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nola family Parent Fearlessly

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2019

WINTER OPEN HOUSES & SCHOOL SPIRIT

BEAD AWARE

THE TOXIC TALE OF MARDI GRAS BEADS P. 12

OUR FUN & HEALTHY CALENDAR PULL-OUT

Start the year right! P. 28

MARDI GRAS: CAMPS, PARADES AND SAFETY TIPS P. 9


Contr ibutors Pat Blackwell, Ph.D. is a licensed developmental psychologist who writes our award-winning “Learning Years” column. Scott Campbell is publisher and founder of River Road Press, a local boutique publisher of local and regional authors.

Laura Claverie is a local mom, grandmother and writer. Laura is the Hip Grannie.

Jenni Evans is a parent educator at the Parenting Center at Children’s Hospital who writes our award-winning “Parenting Corner” column.

Sarah Herndon is a freelance writer, mom, and frequent contributor to Nola Family.

Kate Stevens is a freelance writer and frequent contributor to Nola Family.

nola family publisher/editor ann bower herren ann@nolafamily.com office manager jenny ziglin jenny@nolafamily.com advertising sales angela guillot angela@nolafamily.com durban zaunbrecher durban@nolababy.com designer cat landrum 2nd story creative copy editor emily berger edit intern erin cohn chapelle johnson

Erin Cohn and Chapelle Johnson are our amazing edit interns at Nola Family magazine.

ad production sara youngblood contributing photography twirl photography info@nolafamily.com or 504.866.0555 The opinions expressed in this publication are those of the authors and/or contributors and do not necessarily reflect those of the publisher, editor or advertisers. For reprint information, contact ann@nolafamily.com Business office: 8131 Oak St., Ste. 100, New Orleans, La., 70118 504.866.0555

www.nolafamily.com

| january/february 2019

A publication of

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january/february 2019 volume 13, issue 1


nola family CONTENTS J A N U A R Y/ F E B R U A R Y 2 0 1 9

p. 34 p. 18

p. 12

FEATURES 10 mardi gras fun family-friendly tips and our favorite parades.

12 mardi gras beads the not-so-great elephant in the mardi gras room.

21 french education learn the importance of a bilingual education.

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| january/february 2019

34 get outside

6

exploring the environment with audubon louisiana nature center.

38 can swimming make your kids smarter?

p. 38

EDUCATION & GUIDANCE

IN EACH ISSUE

8 hip grannie

28 a fun & healthy new year

grandparents’ day

our pull-out calendar guide.

9 mardi gras camps

36 mom about town

your complete resource to your child’s school break.

melissa pia bossola beese creates fun at little pnuts.

17 open house calendar where and when to visit.

44 spotlight

18 school spirit

47 out and about

learn how these schools stand out.

where, when and what to do.

22 school listings

the brain benefits of swimming.

helping you make the best choice for your child.

45 book reviews

40 learning years

scott campbell with river road press shares his picks.

henry aucoin foundation.

the power of object permanence.

42 parenting corner change happens.

46 in the know where to go to seek support.

ON THE COVER Hayden Bourg, 2, loves Mardi Gras. Photo by Twirl Photography.


HIP

GRANNIE

Grandparents’ Day

MARDI GRAS CAMPS

by Laura Claverie

Papa and I recently attended our last Grandparents’ Day at St. George’s. To be clear: No one is leaving the school. Amelia is now in the fourth grade, the last year grandparents are invited. Starting next year, we will become radioactive in her fifth grade eyes.

“So what does a grandmother do when she feels she’s being put out to pasture by the school administrators and a prepubescent’s normal need for independence?”

It seems like yesterday when we proudly walked into Pre-K for the first time. Rylan grabbed our hands and immediately took us to his cubby where we oohed and ahhed over the contents: his mat, lunch bag and matching water bottle. Two years later, Amelia walked us to her cubby, which she announced was the same exact one that her big brother had two years earlier. It was a proud moment for us all. What makes this significant is that Papa and I have not missed a Parents night, conference or weekend at their far-flung colleges since Philip and Stephanie were at St. Charles Avenue Presbyterian Nursery School, almost 40 years ago. Some might call this perfect attendance; others might say it’s neurotic. Both are right. So what does a grandmother do when she feels she’s being put out to pasture by the school administrators and a prepubescent’s normal need for independence? I think my longing for more little ones is starting to show. The other day I was at Rylan’s soccer game at City Park. A young mother walked past us, carrying a tiny infant. I gave the baby a pitiful, lingering stare and let out an audible sigh. Rylan gave me a serious look and said, “Lollie, I need to tell you a secret. My parents told Amelia and me they want to have another baby.”

I couldn’t believe my ears! This didn’t make sense on a couple of levels: they’d never discuss that in advance with the kids, and the age differences would be really tough on them. “Rylan, are you sure? There would be a twelve-year age difference between you and the new baby,” I pointed out. “Yes, see, they think that when Amelia and I go to college, they’ll be lonesome and they’ll want another kid in the house.” Suddenly, it started to make sense, or at least some off-the-wall wishful thinking. He then told me the names they’ve picked out for the new baby: Emily if it’s a girl, Rocko or Nico for a boy. “Rocko? Nico?” I asked. | january/february 2019

I didn’t know whether to laugh, cry or tackle him on the field. I’d long forgotten how gullible I am around my grandchildren.

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Then he put his hand on my shoulder and said as serious as a heart attack, “Lollie, I have one more thing to tell you. Promise you won’t tell anyone.” Again, I swore to keep my big mouth shut forever. I wouldn’t break that kid’s trust for all the beer at Jazzfest. “Lollie, everything I told you is a joke! And you believed me!!” he howled with victorious laughter.

Days later--and only two hours after Papa and I left our last Grandparents’ Day--we returned to St. George’s to see Rylan compete in the finals of the Cottonwood Oratory contest, where he stood on the stage in front of the entire middle school and dozens of parents and grandparents. There on the stage he expounded for five minutes, looking poised, confident and articulate. He owned the auditorium. I thought: this kid could argue a case in the U.S. Supreme Court and win. Especially if the Judges have grandkids.

Kidcam Camp: Holiday Camp at Woodlake Swim & Tennis Club

1001 Elmwood Park Blvd. Ages: 5-12 Cost: $50/day, $40/additional sibling, 20% session discount Dates/Times: March 4-8, 7:30 am-5:30 pm. Contact: gm@lasertagnola.com Campers will blast through the ancient Mayan ruins in laser tag, crash through the jungle in bumper cars, and explore the ancient temple in a round of mini golf.

82 Sequoia St., Kenner Ages: 4-13 years old Dates/Time: March 4, 6-8, 7:30 am-5:30 pm Fees: $50/day first child, $40/day additional child Contact: holidaycamp@kidcamcamps.com or call 844-KIDCAM1 Woodlake Club offers ample green space, tennis courts, levee play, holiday-themed arts and crafts, science and food activities, and more. Field trips to nearby parks.

Audubon Zoo’s Mardi Gras Camp

Louisiana Children’s Museum: Awesome Architecture Mardi Gras Camp

Audubon Zoo, 6500 Magazine St. Ages: Pre-K through 4th Grade Cost: $40/members, $50/non-members. Before care is $7/per child, per day. After care is $10/ per child, per day. Dates/Times: March 6-7, 9 am-3 pm. Before care (7:30-8:45 am) and after care (3:15-5:30 pm) available. Contact: Lindsey Legros, Zooedadmin@ auduboninstitute.org, (504) 212-5380 Audubon Zoo will host Mardi Gras camp for ages 4-11. Each day is full of animal exploration, scientific investigation, arts and crafts, and more!

Church’s Karate Academy: Mardi Gras Break Camp 4716 Paris Ave., New Orleans Ages: 6-12 years old (5-year-old siblings/ previous campers welcome as well) Cost: $45/ day or $160 for all 4 days Dates/Time: March 1st and 6th -8th, 8:30 am-3:30 pm (FREE Early Drop-off/Late Pick-up 7 am /6 pm) Contact: nolakoreankarate@gmail.com or call 504-309-6138 It’s sure to be a safe, positive, and motivational camp adventure where your child is guaranteed to obtain physical and mental fitness.

JCC Uptown - Mardi Gras Mini Camp 5342 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans Ages: Grades K-5 Cost: $50/day; JCC membership required Dates/Time: March 6-8, 9 am-3 pm Contact: 504-897-0143 Have lots of fun playing games and sports, making springtime crafts, hanging out with friends, and meeting new buddies. Wear tennis shoes and bring a lunch every day.

420 Julia Street, New Orleans Ages: 5-8 years old Cost: Members $40/day, or Non-Members $50/ day (before care: $10; aftercare: $15) Dates/Time: March 6-8, 9 am-3 pm Contact: 504-523-1357 Design and build a model of a house, collaborate to create a Kid City and explore a variety of building materials in this hands-on, STEM-based camp!

Upturn Arts: DISCOvery Camp 1719 Toledano St. Ages: 4-14 years old Cost: $68.25/day or $136.50 both days (early bird price). Upturn Arts provides all services on a sliding scale for middle and low income households. Dates/Times: March 7-8, 9 am-4 pm (before and aftercare available) Contact: cole@upturnarts.org or call 504-390-8399 Young artists will learn materials to perform at the Studio 504: Disco for Dance on April 5.

¡Vamonos NOLA! Mardi Gras Camp 5818 Perrier St. Ages: 3-10 (must be potty trained) Cost: $50/day or $225/week (members); $70/day, $250/week (non-members). Dates/Times: March 1-8. No camp on Fat Tuesday, 9 am-3:30 pm. Before and aftercare available for additional fee. Contact: info@vamonosnola.com ¡Vamonos NOLA! is your Spanish Language Vacation Camp Destination.

Belle Chasse YMCA Mardi Gras Camp 8101 LA-23, Belle Chasse Ages: 3-14 (must be fully potty trained) Dates/Times: March 4, 6, 7 & 8, closed March 5, Drop off starts 7 am & pick up by 6 pm Cost: Members: $25/day, Non-members—$40/day Contact: Vanessa at 504-392-9622 Kids have the opportunity to play sports, make arts and crafts, and make new friends! Be sure to pack a lunch and plenty of snacks!

East Jefferson YMCA Mardi Gras Camp 6691 Riverside Drive, Metairie Ages: 5-14 Cost: (members and non-members) Daily: $35/ non-members + $10 non-member registration fee; $25/members Dates/Times: March 4-8 (no camp March 5), 7:30 am -3:30 pm. 10% discount for members who register for MORE than three days of camp! Contact: Abbe Ginn, abbeg@ymcaneworleans.org, 504-888-9622 ext. 104 Activities include themed stories, songs, crafts, games, and holiday decorations! Please bring a lunch and snacks (no peanut products please!) and wear play clothes.

West St. Tammany YMCA Mardi Gras Camp 71256 Francis Rd., Covington Ages: Pre-K - 4 and up Dates/Times: March 3, 4, 6, 7 & 8; Closed March 5. Drop off starts 7 am & pick up by 6 pm. Cost: Members $30/day, Non-members $40/day plus registration fee. Contact: Krissy Cook, 985.893.9622 When school is closed for a holiday, come to the YMCA and play! Bring 2 snacks (morning and afternoon), a bag lunch, and a water bottle.

Sponsored by

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

So there I was, totally sucked into the moment. I was levitating with joy, almost giddy and swearing on a stack of Bibles that I wouldn’t breathe a word to anyone. I started thinking about all the baby furniture I’d given away and wondering if I could get any back.

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“Yeah, Dad got those names from a book he’s reading or something,” he said.

Adventure Quest Laser Tag Mardi Gras Camp

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P O T R OU FUN D I K R O F S E D A R S A PA R G I D R MA

9 1 20

d by

re Sponso

Tips and tricks for surviving your first carnival season as a parent.

Some are day parades, some night- but all are fun for different reasons, whether it’s the crowds, the throws, or how the parade rolls and its theme. Krewe of Barkus

March 3

Krewe of Joan of Arc

Krewe of Excalibur

Krewe of Athena

French Quarter. This annual walking parade celebrates St Joan of Arc’s birthday and the Epiphany. 6 pm.

Metairie. The medieval theme carries through with grand costuming, including fully suited knights on horseback. 7:30 pm.

French Quarter. Man’s best friend is the center of this parade through the streets of the French Quarter with their humans there simply as their escorts. 2 pm.

February 9

February 23

February 28

Krewe of Thoth

Krewe of Chewbacchus

Krewe of Caesar

Krewe of Muses

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Marigny. The Krewe of Chewbacchus also makes all of its own throws and has created hundreds of elaborately decorated bandoliers, bean bags, Frisbees, stuffed animals, and more. 7 pm.

Metairie. The largest Carnival organization in Jefferson Parish, it’s known for its fiber optics, neon and 3-D figures. 5:30 pm.

Uptown. Among the krewe’s throws are 3-D die-cut metallic necklaces, six-inch stuffed polar bears and specialized doubloons. Noon.

Metairie. America’s longest running, most flamboyant children’s Mardi Gras Krewe. Noon.

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February 17

‘tit Rex Marigny. The first and only MicroKrewe. The ‘tit Rex floats are made out of shoeboxes that look like full-size floats. 5:30 pm.

Krewe of Little Rascals

February 24 Krewe of King Arthur and Merlin Uptown. It’s the largest parading krewe on this first Sunday—family Sunday— of Mardi Gras. Follows the Krewe of Carrollton. 1 pm.

Uptown. Everyone’s goal– catch the coveted Muses shoes! 6:30 pm.

March 2 Krewe of Endymion Mid-City. Carnival’s largest parade with 3,200 riders and 36 floats. Lionel Richie, Flo Rida and Chicago will perform at the Endymion Extravaganza following the parade. 4:15 pm.

Metairie. Established in 2014, it’s the newest all-female Mardi Gras club in Jefferson Parish. 5:30 pm.

March 5 (Fat Tuesday) Krewe of Rex Uptown. This parade krewe is the origin of many traditions of Mardi Gras, including its colors of purple, green and gold, as well as the collectible doubloon coins. 10 am.

Krewe of Elks-Jeffersonians Metairie. Comprised of 4,000 male and female riders and featuring more than 90 trucks, it is the oldest and largest of all the truck krewes. Follows the Krewe of Argus. 11 am.

There are several schools and churches on or near the routes that allow you to buy a bathroom pass for a fee. If you’re really lucky, you may know someone who lives near the route. Start Google-mapping your friends now.

Spots: The best spots to watch the parades are, of course, located near the home of a friend with a bathroom. Barring that, we like watching at the beginning of almost every parade, which is great for parents who want to get their kids home ASAP on a school night – start earlier, end earlier.

