectare bush block at Back Valley just south of the Inman Valley. And that might have been where the story ended, with their family of five enjoying regular holidays in the countryside. Except that in 2011 the disused but picturesque dairy farm next door, all 1000 hectares of it, went up for sale.

With the existing cottage too fragile to be restored, Helen and Paul lost no time in building a new home on the lower slopes of the property, taking advantage of the spectacular vistas across the landscape. Previous page: The home is hidden in a valley-within-a-valley on 1000 hectares of picturesque rolling hills. This page: Plate-glass and louvre windows run the length of the living area, linking the indoors and outdoors and placing the views centre stage.

For Helen and Paul, who primarily live and work in Adelaide, it was a big leap – far more ambitious than their small hobby farm. But Yala Yala Springs seduced them, and understandably so. Hidden in a valley-off-a-valley it’s a real story-book farm. Surrounded by a ring >

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of hills, plump cattle graze peacefully in the lush paddocks. A chain of springs and permanently-flowing streams run through the farm, providing a year-round water supply. This Arcadian scene is topped off by heritage-listed bushland on the upper slopes; a beautiful remnant that has never been cleared or grazed. Helen and Paul took the plunge with the aim of dividing their time equally between country and city once their children had been schooled. Until then Yala Yala Springs is a beloved holiday and weekend retreat for the family, although Paul stays on for an extra 2-3 days to tend to the farm. With the existing cottage too fragile to be restored, Helen and Paul lost no time in building a new home on the lower slopes of the property, taking advantage of the spectacular vistas across the landscape. Helen and Paul, like many home builders, started the design process by visiting various displays. They fell in love with a Sarah Homes’ design inspired by the ‘Lindsay’ they saw displayed at Old Noarlunga. They then modified the Lindsay design to suit their lifestyle and family requirements. An unusual aspect of this project was their sourcing old jetty timbers from Moonta to lend rustic elements throughout the build. With a reputation earned over 50 years for designing and building attractive, energy-efficient houses in South Australia, Sarah Homes has long had a significant presence on the Fleurieu Peninsula. Owing to the region’s strong beach and holiday ethos, Sarah Homes are a good fit … and for this reason have built extensively in this region.

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Helen and Paul’s charcoal-coloured contemporary house was constructed in an amazingly speedy four months. Built from lightweight materials in minimalist style, it succeeds as a clean, sleek counterpoint to the rural setting. A key feature is the giant indoor-outdoor niche at the eastern end of the house. Under the main roof and enclosed on three sides, the front is open to the outside with immense rough-hewn wharf timbers framing the view. The family enjoy this sheltered space all year round: the outdoor kitchen and shade make it perfect for summer entertaining, while the fireplace transforms it into a cosy nook for winter. The interiors are a clever combination of modern with a rustic twist. Slick glass and tile finishes and an informal plan are off-set by the warmth of more wharf timbers. Plate-glass and louvre windows run the length of the living area, linking the indoors and outdoors and placing the views centre stage. A wood-burning fireplace integrated with a rough-cut timber feature wall also adds texture and rusticity. Keeping true to the spirit of a holiday house, the couple have decorated in a relaxed, comfortable style. Helen describes the decor as ‘neutral with a bit of fun’. Off-white throughout, there are occasional flashes of vivid mandarin on the kitchen and bathroom cabinetry. The furniture is eclectic, keeping the tone casual. Two red, seventies armchairs and a shag-pile carpet add a slightly retro feel. A random collection of paintings clustered on one wall creates a touch of colourful chaos, with two enormous family photo-boards giving a personal touch. Topped off by a backdrop of rural scenery the home feels fresh and vibrant.


Ultimately, this luxurious house will be for family and friends while Paul and Helen build another one as their primary residence higher up beside the heritage bush. Meanwhile the couple is working hard on outdoor improvements. The driveway now has attractive stonework and timber fencing and is lined by an avenue of young eucalypts. At the front pine trees have been removed and eucalypts planted to give shade and attract birdlife. To the west they have established a woodland of European trees for autumn colour. The couple have invested enormous effort on the farm itself and achieved a lot in two years. For ease of management, they run beef rather than dairy, and keep a herd of 200 Angus cattle, along with a flock of Dorper sheep. The creeks- and spring-fed dams are now fenced off to prevent cattle intrusion. Roads through the farm have been upgraded and planted with avenues of native trees. New wooden fences and an extensive timber cattle yard have been built.

Keeping true to the spirit of a holiday house, the couple have decorated in a relaxed, comfortable style. Helen describes the decor as ‘neutral with a bit of fun’. Off-white throughout, there are occasional flashes of vivid mandarin on the kitchen and bathroom cabinetry. The furniture is eclectic, keeping the tone casual. Previous page: Plate-glass and louvre windows run the length of the living area, linking the indoors and outdoors and placing the views centre stage. This page top left: The large timber deck is perfect for outdoor entertaining. Top right: An abundant supply of firewood ensures everyone is warm and cosy on wet winter evenings.

Paul and Helen’s challenge is to give back to the land and ‘make it a better property’. Large areas of weed, mainly blackberry and gorse, have been cleared. With the support of the Natural Resources Management Board they’ve begun revegetating several areas to provide habitat for wildlife and shade for their stock – and simply to re-green and beautify the landscape. The couple revel in their slice of precious native bush and have taken great care of it, removing weeds encroaching on the margins, and keeping it carefully fenced to prevent stock entering. They’ve also been delighted to see echidnas, the odd kangaroo, diverse birdlife and rare butterflies. >

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The family has really taken to country life. The children share in most farm activities and are learning valuable life skills from fence-building to tree-planting and animal care, while having fun along the way. Friends and family often come for lunch and end up staying the night. As well as being a peaceful retreat, Yala Yala Springs has brought the family new purpose, a passion for the environment and a healthy outdoor lifestyle. Helen and Paul love their tailored-to-suit home and relish nurturing a beautiful farm back to life. Top left: Retro-styled kitchen appliances add a touch of playfulness. Top right: A splash of vibrant colour is used in the bathroom. Above: even the dog enjoys spending time ‘at the farm’. Right: The home can be seen nestled into the hillside as you approach the farm.

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ALDINGA BEACH

MILE END

OLD NOARLUNGA


MUSIC & BOOKS

Book Reviews by Mike Lucas.

has captured the horror and the humanity through Ali’s voice and, though it is made clear that not everybody involved acted with the best intentions, Ali himself became a hero to many that he helped. Rules and laws, it seems, are not always on the correct side of the line separating right from wrong.

Perfect North by Jenny Bond

Published by Hachette Australia ISBN 9780733629525 $29.99

The People Smuggler by Robin de Crespigny

Published by Penguin Books Australia ISBN 9780670076550 $29.95 From tyrannical Iraq, through the corruption of Indonesia, to Australian asylum, the true story of Ali Al Jenabi is an unimaginable account of the dreadful realities that force people to flee their own countries and the painful practicalities that drive the individuals known as ‘people smugglers’. During the terror regime of Saddam Hussein, Ali Al Jenabi witnessed members of his family being horrifically tortured and spent years suffering terrible abuse at the infamous Abu Ghraib jail. With no alternative he fled his country, leaving his remaining family the only thing he could – a promise to return for them. It was this promise that moulded him into what he was to eventually become. The perseverance, resilience and determination of Ali to provide freedom for his family and hundreds of others, despite constant tragedies that would be more than mere setbacks to the majority, are inspiring and heartbreaking. Robin de Crespigny

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Behind every true story of adventure there will always be the inevitable intertwining personal tales of the lives of the individuals involved. Jenny Bond has taken a fascinating, true account of a failed attempt to reach the North Pole by hot air balloon in 1897, and set it as a backdrop for just such a tale. Up to a point the characters are based on real people, but the story floats into fiction with an engrossing imagined investigation into the past life of one of the three doomed explorers, when over thirty years later, their remains and

equipment are discovered in the icy Arctic wastes. Among the objects recovered by journalist Knut Stubbendorff is the journal of young Nils Strindberg, containing love letters to his fiancé, Anna, back home in Sweden. Deviating from his original task of investigating the details of the unsuccessful expedition, Stubbendorff sets out on a quest to deliver the journal to its intended recipient, unravelling a far more intriguing tale of love, loss and embroidered truth. Shying away from what many would consider to be the one and only story here, Jenny Bond has delivered a narrative that, like the melting Arctic ice, eventually reveals the truth to all.

Pursuing Love & Death by Heather Taylor Johnson Published by Harper Collins Australia ISBN 9780732297213 $24.99 Heather Taylor Johnson’s first novel walks us slowly into the world of a family whose present day attitudes and circumstances


have been morphed and grown by past actions or inactions. On the lead up to a family wedding in Adelaide, each individual questions the validity of their present situation and the choices ahead of them. Graham and Velma, separated over thirty years ago; their children, Luna and Ginsberg, still affected by the break-up of their parents and questioning their own somewhat complicated relationships; and Darren, Graham’s brother, who has never formed a decent relationship with anybody outside the family. As the views of their separate and tangled lives are gradually exposed, it all initially seems so disparate, but with each tug of the curtain we are provided with feelings of identification and empathy in many of the concerns, regrets and the constant changes in outlook of the characters. What this book makes us realise is that lives are complicated, mistakes are made and actions have consequences that can last a lifetime. Inner conflict, self-negotiation and the scarceness of personal resolution are notions which mould our personalities, but as in Pursuing Love & Death, these are the ideas that often have the greatest impacts on our external relationships.

Capturing the Light: The Birth of Photography by Roger Watson and Helen Rappaport Published by Pan MacMillan ISBN 9780230768864 $29.99 In these times of constant visual media bombardment, most of us would find the idea of never having viewed a photograph inconceivable. And the sheer excitement of capturing that first image and fixing it upon a physical surface is something that we could hardly relate to. But in the 1830s, Henry Fox Talbot of England and Louis Daguerre of France were working independently, and using distinctly different techniques to be the first to make that breakthrough. Roger Watson and Helen

Rappaport have themselves captured the light of these two opposing characters, the giants of science whose shoulders they stood upon, the dynamic era in which they lived and the truly original legacy that we now all take for granted. Accompanied by a selection of intriguing first-ever photographs and with a text that is edited to a perfect length, this account of one of the greatest breakthroughs in both art and science reveals, more than most others, the sometimes uncontemplated chasm between now and then. The possibilities that would eventually develop from their magical inventions were, as then, unthought of, and even now it takes a book such as this to focus our appreciation on exactly what these two individuals have given us.

necessary integrity-without-compromise for the target audience? South Australian author, Rosanne Hawke and five other writers have managed to do just that in an original series entitled Through My Eyes. It helps that Rosanne spent ten years as an aid worker in the Middle East and has a respectable back catalogue of thoughtprovoking titles. Shahana is a fourteen year-old orphan supporting her six year-old brother with her embroidery skills. When they rescue an unconscious boy from beside the treacherous Line of Control that separates Pakistan and India, Shahana realises that she has placed her only remaining family at even greater risk than usual. Her fears appear justified by the constant, nearby militant gunfire, the oncoming harshness of winter and the ignorant reluctance of some individuals to see these poor souls as mere children. In an age when the media opens the window to the realities of conflict, and the doorway of escape to freedom is so often closed by people who already have it, these books will help a new generation to embrace compassion and acceptance.

Shahana by Rosanne Hawke Published by Allen and Unwin ISBN 9781743312469 $15.99 How do you write a true to life, absorbing book for middle-school children about children living in contemporary conflict zones around the world, and maintain the 25


Why would a business choose to stay small in an age of expansion and profit?

It must be love Vale Cru is a group of dedicated and like-minded McLaren Vale wine-makers who have been brought together by their shared philosophy of making quality a priority over profit, and they do it out of a common love of what they do. Many of these wine-makers have worked in various of the larger wineries and have found that the higher they climb up the corporate ladder ... the further removed they become from the very thing that brought them to wine-making in the first place. Each of them came to the realisation that in order to spring out of bed each morning in joyful anticipation of the day, they needed to detach themselves from all that is corporate and commercial and return to the basics of getting their hands dirty and immersing themselves in the gritty end of the business. All that has become important is to work from the ground up to experiment and obtain the very best result they can with methods that are as clean as possible, so that the true nature of the raw product (the quality of the grape and often the ingenuity of the blending) carries the wine. To do this, they necessarily have to involve themselves in each step of the winemaking process. It is this degree of personal involvement that ‘makes their day’. They are freed up to create and experiment, and in doing this they anticipate each new day and the satisfaction they know it will bring. Not only do they get to appreciate each day, but as they get nearer to opening a bottle of their own ‘go to whoa’ creation, the greater the wave of excitement and anticipation. ‘We have woven together a group of like-minded strangers and turned them into a tribe’. We’ve created a real movement, a commitment to the finest wine on a human scale’, says Vale Cru member James Hook. ‘There is an innovation that can only happen by having diverse personalities and backgrounds united by the same mindset’, Hook says. As well as new wine styles and types, the Vale Cru wineries are reinterpreting the classic wines, like Shiraz and Cabernet.

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Join the Vale Cru, McLaren Vale’s small batch winemakers for a taste sensation on Sunday the 20th of October at the Victory Hotel. This is the fifth year the Vale Cru has held this event on the lawns of The Victory Hotel overlooking the magnificent waters of the Gulf St Vincent. The day will be a unique opportunity for guests to chat to the winemakers and taste their wines, as well as catching up with other like-minded souls with an interest in wines with soul and a story. This year’s event will feature a keynote speech by Nick Stock, one of Australia’s most respected and prolific wine critics. ‘Vale Cru brings together a confident and talented new generation emerging as the driving force in the McLaren Vale wine scene.’ Nick says, ‘They’re sculpting creative and compelling wines backed by a deep understanding of local terroir and international taste. Exciting times ahead!’ The Vale Cru has strict membership criteria which limits membership to wineries producing fewer than 3,000 cases a year. Despite their small combined size, the group has been dominating the wine media over the past year in classifications that include natural wines, bio-dynamic, organic and alternative varieties. There has never been a better time to be a small batch winemaker in McLaren Vale, with the world sitting up and taking notice of what is going on in this perfect slice of the ‘grape growing world’. Help us protect our beloved McLaren Vale region and all that we treasure – the hills, beaches, vineyards, cellar doors, eateries. Speak out, visit and taste, eat and stay! But most of all, spread to everyone you know the message that McLaren Vale is a world class wine, food and tourism destination – and it must always remain just that! More information about the event is posted on the group’s website; www.valecru.com.au. Watch this video at: boozemonkey.com/blogs/1/1043/the-vale-cru-it-must-be-love


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Dana Kinter

combines creative work with lots of laughter

There is a light and effortless quality to Dana Kinterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work, but behind these light and lovely paintings is an artist whose skills are honed and astute. Story by Petra de Mooy.

