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nola family Parent Fearlessly

September 2021

Bonding with Grandparents College Bound Everything You Need to Know

School Spirit

+Enrichment Programs


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www.nolafamily.com | september 2021


september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

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nola family CONTENTS SEPTEMBER 2021

ON THE COVER Claire R., 5, kindergartener at International School of Louisiana. Photographed by Twirl Photography.

A FEW WORDS

EDUCATION & GUIDANCE

IN EACH ISSUE

6 From the Publisher

10 Financial Lessons Building Credit

8 From The Bookshelf

12 Parenting Corner Family Transitions

14 Hip Grannie Fashionista

16 Wiggle Room Strategies for Middle Schoolers

38 Spotlight Glass Half Full

with Varied Learning Needs to Start the School Year Off Right

39 Gear to Get Back to School

FEATURES 18 A Life Full of Firsts 18 College Bound 19 Prep for the Future 19 Choosing a College 20 Plan a Tour www.nolafamily.com | september 2021

20 What’s a FAFSA?

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21 Start Saving 21 ACT/SAT Scores 24 Fostering Your Children’s Important Bond with Their Grandparents

Get Ready for School with the Library

40 Mom About Town Sarah McCall 43 Out & About What, When, Where: Virtual, On-Going, and Special Happenings

46 In the Know Classes and Family Support Resources


Founder ANN BOWER HERREN Publisher BRANDON FOREMAN

Contributors ROBERT BAER is a Vice President at Fidelity Bank. He coordinates Fidelity’s Financial Literacy initiative.

Associate Publisher AMY L. FOREMAN Editorial AMANDA MILLER Managing Editor EMILY DREZ Assistant Editor

SARAH BATROUS ANTHONY BUI Editorial Interns

Art/Production MELODY TAUZIN ALEX HERRING Graphic Designers

MADDIE SOILEAU

KIMBERLY BRADLEY , a pediatric occupational therapist, writes the “Wiggle Room’’ column. She owns Kim4Kids in Metairie and can be reached at 504.517.5437; kim4kidsnola.com.

LAURA CLAVERIE is Nola Family’s Hip Grannie. She is a local mother,

grandmother, and writer.

SHUKRANI GRAY is the African American Resource Collection, Equity, and Inclusion Librarian at the New Orleans Public Library.

Multimedia Specialist

TWIRL PHOTOGRAPHY Contributing Photography

Advertising/Marketing LAURIE ACOSTA Director of Sales

LISA PHILLIPS , a licensed social worker and parent educator at The Parenting Center at Children’s Hospital, is a contributor to the award-winning “Parenting Corner” column. She can be reached at 504.896.9591; chnola.org/ parentingcenter.

KRISTEN RENFROW Account Executive

EMILY MANCUSO Marketing Specialist

Business Operations JENNY ZIGLIN Office Manager

TERI HODGES Director of Community Partnerships

ROXANE VOORHIES Community Outreach

For reprint information, contact

jenny@nolafamily.com Business Office:

One Galleria Blvd., Ste. 1900 Metairie, LA 70001

Macaluso Orthodontics’ address was misprinted in a previous issue. The correct address is: Macaluso Orthodontics 3333 Kingman St., Ste. 200, Metairie, LA 70006 504.884.4327 info@macorthodontics.com

A publication of  

September 2021 volume 15, issue  6

NOLY FAMILY is published monthly by FAMILY RESOURCE GROUP INC. and distributed free of charge. Subscriptions accepted. Only authorized distributors may deliver and pick up the magazine. We reserve the right to edit, reject, or comment editorially on all materials contributed. We cannot be responsible for the return of any unsolicited material. NOLY FAMILY Copyright © 2021. All rights reserved.Reproduction in whole or part without written permission prohibited.