Waggons: They are a must-have if you’re going with younger kids. We use them to cart drinks, snacks and folding chairs to the parade and to bring tired kids and bags of beads home. Don’t forget to pack wet wipes, hand sanitizer, spare diapers and lots of water.

Throws: Most of what you catch at the parades is pure junk. We’re looking at you, beads made in China and oftentimes destined for the nearest landfill. Donate them to the ARC of Greater New Orleans, where disabled citizens sort the beads and resell them to next year’s riders.

Safety: Wear matching t-shirts, especially easy-to-see ones. It makes finding everyone in your group much easier – and faster. Take a picture of your child as he or she is dressed that day. That way, if you need to show a picture to the police or other adults, they’ll know exactly who to look for. Finally – have fun! Whether you’re a native, or you’re raising a first-generation New Orleanian, Carnival is a tradition the whole family will cherish forever!

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

February 22

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January 6

Bathrooms:

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BEAD AWARE Mardi Gras beads should be tossed (aside) By Kate Stevens

Garcia also finds it wasteful that so many of these unwanted plastic throws end up in the gutter, the storm drains and the landfill. That’s why for Mardi Gras 2019, Garcia has purchased specialty throws from Atlas Handmade Beads, a New Orleans company that sells necklaces and bracelets made of recycled magazine paper from women in Uganda. She has purchased fewer plastic throws as a result and hopes these unique, colorful necklaces from Atlas are ones people will actually wear as keepsakes. “I’d rather have less to throw, but what I’m throwing people want,” says Garcia. Garcia is part of a growing movement to make Mardi Gras more environmentally friendly, less wasteful and with fewer of the plastic throws and toys that studies have shown contain harmful substances like lead and chemical flame retardants. “It’s not just about a cultural shift,” says Katrina Brees, founder of Kolossos, a sub-krewe using bicycles as homemade floats and whose riders pass out artisan throws and edible New Orleansbased snacks. “It’s actually about a toxic health hazard, and a lot of people are beginning to understand that. [Beads are] shifting from being a symbol of happiness to a symbol of sadness, and people feel that.” And there are plenty of beads. Twenty-five million pounds, or 12,500 tons, of them are thrown during the Carnival season from Twelfth Night to Mardi Gras, according to a 2013 report on potential lead exposure from Mardi Gras beads and parade route environments. “This is a time when we certainly have to think about the planet that we’re living on and the impact parades have on the city of New Orleans,” says Howard Mielke, a professor in the pharmacology department of the Tulane University School of Medicine and co-author of the lead exposure report. “The parades are wonderful. I love them. We just have to make sure to find a way to make them kinder to the environment and to the health of our children.”

Plastic beads left in the gutter as garbage become an environmental nightmare. In January 2018, the city of New Orleans announced it had retrieved 7.2 million pounds of trash and debris, including 93,000 pounds of Mardi Gras beads, from city catch basins during a four-month cleaning project along a five block stretch of St. Charles Avenue.

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Mary Anne Garcia has ridden in the Krewe of Iris for years, and while the joie de vivre and excitement of Carnival has remained the same, she has seen a change among spectators. They don’t want the same old plastic throws they can get at any parade. “I have found over the last few years, these plastic beads, these big ones that used to be so flashy, nobody really wants them, you throw?” says Garcia, 63, of Metairie. “They’ll drop to the ground. They want something different now.”

And, every year, between 4,500 and 8,000 tons of trash is collected during Mardi Gras just in the French Quarter, according to VerdiGras, a volunteer group seeking to encourage a more green, more sustainable Mardi Gras celebration. While the amount of trash Mardi Gras creates is obvious to parade-goers, the fact that many plastic Mardi Gras throws contain lead levels exceeding federal safety guidelines is less obvious. This hidden danger can be toxic for children who may place the beads in their mouths or pick up beads from the dirty ground which also has been proven to have high lead levels.

So what’s inherently harmful with the plastic in Mardi Gras throws? These plastic Mardi Gras throws contain small amounts of chemical toxins, according to a 2013 report produced by Healthystuff.org and the Ecology Center, a Michigan-based nonprofit, environmental organization, in collaboration with VerdiGras. “As a physician mom, I always felt like the beads smelled funny,” says Dr. Holly Gore Groh, founder of VerdiGras, and a New Orleans mother of four children. “We tried to keep them out of my children’s mouths.” Groh says she knew in her gut something was wrong with the makeup of the beads. So she contacted the research director of Healthystuff.org where scientists soon analyzed the Mardi Gras beads Groh provided. Scientists screened 87 Mardi Gras bead necklaces, bracelets and other accessories and found more than 60 percent of the products tested, or 56 of 87, had concentrations of lead above 100 ppm, or parts per million.

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These harmful plastics can work their way to our waterways and oceans where they can affect animal and plant life and ultimately humans, says Mielke.

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“That was really proof in the pudding that people want improved recycling,” says Fitzwilliam, who helped coordinate the recycling effort. “They want to retain the wonderful things about Mardi Gras that everyone loves and has been coming their whole life for without being overrun by plastic waste.” So what’s next in efforts for a more sustainable Mardi Gras? For future Mardi Gras parades, Groh says she would love to see just one green float with local and sustainable throws. And she thinks it will happen. “The tide is changing,” Groh says.

Donated Mardi Gras throws are sorted by Arc of Greater New Orleans employees and then resold at the ArcGNO’s retail store at 925 Labarre Road in Metairie.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission limits lead in children’s products to 100 ppm, while the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends 40 ppm as a limit, the report says. The problem is that the CPSC doesn’t consider Mardi Gras throws as toys, even though children attend the parades, and therefore the commission has refused to regulate the production of them, says Groh. The report also said more than half of the products tested suggested the use of brominated flame retardants or chlorinated flame retardants. Flame retarded plastics from a variety of sources including electronic waste are likely being recycled into bead production, the report concluded. Groh says these Mardi Gras beads are produced mostly overseas in China and are melted down from plastics like computer boards which also contain toxic endocrine disruptors, says Groh. These chemical disruptors can affect a child’s developing hormonal system, although the effects cannot be currently measured and won’t be known for many years, she says. Additionally, scientists now understand that flame retardants, once used in items like children’s pajamas to keep them from catching fire, can be dangerous. “You end up with substances in the air that are very potent as a toxic substance,” says Mielke of flame retardants. Lead has also been found in plastic Mardi Gras throws, according to Mielke’s report on lead contamination. The beads can have harmful effects if a child places the beads in their mouths, especially if picked up directly off the ground.

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“Even with these apparently small amounts of lead, given the mass of beads being thrown by krewes during Carnival, the total amount of lead hitting the streets becomes large,” Mielke’s report says.

But beads aren’t the only culprit behind the city’s lead contamination. Lead accumulation from lead additives in gasoline and lead-based paints are the highest in older communities surrounding the city’s CBD and decrease as you leave the city center, the report says. Even the soil along Mardi Gras parade routes has been contaminated from decades of use of lead additives to gasoline, the report says.

Testing their bead supplies for lead levels is something most reputable Mardi Gras bead companies do, said Dan Kelly, owner of Beads by the Dozen on Edwards Avenue. Anytime the shop gets a new supplier in China, Kelly asks for reports of previously tested shipments from the last 90 days. If a supplier doesn’t have such a report, Kelly says he asks the supplier to conduct a test. Kelly’s stock of beads is also randomly tested once it reaches his shop, he says. His suppliers understand how important these tests are for American customers, he says. If a shipment isn't acceptable, “Then we’re not going to use them,” says Kelly.

Still, efforts to create more environmentallyfriendly Mardi Gras beads continue on. Naohiro Kato, an associate professor at Louisiana State University’s Department of Biological Sciences, says he has discovered a way to create biodegradable beads through the growth of microscopic algae, or microalgae. About 10 times more expensive than regular plastic, the cost of producing biodegradable plastic makes it “very difficult to adapt” for use in Mardi Gras parades today, Kato says. To help offset the cost of production, Kato is searching for investors to fund the growth of microalgae to first produce a nutraceutical compound for use in medicine and vitamin supplements. Profits from this compound will then allow him to produce biodegradable plastic for use in Mardi Gras beads, he says.

Although many have been receptive to a greener, more grass-roots Mardi Gras over the past few years, the efforts to switch from plastic beads to those made of more environmentally-friendly materials has been an uphill climb.

“The immediate challenge is riders and folks just being used to paying pennies for plastic beads,” says Kevin Fitzwilliam, owner of Atlas Handmade Beads. People love the idea of using something other than plastic Mardi Gras beads but are intimidated by the higher price of organic alternatives, Fitzwilliam says.

New Orleans resident Marcus Ciko, founder of 3D Beads, hopes to have a prototype of a biodegradable, plant-based plastic bead completed by Twelfth Night, he says.

Kelly says he has had several people approach him about selling more environmentally-friendly beads if such a product was available. That turns into a request for funding and the realization that the throws will cost at least $1 per necklace, Kelly says. “No one is going to buy a dollar bead when you can get it for 20 cents,” Kelly says. In bulk, Atlas speciality throws can cost $3 apiece, Fitzwilliam says. But the cost is comparable to the plastic speciality throws that might end up unwanted in the road - something that won’t happen with Atlas throws, he says. Anne Rolfes, founding executive director of the Louisiana Bucket Brigade, a nonprofit environmental health and justice organization, says she thinks it nearly impossible at this moment in time for someone to make a living selling environmentally-friendly Mardi Gras beads. Several years ago, the organization itself tried to sell homemade paper and wooden throws called “ZomBeads” made by local artists, but the effort fizzled after just a few Carnival seasons. People were receptive to ZomBeads, but “There’s still the really high value on the plastics which I’m not sure how to overcome,” Rolfes says.

Another entrepreneur is also working to develop biodegradable beads.

“If there was a more biodegradable option, I think a lot of people would buy it right now,” Ciko says. The potential higher cost of a more environmentally-friendly bead will decrease as new technology improves, he says. “I’m confident in the people I’ve talked to that we can make this happen,” Ciko says. While the complete elimination of plastic beads isn’t going to happen anytime soon, people are interested in a more common way to reduce waste.

Recycling. Last Mardi Gras, volunteers with the Young Leadership Council, Republic Services, and the Arc of Greater New Orleans helped collect 10,000 cans and bottles to be recycled and 1,600 pounds of plastic throws. The throws were donated to the Arc of Greater New Orleans, an organization benefiting adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities. The ArcGNO creates wage-earning jobs for its participants by collecting, sorting and repackaging Mardi Gras beads and stuffed animals.

ArcGNO participants and recycle center employees Tina Brown and Peter Smith sort donated Mardi Gras beads. Recycling and re-using beads is becoming more popular as parade-goers opt for a more green Carnival season. Photo provided by ArcGNO

TIPS TO LIMIT LEAD EXPOSURE DURING MARDI GRAS • Use hand wipes to clean children’s hands before they eat and after picking up beads from the ground • Wash and rinse any beads picked up from the street or dirt along parade routes before allowing children to play with them • Once home, change clothes that may have been exposed to dirt along the parade route Source: Louisiana Department of Health

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

| january/february 2019

A known neurotoxin, lead can cause irreversible brain damage, says Groh.

If beads hit the ground, kick up street dust contaminated with lead, and are picked up by a child, the child could be harmed if the beads are placed in their mouth. “It’s a double whammy for a child,” Mielke says. “They’re getting the dust from the road as well as possible contamination from the beads directly.”

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nola family SCHOOL OPEN HOUSES January/February 2019 SUNDAY

MONDAY

JANUARY 6

7

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

1

2

3

8

9

10 Edward Hynes Charter 8:30 am

Academy of the Sacred Heart 1 year-4th grade 8:30-10 am

Metairie Park Country Day Kindergarten-Grade 2 8:30 am

FRIDAY 4

5

11

12

Trinity Episcopal 9 am

Louise S. McGehee Pre-K-12th grade 8:30-10 am

St. Ann Catholic School 7:30 pm

SATURDAY

John Calvin Presbyterian Playschool 6:30-8 pm

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14

15

16

Audubon Charter School Gentilly Campus 8:45-9:15 am or 9:15-9:45 am

Metairie Park Country Day Grades 3-4 8:30 am Samuel J. Green Charter School School Tour 9-10 am

20

21

22

17

Holy Cross Elysian Fields Campus 6-8 pm

Livingston Collegiate 5 pm

St. Catherine of Siena Catholic 7 pm

24

29

30

5

Samuel J. Green Charter School School Tour 9-10 am

Young Audiences Charter Harvey Early Learning Center Grade K 6-7 pm

10

11

12

FEBRUARY

Waldorf School Soraparu Campus K-8th, 10 am-noon University Montessori 10 am

2

St. Paul’s Episcopal Little Saints/Lower School 9:45-11:30 am

Young Audiences Charter Kate Middleton Campus Grade 9 6-7 pm

6

7

8

9

14

15

16

21

22

23

St. Michael Special School 9-11 am

Bricolage Academy 6 pm

13

Beary Cherry Tree 3:30-6 pm

26

1

Kenner Discovery Vintage Campus High School 6-7 pm

Lycée Français Patton Campus 6-7 pm

TEAR THIS PAGE OUT

www.nolafamily.com

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4

Audubon Charter School Gentilly Campus 8:45-9:15 am or 9:15-9:45 am

Audubon Charter School Gentilly Campus 8:45-9:15 am or 9:15-9:45 am Kehoe-France 8:30 am

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18

19

20

Bricolage Academy 9 am

Some school names are abbreviated due to space constraints.

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

| january/february 2019

St. Andrew the Apostle 5:30-6:30 pm

25

Kenner Discovery Maine Campus Grades 1-8 6-6:30 pm

31

Ursuline Academy Elementary School Tour 8:30 am

3

St. Paul’s Episcopal Middle School 10 am-12:20 pm Samuel J. Green Charter School 5:30-7 pm

Kenner Discovery Rivertown Campus Kindergarten 10-10:30 am

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Waldorf School Peniston Early Childhood Campus 2.5 years-K 10 am-noon

Bricolage Academy 9 am

St. George’s Episcopal Preschool-2nd Grade 5:30-6:30 pm

Isidore Newman Middle/Upper School 9 am

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Louise S. McGehee 5th-12th grade 6-7:30 pm

Louise S.McGehee Pre-K-12th grade 8:30-10 am

Ursuline Academy Elementary School Tour 8:30 am

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18 Metairie Park Country Day Grades 6-7 8:15 am

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WINTER 2019 SCHOOL SPIRIT

We let the leaders do the talking to help you make the best choice.