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The illustrative quality of Dana’s work comes from hours of drawing and painting with a serious commitment to creating. A Bachelor’s Degree in Visual Arts and Applied Design was undertaken in 2000 with this degree quickly followed by an Advanced Diploma in Graphic Design and Visual Communication, completed in 2005. This education, along with the support of some of her early teachers and mentors has given Dana a firm grounding as an artist. Dana came to her art career and education as a mature student. ‘I had children in the early nineties and stayed at home with them, and when they started school, I did too.’ Though exhibiting and having time to commit to her work has come to her a bit later in life, Dana comes at the practice with a kind of youthful abandon that cannot be learned. It comes naturally to her and it stems from her love of nature, a positive attitude and an inquisitive mind. After College she was employed as the Art-Coordinator at Red Poles in McLaren Vale, running the gallery and artistic programs. It connected her to many Fleurieu Peninsula artists and gave her a great opportunity to learn about the business side of art and how galleries operate, while also giving her time to develop her own work. Exhibiting her artworks in The Green Room Willunga and Home Grain Bakery in Aldinga this past year brought Dana a real connection to the region and to the locals. Presently Dana works at Urban Cow Studio in Adelaide, and in a continuous effort to maintain a work/life/art balance Dana says that in this respect she feels as though right now is a great time for her. Her solo gallery show at the Hahndorf Academy during SALA was a near sell out, and another coinciding with the Fringe Festival at Fox Creek Winery, in early 2014, has spurred on a particularly productive period in the studio.

Previous page: Wattle and wattle bird – pencil and acrylic on board. 90cm x 90cm. Photo by David Summerhayes. Above: Portrait of Dana Kinter by Grant Beed.

Dana’s surface of choice is wood. She developed a love for the medium from a woodturning course undertaken early in her arts practise. This material gives her work a lovely warm palette as a base. Starting with a pencil drawing and working up the surface with acrylic paints, she applies colour sparingly while leaving a lot of the wood and original drawing exposed. This technique is her signature and the compositions of native flora and fauna play a large part in the imagery she creates. Leaving large areas of wood exposed gives the work a lovely natural warmth.

An ‘artist statement’ from her current body of work states: An Encyclopaedia of Australian Birds handed to me by my grandmother has always been a tucked away treasure in my bookshelf ...

‘I collect cuttings from trees and bushes that interest me and bring them into the house. I like to draw from life and have a beautiful book that my grandma gave me that I use for reference.’ >

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Above: Bottlebrush with blue wren – pencil and acrylic on board. 90cm x 90cm. Photo by David Summerhayes.

An ‘artist statement’ from her current body of work states: An Encyclopaedia of Australian Birds handed to me by my grandmother has always been a tucked away treasure in my bookshelf ... ‘Cherishing the early morning cuppa sipped on the front porch before the house has awoken, watching the wattle birds dance in the banksia, spending an afternoon drawing in the sunshine with a magpie family to keep me company, or even as I watch on as the young magpie takes pride in acquiring a stolen treat or two from the dog’s (Bill’s) breakfast bowl, it seems only inevitable that I would create this body of work. I have tried to capture those moments in my paintings, for the viewer to “stop and listen to the birds”, even if just for a moment!’

Hope is the thing with feathers That perches in the soul, And sings the tune without the words, And never stops at all, And sweetest in the gale is heard; And sore must be the storm That could abash the little bird That kept so many warm. I’ve heard it in the chillest land And on the strangest sea; Yet, never, in extremity, It asked a crumb of me. Emily Dickinson

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The Dirt James Potter questions whether we should buy into ‘this spring thing.’

Spring has sprung on the Fleurieu and the clichés hang heavy in the air. But should we buy into this spring thing? All flowering bulbs and chubby lambs. How useful is it as an idea for Fleurieu gardeners? Maybe it’s just a concoction of the temperate northern hemisphere’s calendar: a heritage hangover − like instant coffee? (fascinatingly referred to by my father-in law as ‘real coffee’). Maybe it’s had its time, comrades, and (espressos in hand) we shall finish it off? I understand the other seasons – at least in retrospect. I have childhood memories of parched red-bellied summers, sour sob winters, leaf kicking, duck feeding autumns – but spring, with no snow to melt or frozen ponds to thaw, remains the most indistinct of seasons. On the Fleurieu the period of ‘calendar’ spring oscillates between Antarctic and Saharan. But ‘real spring weather’ can last between 1 to 4 months, depending on the year and depending on which part of the Fleurieu. And this is where the problem lies, and also a possible solution without the need to storm the meteorological Bastille. Swedish meteorologists define the beginning of spring as the first occasion on which the average daytime temperature exceeds zero degrees Celsius for seven consecutive days. Maybe we could move to Sweden? Maybe we could adjust a system to suit our climate? Or go one better and devise your very own system for your garden. Take one all-purpose backyard electronic weather station, put your nerd hat on (a cap with a propeller is preferred) and get busy recording! But maybe that’s all cart before the horse. We are doing all this measuring and figuring to arrive at some useful understanding of a gardener’s spring, when maybe all we need to do is look outside. There will still be some figuring required and maybe your nerd hat will still come in handy, but it isn’t difficult to get started – as the ecological indicators of the seasons are everywhere. What you are doing by making these observations and reckoning with the implications of what you have seen is being phenological. To quote our favourite sage, Wikipedia: “(Phenology) is principally concerned with the dates of the first occurrence of biological events in their annual cycle. Examples include the date of emergence of leaves and flowers, the first flight of butterflies and the first appearance of migratory birds ...” So it’s pretty simple. You take note of the first date of flowering of certain plants in your garden, or the falling of certain deciduous leaves, the ripening of some succulent fruit, or if you’re luckier, the

arrival of some rare migratory bird to nest in your garden. Keep your record for 15 years or so, compare with records of like-minded individuals in the area, infer the impact of changing seasons and climate change, use as a guide for many of your garden-related decisions, review all of the above … and abracadabra! You’re an instant green-thumb! Well what did you expect? None of it is hard, but it does work. Any gardening knowledge that is local and specific is of much greater value than the generic lists of seasonal gardening tasks (even the one that might be lurking in this esteemed journal). In fact it is exactly this intimate understanding of plant and animal realms that was integral to our daily survival right up until the past few centuries. So spring is back: but not as we know it. You’re in charge now: you have your propeller hat, your electronic devices, your traditional calendar and your new meteorological and phenological techniques. Go forth, collect data and you just never know, it could be used for the greater good; or at the very least it might help with when to plant your tomatoes. Earthwatch Australia has partnered with the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) and University of Melbourne to establish ‘Climate Watch’, the first large scale phenology network in Australia. www.climatewatch.org Also check out www.naturescalendar.org.uk 33


Sellicks

The bad old days by Mike (Hunta) Rushby.

Last week is a bit of a blur. But the old days of Sellicks are clear as a bell. I was born in 1946, the same year my old man paid ten quid for two seafront blocks at Sellicks Beach and hand-built a small shack as a weekend escape from the ‘big’ city. We shared either side of a boxthorn hedge with sheep, cows and mushrooms. All our garbage went straight over the cliff in front of us. Everybody did it, there was no council pick-up. A brisk westerly often sent it all back in our laps. I personally drove three cars to their final resting place over the edge. Pity. The Plymouth, Essex and Singer would fetch big dollars, now. Funnily enough, just recently, I noticed a tell-tale dimple on the grass verge. I guess the land fill has finally collapsed the roof of one of the old girls. Life was pretty raw back then. Simple, easy going. And it’s not that long ago! All the slabs for shacks and houses were made from shell grit and stones from the beach. On any given Satdy morning, blokes with trailers were shovelling, fever-pitch. The famous Middlebrook Pebble House, now owned by Stan and Airlie Beck, is clear testimony to the 34

innocence of the time. A supreme effort none-the-less. I well remember the Friday afternoon trips coming down to Sellicks each weekend. We used to stop somewhere near the rubber mills on South Road and load up with a couple of blocks of ice and half a trailer full of mallee roots. (Remember mallee roots?) Then the twisty, narrow little road up Tapleys Hill, next stop, Hackham. There were two servos there. We always stopped at the first one to grab a bunch of pies and pasties. The garage guy used to fill our tank and clean the windscreen. (Remember that?) Then, if there was time, we’d pull into The Victory Hotel car park right out front of the pub. The old man would bring out a beer for mum and lemonade and raspberry for Hunta. (I’ve since made up for that.) Then he’d disappear back into that rowdy, dimly lit little bar until we heard ‘time gentlemen, please’ about six o’clockish. (Remember when women were not really welcome in bars?) The whole trip took us about an hour in the old ‘Cussie’ (Ford Customline) from Kensington Park. It still takes an hour today.


At Sellicks in the fifties, there lived three Charleys. I think each had a licence to sell fish. They did anyway. All three used to sit or stand at different vantage points on the cliffs keeping a watchful eye for salmon or, back then, mulloway. They’d watch for hours, days and weeks, in all kinds of weather. And when a school did finally lob, they’d all bitch and whinge over whose school it was. Of course, everything was always amicably resolved. All part of the theatrics. It was very necessary. One day, I remember one of their massive nets busting and tons and tons of fish washed up dead on the beach. From Silver Sands to Cactus Canyon, rotting stinking corpses lay everywhere. One almighty pong lingered for days. Old Charley Dicky (Dickenson) had one of the most lush, fertile veggie gardens I’ve ever seen. Fuelled by rabbit guts, fish guts and frames, seaweed, sheep’s trotters and some evil chemicals that, nowadays, people make bombs out of. We called his garden the ‘triffids of Sellicks’ Old Charley taught me how to trap rabbits. We used to set them just across the road from where I live now. And up the old bullock >

We shared either side of a boxthorn hedge with sheep, cows and mushrooms. All our garbage went straight over the cliff in front of us. Everybody did it, there was no council pick-up. A brisk westerly often sent it all back in our laps. I personally drove three cars to their final resting place over the edge. Previous page: Old thatched-roof lookout shelter with car seat used for spotting schools of fish. This page: Local professional fisherman, Charley Dickinson, and friends netting salmon, late 1950s. 35


Above left: Not having the luxury of council refuse collection, residents would throw their household rubbish (and anything else they needed to be rid of – motor vehicles included) over the cliff. Above right: Young Hunta admires the view down the peninsula.

trail on the southern side of Cactus Canyon. Twenty odd traps used to bag us about half a dozen rabbits a night. I used to put a sign on our gate ‘Rabbits. Five bob a pair’. People with rifles walked past our place, regularly. Then return after about half an hour with a string of bunnies. Nothing was wasted. The guts went on the garden. The meat went in the ice chest. And we stretched the skins on wire frames. Having said all that matter-of-factly, I really don’t think I could kill another bunny. Maybe if I were starving. We had no electricity, just the trusty old Tilly lamps and block ice in the chest. We always had running water, though. I imagine it was a mandatory from the government of the day. On Satdy mornings, (I seem to recall winter ones, mostly) mum and I would walk across the paddocks to Bob Herrick’s dairy farm while he was milking. No automatic machines, then. All by hand. We’d bring home a billy full of warm, fresh milk with cream on top. Yum. (Shock, horror, these days. Bacteria.) On our way we’d pick platesize mushrooms from beneath the cow patties. Great for the immune system. There’s nothing like the smell of fresh cow shit in the morning. These were the days of Vanguards, Morris’, Austins, Vauxhalls, Chevs, Fords and FX Holdens. Back then, before breathalysers, most people we knew drove over the now legal limit. No one ever gave it a thought. One old farmer drove over the cliff with his dog. The barking sounded the alarm but the old guy didn’t make it. Flagons were the flavour of the month. And years. Locals would start off politely with a few longnecks but soon speed up into the plonk. Sherry, muscat, port, claret, were all ‘Vesta Situations’. Recall the ad; ‘saw your light on, thort we’d drop in …. After that, all recollections became furry. Another fascinating part of Sellicks was the reef. For a kid of my age (or any age), it was nothing short of a marvel. Beneath every rock, a living creature. In those days, the reef was literally alive. Octopus, cockles, crabs, anemones, shrimp, fish, starfish, jellyfish, limpets, periwinkles, even the odd abalone. If you fancied a crayfish, you’d trap or shoot a bunny, pop it in a stolen silk stocking and lodge it under a deep ledge at low tide. The strike rate was pretty good, weather permitting. If you drove down onto the beach on any calm Friday or Satdy night, you’d have sworn smugglers were everywhere.

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Torchlights flashing every which way. Dragnets were legal then and lots of people had them, including us. I used to wade out on the deep end, phosphorus lighting up my torso as I watched intently for old Charley Dicky to signal instructions from shore. It was exciting to watch the net being dragged in with all those silver shapes dancing in the torch lights. Perhaps it was wholesale slaughter but, hell, it was good fun. Also on the beach was a shelter shed, change rooms for each gender, a caravan/camping area, a flight of cement steps leading down to the beach, and a quaint little castle complete with watchtower and turrets, nestled at the foot of the cliffs near the ramp. Gone now. All we have is a dunny. And even that’s hard to find. Going to the shop was an experience, too. If you didn’t know it was there, you’d never know it was there. I don’t recall any signage but I might be wrong. The shopkeeper was a nice old lady called Mrs Watson. She was wife of one of the ‘Charleys’. You’d step down into it and I remember it flooding quite often. Most people only shopped there for the paper and loaf of bread which you had to order by name the day before. You always checked the date on the newspaper and the bread was cut with a hacksaw. The shelves were pretty lonely. A few cans of each: baked beans, Irish stew, spaghetti, tomato soup, sardines and condensed milk. Not the place you’d go to stock a nuclear shelter. After my schooldays, I got a job in an advertising agency delivering stuff on a scooter. Apparently, Robert Stigwood had the same job some time before me. (Where’d I go wrong?) For me, work signalled the end of Sellicks for about 25 years, apart from brief visits to see my dad. I worked my way from the production department to creative ending up as creative director of a few agencies, one being my own (with two partners). A few years passed, I packed up and travelled ‘round OZ, came back and went freelance, sold a couple of properties, bowled over the old shack, built a new two storey joint, got married, had a lovely daughter, and remained a one man band ever since. So, I’ve been a ‘local’ for 23 years. Somehow, though, it seems more like 67.


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Yaringa Alpacas

Merenia Vince spends an idyllic morning learning about alpacas. Photographs by Grant Beed.

Back in the year 2000 when Susan Haese bought alpacas Monty and Aramis as pets, she had no intention of establishing an alpaca stud! In fact it was her mum who fancied getting a couple of ‘girls’ and perhaps building the herd up to fifteen or so … still strictly as pets of course. ‘It just got away on us’ Susan confesses, ‘alpacas are very, very addictive’… in the best possible way, as the herd now numbers close on three hundred and Susan has established Yaringa Alpacas as one of South Australia’s elite alpaca studs. Touring the Currency Creek farm by motorbike on a sunny winter morning, leaning over fences to admire these fluffy, long-necked and expressive animals which surge forward to greet us, I too, am charmed. ‘Susan’, I say ‘I have an overwhelming urge to kiss and hug one’. Although they’re friendly and curious, alpacas don’t seek direct contact, and Susan, who knows every alpaca by name, has to catch one of the tamest to indulge me. ‘Princess Donata’ lets me bury my face in her rusty brown fleece very briefly, before gracefully trotting away.