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504.866.0555

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FROM THE PUBLISHER

Adulting is Hard School is back in session and the majority of the learning is in person. I know with the recent COVID numbers, we are all wondering if this will remain in effect. Fingers crossed, we do. The children need this social interaction to develop and also to get back to a routine. I know I am finally starting to get some normalcy to my family’s routine. After-school activities are in full swing and my work schedule is changing to accommodate all that they do. This year, my twin boys are in second grade and my daughter is in eighth grade. My daughter came home from dance class last night and was determined to win her Life 101 game that is required for school. This web-based game is supposed to teach them financial literacy. I am 100 percent on board with this game! The first topic is budgeting and the goal is to save $2,000 for college. Can I tell you, I have not laughed that hard in a while? “Why does it cost so much for an apartment?” “Stop making me buy food, I just bought food.” “How is it time to pay rent again?” “I am just going to not pay my phone bill; that is too expensive.” “I got a job cleaning toilets; it pays $45.” Eventually, she said: Her: I got a $5 per hour raise! Me: That is not a realistic expectation. Most people get 2 percent raises. How much are they paying you? Her: I don’t know! Me: Well, look at your pay stub. Her: I don’t have a pay stub. These were just a few of her questions and remarks. Of course, I had my responses, but I kept repeating the same one. Do you now see why we give you chores? Anyhow, she made it to her goal of saving $2,000 for college. She was so proud of herself. The final question was: What did you learn? She told me her first two responses, and of course, I asked, well what did you learn this time? Her response: Adulting is hard. I was laughing so hard I had tears rolling down my face.

www.nolafamily.com | september 2021

Having activities like these helps immerse our children into the real world. Encouraging your child to take part in after-school activities will also benefit him in a variety of ways and help him prepare for college and future success.

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This issue, we’ve pulled together resources and tips to steer you on the right path in making tough college decisions with your future freshman. Getting a game plan ahead of time is so important, and we are happy we are here to help.

Amy L. Foreman Associate Publisher


september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

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FROM THE BOOKSHELF

GE T R E ADY FOR S CHOOL

WITH T H E L IB R ARY

Going back to school after summer break stirs up a variety of emotions for both children and parents. Students are excited to start a new year, while parents feel stressed about getting all the needed supplies. 2021 has the added uncertainty of returning to school after being virtual for so long. You can help gear yourself and your family towards a successful school year by getting to know your local Library. As the African American Resource Collection, Equity and Inclusion Librarian, I’d like to recommend several resources the New Orleans Public Library offers to provide students and parents with support for a successful school year.

Homework Help Your Library card gives you access to live online tutors! You can utilize HomeworkLA Live from 2 p.m. to midnight, seven days a week. This wonderful resource also provides self-study tools, skill builders, and homework help for K-basic college level skills. Library cardholders can also use the online Writing Center, Career Center, and Adult Education Center.

Homework e-Resources One of the biggest barriers is not having the materials to complete assignments. We’ve created a plethora of online resources just for students. Britannica e-Books offers hundreds of full color and black and white non-fiction downloadable e-books for ages preschool to 18. Our Library also offers World Book Online Encyclopedia, the children’s version of the World Book Encyclopedia.

Test Prep

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It is never too soon to start thinking about test prep. Our online resources are a good place to start for both school-aged children and adults. Learning Express can help people improve their scores on academic, civil service, military, and professional licensing and certification exams, including the PSAT, SAT, GED replacement, TASC tests, and other exams. There is also a special section for Adult Core Skills to help improve your basic math skills, help to become a better reader, and improve your writing, speaking, and grammar skills. The Adult Core Skills also has a section to prepare for your citizenship exam. This section includes a citizenship test practice, citizenship e-books, articles, and flashcards in English and in Spanish.

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Resource Lists You may be thinking about getting school supplies for the beginning of the school year, but you need homework resources throughout the year. Our librarians have created several subject matter related resource lists for parents and for students. The category-specific resource lists provide reading lists, library resources, e-resources and other helpful information in the following areas: · Art · English Language Acquisition (ELA) · Information Literacy · Math · Music · Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) · Science · U.S. History · World History You can go to homework.nolalibrary.org to find a comprehensive list of all the homework resources you have access to for free with your New Orleans Public Library card. If you are interested in getting a Library card, contact your closest location or visit our website.

Shukrani Gray is the African American Resource Collection, Equity, and Inclusion Librarian at the New Orleans Public Library.


september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

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FINANCIAL LESSONS

BUILDING CREDIT YOU’LL WANT TO START EARLY It’s never too early to start talking to your child about managing money and ensuring they exhibit good money management habits. Explaining to them how you’re paying for items (writing a check, using a debit card, using a credit card) and how they work will help prepare them for when they have to start making those choices as they get older. These habits will also help them manage their credit history which can lead to better insurance rates and better interest rates and terms on loans, that may save them thousands of dollars over time. If you have a teenager, there are a number of ways you can help them establish credit, build a credit history, and set them up for financial success. They include:

EDUCATION

Spend time with your teen discussing both the positives of having good credit and the negatives of having poor credit. Talk with them about the types of loans you have, and how they work, how you decided on those loans, what went into applying for them, what the terms are and what factors impacted the rate you received (this could be positive or negative). Also talk about the negatives that can happen if you don’t make your payment on time, or don’t make any payments at all.