ACADEMY OF THE SACRED HEART Sr. Melanie A. Guste, RSCJ, Headmistress At the Academy of the Sacred Heart, we are committed to offering our students the knowledge, skills and character required for global leadership. We define success not only in terms of outcomes, but in demonstrated imagination, innovation and collaboration—all critical competencies of the 21st Century. “We believe our girls ‘will change the world’—whether by exploring the stars, designing new technologies, or partnering to drill wells in Africa. By discovering the intersections of faith, academics, service and community, our students grow to become integrated persons of conscience and consciousness,” says Headmistress Sr. Melanie A. Guste, RSCJ, a Religious of the Sacred Heart who holds a Ph.D. in Human and Organizational Systems and M.S. degrees in Educational Administration and Applied Spirituality. Our school is a community where girls from age 1 through 12th grade grow through relationships, create lasting connections with others, and benefit from an international network of over 150 Sacred Heart schools in 41 countries. Entering through the gates of “Sacré Coeur” as infants and leaving as women, Sacred Heart students grow in confidence and become courageous Christcentered leaders who make an impact in the world.

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ARDEN CAHILL ACADEMY Arden Cahill Academy is proud to introduce our head of high school, Ms. Laura Bloom Martin. Ms. Martin comes to us from a top three school district in the state of Louisiana with over 15 years of secondary education and administrative experience. Laura has excelled in a multitude of capacities including teacher, curriculum and instructional specialist, assistant principal, and most recently as district level supervisor over Career and Technical Education, as well as the Safe Schools program. She has worked extensively with STEM programs, including co-writing a kindergarten through college level STEM pathway on Coastal Restoration for the Louisiana Department of Education. When asked about Arden Cahill Academy’s newest high school venture, Ms. Martin stated, “Our vision is to establish a high school that excels in both academics and the liberal arts, while providing a truly diverse co-ed population on a beautiful campus. We want to be able to extend our unique Cahill culture into the high school to foster academic and emotional growth for all students.” Arden Cahill Academy, 3101 Wall Blvd., Gretna, LA, 504.392.0902, ardencahillacademy.com

Founded in 1998, Ecole Bilingue de la Nouvelle-Orléans is a private, bilingual school with experienced faculty from all over the world, a diverse student body, and the best of French and American academics. Now serving more than 300 students from 18 months to 8th grade, Ecole Bilingue is Louisiana’s only private school accredited by both the French government and the State of Louisiana. The mission of Ecole Bilingue is to develop globally literate students through a rigorous bilingual French-American curriculum set in a nurturing and multicultural community. We guide our students to excel academically, foster their curiosity, and prepare them to become creative and innovative contributors to the world. Ecole Bilingue is set up on the principle that the best way to ensure academic excellence is through a variety of proven teaching methods in a nurturing and vibrant environment. Our beautiful campus includes three buildings specifically designed for early childhood, elementary and middle school students, as well as a large green space and playground. Pauline Dides joined Ecole Bilingue in 2006 and became Head of School in 2009. As part of a very forward-thinking leadership team, Pauline plays a major role in creating innovative educational projects and new teaching methods. She successfully implemented the use of new technology in the classroom, as well as the use of special teaching spaces that encourage student creativity. Dides was the driving force in securing accreditation for the school’s Cycle 2 and Cycle 3 programs. In addition to its accreditations, Ecole Bilingue is affiliated with several global networks, including the AEFE, NAIS, AFSA and Mission Laïque Française. Ecole Bilingue de la Nouvelle-Orléans, 812 General Pershing St., New Orleans, 504.896.4500, ebnola.net

KINDER HAUS MONTESSORI In 1984, our founder, Pat Lacoste, opened Kinder Haus Montessori School in Metairie, followed by our Mandeville campus in 1996, with the vision of providing the highest quality care for young children. Now, as we begin our 35th school year, we celebrate the joys that Montessori has brought to thousands of children who have passed through our doors. We truly believe that Montessori is a gift for life. We fully embrace the Montessori philosophy of education, allowing children to experience its lifelong benefits. The teaching methods focus on work that helps develop a child’s ability to concentrate, be self-motivated, self-directed, self-confident, and independent. Children learn to care for their own needs by helping with snack time and taking care of the environment. This fosters their natural desire to be independent and self-confident, which they take pride in. Children are encouraged to explore their environment and have freedom to make choices. It’s also stimulating and child-oriented, a place where they can learn and explore without fear. Freedom within a structured environment helps develop a sense of order and purpose, which increases critical thinking skills, decision-making, understanding of natural consequences, and encourages creativity. Kinder Haus introduces each child to academic foundations in Math, Science, Language, and Geography. Teachers give individual lessons to support the children socially, emotionally, physically, and intellectually. Children who come through our doors leave with compassion, independence, self-esteem, concentration, and a love for learning. We invite anyone eager to brighten their world to come visit. Kinder Haus Montessori, 5201 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie and 252 Magnolia St., Mandeville, kinderhausmontessori.com

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

Academy of the Sacred Heart, 4521 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans, 504.891.1943, ashrosary.org

Pauline Dides, Head of School and Chevalier of the Order of the Academic Palms

WINTER 2019 SCHOOL SPIRIT

PICKING THE RIGHT SCHOOL FOR YOUR CHILD IS HARD

ECOLE BILINGUE DE LA NOUVELLE-ORLÉANS

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6

WINTER 2019 SCHOOL SPIRIT

URSULINE ACADEMY OF NEW ORLEANS

En français, s'il vous plaît!

Belinda Baker, Director of Early Childhood The Soeur Teresita Rivet, OSU Early Childhood Learning Center of Ursuline Academy of New Orleans offers a program like no other. This NAEYC-accredited program, inspired by the Reggio Emilia approach, is based on the principles of respect, responsibility, and community through exploration and discovery in a supportive and enriching environment. The learning environment, known as the “third teacher,” provides a large variety of both natural and man-made materials for the students to choose from, sparking their intellectual curiosity through a self-guided curriculum.

BIG BENEFITS OF BILINGUAL EDUCATION

Based on the belief that children need to naturally know how to work and problem-solve together, Ursuline Academy Early Childhood students, Toddler 2 through Kindergarten, are given the opportunity to learn through hands-on experiences. The Early Childhood teachers model this belief by working together in order to benefit from each other’s strengths. Located on an 11.5-acre historic Uptown campus, the Center provides a program that is uniquely Ursuline in that it offers the project approach with traditional academic structure and timeless values.

“Bilingualism is an experience that shapes our brain for a lifetime," says Gigi Luk, an associate professor at Harvard's Graduate School of Education. In the past twenty years, there has been a substantial increase in the number of studies touting the benefits of schools with dual-language or two-way immersion programs. School systems in places like New York City, North Carolina, Delaware and Oregon have expanded their dual-language programs knowing their students will reap the benefits of a bilingual education.

Ursuline Academy’s Early Childhood provides a cohesive learning approach that sets the foundation for the future success of its young women. With the distinction of being both the oldest, continuously operating school for girls and the oldest Catholic school in the United States, Ursuline Academy educates the whole person and prepares future female leaders for life in a global society. Ursuline Academy’s Director of Early Childhood, Belinda Baker, is excited to expand the program to include a one-year-old program in the 2019-2020 school year. Ursuline Academy of New Orleans, 2635 State Street, New Orleans, 504.861.9150, uanola.org

Ecole Bilingue de la Nouvelle-Orléans, originally founded as a full-immersion French preschool in 1998, was the first program of its kind in Louisiana. Ecole Bilingue has since expanded to have a full elementary and middle school– speaking to the success and popularity of a bilingual curriculum. Pieere-Loïc Denichou, We spoke to Pierre-Loïc Denichou, Academic Director of Ecole Bilingue de la Nouvelle-Orléans, about the Academic Director, Ecole benefits of a bilingual education on young minds. Bilingue de la Nouvelle-Orléans

1. EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONING SKILLS Arden Cahill Academy

Open House

Thursday, January 17

Pierre-Loïc observes, “When children study another language, they are indirectly going to learn about their own language too. They will make comparisons and notice the similarities and differences as the languages build on one another. This cognitive work is unique to the bilingual approach.” Being able to switch between two languages requires “inhibition” and “task switching,” subsets of executive functioning skills. Studies have shown individuals who speak two languages often outperform monolinguals on general executive function measures, demonstrating the cognitive advantage of bilingualism.

2.

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where to speak which language. As young as three years old, these kids have demonstrated a head-start on tests of perspective-taking and theory of mind, fundamental social and emotional skills. “A bilingual environment helps children understand that not everyone thinks the same way. Language is crucial in explaining how we think and communicating about cultural differences,” Pierre-Loïc noted.

Call to schedule a Spend-a-Day! Ardencahillacademy.com 392.0902 3101 Wall Blvd. Gretna, LA 70056

3. READING COMPREHENSION

In one recent study, by the end of middle school, dual-language students outperformed single-language peers in English reading skills by a full school year’s worth of learning. Researchers credit increased “metalinguistic awareness” for this improvement, suggesting that bilingualism aids in understanding the way all language works. Pierre-Loïc often notices that “children will start to make jokes in the target language. They will start playing around with the meaning of words, in their natural and target languages, as their vocabulary expands. It can be very cute and very funny, but it is a fascinating insight into the bridges that their brains have begun to make between the two languages.”

4. DIVERSITY

Bilingual classrooms are typically more ethnically and socioeconomically balanced. Pierre-Loïc says, “Diversity is natural in the bilingual classroom, not only amongst students but faculty too. Most bilingual teachers are from abroad and offer not only linguistic expertise, but cultural as well. You are not only studying the language, but the countries and cultures in which it is spoken.” Evidence shows that more representative classrooms helps children of all backgrounds to gain comfort with diversity and embrace different cultures.

5. ATTITUDE

Students engaging in a dual-language education have somewhat higher test scores, but more importantly they seem to be happier in school. Dual-language students have been shown to have better attendance, fewer behavioral problems, and higher rates of parent involvement.

6. LIFE-LONG BENEFITS Bilingual kids can speak two languages! That’s amazing! A bilingual education removes international language barriers, ensuring endless possibilities for careers and travel. Ecole Bilingue de la Nouvelle-Orléans embraces a global approach, ensuring their students are openminded and knowledgeable of different cultures through literature and geography classes.

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

EMPATHY Children who are bilingual rely on social cues to figure out when and

Elementary Tours Babies - 7th Grade 9:00 AM High School Tours 8th & 9th Grade 1:00 PM

by Erin Cohn

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Airline Park Academy for Advanced Studies

WINTER 2019

SCHOOL LISTINGS To help you find the right school for your child, we’ve provided a listing of schools, including their upcoming open house schedules. We do our best to verify all information, but it is subject to change. Please verify all information directly with the schools. Note: Unless otherwise specified, tuition figures

www.nolafamily.com

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This year, we’ve enhanced our listings by including Charter Schools with A & B ratings.

Public-Magnet/Co-ed Principle: Tiffani LeBouef Grades Taught: Pre-K-5th Tuition: Pre-K, Income-Based, FREE K-5 Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies by age Number of Students: 380 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Archbishop Chapelle High School 8800 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 504.467.3105, archbishopchapelle.org

Catholic/Female Principal: Leila Benoit Grades Taught: 8th-12th Tuition: $8,500 Student/Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Number of Students: 650 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Archbishop Rummel High School 1901 Severn Ave., Metairie, 504.834.5592, rummelraiders.com

Lasallian/Male Principal: Marc Milano ’90 Grades Taught: 8th-12th Tuition: $8,500 Student/Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Number of Students: 675 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Archbishop Shaw High School 1000 Salesian Lane, Marrero, 504.340.6727, archbishopshaw.org

Grace King High School

6500 Riverside Drive, Metairie, 504.887.0225, alcs.org

4301 Grace King Place, Metairie, 504.888.7334, king.jpschools.org

Lutheran/Co-ed Principal: Doug Molin Grades Taught: Preschool-8th Grade Tuition: $2,520-$5,465 Student/Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Number of Students: 236 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Public/Co-ed Principal: Sharon Meggs-Hamilton Grades Taught: 9th-12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies by grade Number of Students: 1,430 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Beary Cherry Tree 3117 Lake Villa Drive, Metairie, 504.455.1950, bearycherrytree.com

Private/Co-ed Director: Paula Polito Grades Taught: Birth-4 years Tuition: $175/week Student/Faculty Ratio: Ranges from 4:1 to 10:1. Number of Students: 160 Open House: Jan. 25, 3:30-6 pm. Call to schedule a tour.

Alfred Bonnabel Magnet Academy High School 2801 Bruin Drive, Kenner, 504.443.4564, bonnabel.jpschools.org

Public/Co-ed Principal: Dawn Kalb Grades Taught: 8th-12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: Not available at press time. Number of Students: Not available at press time. Open House: Not available at press time.

East Jefferson High School 400 Phlox Ave., Metairie, 504.888.7171, eastjefferson.jpschools.org

Catholic/Male Director: Fr. Louis Molinelli, SDB Principal: Mark Williams ‘85 Grades Taught: 8th-12th Tuition: $8,700 Student/Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Number of Students: 460 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Public/Co-ed Principal: Maureen Bayhi Grades Taught: 9th-12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 29:1 Number of Students: 1,160 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Arden Cahill Academy

Ecole Classique

3101 Wall Blvd., Gretna, 504.392.0902, ardencahillacademy.com

5236 Glendale St., Metairie, 504.887.3507, ecoleclassique.com

Private/Co-ed Principal: Mary Kevin Cahill Grades Taught: 6 weeks-8th grade Tuition: $650-$800/month (6 weeks-Pre-K2); $7,400 (Pre-K3-8th) Student/Faculty Ratio: 11:1 Number of Students: 500 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Private/Co-ed Principal: David Federico Grades Taught: 2 years-12th grade Tuition: $2,700-$6,000 Student/Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Number of Students: 400 Freeman Learning Center (for students with learning difficulties) Grades Taught: Pre-K-12th Tuition: $8,400-$9,300 Student/Faculty Ratio: 7:1 (Elementary); 9:1 (High school) Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Haynes Academy for Advanced Studies 1416 Metairie Road, Metairie, 504.837.8300, haynes.jpschools.org

Public-Magnet/Co-ed Principal: Karla Russo Grades Taught: 6th-12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: Not available at press time. Number of Students: 860 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Jewish Community Day School 3747 W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie, 504.887.4091, jcdsnola.org

Jewish/Co-ed Director: Dr. Sharon Pollin Grades Taught: Babies, plus Pre-K-6th Tuition: $9,015-$11,325 Student/Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Number of Students: 65 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

John Calvin Presbyterian Playschool 4201 Transcontinental Drive, Metairie, 504.888.1378, johncalvinchurch.org

Presbyterian/Co-ed Director: Lauren Crisler Oufnac Grades Taught: 1-6 years Tuition: $1,675-$3,175 Student/Faculty Ratio: 7:1 Number of Students: 180 Open House: Jan. 10, 6:30-8 pm.