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Native to South America, alpacas are newcomers to Australia’s ‘lifestyle’ farming industry, prized for their ultra-soft fleece, as stud animals, as boutique pets with a grazing capability, and as guardians for other herd animals. Often confused with their larger cousins the llamas, traditionally used to carry goods, the smaller alpaca is historically bred for fleece. There are two types of alpaca and Yaringa breeds both: the fluffy-teddy Huacaya, with fleece that grows at right angles to the body, and the glossy Suri with silky dreadlocks. Worldwide, demand exceeds supply for alpaca fleece, with their fine wool used for everything from suits to carpets. Alpacas are intelligent, placid animals that are easy to farm. Admittedly, on my visit I watch some males having ridiculous rows involving wrestling their long necks and dropping dramatically to their knees, but these are benign altercations and there’s normally none of that nonsense with the girls. The only other alpaca vice is spitting – bright green, being vegetarians – but it’s usually at each other and not often. With pads under their feet rather than hooves, they are easy on the earth leading Susan to wonder how Australia’s landscape might look today if settlers had introduced alpacas rather than sheep. Unrelated to sheep, they certainly don’t baa, rather they have a friendly ‘cluck’ and if distressed they ‘cry out’. The lush, 76-acre Yaringa farm with tall shade trees and views across Encounter Bay is alpaca-heaven. The consummate farmer – organised, tidy and on-site seven days a week – Susan is a doting alpaca ‘mother’. She chats to them, hugs them round their woolly


necks, counts them daily to ensure no animal has come to harm and loves to deliver their hay and watch them peacefully munching. Yaringa is a busy ‘alpaca central’. Breeding is a key part of the business and detailed pedigree records are kept for each animal. Susan gives astute consideration to lineage when selecting animals to breed and each summer baby alpacas called ‘cria’ are born to expand the stud, or sold as boutique farm animals. Yaringa’s pedigreed males are part of a stud service which contributes to a strong alpaca gene pool in Australia. Renowned for her knowledge and quality care, Susan provides support to other owners, agisting a number of alpacas at Yaringa, and offering a round-the-clock support service to alpaca owners who need advice, or handson help. Truly dedicated to the industry, Susan is also convening a three-day National Alpaca Conference in May 2014 at the Convention Centre in Adelaide.

The lush, 76-acre Yaringa farm with tall shade trees and views across Encounter Bay is alpaca-heaven. The consummate farmer – organised, tidy and on-site seven days a week – Susan is a doting alpaca ‘mother’.

Previous page: “What you talkin’ ‘bout Willis?” This page top: Alpacas on the move. This page bottom: Susan Haese with one of her herd.

Susan has recently expanded her business to include Yaringa’s own ‘Trendy Alpaca’ range of yarn. In natural alpaca colours of cream, caramel, cocoa and black, the soft, decidedly thermal balls of wool bring to mind toffee and liquorice and look almost edible. Susan would love to value-add to her business by selling her artisan yarn in a farm shop, enthused by a recent visit to New Zealand where she was inspired by their vibrant farm-gate culture. Frustratingly, the Alexandrina council doesn’t yet have a vision for regional tourism of this sort, so a farm-gate shop remains just a dream for Susan. Showing is a vital part of owning an alpaca stud, a crucial way to establish reputation and is the best way to show-case animals to other breeders. Yaringa Alpacas competes in several shows each year, travelling as far away as Melbourne or Sydney, with twenty of the best alpacas tucked into a bed of straw in a large float. (Alpacas prefer to travel sitting down.) Judged on their physique and fleece quality, Yaringa animals consistently win ribbons at the highest levels. For Susan, who strives for excellence rather than fierce competition, these awards merely affirm that her stud is among the best. Deservedly so! Yaringa Alpacas: www.yaringaalpacas.com.au Australian Alpaca Association: www.alpaca.asn.au

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HEALTH & WELLBEING

Leonie Porter-Nocella discovers that regular dental care is

Not just a vain cosmetic indulgence Gum disease is characterised by inflammation of the gums, redness, swelling and frequent bleeding. If left untreated it may result in teeth having to be removed, which can often be costly and is rarely a pretty sight. Not only this, but it is clear that health concerns, like diabetes and oral health issues, particularly gum disease, tend to go hand-in-hand. As reported cases of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes rise, so too does the number of patients presenting to South Australian dental surgeries with diabetes-related oral health issues. However, it is also a fact that only 50% of diabetics regularly visit their dentist. So those with diabetes should give frequent visits to the dentist a high priority rating. It is imperative to educate diabetics about the importance of good oral health and to encourage them to seek regular professional care. Not only will this act as a preventative measure towards improving oral health, it will also help to identify any issues quickly and possibly reduce their severity. These days dentists and physicians are taking a more holistic approach to patients’ overall health — and for justifiably good reason, with recent studies showing that people with serious gum disease had a 40% greater likelihood of having a chronic condition as well. Years ago, any doctor who suspected heart disease would not have referred the patient to a gum specialist or dentist. The same went for diabetes, pregnancy ... or just about any other medical condition. However, due to increased knowledge gained over the past 5 to 10 years, a greater understanding of the links between oral health and overall wellness has changed all this. Were you aware that oral health offers clues to your overall health; or that problems in your mouth can adversely affect the rest of your body? Like many other areas of the body your mouth is teeming with bacteria – most of them harmless. We are usually aware that the body’s natural defences along with daily brushing and flossing can keep these bacteria under control, and that without proper oral hygiene these same bacteria can lead to tooth decay and gum disease. Nevertheless, few people may be aware that certain medications – like decongestants, antihistamines, painkillers and diuretics – can all reduce saliva flow: and since saliva helps wash away food particles and neutralise the acids produced by bacteria in the mouth, it (saliva) aids in protecting you from microbial invasion that could lead to serious disease. However, studies have now concluded that oral bacteria and the inflammation associated with periodontitis – a severe form of gum 40

disease – might play a prominent role in more serious diseases. In addition, certain diseases, such as diabetes, often lower the body’s resistance to infection, making oral health problems even more likely to create health issues in the body general. Australia currently has a National Oral Health Plan in place that has been prepared by the National Advisory Committee on Oral Health – since tooth decay is the second-most costly diet-related disease in Australia – with its economic impact comparable to that of heart disease and diabetes. Four broad themes underpin this Plan: • a recognition that oral health is an integral part of general health; • a population health approach, with a strong focus on promoting prevention and early identification of oral disease; • easier access to appropriate and affordable services — like health promotion, prevention, early intervention and treatment for all Australians; and • education to achieve a sufficiently and appropriately skilled workforce. So good oral health promotes much more than a pretty smile and clean, fresh breath!


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HEALTH & WELLBEING

Gen Me

Ainsley Roscrow describes the pitfalls of parenting with praise.

How would you define the current generation of young people? Adjectives characterising Generation Y could include Gen Me, Gen Why, and the ‘Trophy’ generation (reward just for participation!) Other less desirable descriptions for children born from 1990 – 2005 include lazy, spoilt, narcissistic and dependant. Sometimes coined the ‘blue ribbon’ generation, our young people are accustomed to earning a blue ribbon whether they win or not! But it isn’t all bad. Young people today do however, have some redeeming qualities, including being environmentally and socially conscious, and with a greater ability to balance their life and work choices than either Gen X or the Baby Boomers. But what is the reason for this rise of narcissism and entitlement among our youth? Why do professionals report that young people are having increased trouble complying with the direction and expectations of their teachers and employers? Why are there more documented behavioural issues in young people today, as well as higher rates of depression and anxiety? And why do young people seem to have developed a ‘weird sense of entitlement’; an anathema to the work ethic of the ‘reap what you sow in life’ baby boomer generation. Paediatric neuropsychologist, Steve Hughes, believes that some of the blame may lie squarely at the feet of over indulgent parents. Based in the USA, Dr Hughes works as a consultant to parents, educators and physicians. His research and video lectures are thought provoking, controversial, practical and often hysterically funny. Available online, Dr Hughes seems to have been able to tap into a whole generation of parents who are, with the best of intentions, smothering their children with praise and attention, albeit with less desirable long term results. Dr Hughes has identified that modern parents are having fewer children and their parenting styles and behaviour are in part motivated by a growing concern for their child’s development of emotional intelligence, wellbeing and self-esteem. Parents are generally more emotionally supportive of children and are more concerned with their child’s psychological wellbeing than in previous generations. Despite heightened parental awareness of children’s emotional intelligence and confidence, Dr Hughes highlights some of the challenges that are facing educators and professors as children of the ‘praise generation’ progress through the education system and ultimately enter the workforce.

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After the final report of the Californian Taskforce to Promote Self-Esteem and Personal and Social Responsibility (1990) was published with its conclusions that a lack of self-esteem is central to most of the personal and social ills plaguing the state of California, a plethora of literature started to emerge describing best practice for increasing children’s self-esteem. Low selfesteem, the report argued, could lead to a number of social ills including teen pregnancy, bullying, academic failure and drug and alcohol abuse. This opening of Pandora’s box precipitated a slew of articles, research and information citing the loss of selfesteem and confidence in children as one of the biggest barriers to successful educational and psychological outcomes. In response to this argument, authors, physicians, psychologists and parenting ‘experts’ began a tidal wave of self-esteem building practices, defining them in books, articles, DVDs and blogs. These practical parenting tips began to reflect the ‘new way’ of parenting ... through praise. Building self-esteem became the firstchoice tool for parents and educators as they tackled antisocial behaviour and worked to proactively help children to ‘succeed’. Books like ‘I Can do Anything’, 101 ways to Praise a Child, 501 Ways to Boost a child’s Self-Esteem, and 31 Things to do to Raise Self-Esteem, became instant best sellers. Amazon books dedicated an entire category to the improvement of self-esteem, as well as self-worth books, with descriptive blurbs including: ‘Books like these send the message that if we believe in ourselves, we can do anything. It is a message, which if we hear early and often enough, can make all the difference.’ http://www.amazon.com/can-doanything-kid/dp/0972857702. These published works support the contention that praise leads to confidence which leads to selfesteem which leads to good works. But a number of scientific and psychological studies since the rise of the self-esteem debate have debunked the theory that raising self-esteem in children will raise their social, emotional or educational outcomes. Efforts to boost the self-esteem of pupils in junior high (middle school) has not been shown to improve academic performance and may sometimes be counter-productive. Laboratory studies have generally failed to prove that self-esteem causes good task performance, with the important exception of persistence after failure. High self-esteem does not prevent children from smoking, drinking, taking drugs, or engaging in early sex. In general, the effect of self-esteem on improving outcomes is not supported by research or report findings in therapeutic or educational settings.


Research on the use of praise, suggests that children’s performance on academic tasks actually decreases when children are praised for innate ability. Additionally, other children in the classroom environment come to see children who are praised often as ‘needing extra help’. Indiscriminate praise might just as easily promote narcissism, with its less desirable consequences. Narcissists lack empathy, react aggressively to criticism, favour self-promotion over helping others, and can lack emotional warmth. Does this sound familiar? Remember the Blue Ribbon Generation? Praise for participation alone and ribbons for everyone? Perhaps the current sense of entitlement young people can experience is actually the result of pandering parents and their cosseting parental styles. Parental goals should revolve less around the development of self-esteem and more around the fostering of independence and personal efficacy. Don’t raise your children to be happy, says Dr Hughes, raise them to be lovable and well socialised! Self-esteem is a consequence of competency: great performance is always and only the result of great effort!

Building self-esteem became the first choice tool for parents and educators as they tackled antisocial behaviour and worked to proactively help children to ‘succeed’. Books like ‘I Can do Anything’, 101 ways to Praise a Child, 501 Ways to Boost a child’s Self-Esteem, and 31 Things to do to Raise Self-Esteem, became instant best sellers.

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Port Noarlunga

Mike Lucas dives below the surface of one of the region’s most treasured and emerging seaside communities. Photographs by emme jade.

When George Hepenstal built the first house at Port Noarlunga in 1841 and called it ‘Whale View,’ could he have envisioned what the available tracts of land adjacent to the serpentine Onkaparinga River were to become? Probably. For the beauty and attraction of the locality where Hepenstal set up his relatively unsuccessful whaling station, and undoubtedly dabbled in tobacco and liquor smuggling, is that, apart from the inevitable increase in inhabitants, much of the geography and nature of the area has changed very little. With respectful acknowledgment that the Onkaparinga district has belonged to the Kaurna clans for thousands of years, the story goes that the Noarlunga district was first discovered by pioneers when two horses escaped from their compound near the mouth of the River Sturt and were subsequently pursued. So begins a history of colonisation and conservation that has helped maintain the balance between progression and sustainability and made Port Noarlunga a popular, but relatively unspoilt, tourist destination, once being referred to as ‘the most delightful watering place in South Australia.’