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GETTING A JOB

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Most credit card companies require their applicants to have a steady source of income in order to receive a credit card. Your child will also need a steady source of income to make the payments on the card as well. Allowances don’t count, and if you plan on making their payments for them, you may be setting them up for failure down the road.

OPEN A CHECKING AND SAVINGS ACCOUNT

Managing these accounts for a period of time will teach your teen the basics of

money management. They’ll also get comfortable with making deposits, tracking withdrawals, and adding interest earned on their Savings account, some of the same skills they’ll need when managing credit.

GET A DEBIT CARD

When your teen is ready, get them a Debit Card. This will help them gain some financial freedom while teaching them how to manage their money more effectively. Most financial institutions have accounts that do not allow you to overdraw the account. This will prevent your teen from overdrawing their account with a Debit Card purchase. It may be a little embarrassing for them, but they’ll definitely learn better money management habits if this happens.

SECURED CREDIT CARD

A secured card will give your teen the opportunity to learn how to use a Credit Card responsibly with little risk. The card requires a security deposit equal to the credit limit, typically $500. Let your teen manage the account by making purchases, payments and reviewing the monthly statements with you. These cards typically will convert to a non-secured card after a period of time if the account is managed responsibly. There are a number of other strategies you can use to start your teen down the road to managing their credit effectively. Just remember, you can, and should, play a significant role at the beginning of their credit journey to be sure they understand everything that is involved–both the good and the bad. They may not appreciate your involvement now, but trust me, when they start seeing the benefits later, they won’t be able to thank you enough.

Sponsored by Robert Baer is a Vice President at Fidelity Bank. He coordinates Fidelity’s Financial Literacy initiative.


september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

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PARENTING CORNER

Family Transitions

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When we reflect back upon our life as a parent, we often see our child as if in a movie montage, changing from a baby into a preschooler, heading off to elementary school, then high school and college. Sometimes it’s harder to see the changes in our parent-child relationship, even though it obviously adjusts as they grow and need different things from us. If your son or daughter is headed into their last year of high school, or has graduated and is going off to college, the military, or staying at home while going to school and/or working, congratulations! You have reached one of the Last Big Transitions of Parenthood.

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their own assignments or deadlines without parental nagging; learning some simple money management skills (not just using a parent’s credit card); and experience with how struggle sometimes can build resilience. Setbacks and even failures are important for learning what works and what does not. Being a supportive parent does not mean leaving a child floundering without any help, but it does mean resisting the urge to take over and thereby deprive an adolescent of the sense of competence necessary for living in a more independent environment.

The move from adolescence to young adulthood, like most transitions, does not happen overnight for children or their parents. We have all heard of having an “empty nest” when our last child leaves home, but many of us may not be familiar with the experience of “soiling the nest.” That phrase, while a bit distasteful, usually refers to a period during the last few weeks or months before college that can be bittersweet for families. There is excitement, apprehension, and some sadness. Conflict and tension may erupt when the teen, caught between desire for independence and ambivalence about leaving, seems more irritable, distant, and not particularly interested in your parting words of wisdom. Fortunately, this strain is usually short-lived, and best addressed by the parent not taking it too personally, while seeking out the support of friends who have experienced something similar with their own families. A sense of humor is highly recommended for this stage.

In the past decade, the rise of the smartphone has changed the level of communication between young adults and their parents. In previous generations, a weekly phone call may have been typical, but now frequent texts and calls may be more the norm. Psychologist Lisa Damour wrote a popular essay about how parents of young adults often feel stuck taking out their child’s “emotional trash,” a reference to that experience of frequently receiving an emotionally intense text or call that may leave parents feeling stressed about their child’s struggle of the moment, long after their child has moved on. When our children hand over their “trash” to us, they aren’t necessarily expecting us to solve their problems, but rather want a safe place to vent and find a sympathetic ear. Learning to listen for the difference between wanting advice versus emotional support can start with asking something like: “That sounds hard, honey, I’m sorry. What are you thinking about doing?,” rather than jumping in with a list of ways to solve the problem.