John Curtis Christian School Upper School: 10125 Jefferson Highway, River Ridge, 504.737.4621, johncurtis.com

Christian/Co-Ed Headmaster: J.T. Curtis, Jr. Principal: Leon Curtis Grades Taught: 7th-12th Tuition: $7,445 Student/Faculty Ratio: 22:1 Number of Students: 512 Open House: Schedule tour on website. Lower School: 10931 Jefferson Highway, River Ridge, 504.737.0208, johncurtis.com

Christian/Co-Ed Principal: Deborah Curtis Eutsler Grades Taught: 15 months-6th grade Tuition: $5,350-$6,025 Student/Faculty Ratio: 22:1 Number of Students: 385 Open House: Schedule tour on website.

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

| january/february 2019

do not include additional fees.

6201 Camphor St., Metairie, 504.888.0969, airlinepark.jpschools.org

Atonement Lutheran Church and School

WINTER 2019 SCHOOLLISTINGS

JEFFERSON PARISH

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WINTER 2019 SCHOOLLISTINGS

Kehoe-France School 720 Elise Ave., Metairie, 504.733.0472, kehoe-france.com

Kenner Discovery Health Sciences Academy Maine Campus: 2504 Maine Ave., Metairie, 504.-233.4720, discoveryhsf.org Vintage Campus: 201 Vintage Dr., Kenner, 504.267.9470, discoveryhsf.org Rivertown Campus: 415 Williams Blvd., Kenner, 504.267.9467, discoveryhsf.org Discovery Education Center: 3528 Sam Lenox St., Jefferson, 504.267.9484, discoveryhsf.org

Public-Magnet/Co-ed Head of School: Patty Glaser, Ph.D Grades Taught: Pre-K through grade 11 Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies Number of Students: 1,538 Open House: Jan. 23, 10-10:30 am (Rivertown Campus, Kindergarten); Jan. 24, 6-6:30 pm (Maine Campus, Grades 1-8); Feb. 7, 6-7 pm (Vintage Campus, High School).

Kinder Haus Montessori 5201 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 504.454.2424, kinderhausmontessori.com

201 Metairie Road, Metairie, 504.833.5539, metairie.jpschools.org

Riverdale High School

Private/Co-ed Director: Erika Davis & Angela Perret Grades Taught: 1 year-K Tuition: $130-$276/week Student/Faculty Ratio: Ranges from 6:1 (1 year old), 8:1 (Preschoolers), 12:1 (PK/K). Number of Students: 69 (per day) Open House: Call to schedule a tour, by appointment only.

The Little School 2216 Metairie Road, Metairie, 504.835.9964, thelittleschoolmetairie.com

Episcopal/Co-ed Director: Renee Hemel Grades Taught: 2-5 years Tuition: $2,600-$5,900 Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies by age group. Number of Students: 55 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Metairie Park Country Day School 300 Park Road, Metairie, 504.837.5204, mpcds.com

Private/Co-ed Head of School: Matt Neely Grades Taught: Pre-K-12th Tuition: $15,650-$21,250 Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies by grade. Number of Students: 740 Open House: Jan. 10, 8:30 am (K-2 grade); Jan. 15, 8:30 am (3-4 grade); Jan. 17, 8:15 am (6-7 grade).

240 Riverdale Drive, Jefferson, 504.833.7288, riverdalehigh.jpschools.org

Public/Co-ed Principal: Danielle Yunusah Grades Taught: 9th-12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Number of Students: 1,110 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

St. Angela Merici School 835 Melody Dr., Metairie, 504.835.8491, stangelaschool.org

Catholic/Co-ed Principal: Paige Bennett Grades Taught: Pre-K2-7th Tuition: $4,845-$5,455 Student/Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Number of Students: 365 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Mount Olive Lutheran Preschool

St. Ann Catholic School

315 Ridgelake Drive, Metairie, 504.835.3891, mountolivelutheran.net

4921 Meadowdale St., Metairie, 504.455.8383, stannschool.org

Lutheran/Co-ed Director: Virginia Crawford Grades Taught: 3-4 years Tuition: $275/month for a ½ day M-W-F program Student/Faculty Ratio: 5:1 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Catholic/Co-ed Principal: Susan R. Kropog Grades Taught: Pre-K2-7th Tuition: $2,520-$5,190 Student/Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Number of Students: 830 Open House: Jan. 9, 7:30 pm.

Parkway Presbyterian Preschool

St. Catherine of Siena Catholic School

6200 Camphor St., Metairie, 504.733.6340, parkwaypresbyterianchurch.com

400 Codifer Blvd., Metairie, 504.831.1166, scsgators.org

Presbyterian/Co-ed Director: Marlene Cooke Grades Taught: 18 months-Kindergarten Tuition: $846-$2,565 Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies by age. Number of Students: 160 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Catholic/Co-ed Principal: Kimberlie Kilroy Grades Taught: Pre-K3-7th Tuition: $5,460-5,624 Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies by grade. Number of Students: 864 Open House: Jan. 17, 7 pm (all grades).

Patrick F. Taylor Science and Technology Academy

St. Clement of Rome

701 Churchill Parkway, Westwego, 504.838.2249, pftsta.com

Public-Magnet/Co-ed Principal: Jaime Zapico Grades Taught: 6th-12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 25:1 Number of Students: 730 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Ridgewood Preparatory School 201 Pasadena Ave., Metairie, 504.835.2545, ridgewoodprep.com

Private/Co-ed Headmaster: M.J. Montgomery, Jr. Grades Taught: Pre-K-12th Tuition: $5,275-$7,250 Student/Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Number of Students: 300

3978 West Esplanade Ave., Metairie, 504.888.0386, scrschool.org

Catholic/Co-ed Principal: Dr. Patricia Dowd Speeg Grades Taught: Pre-K2-7th Tuition: K-7, $5,100; PK2-PK4, $5,500 Student/Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Number of Students: 468 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

St. Elizabeth Ann Seton School 4119 St. Elizabeth Drive, Kenner, 504.468.3524, seasschool.org

Catholic/Co-ed Principal: Joan Kathmann Grades Taught: Pre-K1-7th grade Tuition: $3,550-$4,975 Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies by grade. Number of Students: 460 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Public-Magnet/Co-ed Principal: Lisa Babin Grades Taught: Pre-K-5th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies by age. Number of Students: 380 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Private/Co-ed Head of School: Dr. Tanya Price Grades Taught: 8 weeks-7th grade Tuition: $9,510-$9,867 Number of Students: 420 Open House: Feb. 13, 8:30 am.

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Metairie Academy for Advanced Studies

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215 Betz Place, Metairie, 504.833.1471, school.stfrancisxavier.com

Catholic/Co-ed Principal: Barbara Martin Grades Taught: Pre-K2-7th grade Tuition: $5,100-$5,825 Student/Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Number of Students: 450 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

St. Louis King of France School 1600 Lake Ave., Metairie, 504-833-8224, slkfschool.com

Catholic/Co-ed Principal: Pamela K. Schott Grades Taught: 6 weeks-7th grade Tuition: $5,100-$9,300 Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies by grade. Number of Students: 400 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

St. Martin’s Episcopal School 225 Green Acres Road, Metairie, 504.736.9917, stmsaints.com

Episcopal/Co-ed Head of School: Merry Sorrells Grades Taught: 8 weeks-12th grade Tuition: $10,750-$22,200 Student/Faculty Ratio: 11:1 Number of Students: 600 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Thomas Jefferson High School

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Public-Magnet/Co-ed Principal: Andrew Vincent Grades Taught: 9th-12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies by class. Number of Students: 400 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

West Jefferson High School 2200 8th St., Harvey, 504.368.6055, westjefferson.jpschools.org

Public/Co-ed Principal: Vanessa Brown-Lewis Grades Taught: 9th-12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 25:1 Number of Students: 1,470 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Kate Middleton “Main” Campus: 1407 Virgil St., Gretna, 504.304.6332, yacharterschool.org

Lower School: 428 Broadway St., New Orleans, 504.324.7100, auduboncharter.com

Harvey Campus: 3400 6th St., Harvey, 504.301.0329, yacharterschool.org

Public-Charter-Montessori-French/Co-ed CEO: Latoye Brown Principal: Missy Forcier Grades Taught: Pre-K3-3rd Tuition: Free for grades K-3rd; $5,100 for Pre-K3 and Pre-K4 Student/Faculty Ratio: 13:1 in Montessori classes; 25:1 in French classes. Number of Students: 455 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Public/Co-ed School Leader: Brandon House Grades Taught: K-8th grade. Expanding to K-9 in 2019! Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 26:1 Number of Students: 947 Open House: Jan. 30, 6-7 pm, both Harvey Campus (grade K) and Kate Middleton Campus (grade 9).

ORLEANS PARISH Abeona House Child Discovery Center 3401 Canal St., New Orleans, 504.486.0510, abeonahouse.org

Public/Co-ed Director: Grace Millsaps Grades Taught: 6 months-5 years Tuition: $910-$1,020/month. Student/Faculty Ratio: Infants 1:4, four-yearolds 1:8 Number of Students Enrolled: 59 Open House Dates: Call to schedule a tour.

Abramson Sci Academy 5552 Read Boulevard, New Orleans, 504.373.6264, collegiateacademies.org/page/113/abramsonsci-academy

Public-Charter/Co-ed Principal: Rhonda Dale Grades Taught: 9-12 Grade Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Number of Students: 560 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Academy of the Sacred Heart Rosary Campus (Grades 5-12), 4521 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans, 70115 Mater Campus (Ages 1-Grade 4), 4301 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans, 70115 504.269.1213, ashrosary.org

Catholic/All Girls Headmistress: Sr. Melanie A. Guste, RSCJ, Ph.D. Tuition: $9,610-$19,675 Grades Taught: Toddler 1/3s – Grade 12 Student/Faculty Ratio: 9:1 Total Number of Students: 770 Tuesday Tours: Jan. 8, 8:30-10 am (1 year-4th grade).

Alice M. Harte Charter School 5300 Berkley Dr., New Orleans, 504.373.6281, alicemhartecharter.org

Public-Charter/Co-ed Head of School: Robert Hill Grades Taught: Pre-K-8th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Number of Students: Not available at press time. Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Upper School: 1111 Milan St., New Orleans, 504.324.7110, auduboncharter.com

Public-Charter-Montessori-French/Co-ed CEO: Latoye Brown Principal: Adrienne Collopy Grades Taught: 4th-8th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 13:1 in Montessori classes; 25:1 in French classes. Number of students: 430 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Audubon Charter School – Gentilly 4720 Painters Street, New Orleans, 504.324.7100, auduboncharter.com

Public-Charter-Montessori French Immersion/Co-ed CEO: Latoye Brown Principal: David LaViscount Grades Taught: Pre-K3 – 2nd (for 2018-2019) Tuition: Free for grades K-2, $5,100 for Pre-K 3 and 4 Student/Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Number of Students: 190 Open House Dates: Jan. 16 and 25, 8:45-9:15 am or 9:15-9:45 am. Feb. 13, 8:45-9:15 am or 9:159:45 am.

Arthur Ashe Charter School 1456 Gardena Drive, New Orleans, 504.373.6267, firstlineschools.org/arthur-ashecharter-school

Public-Charter/Co-ed Director: Kamisha Gray Grades Taught: K-8th Grade Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies by grade. Number of Students: 713

Benjamin Franklin Elementary Chatham Campus: 1116 Jefferson Ave., New Orleans, Grades PK-5 Nashville Campus: 401 Nashville Ave., New Orleans, Grades 6-8 504.304.3932, babyben.org

CEO/Principal: Charlotte Matthew Grades Taught: PK-8th Grade Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Number of Students: 786 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

17 Gretna Blvd., Gretna, 504.363.4300, tjeff.jpschools.org

Audubon Charter School - Uptown

WINTER 2019 SCHOOLLISTINGS

St. Francis Xavier School

Young Audiences Charter School

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JAN 9

Celebrate by doing a good deed for a friend, family member or neighbor today.

Random Acts of Kindness Day

FEB 17

Head out to the LSU AgCenter Hammond Research Station for the stroll in the “Hody” Wilson camellia garden. Enjoy the beauty, purchase camellia plants, and learn about planting, pruning, and caring for camellias. 1-4 pm.

A family-friendly run/walk starting on Vet. Memorial Blvd. The race finish will coincide with Family Gras. 8:30 am12:30 pm.

Veterans Memorial Blvd. This two-day, FREE festival is a celebration of carnival and family.

2019 Camellia Garden Stroll

Mardi Gras 5K & Kids Half Mile

Family Gras

FEB 24

New Orleans Opera Guild Home. A fun and family-friendly event for kids of all ages! Enjoy light refreshments and amenities between parades. 11 am-2 pm.

Mardi Gras Family Fete

FEB 24

2200 W. Cabela’s Parkway, Gonzales. One of Special Olympics Louisiana’s largest fundraisers, this event attracts hundreds of people to a winter waterhole to take the plunge and raise money. 10 am-3:30 pm.

2019 Polar Plunge Gonzales

FEB 16

FEB 23

Visit Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge, Barataria Preserve Trails, or journey to Fontainebleau State Park.

Take a hike today.

FEB 10

Enjoy a double feature movie night (Frozen and Happy Feet will be showing). Grab your flock and head to Flamingo A-Go-Go. 7 pm.

FEB 22-24

Candyland Inflatable Party Place. The Krewe of Candyland presents the 1st Annual Kids “Royal Mardi Gras Extravaganza,” a Mardi Gras Ball the entire family can enjoy! 11 am-1 pm.

Royal Mardi Gras Extravaganza

Explore a park in your neighborhood! Check out Nola Family’s parks and playground list at nolafamily.com.

FEB 9

by taking a walk in one of our National Parks.

MLK, Jr. Day

FEB 2

Winter Family Olympics!

Movies in the Courtyard

Free admittance to all National Parks. Enjoy

Ready for some outdoor fun? Create your own

Challenge the family by taking the stairs (instead of the elevator or escalator) today.

Join Footprints to Fitness for an awesome Yoga + Pilates Fusion class. Best part, it’s FREE! Every Tuesday in January (minus New Year’s Day). 5:30-6:30 pm.

JAN 23

National Take the Stairs Day!

Free Yogalates at the Plaza

JAN 8

JAN21

and the start of the Carnival season. 6 pm.

Joan of Arc parade

March down to the French Quarter for the

JAN 6

JAN 19

New Orleans JCC. Proceeds from this event will go towards scholarships for the New Orleans JCC’s Maccabi team. 12:30-3:30 pm.