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The port in Port Noarlunga disappeared with the onslaught of road transport. Originally, goods such as flour, firewood and wool were loaded here for onward journeys to Adelaide and other surrounding districts. In 1855 a jetty and tramway were built to aid in the loading of vessels, but the process was long-winded, the risks were great and overland transport was becoming more convenient. The Port Noarlunga reef and Onkaparinga Estuary make up the one of the oldest of the thirteen aquatic reserves in South Australia. The 1.6 kilometre-long reef attracts well-seasoned divers and amateur snorkellers who come to follow the underwater trail and view over 200 species of plants and animals. At the estuary, the sand falls away to the river, and on the far banks the cliffs hold magnificent views down onto the whole of Port Noarlunga beach. With water on three sides of you and a wide expanse of sand all around, the halcyon feeling of separation abounds. The winner of the Australian Clean Beach Award 2010, Port Noarlunga has a lot happening behind the scenes to ensure this region of high biodiversity is recognised and protected. One of the


The winner of the Australian Clean Beach Award 2010, Port Noarlunga has a lot happening behind the scenes to ensure this region of high biodiversity is recognised and protected. Previous page: A beautiful setting at Horta’s. This page top: A tasty pastry awaits at Beck’s Bakehouse. This page below: The recently refurbished foreshore.

key people responsible for this prestigious award is Dick Olesinski. A longstanding member of the South Port Surf Life Saving Club and the South Port Noarlunga Coastcare Group, Dick is actively involved in the dune rehabilitation program. From repairing fencing and maintaining boardwalks to replanting local plant species, the scheme has benefitted from the involvement of local clubs, schools and members of the community. Like many people in the area, Dick refers to Port Noarlunga as a village. ‘It has that feeling of closeness within the community,’ he said. There is very little that Port Noarlunga doesn’t have in terms of sport and leisure. Along the length of the beach, walkers, joggers, swimmers and surfers enjoy the tranquillity and escape. In the summer anglers can be seen lined up along the river, beach and jetty and in the winter, the south westerly winds pull the salmon towards the shore. Upstream of the river, beside the floodplains, is an understated huddle of green sheds which belong to the South Port Rowing Club, Surf Life Saving Club and Aquatic Centre. Continue on and you will come across a Bowling Green and tennis courts. > 45


In 2012, the Port Noarlunga Surf Life Saving Club was stripped back to its bare structure and rebuilt. Renamed the Witton Centre, this fresh new building overlooking the clean, smooth sands also hosts the impeccable Horta’s Restaurant. In December and January, Horta’s served 20,000 meals, an indication of the opportunities open to Port Noarlunga businesses. ‘Port Noarlunga has been the holiday destination for generations of people, more significantly in the bustling periods of a few decades earlier,’ said Filipe Horta, the owner. ‘It is our job to bring it back.’ Victoria Neville, the Facility and Function Manager of Port Noarlunga Surf Life Saving Club provided another example of how the area is developing. As well as the 300-member strong club providing an essential service to the community, the building can be leased out for weddings, seminars and business days all year round. Retail outlets and restaurants are increasing in Port Noarlunga. Antiques, gifts, clothing, home furnishings, books and surfing equipment bring locals and holiday makers to the town. Dave Liston has recently opened the surf shop, Original Surf Co. He recalls visiting Port Noarlunga as a child. ‘The area has a cult following for surfers,’ he said. ‘It’s where the waves first start if you’re travelling southwards.’ Mediterranean cuisine can be experienced al fresco style at Manoli’s, and one of the busiest businesses in Port Noarlunga is Beck’s Bakehouse. In 2007 Dan Beck saw the potential of the town and continued the area’s tradition of boasting a successful bakery within it. Now he employs 23 staff and provides an economical way of experiencing great café culture in a relaxed environment. Artistic talent is abundant with writers, painters, photographers and other artists breathing in the nature and history of the area, and exhaling it onto their paper, canvas or sculpture. Inspiration is everywhere: from the jetty to the cliffs, from the trail of the river to the characters of the buildings, businesses and people. And the hub of all this artistic flair is the Onkaparinga Arts Centre. Originally opened as an institute and library, the centre is now the ultimate canvas for a plenitude of art from the region. When you next visit Port Noarlunga, think of the culture and history, take time to discover the shops, sit down and eat at the restaurants. Then walk to the end of the jetty, turn and survey the surrounding coastline. As the tan and ochre shades of strata along the cliffs fall from the sky to the sea, you are aware of the empty spaces along the bay. Unspoilt, fresh sand welcomes new footsteps every day: footsteps of people from different walks of life who come here to arrive or escape. And, like the sand itself, as you stroll along the beach, you feel that life’s blemishes have been wiped away by the serenity and the relative solitude. The contradictory nature of Port Noarlunga is that it is so close to so much, yet so far away when you are there. Top: Yummy cupcakes at Beck’s Bakehouse. Bottom: Lavish homewares at Lavish Homewares.

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More than meets the eye Eco Tourism is all over Kangaroo Island; however, as Louise Pascale found out, an accredited operator guarantees your experience is also preserving the environment. Complete with linen tablecloths and napkins, wine glasses, crockery and silverware, lunch is being laid out on a picnic table just inside Flinders Chase National Park. On the menu today is poached chicken breast with pesto, feta and lettuce salad, kefalotori and Manchego cheese, served with red and white wines from local winery, The Islander. My tour guides, Gaynor Bowden and Mary Oldfield, are preparing today’s lunch for our eight American guests. From Boston, Louisiana and Long Island they have joined Exceptional Kangaroo Island tours for an authentic Australian wildlife experience. While it looks as though it had been pre-arranged, a wallaby sets himself next to our picnic table to nibble gum nuts while we eat. The visit from our wallaby friend is topping off a morning packed with nature watching, which began with spotting koalas in the wild, then a spot of spontaneous whale- and calf-watching at Remarkable Rocks – followed by dodging a Tiger Snake on the track back to the bus. Then after lunch it is off to Cape Du Couedic to watch fur seals frolic under Admiral’s Arch. While Gaynor and Mary have worked hard at trying to fit as much as they can into one day, what impresses me the most is their determination to beat the large tour buses to our destinations. This for me is the real advantage of the tour. Not only am I experiencing Kangaroo Island with locals who are passionate about where they live, they are making sure that their guests also experience it the way they do. 48

Gaynor loves to share stories with her guests about the Island community, but she also gets to hear even more from them. ‘What I love about tour guiding, you learn something new,’ she says. ‘I always thought Remarkable Rocks were just another rock until I started looking at it through their [guests’] eyes.’ Exceptional Kangaroo Island runs various tours across the Island and today I have joined their Flinders Chase Tour. Covering the largest national park on the island it literally takes you from land to sea. With one third of Kangaroo Island being under the care of national parks, containing the impact of tourism is key to its sustainability. ‘(Kangaroo Island) is very much nature-based. We don’t have any heavy industry; you could even say we don’t have light industry. So in terms of pollution and the rest of it, it is extremely well managed,’ says Pierre Gregor, Chairman of Tourism Kangaroo Island. ‘We’ve got this clean, green aura that we need to maintain. We need to make sure we provide a quality experience that meets people’s expectations, without eroding what they come to see in the first place.’ Just two years ago income generated from tourism was equal to that of agriculture. It now contributes around $54 million to the Gross Regional Product: the second highest in the country. While tourism may come in many forms, it is eco tourism that is really the Island’s specialty, with Bed and Breakfast establishments running


Previous page: Four wheel driving with Exceptional KI Tours. Top left: A local koala supervising the eco-activities. Top right: Remarkable Rocks.

This for me is the real advantage of the tour. Not only am I experiencing Kangaroo Island with locals who are passionate about where they live, they are making sure that their guests also experience it the way they do. off dirt tracks and wildlife tours. While that eco feeling is everywhere, an accredited operator guarantees your experience is making a minimal impact on the wildlife, fauna and overall environment. However, mention the word eco to Exceptional Kangaroo Island owner and operator Craig Wickham, and he cringes. ‘I avoided using the term eco-tourism, eco anything because very early on the whole concept was hijacked,’ he says. For Craig this is not just a business but a lifestyle. With his home just over the road from head office overlooking the banks of a bulging river bed, we chat over a cup of tea on the importance of preserving the environment we are experiencing. ‘You’ve got to operate your business in a manner that is environmentally sustainable, yes, but also economically viable,’ he says pragmatically. ‘There is tension there and you have to make a choice. So I think the most important thing about the accreditation is to know what your choices are, that you do have some options and being considerate of nature every step of the way is not one big thing – it is just all these smaller things.’ Craig grew up on Kangaroo Island in a family-run hotel. He left as a young adult to pursue a career in National Parks, returning in 1990 to take over Exceptional Kangaroo Island. He is passionate about the industry and its survival on the Island.

So, too, is Andrew Neighbour who began Marine Adventures 10 years ago. He made sure he had Eco Accreditation from day one. Being a pioneer in marine tours around the Island, he was committed to preserving the marine environment. His accreditation now extends to being Marine Mammal Interaction Accredited, meaning his tours allow visitors to swim with marine life. ‘We’ve got a license to swim with dolphins, in that you’ve got a whole lot of guidelines that you need to follow and abide by,’ he says. Andrew began his business after 20 years of cray fishing on the Island. Looking to the future he saw an untapped market in marine tours. ‘A lot of mates of mine said “you’re crazy, you’re absolutely crazy” but I could see the big picture I could see where we were going,’ he recalls. While it was a risky proposition to begin with it has certainly paid off with the business expanding this spring to include a 48-seater boat that caters for bus tours. ‘Generally people are really interested in the environment now,’ he says. ‘They stop and listen when you start to tell them about what you’ve done and your history. Quite often we will just shut the boat down in the middle of somewhere and just drift and have a bit of a chat.’

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All over Fired Up pizza Photography by Heidi Linehan.

â&#x20AC;Ś the crowds at Womadelaide tend to prefer margherita and vegetarian, whereas the punters at Clipsal favour the meaty varieties â&#x20AC;Ś


A diesel mechanic by trade, but passionate foodie within, it was Greg Rubenhold’s love of entertaining, food and places that sparked the idea of setting up ‘not just your average catering business’. On a trip to town with a group of friends the question was asked: what would people enjoy eating at any time, any place, with any beverage? And the answer: PIZZA! Greg maintains that everyone loves a good pizza and it’s enjoyed all over the world … and I think we all agree wholeheartedly with that! All Fired Up pizzas are wood-fired and cooked on the oven floor to infuse the incomparable smokiness of the wood fire into the pizza. Toppings use local produce according to availability, thereby ensuring freshness and flavour while supporting the local community. Greg and his partner of 9 years, Nicki, make their pizzas Italian style; that is, with the notion that less is best. This allows the pizza dough to cook properly without being smothered by the toppings, which can often render the base soggy, and at worst, undercooked. Their roasted tomatoes are done in the wood-oven and food ‘prep’ is conducted in their own commercial kitchen … or as Nicki and Greg call it, ‘our room with a view’. The commercial kitchen was built on their 8-acre property with beautiful views over the exquisite Blewitt Springs/McLaren Vale landscape. All inspiration comes from within these walls, with new pizza varieties tried and tested on family and friends, since, as Nicki says ‘they don’t hold back on the truth’. They make everything on site in their room with the view, including the Spangwalie tomato sauce and Ed La Dou barbeque sauce, which are used on their pizzas and now packaged and sold in providores and butchers. And the odd names of these products? Well … that’s another story, with Greg as the King of one-liners and creative names. All Fired Up has come a long way since their weekends at the Port Adelaide Markets with a ute and an Esky full of ice. They now boast the commercial kitchen, cool rooms and a truck that can often be seen rumbling along with oven in tow, off to the next catering gig. This setup allows them to provide service for corporate, private and public events, locally and sometimes even across the border – with one memorable trip being an event in Apollo bay – on the Great Ocean Road in Victoria. They claim it’s genuinely fulfilling to be able to provide a mobile, individually tailored event that covers all bases ... (pun) whether it be a small informal gathering, a formal function or a large-scale festival. They provide the entire dining experience on a roll in/roll out basis, from which they deliver a complete service: onsite cooking as well as service staff, with pizzas either boxed ... or for more formal occasions, plated. Then they clean up. They find it most gratifying to roll out after an event leaving nothing for the party organisers to do but enjoy the rest of the night (while eating any boxed pizza left over from service later, when the last of the revellers may still be kicking on.)

Above: All Fired Up proprietor Greg Rubenhold.

Their itinerary over the summer months, especially during Adelaide’s Mad March, is exciting and varied. The atmosphere of each is as different as the type of crowds each event attracts, so it is always exciting. They tailor the pizza varieties according to the event. For example, the crowds at Womadelaide tend to prefer margherita and vegetarian, whereas the punters at Clipsal favour the meaty varieties like The Cleaver, the Meatlovers and the Tropical and Spangwalie Gourmet. However, despite the excitement of the Festival season, their favourite gigs are the local ones. They love being part of all that the region has to offer – like the beautiful landscapes, the sea, the abundance of wineries, cellar doors and restaurants … not to mention the wonderful locals. They cater events such as the Sea and Vines at Leconfield, The Harvest Festival McLaren Vale, The Almond Blossom Festival Willunga and the Wooden Boat Festival in Goolwa. But now for the truly exciting part: after 10 years of being completely mobile, All Fired Up is opening a shop front. Owing to the growing trend of backyard wood-fired ovens, they aim to provide all your pizza requirements – and even make you a pizza while you browse. Who could pass up an offer like that? 53


Petra de Mooy visits

Paeroa Where the wind travels and people play Photography by Robert Geh.

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Paeroa, loosely translated, means ‘a long, low ridge of hills’. The evolution of Paeroa from vineyard to home in the vineyard is one that uniquely suits its inhabitants. Karen has long worked in the arts and is a collector, while her husband, Matt, is a part-time winemaker and avid gardener. Karen and Matt had been looking to buy a small parcel of land for quite some time. The dream was for a one-acre plot where they could build and where their children, Tessa and Reuben, could ‘free range, adventure, breathe, grow up and be free’. When this larger-than-envisioned property with a vineyard came on to the market, it was not exactly what they’d been looking for, yet it seemed like a perfect fit in a perfect location. ‘We both adore Willunga and its surrounds, and the kids and I have a deep connection with Port Willunga beach. Matt’s involvement in making wine, with both of us having a love for wine, found us with a property that happened to include a 30-acre vineyard, rather than the one-acre we’d been looking for’, says Karen. ‘We also wanted a nice veggie patch and to create a place of gathering for family and friends.’

The property that has lovingly been named Paeroa sits at the foot of the Willunga Hills and encapsulates views of both the hills and the sea. Previous page: A billy cart belonging to the children resides close to the front entry of the home. This page: The view looking west.

Karen is originally from New Zealand but met Matt overseas while travelling in Africa. After returning from her travels Karen followed her heart to be with Matt in his native home of South Australia. However, New Zealand is still very much at the heart of the concept of home > 55


for Karen, and the name Paeroa is from the Maori culture; but as she says, ‘Australia has opened its arms and has become a homeland for me’. The property was purchased in 2008, but it was not until 2009 that Karen and Matt started to have meetings with the architect and the builder. The slab was poured in January 2010 and the house was completed by December of that year. The approach to the building of this home employed three over-arching themes: community conversations, energy efficiency, and heart. When it came to finding an architect a friend suggested Deb Tapfield. Karen says, ‘I had strong ideas but really needed someone to help pull it all together. I felt the house really deserved that. We had very open and engaged conversations with Deb. I had been compiling a book of concepts with some core ideas and notions that I wanted to include and Deb was really open to all of that.’ Deb’s approach to architecture is to create ‘sustainable, beautiful buildings’ and Karen and Matt wanted an energy-efficient home that imbued a nurturing environment to raise young Tessa and Reuben. Deb, as a local and a relatively young designer, was thrilled to take up the challenge. Deb says, ‘what was most exciting for me on the project was having such wonderful clients to work with. I design environmentally-sustainable homes but often there is a lot

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of compromise when clients discover what that really involves. Matt, Karen and I were on the same page from the very beginning. They were amazing clients, always attentive, open to ideas, and understood the constraints of passive [energy] design. We had a great time drawing, discussing and planning with lots of laughs, hugs and conversation thrown in too!’ ‘It was also such a pleasure to work with people who understand art and design. Although the house is based in practicality it is also infused with an aesthetic beauty which was a collaborative effort between Matt’s and Karen’s style and my own artistic expression.’ Karen says, ‘for the building itself we had a conscious thought of trying to use local builders and suppliers as much as possible. Kevin Barker, the builder, was found via Karen’s hairdresser, Vicky. Kevin is a Kiwi and lives in Willunga. Kevin recalls ‘a knock on the door one afternoon from a very excited Karen [that] had us sitting around our kitchen table poring over the then preliminary plans for Paeroa, I probably did say, “yeah OK” right then and there.’ Karen and Matt loved working with Kevin. ‘Kevin and his team worked very organically to come to solutions that addressed all of our needs both in terms of budget and aesthetics.’ Kevin says ‘Paeroa was a full team effort. Matt and Karen put in endless hours finding exactly what was required in the way of fixtures and fittings and the mix of colours and textures. Karen’s artistic flare is [evident in] all of this. We were looked after like gold, with homemade raspberry and chocolate muffins;


watermelon and mint coulis on hot days, and even hot chips one cold and wet afternoon, [which we] shared with Karen and the kids on the gallery floor.’ Paeroa has a creek lined with beautiful old trees. The selection of the house site was based on positioning themselves close to these existing trees, while adhering to the principles of passive solar design – the need to face north. ‘We really wanted to capture the sea views as much as possible as well, so the house actually sits ten degrees off due north yet still works incredibly well as an energy efficient design.’ Other environmentally-friendly features include a one-hundred thousand kilolitre rainwater tank which is filled by collecting the runoff from the expansive roof space. Grey and black water are collected using an underground septic system which releases the water through a septic field into the rows of orchard trees. The house also harnesses sixteen kilowatts of solar power and is energy neutral. As Karen says: ‘we are grid-connected, but solely for the purpose of exporting excess energy back to the grid’.