Whether your children are moving away or staying home, things will change as they segue way into young adulthood. If parents can move into more of a “coaching” role by the end of their child’s senior year in high school, rather than continuing to be more of a “director,” they will help prepare the teen for the increasing self-sufficiency he or she will need. Julie Lythcott-Haims’s wonderful book, How to Raise an Adult, suggests a list of skills necessary for 18 year olds to navigate the future, including: how to handle their own interpersonal problems, such as talking with unfamiliar adults (since they will soon be having conversations with professors, bosses, and health care providers without us there); managing

Of course, sometimes a young adult does need more concrete, direct help. In recent years, teens and college students have reported an increase in symptoms of anxiety and depression, and those numbers only increased during the pandemic. You know your child better than anyone, and if you feel something is drastically different in their behavior, help them find the resources and support available to them. Prevention is key, so when getting ready for the big move, discuss healthy coping skills that have served him or her well in the past. Providing a loving balance of independence and connection to our children will help them grow into the adults they seek to become.

Lisa Phillips, MSW, LMSW, has been a parent educator at The Parenting Center at Children’s Hospital since 2001 and is a regular contributor to the award-winning “Parenting Corner” column. She can be reached at 504.896.9591; chnola.org/parentingcenter.


september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

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HIP GRANNIE

Fashionista For most of her nearly 12 years, our granddaughter Amelia has been a fashionista. Even as a toddler, she wore her onesies and baby hats with a certain style and panache.

www.nolafamily.com | september 2021

As young as age three, one of Amelia’s favorite pastimes was to go into my closet, pull out a dress and a scarf. She’d find some earrings and a long forgotten necklace and then, the piece de resistance, she would find just the right shoes and purse. It was always a combination that I had never thought of, and dang, it was good. I was pretty sure that by the time she started PreK, Saks or Em’s would be calling her for advice.

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But there was one piece of clothing that Amelia lusted for, one thing she has often gone into my closet to try on to see if maybe, just maybe, this time they’d fit. Like Cinderella and the wicked stepsisters, she would zero in on shoes. Not just any shoes. She wanted my favorite red, kickass, Kate Spade backless pumps with the kitten heels and a “hello there” red leather bow. These Barbie-esque babies can take a little black dress and pearls out of the “Grandmother Claverie” look and into the “Even Grandmothers like to have fun” world. Imagine what they could do to a leggy 12 year old who really, really loves these shoes. In a moment of weakness, I once told her that when the shoes fit her feet, I’d give them to her. I meant it and I also thought she’d be around 17 years

old when that happened. I mean, how fast do a little girl’s feet grow? The answer: a lot faster than I thought. She’s almost there, ready to take on the world in my favorite naughty shoes. And she’s not yet a teenager. My dilemma is this: if I give my word, I keep my word. I just don’t want to give away my red shoes. I’m thinking of offering her a lend/lease or joint custody agreement. She can wear the shoes until she outgrows them, then I get them back. Or perhaps she can wear them around my house or hers, but not in public until she’s 18. She can wear them in public, but not to church. Ever. I had hoped that she would forget the shoes, but the other night at dinner, she mentioned that she was one-half a shoe size away from owning my red shoes. I shuffled in my seat and told her that she’d have to come over soon and try them on. As a prelude (or maybe distraction? Or peace offering?) I gave her my red leather cowgirl boots, hoping that would satisfy her. I even told her the boots were special because my mother bought them for me in a Houston boot store, so I knew they were authentic. She wasn’t impressed. So, the day will come when I wrap up my shoes and hand them over to the family fashionista. I’ll take comfort knowing that they will be in good hands, or feet, if you will. And from now on, whenever Amelia admires something of mine, I’ll keep my big mouth shut.

Laura Claverie is Nola Family’s Hip Grannie. She is a local mother, grandmother, and writer.


september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

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WIGGLE ROOM

STRATEGIES FOR MIDDLE SCHOOLERS WITH VARIED LEARNING NEEDS TO START THE SCHOOL YEAR OFF RIGHT Executive function (EF) is the ability of an individual to pay attention, plan, recall instructions, and handle multiple tasks effectively. EF also plays a huge part in time management, task initiation, organization, flexibility, self control, and perseverance. By the time a student is in middle school, having adequate executive function skills are not just an expectation, they are critical skills to have success in and out of the classroom.

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Many students with learning disabilities and varied learning needs will often have poor or limited executive function skills and can benefit from many types of adaptive and organizational strategies at home and at school. EF skills are malleable, which means they can be taught and improved with practice and repetition.

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It is crucial for an adult to assist setting up and reinforcing these strategies to make them successful, routine, and automatic. · Create a color code system for each subject. Use colored tape on the binding of all books, notebooks and workbooks and use a colored marker on the side pages. This allows the child to easily grab subjects when pulling out materials and will help ensure all materials are packed up for homework at the end of the school day.