Kicking for Kids Footgolf Tournament

JAN 6

y h t l a e H & n u A F Year! New

Y R A U R B E F / JANUARY

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

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WINTER 2019 SCHOOLLISTINGS

Christian Brothers School

ENCORE Academy

2001 Leon C. Simon Drive, New Orleans, 504.286.2600, bfhsla.org

City Park Campus: 8 Friederichs Ave., New Orleans, 504.486.6770, cbs-no.org

2518 Arts St., New Orleans, 504.444.2224, encorelearning.org

Public-Charter/Co-ed Head of School: Dr. Patrick Widhalm Grades Taught: 9th-12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies by grade. Number of Students: 1,007 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Catholic/Male President: Joey Scaffidi Principal: Michael Prat Grades Taught: 5th-7th Tuition: $7,650 Student/Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Number of Students: 335 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Public-Charter/Co-ed Arts Focused CEO and School Leader: Terri Smith Grades Taught: K-8th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Number of Students: 600 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Bricolage Academy of New Orleans 2426 Esplanade Ave., New Orleans, 504.539.4505, bricolagenola.org

Public-Charter/Co-Ed CEO: Josh Densen Principal: Michele Murphey, Lower School Principal: Antigua Wilbern, Middle School Grades Taught: K-5th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: PreK 10:1; Kindergarten 13:1; 1st-5th 25:1 Number of Students: 560 Open House: Jan. 18 and Feb. 22, 9 am. Feb. 6, 6 pm.

Brother Martin High School 4401 Elysian Fields Ave., New Orleans, 504.283.1561, brothermartin.com

Catholic/Male Principal: Ryan Gallagher Grades Taught: 8th-12th Tuition: $9,970 Student/Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Number of Students: 1,140 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Cabrini High School

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4600 Canal St., New Orleans, 504.488.4426, cbs-no.org

Catholic/Co-ed: Pre-K through 4th Catholic/Female: 5th-7th President: Joey Scaffidi Principal: Richard Neider Grades Taught: Pre-K-7th Tuition: $7,100 for grades PK-4th; $7,250 for grades 5-7 Student/Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Number of Students: 510 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Cypress Academy 4217 Orleans Ave., New Orleans, 504.383.3337, cypressacademy.org

Public-Co-ed Executive Director: Laverne B. Fleming Grades Taught: K-4th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Number of Students: 250 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

De La Salle High School 5300 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans, 504.895.5717, delasallenola.com

Catholic/Female Principal: Yvonne L. Hrapmann ‘76 Grades Taught: 8th-12th Tuition: $10,600 Student/Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Number of Students: 400 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Catholic/Co-ed President: Michael Giambelluca Principal: Paul Kelly Grades Taught: 8th-12th Tuition: $9,600 Student/Faculty Ratio: 23:1 Number of Students: 600 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Castle Kids Development Center

Ecole Bilingue de la Nouvelle-Orléans

7400 Leake Ave., New Orleans, 504.702.8525

821 General Pershing St., New Orleans, 504.896.4500, ebnola.net

Private/Co-ed Director: Pearlie Harris Grades Taught: Infants-Pre-K Tuition: Varies by age Student/Faculty Ratio: Low; Meets NAEYC/ National Standards. Number of Students: 100 Open House: Tours accepted daily.

Cathedral Montessori School 9 Fortress Road, New Orleans, 504.252.4871, cathedralmontessori.com

Montessori/Co-ed Director: Jan Weiner Grades Taught: Ages 3-6 and grades 1-2 Tuition: $5,265-$9,150 Number of Students: 85 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Private-French/Co-ed Director: Pauline Dides Grades Taught: 18 months to 8th grade Tuition: $8,132-$13,792 Student/Faculty Ratio: 7:1 Number of Students: 300 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Edna Karr High School 3332 Huntlee Dr., New Orleans, 504.302.7135, ednakarr.org

Public-Charter/Co-ed Principal: Dr. Chauncey Nash Grades Taught: 9th-12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Number of Students: 1,106 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Holy Cross School Middle and High School (Main) Campus: 5500 Paris Ave., New Orleans Primary School Campus: 5601 Elysian Fields Ave., New Orleans holycrosstigers.com, 504.942.3100

Catholic/Male Headmaster: Sean Martin Chief School Officer/Principal: Eric DesOrmeaux Dean of Primary School: Brian Kitchen Dean of Middle School: Ronnie Kornick Dean of High School: Phillip White Grades Taught: Pre-K-12th Tuition: $7,025-$8,650 Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies by grade. Number of Students: 980 Open House: Jan. 17, 6-8 pm (Elysian Fields Campus).

Holy Name of Jesus 6325 Cromwell Place, New Orleans, 504.861.1466, hnjschool.org

Catholic/Co-ed Principal: Jessica A. Dwyer Grades Taught: Pre-K3-7th grade Tuition: $5,920-$7,800 Student/Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Number of Students: 500 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Edward Hynes Charter School 990 Harrison Ave., New Orleans, 504.483.6100, hynesschool.com

Public-Charter/Co-ed School Leader: Michelle B. Douglas Grades Taught: Gifted Pre-K, K-8th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Number of Students: 695 School Tours: Jan. 9, 8:30 am.

Isidore Newman School

3401 Canal Street, New Orleans, theguildnola.org

1903 Jefferson Ave., New Orleans, 504.896.6323, newmanschool.org

Private/Co-ed Principal: Jacqueline Case, Executive Director Grades Taught: Adults 18 years of age and older who may have Autism Spectrum Disorder, Down Syndrome, or other intellectual disabilities Tuition: $15,150 and NOW Waiver Student/Faculty Ratio: 5:1 Number of Students: 22 Open Houses: Call for a tour.

Private/Co-ed Head of School: Dale M. Smith Grades Taught: 6 weeks-12th grade Tuition: $5,992-$25,100, includes fees Student/Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Number of Students: 1,025 (Pre-K-12th) Open House: Jan. 23, 9 am (Middle/Upper School). Call to schedule a tour for lower school (Pre-K-5th grade).

International High School of New Orleans 727 Carondelet St., New Orleans, 504.613.5703, ihsnola.org

Public-Charter/Co-ed Head of School: Sean Wilson Grades Taught: 9th-12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Number of Students: 564 Open House: April 11, 6 pm.

International School of Louisiana Uptown Campus– French and Spanish language immersion 1400 Camp St., New Orleans, 504.654.1088, isl-edu.org Public-Charter/Co-ed Principal: Laura Adelman-Cannon Grades Taught: 3rd-8th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Number of Students: 718 Open House: Call to schedule a tour. Westbank Campus– Spanish language immersion 502 Olivier St., New Orleans, 504.274.4571, isl-edu.org Public-Charter/Co-ed Principal: Rosa Alvarado Grades Taught: K-5th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Number of Students: 307 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

KIPP Renaissance High School

Public-Charter/Co-ed Principal: Ghislaine Camey Grades Taught: K-2nd Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Number of Students: 311 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Public-Charter/Co-ed President: Rachel Wisdom Grades Taught: K-12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: Not available at time of press. Number of Students: 1,760 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Lycée Français de la Nouvelle Orléans Patton Campus (Pre-K4-2nd Grade): 5951 Patton St., New Orleans

3820 St. Claude Ave. (Douglass), New Orleans, 504-373-6255, kipp.org/school/kipp-renaissance-high-school

Johnson Campus (3rd-8th Grade): 1800 Monroe St., New Orleans

School Leader: Mrs. Towana Pierre-Floyd School Leader, Upper School: Mr. Robert Corvo Grades Taught: 9th-12th Grade Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Number of Students: 551 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Public-Charter/Co-ed CEO/Principal: Marina Schoen Grades Taught: Pre-K4-8th Tuition: Free for LA4 Program and K-7th; $4,975 (Pre-K4) Student/Faculty Ratio: Ranges from 10:1 to 25:1 Number of Students: 955 Open House: Feb. 5, 6-7 at Patton Campus.

Lake Forest Elementary Charter School

504.620.5500, lfno.org

Morris Jeff Community School

11110 Lake Forest Blvd., New Orleans, 504.826.7140, lakeforestcharter.org

Pre-K-8th Grade Campus: 211 S. Lopez St., New Orleans

Public-Charter/Co-ed School Leader: Mardele S. Early Principal: Robert M. Bell, IV Grades Taught: K-8th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: Ranges from 15:1 to 20:1 Number of Students: 635 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

High School Campus: 1301 North Derbigny St., New Orleans

Livingston Collegiate 7301 Dwyer Rd., New Orleans, 504.503.0004, collegiateacademies.org/LivingstonCollegiate

Public-Charter/Co-ed Principal: Evan Stoudt Grades Taught: 9-11 Grade Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Number of Students: 450 Open House: Jan 15, 5 pm.

Louise S. McGehee School Dixon Campus– French and Spanish language immersion 4040 Eagle St., New Orleans, 504.934.4875, isl-edu.org

Middle and High School: 5624 Freret St., New Orleans, 504.304.3961, lusherschool.org

2343 Prytania St., New Orleans, 504.561.1224, mcgeheeschool.com

Private/Female Headmistress: Dr. Kimberly Field-Marvin Grades Taught: 1 year-12th grade Tuition: $12,935-$23,635 Student/Faculty Ratio: 8:1 Number of Students: 456 Open House: Jan. 10 and Jan. 17, 8:30-10 am (Pre-K-12th); Jan. 17, 6-7:30 pm (5th-12th).

Lusher Charter School Lower School: 7315 Willow St., New Orleans, 504.862.5110, lusherschool.org

morrisjeffschool.org, 504.373.6258

Public-Charter/Co-ed Head of School: Patricia Perkins Grades Taught: Pre-K4-10th Tuition: K-10, Free; Pre-K4, may require tuition based on family income Student/Faculty Ratio: 7:1 Number of Students: 1,010 Open Houses: Call school to schedule a tour.

Mount Carmel Academy 7027 Milne Blvd., New Orleans, 504.288.7626, mcacubs.com

Catholic/Female President: Sr. Camille Anne Campbell Principal: Ms. Beth Ann Simno Grades Taught: 8th-12th Tuition: $9,100 Student/Faculty Ratio: 9:1 Number of Students: 1,235 Open House: Call school to schedule a tour.

New Orleans Center for Creative Arts (NOCCA) 2800 Chartres St., New Orleans, 504.940.2787, nocca.com

Public-Arts/Co-ed President: Kyle Wedberg Grades Taught: 6th-12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Number of Students: 550 Open House: Call school to schedule a tour.

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

1400 Moss St., New Orleans, 504.482.1193, cabrinihigh.com

Canal Street Campus

The Guild at Raphael Village

WINTER 2019 SCHOOLLISTINGS

Benjamin Franklin High School

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WINTER 2019 SCHOOLLISTINGS

2319 Valence St., New Orleans, 504.304.3532, firstlineschools.org/samuel-j-green-charterschool

New Orleans JCC Nursery School and Pre-K 5342 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans, 504.897.0143, nojcc.org

Jewish/Open to all/Co-ed Director: Adrienne Shulman Grades Taught: 13 months-5 years (including Pre-K) Tuition: $3,800-$7,990 Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies by age Number of Students: 180 Open House: Tours are held every Tuesday at 9:30 am from Oct. 9 to April 30. Due to holiday closures, no tours on January 1, March 5 and April 23.

New Orleans Military and Maritime Academy 425 O’Bannon St., New Orleans, 504.227.3810, nomma.net

Principal: Mr. Daniel Garbarino Grades Taught: 8th-12th Grade Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 25:1 Number of Students: 867 Open House: Call school to schedule a tour.

Nola Nature School 1009 Harrison Ave., New Orleans, 202.714.4876, nolanatureschool.com

Private/Co-ed Principal: Clare Loughran Grades Taught: Pre-K 3 and Pre-K 4 Tuition: $8,000 Student/Faculty Ratio: 5:1 Number of Students: 10 Open Houses: Call school to schedule a tour.

Raphael Academy

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Private/Co-ed Principal: Megan Riley, M.Ed Grades Taught: Early Childhood/1st Grade and 5th through 12th Tuition: $11,300-$12,750 Student/Faculty Ratio: Seven students with a lead teacher and an assistant Number of Students: 17 Open Houses: Tours on the first Tuesday of the month and as requested.

Royal Castle Child Development Center 3800 Eagle St., New Orleans, 504.488.1045

Private/Co-ed Director: Pearlie Harris Grades Taught: Infants-Pre-K Tuition: Varies by age Student/Faculty Ratio: Low; Meets NAEYC/ National Standards Number of Students: 100 Open House: Tours accepted daily.

Sophie B. Wright Charter School 1426 Napoleon Ave., New Orleans, 504.304.3916, sophiebwrightschool.com

Principal: Sharon L. Clark Grades Taught: 9th-12th Grade Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Number of Students: 570 Open House: Call school to schedule a tour.

St. Andrew the Apostle Roman Catholic School 3131 Eton St., New Orleans, 504.394.4171, sasno.org

Catholic/Co-ed Headmaster: Elizabeth Konecni Principal: Katherine Houin Grades Taught: 8 weeks-7th grade Tuition: $5,388 Student/Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Number of Students: 430 Open House: Jan. 30, 5:30-6:30 pm.

Trinity Episcopal School

Waldorf School of New Orleans

1315 Jackson Ave., New Orleans, 504.525.8661, www.trinitynola.org

Soraparu Campus (K-8th): 517 Soraparu St., New Orleans, 504.525.2420, waldorfnola.org

St. John Lutheran School

Episcopal/Co-ed Headmaster: The Rev. E. Gary Taylor Grades Taught: Early Childhood-8th Grade Tuition: $5,165-$21,105 Student/Faculty Ratio: 7:1 Number of Students: 350 Open House: Jan. 11, 9 am.

University Montessori

Early Childhood Center: 2010 Peniston St., New Orleans, 504.345.2236, waldorfnola.org Waldorf/Co-ed Grades Taught: 2.5 years-8th grade Tuition: $5,408-$11,073 Student/Faculty Ratio: 9:1 to 15:1 Number of Students: 130 Open House: Jan. 19, 10-11:30 am (2.5 years-K) and Jan. 26, 10 am-noon (K-8th).

7508 Burthe St., New Orleans, 504.865.1659, umsnola.org

Warren Easton Charter High School

3937 Canal St., New Orleans, 504.488.6641, sjlno.com

Lutheran/Co-ed Principal: Bethany Jones Gonski Grades Taught: 3 years-8th grade Tuition: $5,750-$6,250 Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies by grade. Number of Students: 170 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

St. Mary’s Dominican High School 7701 Walmsley Ave., New Orleans, 504.865.9401, stmarysdominican.org

Catholic/Female President: Dr. Cynthia A. Thomas Principal: Carolyn Favre Grades Taught: 8th-12th Tuition: $9,745 Number of Students: 891 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

St. Michael Special School 1522 Chippewa St., New Orleans, 504.524.7285, stmichaelspecialschool.com

Private/Co-ed President/Principal: Tish Sauerhoff Ages Taught: 6 to 21 years Tuition: $5,170 Student/Faculty Ratio: 6:1 Number of Students: 205 Open Houses: Feb. 7, 9-11 am.