‘We really wanted to capture the sea views as much as possible as well, so the house actually sits ten degrees off due north yet still works incredibly well as an energy efficient design.’ Other environmentally-friendly features include a one-hundred thousand kilolitre rainwater tank which is filled by collecting the runoff from the expansive roof space. Previous page: An eclectic mix of fabrics, colours and textures makes the lounge room warm and inviting. Above: Corten Steel, wood and cement board are used to give the home a rustic industrial look.

‘Deliberately we did not put in air conditioning or heating so the home really works. We only have the fireplace for cold days, along with some small energy-efficient heaters in the kids’ rooms ... for the same reason.’ >

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Aesthetically, the concept of the original design came from the idea of a central gallery hall that came from Karen’s ‘great book of concepts’. At Paeroa the hall doubles as a gallery and displays an ever-changing collection of drawings, prints and paintings. ‘I have a strong interest and passion in the arts and have enjoyed purchasing pieces throughout my history of working in the arts’ sector.’ ‘We also use the hall for bowling and cricket and soccer’, Karen tells me enthusiastically. The gallery also divides the children’s bedrooms and play-area from the large, shared kitchen, dining, and lounge areas, which are an additional buffer to a lovely master bedroom, ensuite and outdoor bath. All of these areas are joined seamlessly by a very well-honed, polished concrete floor. The home has gorgeous vistas of the hills and the ocean, as well as sheltered areas that create more of an intimate home feel by means of a courtyard and enclosed backyard where kids can play. Karen and Matt have travelled to many places around the globe, and as a result they have a beautiful collection of small sculptural pieces and textiles that imbue the home with warmth and richness. ‘Both Matt and I have a love of travel, arts and textiles. So over the years we have accumulated eclectic pieces from our trips to various places around the world’, Karen reveals. The whole ethos of the home hinges on a few very important concepts: fitting in with the environment, and being a very comfortable place to live and play. The polished concrete floors make for very user-friendly indoor/outdoor living. When the doors are open Matt and Karen did not want a flooring material that was something that they needed to be precious about. Many of the material selections both indoors and out have a sophisticated, yet rugged quality that make the home great for entertaining and living comfortably, with little effort. The landscaping around the home is gorgeous. The brief was to have a robust garden that would fit in with the environment. Karen says, ‘Nick from Urban Sustainable Landscape and Design was phenomenal at choosing local and native plants. We used stone from the local quarry to create a stepping-stone path and the wooden > 58


Karen and Matt have travelled to many places around the globe, and as a result they have a beautiful collection of small sculptural pieces and textiles that imbue the home with warmth and richness. ‘Both Matt and I have a love of travel, arts and textiles. So over the years we have accumulated eclectic pieces from our trips to various places around the world’, Karen reveals.

Previous page: The north face of the house captures all of the winter sun and the large overhanging eaves give shade and shelter from the summer sun. Previous page left: The kitchen bench is illuminated by earthy woven light fittings. This page top: The kitchen – designed and fabricated by Goolwa Kitchens, is warmed up by the solid wood island. Left: A private outdoor bath and shower. 59


poles are from Moonta Jetty.’ The design is both low maintenance and drought tolerant. Tessa and Reuben love the cosy reading nook and ‘hanging out’ eating and talking at the generous kitchen counter. They also love the long, low deck that they can tumble off to play on the grass ... and they both love the beautiful old tree next to the creek, affectionately known as ‘The Magic Tree’. Karen worked for two years as project manager in the creation of their dream home. ‘It was a great project to do with our son Reuben (then 4) in tow as creative learning and enrichment. By the end of the project he had decided he was going to be an architect and was building scale models.’ Karen and Matt could not have been more pleased with the outcome. ‘We were overwhelmed with the professionalism and workmanship of everyone on the project and the way it all came together.’ Paeroa was a place that Matt and Karen wanted to create for their family to grow, adventure, play and breathe in. While achieving that, they have also created a home to share. I am sure that all who go there leave feeling equally nurtured and inspired. 60

Top: An outdoor bathroom enables you to soak up the rays as well as the bubbles. Above left: Cantilevered shelving in the kitchen. Above right: The master bedroom boasts a glorious view of the vineyard.


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Jason Porter catches up with Willunga native

Julia Henning on the eve of her new album release. Photographs by Emily McAllan.


At 22, Julia Henning’s music career already reads like that of a seasoned pro. She has released two EPs: ‘Divisions’ (2012) plus a live recording at the Sydney Opera House (2013) and her recently recorded album ‘Fledgeling’ is about to hit the shelves. When listening to Julia’s music it is difficult not to draw comparisons with vocalists like Tori Amos (her flowing red locks possibly contributing to this) or Kate Bush (Julia’s live recording even includes a cover of Kate’s ‘Running up that Hill’). These are comparisons Julia is completely fine with – despite these influences being rather sophisticated for such a young artist. Julia’s parents undoubtedly exposed her to a broad range of music and culture in her formative years. She recalls being taken to see performers like Marcel Marceau and Ute Lemper, while music played around the home included the likes of Billy Joel, Elton John and Bette Midler. She also has keen recollections of comedy duo Flanders and Swann being played on many occasions. In recent times however, Julia cites song writing legends Leonard Cohen and k.d. lang among her influences. By the time Julia was seven she was composing her own songs on a little electric keyboard, singing in the Australian Youth Choir – and planning a long and illustrious career in ‘showbiz’. Despite both of her parents being firmly entrenched in academic careers, they have continued to support her creative endeavours from the outset. By age 16, after realising music was undoubtedly her future, Julia had left school to begin studying music at TAFE. She honed her skills by performing her own cabaret shows – even travelling to the United States to receive one-on-one tuition on the finer points of cabaret performance from Karen Kohler. At this point Julia’s music career was well and truly in motion, but after spending time with other like-minded music students at TAFE, she decided to deviate from cabaret in an effort to spread her creative wings. She’d been writing songs for many years and has a healthy back catalogue to draw on. Her focus gradually developed into the more contemporary style you hear today. Julia prides herself on writing deep, meaningful songs with honest and heartfelt lyrics that she sings with real emotion. She is mature beyond her years in both her stage persona and in person. Late in 2012 Julia and her band were given an amazing challenge. They had to come up with a show worthy of performance at the Sydney Opera House! I asked Julia how she managed to secure two nights at such an iconic venue. Apparently her father was responsible; he simply emailed the Opera House and asked how someone might go about organising a performance there. They responded with a list of criteria, to which he promptly set about assembling all the necessary materials and information. Nothing was heard for a while, but then a call came out of the blue announcing the availability of two nights a few short months away. This sent the team into a tailspin. It was such a short time to prepare for for such an enormous undertaking! Julia spent endless hours

Previous page: Julia Henning. Above: The band from left to right; Ashley, Matt, Julia, Eli and Nick.

writing and rehearsing to ensure that she had enough material for the show. The opportunity was not wasted. It all magically came together on the night, and can be corroborated by listening to Julia’s live CD (or watching the video). She and the band come together amazingly well. Liaising with all involved in the production process was a real education for Julia. Both nights were a sell-out! A couple of busloads of foreign tourists were lucky enough to sit in on rehearsals. They were so impressed that they wanted more … so they bought tickets for the evening performances! Since then Julia’s had even more success on Triple J’s ‘Unearthed’ radio station, with her track ‘If and Only If’ (from the ‘Divisions’ EP) reaching number one on the Unearthed Charts. Trying to launch a music career without the backing of a major label can be a huge and daunting commitment in both time and finances. In recent times this has been made easier by a number of ‘crowd-funding’ websites. Earlier this year in an effort to acquire the necessary funds to record and master their new album, Julia and her band (guitarist Ashley Crago, bass player Nick Evans, drummer and arranger Eli Green and pianist Matthew Moore) enlisted the help of one such website called ‘Pozible’ (an Australian site catering for locally-based creative endeavours). Fortunately they were successful in reaching their goal, so we’ll be seeing the new album on the shelves very soon. Unlike many musicians of her age, for Julia it has never been about being a ‘rock star’ – she’s had a long term vision of being a performance artist of the highest calibre. Her genre has changed a little as she’s matured, but her vision has essentially remained the same. This clarity and determination is quite inspiring. It will be satisfying to watch her career climb to new heights in the near future – and well beyond. More info: www.juliahenning.com www.facebook.com/JuliaHenningMusic www.youtube.com/user/henningjulia/videos 63


Penny’s Hill Winery 25th Anniversary

Merenia Vince asks ‘Why the red dot ... and who feeds the chooks?’ Photographs by Deb Saunders.

Midway between Willunga and McLaren Vale, the vine country gives way to a pocket of farmland grazed by black-faced sheep and ringed by rough-hewn fences and limestone walls. A curious Georgian homestead stands starkly in the landscape, juxtaposed with an elegant black sign bearing an unmistakable red dot.

New to the industry and with stiff competition in a region with sixth generation family vineyards, Tony was undaunted. He hired expert help from grower David Paxton and didn’t give up his day job, commuting to his firm in the city for several more years. Narrow-row Shiraz vines produced the first vintage in 1994.

Penny Hill’s iconic cellar door, an artful combination of the glamorous and rustic is intrinsic to the McLaren Vale wine region, and so it’s hard to believe that 25 years ago it only existed as a signature on a piece of paper.

The idea for the red dot came about as the result of a favour to Tony’s sister-in-law, Penny Dowie. An artist who lived in the country, she asked Tony to occasionally pop into the Adelaide art gallery where her paintings hung, to check whether any had sold. A dutiful brother-in-law, Tony became familiar with the small red ‘sold’ sticker underneath the paintings, and was struck by the visual power of a 14mm red dot. The rest is history.

On 8th day of the 8th month in 1988 Tony Parkinson signed deeds for 80 acres of McLaren Vale farmland. (Plenty of number 8s in this story!) With a well-established advertising agency in Adelaide city, Tony, with his wife Susie, wanted to move their young family out of town and raise them on a rural property with a country lifestyle. Tony also wanted a cash crop and having a love of red wine, his inclination was for a vineyard. A perfectionist, he initially looked for an established vineyard, but after four years of searching and still not finding the right place, he opted to start from scratch, buying farmland at the bottom of Penny’s Hill in East McLaren Vale.

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Tony has a passion for branding and a feel for words. A true creative, with a notebook at the bedside, he wrote down more than 400 possible names for his new vineyard and wine label only to arrive at the name already in front of him: Penny’s Hill. Tony is not afraid to laugh at himself; ‘I got very confused ... I was disappointed I couldn’t find a tricky name. In the end I had to drop my romantic notions. Penny’s Hill works; it’s about the place and it’s a friendly, happy name.’

Over the next decade, Tony purchased more Vales’ property, joining up several parcels of farmland and planting them with Shiraz, chardonnay, cabernet and merlot vines to create the Penny’s Hill Estate. The jewel in the crown was historic Ingleburne, a sheep and grain farm dating from colonial times, located in the heartland of McLaren Vale’s wine region. With sublime vistas of hills and vales this property is now the home to Penny’s Hill cellar door, restaurant and gallery, as well as the vines.


The distinctive two-story, blue-stone Georgian homestead on this property attracts a lot of curiosity and has a good luck story attached. It was built in the 1850s by an immigrant tenant farm labourer and father of eleven from Devonshire, Thomas Goss, who struck it big at the Victorian goldfields. Overnight Thomas went from labourer to estate owner, building a trophy home replicating his native Devonshire architecture. Ingleburne farm and house continued in the same family until purchased by Tony, and following a loving restoration the homestead is now an elegant by-invitation guest-house and artists’ retreat. Thomas Goss’s great-great grandson, Keith Rowland, continues to visit the farm and cellar-door twice daily to feed the chooks. A romantic with a love of history, Tony revelled in the farming heritage of the Ingleburne property and has woven the simple, grounded aesthetic into the Penny’s Hill brand, creating a cellar door which has become a tourist destination in its own right. The colonial farm buildings; barn, stables, cottage, and even the chookshed have been preserved with several acres of land around the cellar-door kept unplanted and now grazed by the black-faced Suffolk sheep. Rustic stringy-bark fences, based on the traditional post and rail design were commissioned, and Tony scoured auctions to buy the 16 sets of antique iron farm gates that adorn the estate. He convinced local stone-waller Tiger McMillan to build 500 metres of limestone walling on the farm, thereby re-launching Tiger’s career and also sparking off a much copied limestone-wall motif in the McLaren Vale wine region. > Previous page: The winery complex as seen from the air. This page top: Tony scoured auctions to buy the 16 sets of antique iron farm gates that adorn the estate. This page centre and left: The distinctive red dot, inspired by the little 14mm sold dots seen at artist openings, has become synonymous with the Penny’s Hill brand.

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To celebrate 25 years since inception, Tony has produced a private label, limited edition wine, named The Piano. The name is a tribute to his 93 year old mother, Celine Parkinson, an accomplished pianist.