· Follow this color code in their assignment pad and be sure each subject is listed in the same order every day to increase success for copying homework assignments down. Also, use Post-it flags or paper clips to easily find the current day or week in the assignment pad. Teach them to move paperclips or flags when necessary. · When using a binder, ensure the dividers have pockets for storage. Use the front and back parts of the binder for immediate needs, such as items to be signed and returned to school. Also, allow them to have an extra folder divider to store items such as drawings and non-academic related papers. · Use a checklist! Create a morning checklist for all items needed for school and an end-of-the-school-day checklist. Kids with executive function weaknesses have to be taught this skill and reinforced every day. · Assist your child in organizing and labeling their Google Drive each week. This is another skill that needs to be taught, scaffolded, and reinforced by an adult. Allow them to have a “Fun” Google Drive folder to keep their nonacademic and leisure files in one place. · Each week, help your child straighten out their binder, desk, backpack, and locker. Use the system Trash, Treasure,

Keep. Trash: thrown away or recycled, Treasure: something they want to hold onto, but not pertinent for academic purposes. Keep: important and should be organized and filed away to its proper home. · Teach your child how to use a monthly calendar to improve time management skills and how to initiate, plan, and execute when working on bigger projects. Calendars are also helpful for weekly task reminders such as the Trash, Treasure, Keep strategy. Encourage children to use a simple line strike once tasks are complete to improve self confidence. · Use a timer at home to assist with task initiation and task completion. Time Timer is a wonderful visual timer, and also is in the form of an app. Setting timers on phones or Alexa type devices also can be very beneficial. · Google Drive has a “Tasks” feature that is easy to set up to create recurring daily or single event task reminders. Ongoing einforcement of these strategies can help your middle school child become more independent, confident, and feel accomplished. Keep in mind that these skills are malleable and often must be taught to students who have attention difficulties and executive function weaknesses to have academic success in middle school.

Kimberly Bradley, MS, LOTR, is a pediatric occupational therapist and owner of Kim4Kids.


september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

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A Life Full of Firsts By Anthony Bui

When it comes to children, life is full of moments that will bring tears to any parent’s eyes. First steps, first day of school, first adult job, and every other first in a child’s life can be both a joyful and worrying time. Having been able to experience life and go through these moments themselves, parents know how to prepare themselves for these moments. They have the emotional maturity to properly handle these transitions in their children’s lives. Kids on the other hand may have a bit more difficulty in these times. They may not ask for it, but it is essential that parents are there to offer their children the love and support needed to overcome those first day jitters. This is especially the case for those transition years when it comes to school. Eighth grade going into high school, eleventh grade going into twelfth, and even the first year of college can be extremely stressful to children. These are pivotal moments for them, and they need the guiding hand of their parents. The key words there were “guiding hand.” It is essential to remember not to be too overbearing. These are years in a child’s life where they have the chance to reinvent themselves and take responsibility. A parent looming over them every step of the way would only nullify their experience. It would cause even more stress in an already stressful situation and leave them clueless as to how to handle these same problems in the future without relying on their parents for everything. The best way to prepare them for these years would be to slowly increase the amount of responsibilities that they have and teach them real life skills

that they can use in these next stages of their lives. Going from eighth grade to high school, school becomes much more important than just grades. What they do in these next four years of their lives is vital for things like their future career and college. Teaching them proper study techniques, time management, and money management for example in these years would be very beneficial long-term. For eleventh graders heading into their final year of high school, now is the time to prepare them to leave the nest. All of the skills that were previously introduced should be fine tuned, and parents now need to prepare their children to potentially go off to college. This is the year to teach them about financial aid, scholarships, creating a monthly budget, and teaching them how to do miscellaneous tasks around the house that they have been neglecting. For the most part, a parent will not be on campus to cook and clean for their children. If they choose to go to school out of state, dad will not be there to fix every problem that arises with one’s car. The responsibility is up to the child now, and if given the opportunity to handle these problems under a parent’s watchful eye, they will know what to do when on their own. It is all about preparing children for the next stage of their lives. Parents, even though it is so hard, cannot baby their children forever. As they grow up, they must be taught the responsibilities and life skills needed for this new stage. A parent knows their child best, so the varying skills and the timeline for each introduction of them will change from child to child. One thing is for certain, though. No matter how old they get or what stage of life they are in, they will always be our children.