St. Andrew’s Episcopal School

St. Paul’s Episcopal School

8012 Oak St., New Orleans, 504.866.6553, standrewsepiscopalschool.org

6249 Canal Blvd., New Orleans, 504.488.1319, stpauls-lakeview.org

Episcopal/Co-ed Interim Head of School: Kathryn Fitzpatrick Grades Taught: 18 months-8th grade Tuition: $13,715-$14,915 (Pre-K-8th) Student/Faculty Ratio: 7:1 Number of Students: 150 Open House: Call school to schedule a tour.

Episcopal/Co-ed Head of School: Charleen Schwank Grades Taught: 6 weeks-8th grade Tuition: $10,875-$14,900 Student/Faculty Ratio: 8:1 Number of Students: 285 Open House: Jan. 24, 10 am-12:20 pm (5th8th grade), Jan 31, 9:45 am-11:30 am (Early Childhood-4th grade), April 2, 9:30-11:30 am (all grades).

St. Augustine High School 2600 A.P. Tureaud Ave., New Orleans, 504.944.2424, staugnola.org

Catholic/Male President: Kenneth St. Charles, Ph.D., ‘81 Principal: Sean J. Goodwin, ‘95 Grades Taught: 8th-12th Tuition: $7,350 Student/Faculty Ratio: 18:1 Number of Students: 625 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

St. George’s Episcopal School 923 Napoleon Ave., New Orleans, 504.891.5509, stgeorgesepiscopal.com

Episcopal/Co-ed Headmaster: Ralph Wales (Interim) Grades Taught: 1 year-8th grade Tuition: Preschool: $4,830-$20,350 Student/Faculty Ratio: 5:1

St. Rita Catholic School 65 Fontainebleau Drive, New Orleans, 504.866.1777, stritanola.org

Principal: Shanda Theriot Catholic/Co-ed Grades Taught: Pre-K-7th Tuition: $5,500 Non-Catholics/$5,000 Catholics Student/Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Number of Students: 220 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

Stuart Hall School for Boys

Montessori/Co-ed Director: Teddi Locke Grades Taught: 20 months-6 years Tuition: $6,460-$11,650 Student/Faculty Ratio: Ranges from 7:1 to 10:1 Number of Students: 54 Open House: Jan. 16, 10 am. Call to schedule a tour.

2032 S. Carrollton Ave., New Orleans, 504.861.1954, stuarthall.org

Ursuline Academy

Catholic/Male Head of School: Kevin Avin Grades Taught: Pre-K3-7th grade Tuition: $13,600-$14,575 Student/Faculty Ratio: 7.2:1 Number of Students: 347 Open House: Private tours of the campus are given daily by appointment.

3019 Canal St., New Orleans, 504.324.7400, warreneastoncharterhigh.org

Public-Charter/Co-ed Principal: Mervin Jackson Grades Taught: 9th-12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 25:1 Number of Students: 1,006 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

2635 State Street, New Orleans, 504.861.9150, uanola.org

Catholic/Female President: Dr. Karen Thomas McNay Grades Taught: 2 years-12th grade Tuition: $10,550 Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies Number of Students: 620 Open House: Elementary School Tours: January 16 and 30, 8:30 am.

St. Pius X Catholic School 6600 Spanish Fort Blvd., New Orleans, 504.282.2811, stpiusxnola.org

Catholic/Co-ed Principal: Deirdre D. Macnamara Grades Taught: Pre-K3-7th grade Tuition: $4,825-$5,675 Student/Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Number of Students: 530 Open House: School tours can be scheduled on our website.

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

500 Soraparu St., New Orleans, 504.524.5955, raplaelacademy.org

Public-Charter/ Co-Ed Director: Ava Lee Grades: PreK-8th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 8:1 Number of Students: 528 Open House: Jan. 24, 5:30-7 pm. School Tours from 9-10 am on the following Tuesdays: January 15 and February 5.

Number of Students: 300 (Pre-K-8th) Open House: Jan. 17, 5:30-6:30 pm (Preschool2nd Grade).

WINTER 2019 SCHOOLLISTINGS

Samuel J. Green Charter School

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Get Outside! Exploring the Environment with Audubon Louisiana Nature Center

In today’s world, interacting with the outdoors can fall to the wayside in favor of television, iPads, PlayStations...the list goes on. However, studies show that being outside for just 15 minutes every day can have lasting health benefits for the whole family. Additionally, teaching children about the environment can help to promote lifelong sustainable practices that make the world a better place for everyone. Audubon Louisiana Nature Center, located in New Orleans East, provides the perfect setting for people of all ages to enjoy the outdoors while also learning something new. Hurricane Katrina flooded the facility in 2005, but Audubon was committed to bringing this facility back to the community and it reopened in October 2017 with modern buildings, beautiful nature trails, and many new programs celebrating the wonders of the natural world.

Holistic Health

Gardening is shown to improve strength, flexibility, lower blood pressure, and elevate your mood. Get your little one involved in this healthy hobby at the Kinder-Garden, a handson space for children to explore the benefits of growing and eating nutritious food.

Go Green

Every program that Audubon Louisiana Nature Institute provides furthers their mission of conservation. Visiting the Audubon Louisiana Nature Center helps to instill in visitors an appreciation for the natural world, so that together we can make a difference. The Nature Center provides children with tangible ways they can practice conservation, such as recycling soda cans or reducing use of single-use plastics.

Stay Tuned… Beginning in 2019, Audubon Louisiana Nature Center will offer even more educational opportunities for everyone to enjoy like community gardens, nature-themed festivals, service-learning programs, and a farmers market!

Read on for our top benefits of getting outdoors at Audubon Louisiana Nature Center!

Energy Boost

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Stimulate the Senses

Encourage Curiosity

When children have the opportunity to learn about the natural world and its complexities, their minds expand exponentially. Enjoy a trip to the Planetarium to provide your child with a first-hand look into the mysteries of space exploration.

One of the best ways to engage all five senses is to get outside. Audubon Zoo, Audubon Aquarium of the Americas, and Audubon Louisiana Nature Center offer “Sensory Sundays” designed for guests who benefit from calmer environments and hands-on sensory activities.

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

| january/february 2019

Studies suggest that spending 20 minutes in the open air gives your brain an energy boost comparable to one cup of coffee! Head to the boardwalk trail for a short exploration of NOLA’s unique forest ecosystem.

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5

MOM ABOUT TOWN

THINGS

I’M LOVING RIGHT NOW

Melissa Pia Bossola Beese PLAY On asking her favorite toy brand ( we had to! )

www.nolafamily.com

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TIKI

“TIKI is everything. I’d like to call it my mid-life crisis. We love Latitude 29 in the FQ as it’s the REAL deal – as authentic as they come. We are currently putting in a Tiki Bar in the house. No joke!” Beachbum Berry’s Latitude 29, 321 N. Peters St., New Orleans

“We all love Velvet Cactus as it’s close to work and home, and they have so much for the kids to do so we can enjoy adult conversation.” The Velvet Cactus, 6300 Argonne Blvd., Lakeview

PARADE

“We like Chewbacchus because it’s fun and unique and we are Star Wars lovers. We also love to go to the parade route for Bacchus Saturday, the kids always have fun!” Intergalactic Krewe of Chewbacchus, Feb.9, Marigny

RESOLUTION ”Our Big Resolution for 2019 is to be content. We’ve been leaping and bounding for a few years now, and I’d like to just stay home and be content with what we have. I’m sure I’ll get restless by February…..what’s a resolution again?”

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

| january/february 2019

“That is so mean as there are so many and because they are all different... I’d have to say HABA. They cover everything from infant toys to family games, and they are all beautifully made and designed.”

NOSH

Melissa Beese, mom to Tristan, 11 and Finn, 7, started Little Pnuts Special Delivery subscription service June 2012. Fast forward three short years, and her subscription service became a full-fledged retail store– Little Pnuts Toy Shoppe opened on Harrison Ave. in March of 2015. But she and her husband Stefan are not ones to let the grass grow under a thriving business – look for Little Pnuts to move to their new and bigger location at 400 Harrison Ave. in early spring!

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Can Swimming Make Your Kid Smarter? by Erin Cohn

While many people are aware of the physical benefits of swimming, new research suggests that it can also be instrumental in early childhood brain development. Love Swimming, the premier instructional swimming program in New Orleans since 2002, bases their lesson plans on the notion that swimming is a brain-boosting activity. Love Swimming instructors witness the learning benefits of swimming every day.

Read on for love swimming’s top brain benefits.. . 1. Promotes Hippocampal Neurogenesis Brain damage from stress and depression can be reversed with swimming via hippocampal neurogenesis, or replacing lost neurons. Hippocampal neurogenesis also improves long- and short-term memory. Marshall says, “Being in the water engages the bodies of children and babies in a completely unique and different way from land-based activities. Water on the skin helps create billions of new neurons as your child kicks, glides, and smacks at the water.”

2. Improved Breathing and Communication

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3. Better Cognitive Function A 2014 NCBI study found that immersing oneself in a pool increases blood flow to the brain, which can help improve memory, mood, clarity and focus. Additionally, swimming activates both brain hemispheres and all four lobes of the brain simultaneously which can lead to increased cognition and an easier time learning. Marshall says, “In my mind, if you had to choose one activity for your child before age 6, swimming must be in that activity because of the benefits to the brain, the confidence it builds in kids, and the way that confidence expands into their social networks.”

for Easy Learning A 2012 study found children who learned to swim at a young age reached many developmental milestones earlier and more easily than non-swimming peers. Researchers believe this is because the bilateral cross-patterning movements in swimming aid in the development of nerve fibers in the corpus callosum, which connects the hemispheres of the brain and facilitates communication between them. “We have had a lot of experience with this concept at Love Swimming. Bilateral cross-patterning movements increase reading skills, language development, academic learning, and spacial awareness,” Marshall recalls.

5. Invaluable Therapy for Children with Special Needs Love Swimming offers many classes specifically for children with special needs, and Marshall notices that “Children with autism are often very attracted to water. Swimming lessons offer all the same brain benefits for youth on the spectrum, but the experience can be even more special for a kid facing additional challenges.” For children on the autism spectrum, or with other special needs, water on the body can have a calming effect as it reduces enervating noises. Additionally, water is a soothing environment that emphasizes gentle and repetitive motions which can help reduce stress and anxiety.

6. For the Love of Swimming! In addition to all these amazing brain-related benefits, swimming is just plain fun! Marshall says, “Most of our swimmers at Love Swimming would say that swimming is their favorite activity. When lessons are approached with fun and continuous support, learning to swim transforms from something scary into the highlight of their week.”

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Marshall suggests regular lessons so that a child can swim independently by age four because “taking breaths on their own is a huge part of swimming. Swimming aids in the development of mobility functions in the water so that breathing becomes deeper. This improved respiration helps the baby to be better at making sounds, which improves communication and overall language development. Babies who can communicate better are generally happier!”

4. Enhance Gross- and Visual-Motor Skills

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LEARNING YEARS

It Won’t Go Away THE POWER OF OBJECT

PERMANENCE

By Pat Blackwell, Ph.D

www.nolafamily.com

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This makes sense when you think that in order for a child to describe something, he must have a way of mentally representing things. In terms of attachment, a child must be able to discern strangers from familiar persons and must understand that important people in his/her world have permanence to them. One cannot form a stable relationship with someone unless one has a mental scheme or representation of that person as stable as well as dependable! It is by no coincidence that true attachment coincides with a more sophisticated understanding of the permanence of objects.

The Development of Object Permanence Notice that prior to four months, your baby will not search for an object if it is placed under a cup or cloth. At around 4 to 8 months, your child will try to retrieve a partially covered object that he is engaged with. He will continue to fail to look

for a completely hidden object, even if he was eagerly engaged with it. Between 8-12 months, clearer signs of your child’s burgeoning object concept are apparent. This is also the period that developmentalists can discern a true sense of attachment (or bonding) between infant and parent. At this age, peek-a-boo is a good activity because it capitalizes on your baby’s great interest in your face. It is also a good way of relieving separation anxiety. As your baby sees the repetition of your face appearing and disappearing, he understands that separations are not final, and that there is a predictable return of your treasured face and presence. It is not until 18–24 months that your child is fully capable of mentally representing an object. At this age, he fully understands that objects have permanence, and he will take great enjoyment in locating objects in elaborate games of hide-andseek. Notice that this is also when language ability explodes.

Advancing Object Permanence Ability From birth on, stimulate your baby’s object concept by having your baby track your face back and forth and later by playing peek-a-boo. Cover a hand mirror with a cloth and let baby find her reflection or have baby cover her own face and let you find her. Raise the bar by “hiding” partially covered objects, then fully covered ones. When your baby can crawl, hide-and-seek capitalizes on motor and cognitive skills. Crawl around on the floor and let baby find you. Mix in sound as a clue for your baby to find you– this is multisensory learning. Cover a table with a cloth for a great hideaway. Please note that as with any interesting and important activity, your baby will want to repeat and repeat and repeat. Follow her actions, and don’t impose your concept of boredom on the activity. Repetition is how your baby forms the neural wiring or connections to fully establish a concept in their brain. Pelts, Kirkhart & Associates 504.581.3933 pelts-kirkhart.com

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Renowned Swiss child psychologist, Jean Piaget, was the first to recognize the significance of observing child play. By simply watching and recording (or journaling) the play behavior of his children, he developed a sophisticated theory of child development, focusing, in particular, on cognitive (intellectual) development. According to Piaget, object permanence is the first and perhaps most profound cognitive milestone. This concept refers to the idea that when an object disappears from view, it continues to exist. The object permanence concept is important because it is integral to symbolic reasoning which in turn is essential to language, math, and emotional development – such as attachment or parent-child bonding.

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PARENTING CORNER

CHANGE HAPPENS By Jenni Watts Evans

This month brings a new year – and a transition out of the holiday season and back to the usual routine. That’s a comfort for most parents, but for kids it can be stressful. Next month maybe it’s a new baby or a move to a new home. Change can also be unexpected: death, fire, separation or divorce. Change happens, and it is important to be tuned in to your child’s needs in times of stress. Depending on their age, children need adults in their lives to provide consistency, empathy, support, and appropriate communication so that they are given information about what affects them, and they are listened to regarding their thoughts and frustrations. You can also help on the front end by building your child’s resilience. So when the inevitable adversities in life occur, your child is better prepared to weather the storm. We help our bodies fight disease by building resistance and immunity. Similarly, though there is no immunization for stress, we can increase resilience by giving children skills and experiences that build social-emotional development and problem solving abilities that help them manage when emotions are high. When children eat healthy and exercise, they build strength to ward off physical illness. Raising children in an environment where they feel safe emotionally and physically builds their ability to be strong, adjust, and bounce back when bad things happen. By helping children identify feelings and manage emotions instead of denying or criticizing them, we help them build the social and emotional skills they need.