Inspiration for the cellar door came when Tony was making his very first wine sale from one of the farm sheds. As he wheeled cases of wine on a sack-truck to the customer’s car he had a cathartic moment: ‘I need a shed.’ With the help of architect and brother-in-law Drew Dowie, he built a cellar door complex with ‘shed characteristics’, echoing the simple buildings already on the farm, copying their roof pitch and using typical farm materials of galvanised iron, stone and wood. An upmarket shed admittedly, the Penny’s Hill cellar door, gallery and restaurant complex have a restrained yet inviting simplicity and harmonise perfectly with the outlying buildings. And the wine? With the input of winemaker Ben Riggs, Penny’s Hill wine went from strength to strength. As a boutique winery the wines, especially the Shiraz, have achieved a string of awards nationally and internationally. Penny’s Hill wine is well-travelled, distributed to all major global markets. The Kitchen Door restaurant is a gourmet destination and headed by chef Ben Sommariva has won the title of Best Restaurant in a South Australian Winery, three times, as well as nationally in 2007. To celebrate 25 years since inception, Tony has produced a private label, limited edition wine, named The Piano. The name is a tribute to his 93 year-old mother, Celine Parkinson, an accomplished pianist. Furthermore, with 88 keys to a piano keyboard this wine celebrates the number eight, a number so significant at the beginning of Penny’s Hill. Penny’s Hill Winery is the sum of a remarkable mind. Clear-sighted, confident and determined, with a flair for branding and marketing, Tony Parkinson is a visionary businessman, who tapped into the regional trend for wine, tourism and food, incorporating all three of these into his venture. More than just a shrewd businessman, his romantic side − an artistic sensibility and feel for history − are stamped on everything from the look of his wine labels to the pastoral simplicity of his cellar door. At Penny’s Hill, Tony brings us a beguiling story of past and present, wrapped around a fine wine. Happy 25th Anniversary, Tony and everyone at Penny’s Hill. Top: The distinctive two-story, blue-stone Georgian homestead. Above: Portrait of Tony Parkinson by Grant Beed.

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Montessori Children’s Centre McLaren Vale 22 Tatachilla Road (08) 8323 8855 www.montessorichildren.com.au mccmv@iinet.com.au

“and splendid regional platters”

Olivers Road, McLaren Vale Phone +61 8 8323 9196 cellar@tapestrywines.com.au www.tapestrywines.com.au

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PENINSULA PEOPLE

New faces on the Fleurieu

Stephanie Johnston talks to Irina Santiago about her move to McLaren Vale from Salvador, Brazil.

Irina Santiago’s home ‘town’, Salvador, has a population of 3.5 million, in a densely populated region of 13 million people. The original capital of Brazil, its world heritage-listed historic port is crammed with brightly-coloured colonial houses and narrow, cobbled streets that teem with people, food and music; reflecting European, African and indigenous Indian influences over the centuries. It is hard to imagine anywhere more dissimilar to the serene rural landscape that can be viewed from Irina’s kitchen on California Road, McLaren Vale. Irina was in her late thirties when she decided to change her life and career. Until then she had lived in Salvador, working as a government advisor in foreign trade and investment, earning a Master’s degree in agricultural policy along the way. Her career had reached a point where she couldn’t really go any further without becoming involved in the game of politics itself. ‘I didn’t want to pursue that, so I realised I needed to make a change,’ she explains. ‘Then I thought, if I am going to do something different, then let’s do something really different.’ At this stage of her life, she felt that moving to another Brazilian city would be almost ‘as radical’ as moving overseas so, when an interest in viticulture and winemaking led her to look into what various universities around the world had to offer, she decided on the University of Adelaide. ‘My brother had lived in Australia for six months and he had always given me this perception that Australia is very informal, but that there was this interesting balance of hard workers who also value their free time very highly,’ Irina recollects. ‘I knew that I needed this balance; that it was time for that.’ Within six months of commencing a (second) Master’s degree in Adelaide, she secured a job at Paxton’s Winery, enduring 38˚ heat on her first day in the vineyards. ‘That was the moment I was absolutely sure I’d made the right decision,’ she recalls. ‘I remember just laying down on the floor, covered with dust, wondering what have I done with my life, but at the same time feeling happy, happy, happy ...’. Irina found herself falling into the embrace of the McLaren Vale community, its beautiful landscape and ocean beaches. The work at Paxton’s linked in nicely with her studies into biodynamic certification, which in turn led to the offer of a PhD scholarship to research the assessment and adoption of sustainability in viticulture. Around the same time someone sent her an advertisement for a part-time position with the McLaren Vale Grape Wine and Tourism Association. Technically, the scholarship precluded her from taking on any kind of employment; however Irina managed to persuade her supervisors that the job working with McLaren Vale grape growers on generational farming and sustainable viticulture practices would both inform and enhance her research.

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‘My brother had lived in Australia for six months and he had always given me this perception that Australia is very informal, but that there was this interesting balance of hard workers who also value their free time very highly,’ Irina recollects. ‘I knew that I needed this balance; that it was time for that.’ Above: Irina Santiago. Photo by Alexandra Paxinos. Overleaf: McLaren Vale vineyard. Photo by Grant Beed, compliments of the Currant Shed.


‘It was a case of being in the right place at the right time,’ she says. ‘McLaren Vale called me.’ Meeting and falling in love with grape grower and winemaker Dudley Brown – an American expatriate who had already made McLaren Vale home – sealed the deal. ‘It was one of those encounters in life where everything starts to make sense, and you feel that you belong to a place.’ Irina is working on creating a meaningful definition of sustainability that will enable farmers to grow the best grapes they can, in the context of a specific site. Her approach is not about applying standard parameters that might suit the retail sector, but about aiming for a sustainable combination of all the relevant parameters of a particular vineyard. The model takes into account how the natural environment combines with cultural and market forces to impact on an individual business, and also encompasses the farmers’ collective responsibility for maintaining and enhancing the whole landscape. ‘If the farm doesn’t take care of the whole landscape they won’t be able to keep producing.’ People won’t visit the area any longer, because it’s ugly, then you won’t have buyers and so on. We need to

understand the complexity of those relations in order to attain a truly sustainable system,’ explains Irina. The research is not about telling growers what to do, but about giving them the tools for evaluating the sustainability of their path over time, so that they can attain longevity in the wine business. The McLaren Vale Grape Wine and Tourism Association believes Irina’s ‘people, planet and profit’ methodology is one of the finest programs for sustainability in viticulture in the world. According to association CEO Peter Ali, ‘The program embraces the triple bottom line approach relating to economic, social and environmental considerations and is independent of farming systems, meaning conventional, organic and biodynamic grape growers alike can benefit from participating.’ Irina in turn has been impressed with the way the McLaren Vale community operates collaboratively. ‘It is such a wonderful community. No-one keeps secrets. Everyone shares information. If you have a problem, everyone comes and helps,’ she remarks. ‘That’s unique. I don’t know if people here are aware of what they have.’

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Eden at the races

It’s the 20th anniversary of the Langhorne Creek Vignerons’ Day, held at the Strathalbyn Racecourse, on Sunday 17 November. One of the founders, Andrew ‘Ack’ Verco, of Howlin’ Gale Wines, reminisces. Story by Heather Millar.

‘[The late] Edgar Pike was on the committee with me for the Strathalbyn Races,’ says Ack. ‘Edgar came up from Clare, you see, and they had something similar up there, so that’s how he came up with the idea for the Vignerons’ Race Day.’ ‘Edgar said to me, well why don’t we get something happening with the other Langhorne Creek wineries – a wine and food day. So we bandied the idea around for a bit. Then we went to the wineries about getting involved ...’ ‘I remember it clearly – we had a band, and a good turn-out from the wineries; I reckon just about everyone in Langhorne Creek came, it was jam packed. Blues from down at Middleton did the food ...’ ‘The second year we did it was the windiest day; you could hardly even hear the band. I remember there was Tommy Ruff on the plate, and all the lettuce leaves just blow off it – it was a debacle! But if it’s a fine day, it’s a great day out.’

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The format hasn’t changed very much over the years, according to Ack. It’s a family day out – there are pony rides, an animal nursery and a bouncy castle for the kids. Music, plenty of local wine and food for the adults – and of course the chance to cheer on the horses. ‘It’s hard being the band at a race day – they have to stop when the bugler plays before a race, and there’s so much going on around them. We’ve had some great bands there over the years – Graham Cornes band [the Cornesy’s Allstar Rock Band, formerly known as the 5AA Rock-n-Roll Allstars], that popular Adelaide band The Happy Leonards, jazz bands ...’. This year a jazz band has been booked. And there are a few new things in the pipeline for the 20th anniversary. There’s a barrel race, which will see winery staff pushing a wine barrel down the track competing against other wineries. There’s also the Eden marquee, offering race-goers (as the press release says) ‘a high-end, decadent atmosphere to mix and mingle in a cocktail setting’.


Head chef Marcus McCreight from Giovanni’s Restaurant in Mt Barker has worked closely with local farmers and growers to source the best seasonal ingredients for the extensive grazing menu. In the afternoon, the team from Giovanni’s will be loading up large rustic boards with a range of freshly baked wood-fired gourmet pizzas. For dessert guests will be lured by the ‘Sweet temptation in Eden’. The menu will be complemented by an extensive range of wines from Langhorne Creek Vignerons, and beers from one of the club’s longest serving sponsors, Lion Nathan. There is a designated wine area where the wineries offer tastings and sales by the bottle or glass.

The format hasn’t changed very much over the years, according to Ack. It’s a family day out – there are pony rides, an animal nursery and a bouncy castle for the kids. Music, plenty of local wine and food for the adults – and of course the chance to cheer on the horses.

‘The Race Day has certainly given us more of a profile’, says Ack’s wife Jenny. ‘Everyone works incredibly well together. Even just locally in the regions around the Hills; it gives us a chance to showcase the wines – particularly for the small producers who don’t have a cellar door like us.’ The Vercos used to showcase their Howlin’ Gale wines, but now they prefer to just enjoy the day out. Tickets to Eden are $180 for the Langhorne Creek Vignerons’ Day and include food, beverages, a race book, bus transport from Adelaide and entry on the day. General admission is $20. Go to www.strathracing.com.au for more information and bookings.

Previous page: ‘Little Adam’, winner of the 2012 Vignerons’ Cup. Photo by Atkins Photography. This page: Punters take in the sun, food and local wines between races.

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UPCOMING EVENTS South Australian Readersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Festival 25 October to 3 November The Fleurieu Art Prize Festival 26 October to 25 November Sand sculpture exhibition by Sandstorm Events 23 November to 1 December 2013 City of Onkaparinga Christmas Pageant Sunday 25 November Beachside Food and Wine Festival Saturday 30 November For full event details visit www.onkaparingacity.com Keep up to date with all our event news on Twitter @OnkaparingaCity or check out our facebook pages CityofOnkaparinga and ArtsCentrePortNoarlunga

(08) 8384 0666

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www.onkaparingacity.com


on gi re e th of urs vo a fl ue iq un e th e nc rie pe Ex In the McLaren Vale things happen... but not by chance. The region’s passionate wine producers are amongst the most cohesive in Australia, banding together, getting their hands dirty and achieving some incredible feats in the process, proving that two heads really are better than one. It’s these dedicated producers that now have industry peers and wine lovers alike looking at their region through different eyes. Scarce Earth is a McLaren Vale initiative exploring and celebrating the geological, climatic and soil diversity of the region. All wines come from a single block, a small plot of land with a unique flavour profile and personality. A panel consisting of three local winemakers and three independent experts, assess each wine to ensure that site is expressed in the glass and the wine free of overt winemaking influences. This project gives wine lovers at all levels the opportunity to explore the influence of site and the chance to taste some of the region’s best Shiraz vineyards. Over time, Scarce Earth will be an invaluable resource for local winemakers and grape growers, as they strive to gain an unparalleled understanding of Australia’s most significant variety. www.mclarenvale.info/scarceearth


PENINSULA PEOPLE

Anna Fenech

Despite the Fleurieu having been my home for over four years now, it’s long been a place I’ve enjoyed visiting and exploring, with one of my very favourite places for photographs being Kuitpo Forest. It is here that I enjoy experimenting with various takes on capturing light as it seeps through the forest ceiling, accentuating the shapes and textures of the trees. I also love just driving throughout the countryside, through old towns, past vast hills, farms and valleys in the hope of discovering new things. I am rarely disappointed. I love to find something that has been sitting there unseen or unacknowledged for years and years, and then being able to capture forever a small piece of its story with a single click. In 2004 I began studying Visual Arts and Applied Design at O’Halloran Hill TAFE, at which time I really got into photography after my first shoot. I remember returning to the studio to develop my film and watching the image gradually appear and come to life in the developer, knowing I had captured a moment that would now be forever frozen in time. So after completing the Cert III I decided to continue on and study a Bachelor of Visual Arts, where photography would become my major.

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At that time I was focused mainly on portraiture, with light always playing a major part in my photographs – whether natural or controlled. I loved to capture the shape and feeling of everything I shot … and still do. My graduating exhibition piece was a selfportrait silhouette series, illuminated by a framed light box. During the years at TAFE I had tended to use mainly digital cameras, but by the time I finished I felt the need to go back to basics. I decided to step right away from digital and get back to the basics of film itself, where lack of control over the outcome of photographs was a great starting point for experimentation. I slowly began collecting vintage cameras, like the box Brownie, where the only control I had was how long to hold down the shutter release. At the moment I have two Kodak box Brownies, a 1930s Kodak Junior, two Pentax SLRs, a 1950s Kodak Duaflex II, two Polaroids, with my current favourite being a brand new Lubitel +166, which was based on the Russian GOMZ and LOMO series after World War II and shoots both medium format or 35mm. Something I really enjoy is to shoot a few rolls of film, then get it developed to see what I’ve managed to capture: whether it’s exactly how I’d imagined it would be – or unexpectedly strange and beautiful.


I love to find something that has been sitting there unseen or unacknowledged for years and years, and then being able to capture forever a small piece of its story with a single click.

I’ve now also stepped right away from editing and ‘perfecting’ my photographs with effects and touch-ups. I’ve found that imperfections and unexpected outcomes can render an image even truer and more beautiful. I’ve even stripped my shots further back, away from portraiture, to explore details in landscapes and in natural lighting. I like to capture the little things that might normally be missed, and by means of strong composition create something interesting from an object or scene that may initially have seemed quite ordinary. My love of the arts urged me on to further study, where I completed a Graduate Diploma in Art History at Adelaide University. Then by 2012 I was happily working at JamFactory Contemporary Craft and Design as part of the Carclew Youth Arts Administration Traineeship. Being surrounded by so many creative artists keeps me inspired and motivated to continue tinkering on with my vintage cameras. At the moment I’m still finding my own style, and dream of one day producing a book of my favourite pieces. For now though, I’m working on a few ideas for a collaborative exhibition with my fiancé and friends.

Image 1: Untitled, 2013, Pentax SLR, 35mm film. Image 2: Untitled, 2013, Pentax SLR, 35mm film. Image 3: Untitled, 2013, Lubitel +166, 120 film. Above: Self portrait. 75


Brewing up a storm in

Myponga If you visit the brewery on a warm day youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re likely to find three Samoyeds lying around in the sun ... Story by Heather Millar. Photography by Grant Beed.


In November last year, just a few months after Kate Henning and Simon Dunstone were married, they bought the Myponga Brewery, and the Smiling Samoyed Brewery was conceived. It was after Kate Henning bought partner Simon Dunstone a Coopers beer brewing kit for Christmas several years ago that a shared passion for brewing began. ‘It fairly quickly spiralled out of control’, laughs Kate. ‘We ended up with a whole room in our house dedicated to brewing!’ ‘We made some pretty terrible beer with that kit,’ agrees Simon. ‘But we quickly got the bug, and worked out how we could improve the beer we were making. Before long, we had a full all-grain brewery and four beer taps at home! ‘Our poker nights were pretty popular – people loved coming round and tasting the beer. And then they started asking if we’d ever thought about making it professionally. We were looking at what we might do to start our own business ... we’re both passionate about beer, so it just made sense to try and do it.’ Last year Kate’s parents bought the Myponga Market, and initially the couple planned to use one of the rooms at the market for a weekend production brewery. Kate’s parents had signed the purchase agreement for the market a week before the couple got married. They went to Europe on honeymoon for three months where they visited forty-two breweries and sampled many more beers. When they got back, the Myponga brewery, right behind the market, came up for sale. >

‘We were looking at what we might do to start our own business ... we’re both passionate about beer, so it just made sense to try and do it.’

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‘We thought, why not? We can sell our beer to customers at our own bar, tell them about it, show them where it’s brewed ... it’s a much better business model. So we worked out our finances, and bought the business at the end of November last year,’ says Simon. The couple sold their house up north and moved to Myponga. Simon gave up his job as a software engineer, and started getting the brewery set up for production. Kate has continued her work as a lawyer in the city for the time being. The couple had their first run at the end of July, with their new 1000L all-grain brew-house up and running with a new range of hand-made craft beers produced on site. Both Simon and Kate are studying for a Graduate Certificate of Brewing through Ballarat University, learning all about the science behind brewing. ‘As a professional brewer you need to know what’s going on behind the scenes and be able to control every aspect of the process. And there’s also the safety and legal aspects. There’s a lot to learn going from home brewer to professional brewer’, he laughs. While the new brewery was being set up, they were open three days a week selling craft beers. They now have over 50 varieties in bottles, and six on tap as well as two ciders. ‘It’s all small-batch beers by small independent breweries,’ says Simon. ‘It’s given us a chance to see what people like – also what works and what doesn’t.’ The couple have added to the food offered at the brewery as well. There’s the Brewery Platter, which is a plate of local and SA produce, such as Alexandrina cheese and Willunga almonds; and they have just put in a wood-fired pizza oven.

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Their logo is a cute, smiling Samoyed, which of course begs the question ... where did that unusual name come from? ‘We have three Samoyeds,’ says Simon. There’s brother and sister Cooper and Mia, and now Poppet, a rescue dog we recently added to the family. The first brew is named after the dogs: a pale ale called 12 Paws. ‘If you visit the brewery on a sunny day you’re likely to find the dogs lying around in the sun, welcoming visitors,’ says Simon. The brewery is open during the week, when visitors can come and watch the brewing through a big glass viewing window they have installed. ‘If our sign’s out the front – you know we’ll be brewing’, says Simon. Through the viewing window is the brewing shed itself – once upon a time the Myponga Hardware store. The previous owner of the brewery was Troy DeYoung, of DeYoung’s Salvage in Seaford, so the place is full of interesting collectible and recycled items. ‘He did a great job of doing the place up, putting in the bar and beer garden, decorating it and putting in all the trinkets and things,’ says Simon. Kate and Simon have added their bottle collection to the eclectic interior of the brewery: a wall of craft beer bottles from around the world. ‘We’ve been collecting them for years; it was becoming a bit of a mess at home’, says Simon. It’s almost as though the couple knew years ago that one day there would be a wall full of cabinets in a brewery just waiting to be filled with their collection!


the court house

WINNER - LUXURY ACCOMMODATION CATEGORY - 2012 STATE TOURISM AWARDS

food · wine · art

Normanville’s best kept secret Open for brunch and lunch 7 days Open for tapas and evening meals Thursday to Sunday Fabulous food from the Fleurieu

The Court House: 52 Main Street, Normanville, South Australia Phone: (08) 8558 3532 Email: court.house@optusnet.com.au

This luxury award-winning boutique hotel offers five modern Asian-themed suites along with professional and discreet service. Chef Juliet Michell prepares arrival tea and breakfasts. Dinner is available in The Australasian Dining Room. 1 Porter Street, Goolwa. T: 08 8555 1088 www.australasian1858.com

Shake hands with Spring.

The Kitchen Door is dedicated to using local Fleurieu produce. Enjoy fresh spring dishes like our Lobster and Wagu Oxtail Salad matched with award winning wines from the Penny’s Hill range.

Open for Lunch and Afternoon Coffee Wednesday to Sunday Dinner Wednesday to Saturday Fresh new Spring Menu and daily specials featuring regional produce.

SA’s Best Restaurant in a Winery 2013

Open Thursday – Monday for lunch from 12pm (closed Tuesdays and Wednesdays)

281 Main Road McLaren Vale, South Australia

Ph: 08 8557 0840 email: restaurant@gwg.net.au www.pennyshill.com.au *WINNER! Best restaurant in a winery: Australia 2007, South Australia 2007, 2010, 2012, 2013

Bookings: 8598 4184 www.leonardsmill.com.au

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Subscribe now to and go in the draw to WIN a meal at Au Pear worth $200!

A hint of the Mediterranean complementing all that we love about the Southern Vales.

192 Main Road Willunga

Subscribe to Fleurieu Living Magazine for one or two years and go in the draw to win a lunch or dinner at Au Pear worth $200. Competition closes on 6 December 2013. The winner will be contacted by phone or email and announced on our Facebook Page: www.facebook.com/FleurieuLivingMagazine by 13 December. A voucher for $200 will be mailed to the winner. This will be redeemable at the restaurant until 15 March 2014.  You can subscribe online at www.isubscribe.com.au/FleurieuLiving or by filling out and mailing in the subscription form bound into this issue. Good luck!

Terms and Conditions: Subscriptions must be received by Fleurieu Living before 5pm on 6 December 2013 to be considered for the draw. One entry is allocated per subscription. The winner must be over 18 years of age.


September 21, 10am ~ 3pm, lunch included Workshops held by Carol Lefevre, Jude Aquilina and Peter Greenway. Writing Competition Award Ceremony.

October 21, Cellar Door Muster Performances of the writing competition winning entries at the cellar doors. Fun and prizes!

Enquiries to: writing@langhornecreekwritersfestival.com Full programme, booking form & online registration at: www.langhornecreekwritersfestival.com Enjoy a Kangaroo Island holiday at 34 Art Feast venues island-wide with local fine art, installations, poetry, youth art, gourmet produce, music, birds on toilet walls and wildflowers galore. Janine Mackintosh, Episodic ©

Starting point of the McLaren Vale Cheese and Wine Trail, Blessed Cheese combines a specialist artisan and farmhouse cheese shop, licensed café and providore. Pack a picnic or dine in our casual café for a regional breakfast, lunch, coffee or cake and of course ... cheese.

150 Main Road McLaren Vale 5171 T: 8323 7958 F: 8323 7918 E: info@blessedcheese.com.au W: blessedcheese.com.au

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FOOD & WINE

Two Chefs, a Starter, a Main and a Dessert Leonie Porter-Nocella visits Cameron Clarke of Leonard’s Mill and Lucy Dalston of The Courthouse. Photographs by Heidi Linehan. Cameron’s starter and main Jane Mitchell and Alan Greig are the new(ish) owners/proprietors of the amazing reincarnation of Leonards Mill in Second Valley. They bought it about 2-3 years ago and have transformed it from, well, what it had been for many, many years … into a warm, vibrant hub of great food and wonderfully balanced hospitality (good and attentive without being too much so). They had both been high-flyers in the corporate world but had been longing to get into ‘food’ … so took courses … even a baristas’ course … and went for it. The outcome is a tribute to their preparation! I was going to begin this profile of their chef, Cameron Clarke, by commenting on how lucky Jane and Alan are to have someone so talented and creative on board. I say ‘was’, because since then I have spoken with Jane and found that they are totally aware of what a gem they have in Cameron and have even come to think of him as ‘family’!

Above: Cameron Clarke, chef at Leonard’s Mill. Overleaf: Cameron’s Epic Vegetarian Superfood Starter.

Despite Cameron’s experience in top (even Michelin-starred) restaurants from England, Scotland, Cornwall and France (in the snow season with daily-changing menus) to balmy Hayman Island ... he claims that the most influential people in his working life have been fellow chefs right here on the Fleurieu. At 27 and looking even younger, Cameron’s been working on himself to maintain a healthy mind and body. Reading, exercising, art and music, gardening (calms the mind) reflecting, and experimenting in the kitchen are all part of this ‘maintenance’ ideology. This may strike some as odd, but a combination of split shifts and the stress of particularly frenetic services can take a toll ... even with supportive collaboration from fellow chef Kath Larcombe. Read Anthony Boudin’s ‘Kitchen Confidential’ for a thrilling no-holds-barred portrayal of the perils of cheffing. Cameron’s aim is to counter these by planting a kitchen garden at Leonard’s Mill and at home, with a view to both culinary and therapeutic gain. When asked to describe his style of food he was a bit hesitant to label it, but came up with ‘rustic elegance’ ... for want of something more precise. He loves art and for him cooking is yet another form of expression; therefore he loves to experiment and create as an art form. His ultimate aim is to teach cooking and/or open his own restaurant. All I can say to this is: ‘I’ll be there!’ Take a look at these two dishes; starter and main, and you’ll see why.

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Cameron’s Epic Vegetarian Superfood Starter SERVES 4 Ingredients 4 tablespoons sprouted chickpeas 2 tablespoon Goji berries ½ cup fresh garden peas 1/3 cup fresh broad beans 200g Danish fetta 1-2 bunches baby heirloom beetroots for roasting 1 bunch small red radishes for pickling ½ bunch each of mint and parsley. Chop half and pick rest ½ cup bean shoots 1 tablespoon of coriander and 1 of cumin seeds roasted and ground together 1 cup of soaked pearl barley Have on hand a few lemons and a good brand of extra virgin olive oil. 1. A week or so before, lay out a tray with wet paper to sprout 4 tablespoons of chick peas. Change paper regularly, keep moist and leave in a warm spot. Once sprouted (5-7 days) transfer to a container and keep in fridge. Keeps for 4-7 days. Alternatively, soak overnight and cook as normal. 2. Soak pearl barley overnight, cook in cold water with bay leaf and garlic clove and simmer for 30-40 minutes until cooked. Drain. Once cool add lemon zest, ground coriander and cumin, chopped parsley and mint, salt, pepper and olive oil to taste. Serve at room temperature.

3. Roast foil-wrapped baby beets for 30-40 minutes at 180c with a touch of balsamic and olive oil, garlic clove, salt and pepper until a knife can penetrate. Allow to cool, then peel, cut in half and dress again in balsamic, olive oil and season. Serve warm. Bash the peas in a mortar and pestle, then add broad beans, zest of one lemon and juice, 1 tablespoon of chopped mint, and olive oil to a consistency of still firm but not dry. Season and crumble in a bit of fetta. Also serve warm. 4. To pickle radish boil a small pot of water, and in another pot place equal quantities of sugar, white vinegar and a quarter of water. Add cloves, bay leaf, coriander seeds, cardamom and cinnamon to create flavours. Bring to boil and simmer. Place radishes in boiling water for 3-4 minutes until half-cooked, then drain and immerse, weighted down, in the pickling liquid. Take off heat. Ready once cooled. 5. Assemble with pearl barley as the base, bean shoots, a few random placings of the warm smashed peas and broad beans, place warm beetroots and radishes, sprinkle goji berries and picked mint, parsley, crumbled fetta, sprouted chickpeas, loose peas and tendrils. Finish by squeezing a little lemon juice, drizzle olive oil and season. All done. >

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Cameron’s K.I. Snapper / Skordalia / Lentils / Caramelised Root Vegetables Ingredients 4 x 180g snapper portions 300g of red nugget lentils, soaked in water overnight 1 each carrot, onion and celery stalk finely diced, then sauté 2 mins together in butter 4 brown onions 1 leek 1 bunch of mixed heirloom carrots 1 bulb medium-sized fennel (keep fronds for garnish) 5 Desiree potatoes peeled and diced to 3cm 1L full cream milk 2L fish stock, veg stock or water 250g butter Bay leaves 1 tablespoon Rosemary 100ml thickened cream Roasted garlic, chopped parsley and lemon zest for garnish. 1. For skordalia peel and dice five large Desiree potatoes and place in pot with 70% milk and the rest water. Add a bay leaf and use a vegetable peeler to zest one lemon, add 2 cloves of bashed garlic. Bring to boil then turn down to a slight simmer until cooked. Strain and pick out bits. Mash by any means adding a good quality olive oil until shiny. Add salt to taste. A good result can be achieved in a kitchen aid with the whisk attachment.

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2. Cover lentils by a few cm with fish stock then add bay leaf. Bring to simmer (the lentils may need extra liquid) for about one hour. Cool on a tray in fridge. Then add sautéed vegetables, stock, a knob of butter and seasoning. Bring back to heat. 3. To braise leek, preheat oven to 180c. Cut into 6 cm lengths but keep whole and round. Wash, and then place in a small tray to fit. Add seasoning, butter, bay leaf and either a little water for steaming … or fish or veg stock. Cover with foil and cook until tender (30-40 mins). Cool then slice down and pan fry until caramelised. Use same method for fennel, but cut into portion size wedges and add a little sherry vinegar. 4. For caramelised onion puree, slice onions and add to med/hot pan with a little oil and pinch of salt. Sweat down, turn pan to low, add butter and stir every few minutes. After time it will slightly catch on the bottom. Scrape this and continue until the onions are brown. Do not forget to keep stirring or it will burn. Blend smooth with cream and 30g butter. 5. Peel heirloom carrots and simmer for five minutes, drain. Then pan-roast in olive oil for colour. Take off heat and deglaze with butter, a splash of sherry vinegar and one tablespoon chopped rosemary. 6. To assemble, pan-fry snapper portions and add butter right at end and ‘monte’ the fish. ‘Smear’ mash, make a hole in middle and fill with lentils. Dollop the onion puree in a few artistic spots, build the carrot, leek and fennel, then finish by ‘placing’ fish and garnish. Enjoy.


Lucy Dalston of The Courthouse, Normanville Lucy has cooked at the Court House in Normanville for the past five years and has overseen owner Bruce Gordon’s vision of a regionallyinspired tapas menu. In turn, Lucy finds her own inspiration in the quality of the fresh, seasonal Fleurieu produce that is delivered daily to the kitchen door … and to which she applies her artistic flair to ensure that we’ve already devoured it with our eyes before gratifying our palates! Despite Lucy having cooked exclusively on the Fleurieu, the person responsible for ‘that defining moment’ in her career was, ironically, a home cook in India who cooked traditional recipes with classic Indian ingredients. And while Lucy has already travelled throughout Asia, Europe and North America, we are now salivating in anticipation for the inspirational aftermath of a recent trip to New Orleans. Canadian-born Bruce has lived in South Australia for eighteen years and spent all but three of those working on the Fleurieu, for which he has an enduring, even touching, passion … with the Court House being the embodiment of his lifetime in hospitality. This ‘lifetime’ includes owning and managing several restaurants in Canada, England and Australia.