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– best mastered through practice. Using the earlier analogy, this is like our bodies building resistance to common illnesses by being exposed to germs and fighting them off, leaving the body with heroic antibodies to fight that disease. The more often the body is exposed and conquers that illness, the better it gets at recognizing it and dealing with it. Experiencing frustration and even failure can help children be ready to “try, try again.” Parents and teachers help when they gently push young people to challenge themselves beyond their intellectual, emotional, social, and physical comfort zones. With the adult’s support and encouragement as they take risks, children can experience the feeling of learning from experiences and coming out on the other side, knowing the adult has their back.

Build strong, positive relationships • Listen! People won’t care how much you know until they know how much you care. • Slow down – in your actions and communications with children. • Choose your moments; relationship-building happens during caregiving, conflict, and transitions. BE the person you want to SEE. Create a supportive environment that is emotionally safe • Model compassion • Don’t deny feelings (DO “You’re mad. I hear you.” DON’T “Stop it, it’s no big deal.”) • Focus on strengths (“I know you’ll do it when you’re ready.” Even if there is a consequence.) • Provide consistent routines, plan for transitions – especially those that are tough (“We’ll have to leave the play room in a minute. Remember you wanted to get a cracker for the ride home.”) • Take the time to identify feelings and talk about how you, your child, and others might respond (“When I get mad, I really have to be by myself for a minute.”)

Of course, parents need support, too! Strengthening families, a project of the Center for the Study of Social Policy (cssp.org), outlines Five Protective Factors for parents and communities: 1.

Parent Resilience – getting support and having the ability to cope with and bounce back from their own problems and challenges;

2.

Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development – having accurate and relevant information about their child’s development and appropriate expectations for their behavior;

3.

Social and Emotional Competence – modeling positive interactions, self-regulation, and effective communication through the parent-child relationship;

4.

Social Connections - maintaining connections with friends, family, and neighbors to build networks around childrearing and get assistance and resources;

5.

Concrete Support in Times of Need – helping ensure the basic needs of a family are met is a social responsibility; parents need access to services that reduce the stress of difficult situations and crisis.

Do it for yourself and your family. Do it for your community. With children and their caregivers in mind, we can create environments where everyone thrives and has what they need to roll with the punches.

The Parenting Center at Children’s Hospital 504.896.9591 chnola.org/ParentingCenter

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january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

Resilience also incorporates attributes like grit, persistence, initiative, and determination

For an environment that supports positive socialemotional development:

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SPOT LIGHT usband n, and h (l-r) Susa , Emily in m h Benja it ry w e n y and Hen Dwa

Sus a firs n, hold t tim in e at g Hen ry two mo for the nth s ol d.

Henry’s Heart By Erin Cohn, Edit Intern, NOLA Family

| january/february 2019 www.nolafamily.com

WHO GOT THE BABY IN THE KING CAKE? Written and Illustrated by Johnette Downing

A New Orleans multi-award winning musician, singer and author presenting Louisiana Roots concerts and author visits for children, as well as keynotes and workshops for educators globally, Johnette is dedicated to celebrating childhood, nurturing cultural exchanges and fostering literacy through her music and books. Downing has garnered multiple awards including a 2017 Louisiana Writer Award, 59th Grammy Award Participant, eight Parents’ Choice Awards, and many more. She has written and illustrated dozens of books for children.

THE LITTLE FLOAT THAT COULD On February 8, 2019, Henry’s Hearts is hosting a Mardi Gras Masquerade Gala. Held at Deutsches Haus, the gala boasts a silent auction, food from local restaurants, a live band, and an open bar. All proceeds will benefit pediatric heart patients and their families. Tickets (must be 21 or over) and sponsorships can be purchased at hhg2019.brownpapertickets.com.

Written and Illustrated by Yvonne Spear Perret The big day has arrived, and the youngest riders in the Mardi Gras Day parade are ready to share their beads and trinkets with the children of New Orleans. But as they prepare to start the parade, their float falters and breaks a wheel. Will the children be able to work together to bring the magic of Mardi Gras to the Crescent City? In this Louisiana adaptation of The Little Engine That Could, the children must work together and ask for assistance from other floats as they try to celebrate the spirit of the day. Perret captures the hopes and fears of the children as they prove that even the smallest riders can have the biggest spirit. The illustrations add the glittering sights of the season through bright decoration, highlighting the traditional Carnival colors of purple, green, and gold. The book is completed with a glossary of Carnival- and costume-themed terms.

About Yvonne A graduate of Tulane University, Perret taught at St. Joseph Academy, St. Angela Merici and Mount Carmel Academy. She retired in 2008 from Isidore Newman School in New Orleans after 13 years. While at Newman, Perret taught math and English and also served as interim principal of the high school from 2007-08. She is also the author of Simon of New Orleans and Yat Wit - Chicken Gumbo for the New Orleans Soul.

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These local authors have made tremendous contributions to books and music that celebrate New Orleans and Louisiana.

About Johnette

Susan and her husband, Dwayne, were told to pray for a miracle. Despite grim odds, Henry’s 13-hour surgery was a success, and on July 12, after 77 days apart, Henry and Benjamin were reunited. The following day, Henry went home.

In the six years since the Foundation began, Henry and his siblings have been able to present 70 grant checks to families in need, amounting to a total of $100,000. Of course, their work is far from over!

Celebrating Mardi Gras! Great books for little kids and young readers.

Based on a song from Johnette Downing’s new album Swamp Romp, A Louisiana Dance Party for Children, this rhythmic original story celebrates king cake, the culinary centerpiece of New Orleans Mardi Gras. Believed to have originated in twelfth-century France, the king cake is an homage to the wise men or three kings. At king cake parties in New Orleans, usually hosted before Mardi Gras parades, you will hear locals ask, “Who got the baby in the king cake?” Beautiful, colorful, cut fabric illustrations accompany this joyous book designed to entertain and educate kids of all ages. Written and illustrated by Johnette Downing.

When Susan Aucoin was 29 weeks pregnant, she was told that she had twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome– a rare disease of the placenta that only affects identical twin pregnancies. Susan’s OB sent her to a specialist who discovered a congenital defect in one of the twins; that baby would have to have open-heart surgery soon after birth. When Henry and Benjamin were born on April 27, 2009, Henry was immediately taken to the NICU. After numerous complications, Henry’s first open-heart surgery was scheduled for May 15. At 4 ½ pounds Henry was the smallest baby his surgeons had ever performed this procedure on–his heart was about the size of a quarter.

Since Henry’s first night in the hospital, Susan wanted to do something to help other pediatric heart patients and their families traveling to New Orleans for treatment. Even though she was the owner of a monogram business, employed part-time at Collins Pediatrics and mom to three small children, Susan was determined. Upon hearing Susan’s idea, Dwayne got on board. In 2013 the Henry Aucoin Foundation was established in honor of their son, Henry. The Foundation’s goal is to raise money for the American Heart Association through Team Henry during the New Orleans Heart Walk every November, as well as to raise funds for grants through Henry’s Hearts galas throughout the year. The grants help families that are under a financial burden due to surgery, procedures, medications, equipment, and travel expenses. Looking to the future, Susan hopes that the grants could eventually provide a transportation van for patients as well as fund ‘Henry’s House’, a place where patients and their families could live while receiving treatment in New Orleans, so they don’t need to live in hotel rooms.

KEEPING IT LOCAL

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In The Know

We have complete listings on our dedicated ‘classes’ calendarjust go to nolafamily.com and click on ‘Calendars’.

East Jefferson General Hospital For more information or to register, call EJGH Health Finder at 504.456.5000.

Baby Basics Basic infant care, including feeding, sleeping, bathing, safety and more. Jan. 14, 6-8 pm. FREE.

Infant CPR Non-certifying program teaches how to give CPR to an infant. Jan. 9, 6-7 pm. $15.

Breastfeeding Class Focus on basics of breastfeeding. Jan. 15, 6-8 pm. FREE.

Breastfeeding Class Helps families achieve a successful breastfeeding experience in hospital and home. Feb. 5, 6:30-9 pm. FREE.

Touro Family Birthing Center

Louisiana State Police - Troop B Child Safety Seat Inspection Station 2101 I-10 Service Road, Kenner. Every Wednesday, 1-4 pm. Walk in or call 504.471.2780 for an appointment. FREE.

For more information or to register, call 504.897.7319 or visit touro.com/events.

Baby Food Making Learn the basics of baby food, including when and how to introduce solids. Jan. 7, 6-7:30 pm. FREE.

Louisiana State Police - Troop L

Kohl’s Happiest Baby on the Block Learn to turn on a baby’s “calm reflex.” Jan. 12 and Feb. 9, 10 am-noon. Feb. 11, 6-8 pm. FREE.

Child Safety Seat Inspection Station 2600 No. Causeway, Mandeville. Every Tuesday, 3-6 pm. Walk in or call 504.893.6250 for an appointment. FREE.

Prenatal Breastfeeding Class For moms who already know they want to breastfeed and moms who want to know more. Jan. 17 and Feb. 21, 6-8 pm. FREE.

Ochsner Medical Center – Baptist Registration is required for all classes. Visit ochsner.org/baptistclasses.

Grandparenting 101 Learn how to best support your children as new parents. Jan. 23, 6-7 pm. FREE.

Happiest Baby on the Block Learn techniques to calm and soothe a crying baby. Jan. 2 and Feb. 6, 6-7:30 pm. $25.

Infant/Child CPR Training Learn the basic technique of CPR and relief of choking. Jan. 24 and Feb. 28, 6-7:30 pm. FREE.

Breastfeeding Class Covers the basics of breastfeeding. Jan. 7 and Feb. 4, 7- 8:30 pm. FREE.

Diapers to Desk Equips new moms with confidence and support needed to return to work from maternity leave. Jan. 29, 9:30-11 am.

Grandparents Class Learn the latest trends to help support your children. Jan. 10 and Feb. 21, 6:30-8:30 pm. FREE. Prenatal Refresher Class Reviews key points concerning labor, birth, and the newborn baby. Jan. 17, 6:30-8:30 pm. FREE. To register, call 504.464.8365.

Breastfeeding Class Discuss techniques and recommendations for new mothers. Jan. 16, 6-8 pm. Baby Care Basics Basic baby care, normal behavior, comforting baby and how to keep baby safe. Jan. 23 and Feb. 20, 6-8 pm. Breastfeeding Class in Spanish Feb. 21, 11 am-12:30 pm.

Ochsner Medical Center – West Bank Campus Registration is required for all classes. Email familyunitwb@ochsner.org or call 504.391.5529.

West Jefferson Medical Center Most classes are free, unless otherwise noted. Registration is required. Call 504.349.6200.

ABC’s of Breastfeeding Discusses basics and concerns. Jan. 8 and Feb. 5, 7-9:30 pm. Family and Friends CPR Basic introduction course. Jan. 22 and Feb. 19, 7-9:30 pm. $15/person, $25/couple. Grammy-Mommy-Me Breakfast discussion for mom to be and grandmas to be on “what’s new?” Jan. 26. $25/ couple. Caring For Your Newborn Registered nurse discusses newborn behavior and care. Jan. 26 and Feb. 23, 1-4:30 pm. FREE.

East Jefferson General Hospital See previous for registration information.

It’s Great to be a Girl! For girls ages 9-12, seminar includes an informal discussion on self-esteem, selfcare, puberty and communication. $20/ person. 6:30-8:30 pm.

Ochsner Medical Center – Baptist See previous for registration information.

Sibling Class For ages 3-10, prepares sibling(s) for their new brother or sister. Jan. 14 and Feb. 11, 5:30-6:30 pm. FREE.

Ochsner Medical Center – West Bank Campus See previous for registration information.

Sibling Class For ages 3-11, prepares sibling(s) for their new brother or sister. Feb. 23, 9:3010:30 am. FREE. Safe Sitter Ages 11-13 will learn safe and nurturing child care techniques, behavior, and appropriate responses to medical emergencies. Jan. 3-4, 9 am-2 pm. $75/2day class.

t u o b A & t Ou JANUARY 1 TUES

Mercedes-Benz Superdome. Featuring the champions of the Big 12 and the SEC. Tickets available at ticketmaster.com. Kickoff at 7:45 pm.

See listing above for registration information.

West Jefferson Medical Center See previous for registration information.

Siblings T.L.C. Ages 3 and older. Prepares sibling for arrival of mom’s new baby. Jan. 12 and Feb. 9, 2:30 pm. Mother-Daughter Rap Breakfast discussion for mothers and pre-teen girls. Feb. 12, 9-11 am. $25/ couple.

City Park, 1 Palm Dr. Join City Park for this New Orleans holiday tradition with 25 acres of lights in the New Orleans Botanical Garden, Carousel Gardens Amusement Park and Storyland. Visitors can also ride the antique carousel and holiday train. $10. 6-10 pm.

ALLSTATE Sugar Bowl

Touro Family Birthing Center

Sibling Class For children 4-11, children learn what to expect when a new baby enters the family. Jan. 19, 9-10:30 am.

Celebration in the Oaks

New Year's Day The Polar Exp ress Train Ride Union Passenger Terminal. Each ticket includes fantastic entertainment, delicious hot chocolate, a scrumptious cookie, and a keepsake sleigh bell to bring home. Families are encouraged to wear their pajamas for the ride! $50/adult, $40/child. Times vary, visit nolathepolarexpressride. com/scheduling-tickets/ for more information.

5 SAT

Home Depot Kids: Easel w ith Whiteboard Home Depot, various locations. All kids get to keep their craft, receive a FREE certificate of achievement, a workshop apron, and a commemorative pin. Visit homedepot.com/workshops to register. 9 am-12 pm.

4 FRI

Wizard World New Orleans

Seedlings

Ernest N. Morial Convention Center. Fans will be on hand to celebrate movies, comics, cosplay, video gaming, television, original art, collectibles, contests and more. Kids 10 and under are free. Ticket prices vary. For more information, visit wizardworld.com/comiccon/new-orleans. Continues through Jan. 6.

Longue Vue House & Gardens. Through self-guided activities, kids engage in seed planting, art-making, insect observation, story time, and more! Play, learn, and grow as you and your Seedling explorer investigate new ideas and make new friends. $5/non-members, free for members. 9:30-10:30 am.

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

Ochsner Medical Center – Kenner

Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby An informative class on nutrition and wellness for expectant and new mothers. Feb. 6, 6-8 pm. FREE.