Above: Lucy Dalston, chef at The Courthouse Overleaf: Lucy’s Brown Sugar Meringue with oven baked rhubarb and pink cream.

The Court House was conceived as a regionally-inspired tapas restaurant with an eye to creating an environment similar to that of country inns in rural Spain: with the menu determined by whatever arrives from local growers. Keep it simple and bursting with flavour. Bruce’s wife, Christine’s ‘design eye’ is evident throughout the venue and can be most appreciated in her linocut prints and reworked ‘found objects’ adorning many of the walls and ledges of the Court House. But for all that, a good part of the Court House’s success lies in the active promotion of local produce – like the food-focused dinners featuring a monthly ‘hero’ of seafood, fowl, or pork: live music on the first Sunday of the month and dinners featuring a different regional winemaker each month. Such is the success of this promotional activity, that they are now about to expand into the entire old Court House building, thereby creating two new dining areas, with the added appeal of having the gaol cells included! They open seven days a week, with evening meals on four (Thursday to Sunday). > For information on monthly attractions go to; www.courthousenormanville.com.au/

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Lucy’s Brown Sugar Meringue with oven baked rhubarb and pink cream NOTE: FIRST WIPE MIXING BOWL WITH WHITE VINEGAR TO REMOVE ANY OILY RESIDUE. Meringue 4 egg whites 1 cup brown sugar ½ teaspoon cornflour Beat egg whites on high until soft peaks form. Gradually add brown sugar and continue beating until firm peaks form (it’s ready when the bowl can be turned upside down). Whizz the cornflour through it. Dollop the mixture in freeform mounds onto a baking tray lined with baking parchment. Bake in a preheated oven at 160c for 10 minutes then lower heat to 120c and cook for 1 hour or until crisp on the outside. Allow to cool completely in the oven with the door ajar.

Rhubarb 1 bunch of rhubarb ½ cup brown sugar 50gm star anise Rind of ½ an orange 50ml orange liqueur Combine ingredients in a shallow baking try. Wrap with alfoil and bake for 10 minutes in a hot oven (200c). Unwrap and allow to caramelise for 5 minutes or so. Pink Cream 300ml Fleurieu cream 100ml raspberry coulis Whip cream until firm peaks form and then stir through the coulis. Assemble in a casual fashion with the meringue as base topped with cream and rhubarb. Can’t wait to try it!

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50% off

First 5 ro om quoting re bookings f no. FL5 8

unspoilt island, spoilt guests KANGAROO ISLAND LODGE and REFLECTIONS RESTAURANT Scenic Drive, American River Kangaroo Island SA 5221 Telephone: 08 8553 7053 Facsimile: 08 8553 7030 Email: res@kilodge.com.au www.kilodge.com.au

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RETAIL

What to buy. Where to buy it.

Kidman: The Extraordinary Life of Sir Sidney Kidman by Christo Reid. RRP: $90 Available at: Dillons Bookshop in Norwood, Title Bookshop in Vaughan Place or at; sidneykidman@christoreid.com

Autumn McLaren Vale, 40 x 40cms oil on canvas by John Lacey. RRP: $960 (including GST) Available at: Green Tank Gallery 41 Woodcone Rd Mt Compass Ph: 08 8556 8388 www.johnlacey.com.au

Scenic Flight for two RRP: $350 Available at: Adelaide Biplanes Colville Road, Aldinga. Ph: 08 8556 5404

G I F T

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V O U C H E R


SHOP LOCAL: Our small providores, cafés, wineries and boutique shops are chock full of great products. Unique and high quality items are available on your doorstep.

Life by numbers RRP: $34.95 Available at: All That Jazz 29 North Terrace Port Elliot SA. Ph: 08 8554 3645

Retro wire stool RRP: $269 Available at: Coast by Design 34 The Strand Port Elliot SA. Ph: 08 8554 3448

2010 Kay Brothers Hillside Shiraz RRP: $40 Available at: Fine Wine Retailers, Dan Murphy’s, Cellar Door, Online shop 57 Kays Road, McLaren Vale www.kaybrothersamerywines.com

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Louise Reeves was a city girl for most of her life, until the call of adventure took her to Canada to work in the snowfields. There she met Steve Padmore, a handsome, bronzed Aussie who made her laugh.

Fleurieu Weddings

The friendship would soon blossom into romance with a shared love of the beach, surfing, family; and ultimately, the birth of their beautiful baby girl, Willow. Despite settling in New South Wales, the couple decided to wed in the home of Louise’s parents, Mary and George Reeves, whose family have lived in the Yankalilla region for over five generations. On Saturday the 23rd of February, Steve and Louise celebrated their wedding on the beach in front of Mary and George’s recently renovated family beach house, formerly owned by Louise’s grandparents, Murray and Thelma Mitchell. Thelma had been a renowned interior designer in Adelaide, and ‘the beach-house’ had been featured in Belle Magazine, some 20 years earlier. Louise’s grandmother would have loved to have seen the old chairs painted a distressed white, the quirky signs on old grey timber, with

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daybeds draped in white muslin curtains and dotted along the beach in front of the house. The house was filled with succulents, pink-blush lilies, and roses from floral designer Marge Lindsay. The guests stepped onto beach for the ceremony armed with umbrellas, shielding them from a hot afternoon sun. There, Steve and his four groomsmen dressed in light brown suits with white shirts, canvas sneakers, succulents in their buttonholes, waited patiently for the bridal party to arrive. Louise’s bridesmaids appeared first, with dresses in shades of blossom peach and soft pink, their jewelled sandals completing the look. Two little flower girls, the couple’s daughter and Louise’s niece, stole the show with their pink tutu dresses, flower halos and sequined gold collars. Finally, Louise’s father guided her down the sandy aisle in a Claire Pettibone-inspired dress with layers of soft cream Italian silk, satin and lace. Her sixties-inspired hair was pinned in place with a veil billowing behind, her diamond earrings completing the image.


Tears flowed as the couple read their self-composed vows. After the ceremony guests were treated to pink blush cocktails and champagne under the shade of the marquee on the open deck of the beach house. With the Reeves family’s ‘foodie’ lineage, it was no surprise that an organic feast of epic proportions followed – the menu created by celebrated Adelaide Chef Emma Reeves, Louise’s cousin. All ingredients were sourced from the best local producers on the Fleurieu Peninsula and in Adelaide: all organic, all gluten free and all delicious and all perfectly complemented by McLaren Vale wines. A delightful dessert table was styled by food-stylist, Di Reeves (Louise’s Aunt) and contributed to by sister-in-law Sarah Glezer. By perfect design the sunset threw a brilliant gold-red over the guests, and as the celebrations continued Steve and Louise took their last dance then slipped away as husband and wife for the first time.

Steve and Louise celebrated their wedding on the beach in front of Mary and George’s recently renovated family beach house, formerly owned by Louise’s grandparents, Murray and Thelma Mitchell. Thelma had been a renowned interior designer in Adelaide, and ‘the beach house’ had been featured in Belle Magazine, some 20 years earlier.

This was indeed a vintage romance wedding by the sea, blending old family traditions and welcoming the new – captured as a treasured moment for future family albums by photographer Lisa Stewart.

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JOHN LACEY ARTIST STUDIO & GALLERY

Fleurieu Art Prize Community Event Exhibition Oct 26 - Nov 24 - Daily 11 - 5pm

All other times open most days • Impressionistic & contemporary landscapes Curtains · Blinds · Shutters · Interiors Phone: 83828116 · Mobile: 0421 795 994 Visit our showroom: Shop 4 / 3-9 Gawler Street Port Noarlunga Email: creativemood@adam.com.au www.creativemoodsa.com.au

41 Woodcone Rd Mt Compass Ph. (08) 8556 8388 Mob. 0419 823 708 Email: laceyjla@internode.on.net www.johnlacey.com.au

gallery studio

Graphic design and art direction for print and online media. Preferred supplier to FLM.

Elegant boutique accommodation • Wine and dine Gourmet café restaurant • Corporate functions and weddings • Advanced clinical and specialised treatments to feel renewed.

www.threefiftyseven.com

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Ph 8554 2088 14-30 Waterport Rd Pt Elliott SA E: info@authenticity.com.au W: authenticity.com.au


Being Social: FLM First Anniversary Party On June 21, FLM celebrated its first anniversary party at Angove McLaren Vale Vineyard and Cellar Door. The wood oven was stoked up and All Fired Up was dishing out delicious pizza. An extra tall macaron tower was assembled by Fleurieu Kitchen and a chocolate fountain from Chocolique was a big hit with the small people (as well as some of the not-so-small).

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01: Ernie Murray, James Potter and Noni Lauder 02: Graham Richards, Sande Bruce and Tim Robson 03: Nadia Schiller and Clare Rafferty 04: Damian Dawson and Briony Liebich 05: Jane Mitchell, Olga Kostic and Andrea Travers 06: Arora Lumsden, Leonie Giles and Nadia Haddrick 07: Johanna Bennett and Abbey Threadgold 08: Kate Henning and Simon Dunstone 09: Richard Angove, Julie Kennedy and Paul Harvey 10: Celine Doneghan and Karel Vandersteegen 11: Brice and Brenda Pearson.

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SOCIAL PAGES

Being Social: Australia’s Biggest Afternoon Tea On May 23rd, FLM headed to Alexandrina Cheese Company for ‘Australia’s Biggest Afternoon Tea’ to help raise funds for the Cancer Council and celebrate the launch of Special Guest Author Rebecca Sullivan’s first book – Like Grandma Used To Make! Rebecca is the face of the new ‘granny skill’ movement; a growing community of women who share and preserve these traditions by collecting and passing them on.

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Being Social: Big Fiesta Night FLM headed over to Hortas in Port Noarlunga for the Big Fiesta Night on Friday 12th July. Guests enjoyed a great set of entertainment by Brazilian dance group ‘Danca Brazil’, as well as a great mix of Portuguese and Brazilian food and wine.

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01: Helene Hurreil, Wilma Evans, Mandy Palitti and Nerida Ewart 02: Mandy Brokenshire, Amy Slade and Sue Slade 03: Anna Leahy and Lyn Mateer 04: Suzanne and Diny Warmer 05: Rebecca Sullivan 06: Hanna Barkley, Meagan Harrison and Rebekah McCaul 07: Dorinda Hafner with Filipe and Paula Horta 08: Lisa and Darryn Jones 09: Katie Wright and Lorraine Burns 10: Ryanna Villanueva, Sam Ibberson and Diané Ranck 11: Diané Ranck and Filipe Horta 12: Kelly Sullivan, Silvi Milans and Alexia Rocha (from Danca Brazil).

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Being Social: Edinburgh Great Shiraz Challenge On Sunday 30th June, FLM ventured away from the Fleurieu for The Edinburgh Great Shiraz Challenge at the Edinburgh Hotel in Mitcham. Over 250 Shiraz from around the world were available for tasting, many of which were from our beloved Fleurieu wineries. The event hosted over 700 people and was a great day for everyone involved.

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Being Social: Sea & Vines Festival 2013 FLM made sure to check out some of the action at Sea & Vines on the June long weekend. Here are some snaps from some of the wine-tasting at dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Arenberg and the Little Berry Markets at the Rosemount Estate cellar doors.

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01: Elyce Falzon, William Alexander, Chiz McLeay and Preeya Alexander 02: Jason Hays and Sam Fielke 03: Nicholas Dinan, Adam Norsworthy and Paul Knape 04: Sam Tabalotny and David Muster 05: Byron Webster and Marteen Smith 06: Kar Peng Ng and Ken Chin 07: Clarke Greenhalgh, Diva Santos, Ella Spencer, Benjamin Tirant 08: Tracy and Jessica Reed 09: Sue Bowley, Anthony Brattoli, Sharon Pearson, Alan Williams, Silvana Papagiannis 10: Tiffany Hua and Tom Waye 11: Alison and David Wickstein 12: Chris Bell and Joe Bendyk.

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recommends:

MYPONGA MARKET At Myponga Market you can browse unique stalls selling retro furniture, antique tools, collectables and rare vinyl recordings. Enjoy coffee and cake at the cafe. Smiling Samoyed Brewery is directly behind the market. Market open Sat, Sun and most Public Holidays. 46 Main South Road, Myponga. T: 8558 6121 W: mypongamarket.com facebook.com/mypongamarket

ANCHORAGE AT VICTOR HARBOR The ideal location for whale watching. Delightful heritage style accommodation with balcony rooms with sea views and spa baths. Central to shops and tourist sites. Licensed café restaurant wine bar open 7 days for breakfast lunch and dinner. Fresh house-roasted coffee all day. Seafront dining on the veranda. The ideal destination for a stop-over on the way to KI or a relaxed overnight stay. Free WiFi. Off-street parking. 21 Flinders Pde, Victor Harbor. T: 85525970 W: anchorageseafronthotel.com

EAT AT WHALERS From dawn to dusk as the sky changes hue, we continue to marvel at our stunning view. Come share it on the deck or at an indoor table, we’re called Eat at Whalers and we’re more than able. We’re cuisine by the sea – fare from grower to plate, changing with the seasons with a menu first rate. Our vista is gorgeous and so’s the local wine, not surprising that the critics say we’re utterly divine! 121 Franklin Parade, Encounter Bay T: 08 8552 4400 or W: whalers.com.au

LAKE BREEZE WINES Experience the stunning views of the Follett family vineyard from the newly renovated cellar door. The ideal place to stay and enjoy lunch accompanied by trophy winning wines. Lake Breeze can lay claim to being one of Australia’s most awarded boutique wineries.

VICTOR APARTMENTS Spectacular ‘ocean-viewed’ boutique accommodation. Relax and unwind in one of five fully-equipped apartments, retreats and townhouses. Individually designed and decorated with elegant style. All with stunning ocean and island views in an elite area of town.

IBIS SIDING GARDEN CENTRE Ibis Siding is a large nursery situated in Goolwa. It has been owned by the Gilbert family since 1989 and is spread over 4 acres and specialises in coastal plants, natives, exotics, indoor plants, tube stock, natural products, fodder, chickens, pots, fish and aquatic plants.

Open 7 days 10am~5pm Step Road, Langhorne Creek T: 08 8537 3017 W: lakebreeze.com.au

Victor Harbor SA 5211 T: 08 8410 8189 or 0450 798 952 E: victorapartments@gmail.com W: victorapartments.com.au.

Corner of Kessell Road and Goolwa Street, Goolwa SA 5124. T: 08 8555 1311.

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