KIDS & TWEENS

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The OWEL Project Workshop Maison Lafitte, 402 Lafitte Street, Mandeville. A LIVE workshop featuring classes for girls ages 12-22 on real-life applications. For more information, visit theowelproject.com. $75. 9:30 am-4 pm.

Freret Market

play. All ages. For more information, visit nojcc.org/kickingforkids2019. $200/team (all walking) or $240/team (with one golf cart). 12:30-3:30 pm.

8 TUES

Kicking for Kids Family Footgolf Tou rnament

Culinary Kids, 915 Marigny Ave., Mandeville. Drop off the kids for a 3-hour, moviethemed dinner/dessert/pajama party. Kids bring blankets and pillows for carpet time and enjoy a mini cooking class as they make their dinner, desserts and snacks with our teachers! Ages 5-12. Movie and menu TBD. Reservations required. $35/ child. 6-9 pm. Continued on Jan. 25.

Little Acorns

Toddler Social Club New Orleans JCC, Uptown. Little ones have the chance to play with parents and friends. Toddler Social Club is a free member event open to all children ages birth to 5 years old and their parents. For more information, visit nojcc.org. 9:30-11 am.

15 TUES

Justin Timberlake Smoothie King Center. Sing along with Justin Timberlake on his The Man Of The Woods Tour. Tickets available at ticketmaster.com and vary by seat location. 7:30 pm.

New Orleans City Park. For children ages 18 months to 4 years. Join for storytime, activities, and a healthy snack. To register or for more details, contact Lindsay at nobgeducation@nocp.org. $3/child; adult chaperone required at no cost. 10-11 am.

live by the LPO. For more information, visis lpomusic.com. Ticket prices starting at $10. 7:30 pm.

21 MON

19 SAT

Girl Scout Day National WWII Museum. All levels of Girl Scouts and their families are invited to join for the annual Girl Scout Day. Uniformed Girl Scout: FREE, Non-Scout children: $5/child, Adults with Girl Scouts: $10. 10 am-2 pm.

Jaws - In Concert Mahalia Jackson Theater. Watch Steven Spielberg’s thrilling masterpiece while John Williams’s iconic score is performed

Martin Luther King, Jr . Day Free Admittance to All National Parks All national parks across the country will waive entrance fees today in commemoration of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Visit nps.gov/planyourvisit/fee-freeparks.htm to learn more.

www.nolafamily.com

The Saenger Theatre. Set against the backdrop of 19th-century France, Les Misérables tells an enthralling story of broken dreams and unrequited love, passion, sacrifice, and redemption–a timeless testament to the survival of the human spirit. Ticket prices vary. For more information, visit saengernola.com. Continues through Jan. 13.

Parents' Night Out

16 WED

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| january/february 2019

New Orleans JCC, Uptown. Join for the inaugural Kicking for Kids Footgolf tournament. Proceeds go towards scholarships for the New Orleans JCC’s Maccabi team. No experience is required to

Les Miserables

13 SUN

Battle of New Orleans Anniversary at Chalmette Battlefield Chalmette Battlefield. Return to the War of 1812 with cannons, campfires, and British and American troops and civilians. The sights and sounds of the Battle of New Orleans will come to life through period craft demonstrations, music, hands-on activities, cannon and musket firings, and more. FREE. 9 am.

Freret Street and Napoleon Ave. The market is split up along three category lines: food, art, and flea. Besides all of the great shopping every week, the market also hosts local restaurants serving up their unique cuisine, live music, and a kids area. Free admission. 11 am-4 pm.

6 SUN

11 FRI

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23 WED

Dimensions in Blue, USAF Band of the West New Orleans Jazz Museum. Based at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, this jazz component of the USAF Band of the West is touring the region and stop in New Orleans for this program. Free Admission. 2-3 pm.

Cub Scout, Boy Scout, and Scouts BSA Day National WWII Museum. All levels of Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, and Scouts BSA along with their families are invited to join for the annual Scout Day. Uniformed Scouts: FREE, Non-Scout children: $5/child, Adults with Scouts: $10. 10 am-2 pm.

Champions Square. Spend the day sampling Louisiana’s finest King Cakes from the greatest bakers in the area. Free admission. 10 am.

New Orleans JCC Sock Hop

Roussel Hall, 6363 St. Charles Ave. Join as the LPO dives into Mardi Gras with Saint-Saens’s classic Carnival of the Animals with a New Orleans twist. Arrive 45 minutes prior to the concert to interact with musicians and their instruments. Free for children ages 15 and under. Ticket prices vary. 2:30 pm.

Freret Street and Napoleon Ave. The market is split up along three category lines: food, art, and flea. Besides all of the great shopping every week, the market also hosts local restaurants serving up their unique cuisine, live music, and a kids area. Free admission. 11 am-4 pm.

3 SUN

Groundhog Day Br ickUniverse New Orleans LEGO Expo Pontchartrain Convention & Civic Center. Experience hands-on LEGO attractions and activities built to inspire, educate, and entertain. This fun, family-friendly event will have tons of amazing LEGO creations to gawk at, building zones to unleash your creative energy, and vendors selling the latest LEGO sets, mini-figures, and accessories. For more information, visit brickuniverse.com. $15/ticket purchased online, $18/ticket purchased at door. 10 am-4 pm. Continues on Feb. 3.

Uptown Classic 5K & Family Fun Run Audubon Park. Have fun at the JCC’s 7th annual Uptown Classic 5K & Family Fun Run. The post-race party includes food and entertainment. Prizes will be awarded in each age group, and the grand prize for the top male and female finisher is a one-year gold membership at the JCC. Register at nolarunning.com. 8:30 am-12 pm.

8 FRI

Tet Fest: Vietnamese New Year Mary Queen of Vietnam Church, 14011 Dwyer Blvd. Fest-goers will enjoy authentic Vietnamese foods, family-friendly activities, and both daytime and nighttime performances of traditional music and dancing. The weekend will kick off with an assortment of activities and games. A firework show and dragon dance are scheduled for Friday and Saturday night. Tet Festival is a free festival open to all. Continues through Feb. 10.

Parents' Night Out Culinary Kids, 915 Marigny Ave., Mandeville. Drop off the kids for a 3-hour, moviethemed dinner/dessert/pajama party. Kids bring blankets and pillows for carpet time and enjoy a mini cooking class as they make their dinner, desserts and snacks with our teachers! Ages 5-12. Movie and menu TBD. Reservations required. $35/ child. 6-9 pm. Continues on Feb. 22.

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New Orleans JCC, Uptown. Open to young dancers in grades 5, 6 and 7. Each dance features a live DJ and a snack bar stocked with soda, candy, pickles, and popcorn for sale. $10 member/$14 non-member. 7:30-10 pm.

Family Concert: It's Carnival Time !

Freret Market

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| january/february 2019

Longue Vue House & Gardens. Unwind and grow as you and your little Sprout investigate plants, animals, crafts, stories, and songs that foster holistic early childhood development! $5/non-members, free for members. 9:30-10:30 am.

FEBRUARY 2 SAT

King Cake Festival

26 SAT

Sp routs

27 SUN

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10 SUN

14 THURS

Jefferson SPCA Pet Fest

Henry's Hearts Gala Deutsches Haus, 1700 Moss St. Annual gala to benefit pediatric heart patients & their families. 21 or older event. For more information, visit henryaucoinfoundation.org. 7 pmmidnight.

Dreamgirls

12 TUES

Wizard of Oz

Valentine's Day16 SAT

Get Yah Praise On Audubon Zoo. The 10th Annual Get Yah Praise On at Audubon Zoo is a hand clapping, foot stomping good time for the entire family and features a great gospel music showcase with a soul-stirring lineup of local and regional gospel performers. Included with Zoo admission and complimentary for Audubon members. 11 am-4 pm.

City Park Pavilion of the Two Sisters. Guests are invited to stroll the grounds, dance in the ballroom to a live DJ, enjoy hor d’oeuvres and desserts, create their own Mardi Gras mask craft, and second line with the princesses. $50/person. Infants under the age of one are free. For more information, visit petiteprincesscompany.com. 4-6 pm.

Little Acorns New Orleans City Park. For children ages 18 months to 4 years. Join for storytime, activities, and a healthy snack. To register or for more details, contact Lindsay at nobgeducation@nocp.org. $3/child; adult chaperone required at no cost. 10-11 am.

22 FRI

18 MON

parades, New Orleans cuisine, local art at the Art Market, a Kids’ Court with face painting and interactive games, and free outdoor concerts. Enjoy the parades rolling directly next to the Family Gras festivities including the Krewe of Excalibur on Friday evening, the Krewe of Caesar on Saturday evening and the Krewe of Kings on Sunday evening. Free admission. Continues through Feb. 24.

23 SAT

New Orleans JCC Sock Hop New Orleans JCC, Uptown. Open to young dancers in grades 5, 6 and 7. Each dance features a live DJ and a snack bar stocked with soda, candy, pickles, and popcorn for sale. $10 member/$14 non-member. 7:30-10 pm.

Family Gras Presidents' Day

Clearview Center, 4436 Veterans Memorial Boulevard, Metairie. Bring the kids to enjoy the traditional spectacle of Mardi Gras

www.nolafamily.com

The Saenger Theatre. This production of The Wizard of Oz is a spectacular celebration of that classic 1939 MGM film. It’s a new, refreshed and lavish rendition of the beloved classic. Ticket prices vary. For more information, visit saengernola.com. Continues through Feb. 13. 7:30 pm.

Children's Mardi Gras Pr incess Ball

20 WED

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

| january/february 2019

Jefferson Performing Arts Center. DREAMGIRLS follows the story of a black, all-girl singing trio from Chicago called “The Dreams” and the behind-the-scenes reality of the entertainment industry. For more information, visit jpas.org. Tickets start at $20. Continues with weekend performances through Feb. 24.

Lafreniere Park, 3000 Downs Blvd., Metairie. Pet Fest had to be rescheduled due to rain on Nov. 25, 2018. Admission is free to this mega pet event that will feature an Adopt-AThon with more than 40 shelter and rescue groups offering hundreds of adoptable pets. Attendees will also find a Pet Health Watch area, costume contest presented by Pet Krewe, raffle, Pet Marketplace, delicious local cuisine and live entertainment. 10 am-4 pm.

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Ongoing Toddler Time

Free Wednesdays

BYO(B)aby

Louisiana’s Children Museum. The museum hosts activities for children ages 3 and under and their parents or caregivers every Monday-Friday. $10 admission, free for members. 10 am.

New Orleans Botanical Garden. Free admission for Louisiana residents, courtesy of the Helis Foundation. 10 am-5 pm.

The Broad Theater, 636 N. Broad St. Weekly Thursday matinees for young infants and their parents. The theater partners with Asuka to offer sushi rolls for sale. 11 am.

Free Wednesdays

Free for children and students through 12th grade

New Orleans Museum of Art. Free admission for Louisiana residents, courtesy of The Helis Foundation. 10 am-6 pm.

Contemporary Arts Center. Free admission at all times, courtesy of the Helis Foundation. 11 am-5 pm.

Drop In & Play

Museum Highlights Tour New Orleans Museum of Art. Take an engaging and informative tour every Tuesday of the museum’s permanent collection and special exhibitions. Included with museum admission. For more information, call 504.658.4100. 1-2 pm.

Rosa F. Keller Library. Meet new friends, and share Lego Duplo, Play-Doh, and puzzles with your child. Ages 1-5. Thursdays, 10 am-noon.

Free Thursdays Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Free admission for Louisiana residents, courtesy of The Helis Foundation. 10 am-5 pm.

Ogden After Hours Ogden Museum of Southern Art. The weekly music series is held every Thursday night for all ages and includes a children’s art activity. For more information, call 504.539.9650. 5-8 pm.

Drop In & Play Milton H. Latter Memorial Library. Meet new friends, and share Lego Duplo, Play-Doh, and puzzles with your child. Ages 1-5. Fridays, 10 am-noon.

Free Sundays Contemporary Arts Center. Free admission to all Louisiana residents, courtesy of The Helis Foundation. 11 am-5 pm.

Storytimes & Other Activities New Orleans Public Library For more information and a complete listing of activities, visit nolalibrary.org/events

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Alvar Tuesdays at 11 am (toddlers) Central City Tuesdays at 10 am (ages 3-5); and, first & third Monday of the month at 5:30 pm (with craft) Children’s Resource Center Wednesdays at 10:30 am; first & third Monday of the month at 4:30 pm (with craft); second Monday of the month (English & Spanish, with craft); second Saturday of the month at 11 am (Lego club); and, fourth Monday of the month at 4:30 pm (French, with craft) East New Orleans Regional Tuesdays at 5 pm (with craft, ages 2-8); and, Wednesday at 4:30 pm (Lego club, ages 3 & older)

Rosa F. Keller Mondays at 11 am (ages 2 and under) & Saturdays at 11 am (ages 3-5); and, second Thursday of the month at 6 pm (Reading with Rover) Martin Luther King Tuesday at 3:30 pm (after-school family) and Thursdays at 3:30 pm (Mixin’ It Up)

Norman Mayer (Gentilly) Wednesdays at 10:30 am (baby & toddler); and, first and third Saturday of the month at 10 am (Sewing Class, girls ages 13-17) Robert E. Smith (Lakeview) Thursdays at 11 am (ages 5 and under; and, Saturdays at 3 pm (Lego Club)

Mornings with Mommy Barnes & Noble, Metairie. Free. Tuesdays at 11 am.

Storytime Pottery Barn Kids, Lakeside Shopping Center, Metairie. Free. Tuesdays at 11 am.

Milton H. Latter Tuesdays & Saturdays at 10:30 am

Storytime

Main Library Thursdays at 1:30 pm & Saturdays at 1 pm (with craft for ages 7 and under)

Storytime

Mid-City Thursdays at 11 am; and third Monday of the month at 6 pm (Family Story) Nix Library Wednesday at 5:30 pm (ages 2-7)

Barnes & Noble, Metairie, Westbank & Mandeville. Free. Saturdays at 11 am. Louisiana Children’s Museum. Included with general admission, $10; free for members and children younger than 12 months. Weekdays through Saturdays at 10:30 am.

january/february 2019 | www.nolafamily.com

| january/february 2019

Algiers Regional Tuesdays at 10:30 am & Saturdays at 2:30 pm (ages 5 and up); first & third Tuesday of month at 4 pm (Teen Game Day), and, second & fourth Monday of the month at 5 pm (Lego Club, ages 8-14)

Cita Dennis Hubbell Tuesdays & Thursdays at 10:30 am; Saturdays at 10:30 am & 2 pm (Saturday Movies), and, Mondays through Thursdays at 4:30 pm (Drop-in Homework Help)

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www.nolafamily.com

| january/february 2019

Profile for nola family mag & nola boomers mag

Nola Family Magazine January/February 2019  

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