College Bound! www.nolafamily.com | september 2021

By Sarah Batrous

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Going to college presents a huge shift in daily life and responsibilities for students. Navigating this change can be challenging, but there are plenty of resources to help on-campus. This is the first time many students have complete control over what to eat, their schedules, and how to spend their time–feeling overwhelmed is normal. How can students prepare and parents help out? You are not alone. No matter what you are experiencing on campus, there are resources to help you. Often, students can get free counseling services at the on-campus counseling center and free testing and resources at the health center. If they’re feeling unsure about their major or career choice, student advisors, dean associates for their major, and career counselors can all help guide them through it. If the worry is with being in a dorm for the first time, don’t worry. Resident Assistants will try to make students feel comfortable in the first week with dorm events, get-togethers and chats. Get involved! Colleges and universities offer plenty of avenues for their incoming freshmen to find like-minded peers. Not only are there clubs,

sororities, fraternities, and sports teams, campus groups are excellent places to start for students coming into their own. Campuses offer groups for LGBTQ youth and allies, Christian ministries, and Hillel International for students wanting to meet others with similar interests. Parents, don’t panic! Ultimately, you are there to help guide your child on this journey, but there are ways to help without being overbearing. Remember, this is the time for your children to shine, and they need some space to grow. It all comes down to understanding when to intervene. While they will not need your help for everything, there are some issues where it may be best to get involved. If you suspect that there is a serious issue, like an ongoing disease or mental crisis, absolutely help. For minor issues, your student is going to want an ear to listen instead of an immediate solution. Finding your way in college can be daunting, but making use of the programs, activities, and helpful staff can make a huge difference. Don’t be afraid to lean on your parents and peers for extra support. On-campus or off-campus, you are not alone on this journey.


Prep for the Future By Sarah Batrous

NORDC offers great programs for teens preparing for college.

Chevron Future Leaders

Chevron presents the ACT Prep Program for teens preparing to take the ACT for college entry. This program is offered through the industry’s leader in test prep, Princeton Review.

The Chevron Future Leaders Program is an innovative leadership development program offered by NORD and supported by Chevron. Designed to prepare future leaders for post-high school success in both college and the workplace, this program focuses on skills development and early career exploration for young adults from schools across the city.

Teen Career Camp

Teen Programs at NORD

The Teen Career Camps offer local teenagers ages 13-15 career exploration and job preparation skills as well as financial literacy training and character development.

Glam U 101 Glam U mentors girls and builds confidence. Programming includes runway classes, fashion shows, makeup lessons, and photo shoots. info@glamu101.org

ACT Prep Program

Teen Council The NORD Teen Council is a year-long enrichment-based curriculum aimed towards empowering teens through event planning, character development and monthly recreation opportunities.

Teen Council Special Events Teen Council events are designed for teens by teens. Events are free and open to New Orleans residents ages 13-17.

Choosing a College By Anthony Bui

All of these factors and variables can become too much sometimes. They could become so overbearing to the point that it causes a strain on one’s mental health. With this strain, parents are desperately searching for ways to help their children. The solution is simpler than they realize. Parents need to effectively communicate with their kids. This isn’t simply done by asking questions and waiting for answers. It is done by having a real discussion about their future and about college. This can be done one or one or even facilitated by a school counselor. Having a conversation like this is the best way to help gauge their children’s mental health and readiness for college. It is through this open communication that trust is formed and productive conversations will occur. One way to destroy this productivity would be to

not include the child in these conversations. School counselors are trained for this, and they do know a lot of information on how to properly handle and assist students during these years of their lives. But, a parent should not go to a school counselor behind their children’s backs. This would just burn a bridge between parent and child. No one knows children better than the parents themselves. They know things like the child’s maturity level and level of independence. Based on this knowledge, a parent can direct the conversation to where it needs to go. They can discuss all of the different choices and what each college offers. Ultimately, conversations like these help them to notice their own level of readiness and helps making decisions related to college much easier. They may now even seek the guidance of their school counselors on their own. This is a stressful time for children and a parent’s job is to not make it more so. This is best done through communication. Believe it or not, children may always be children in the eyes of parents, but every day they are growing older. One day, they may ultimately make that decision to leave home and go to college. It is not an easy decision, so as a parent, do not be scared to sit down and have those conversations adult to young adult.

september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

When it comes to choosing a college, so many factors are involved that it seems like there couldn’t possibly be any right answer. If a student chooses to go to a big school, he would lose out on the intentionality of smaller colleges, but the bigger school offers more in terms of curriculum though. Well, this school is further away which gives the freedom to branch out and really discover oneself. On the other hand, living close to home means mom will do laundry for free. These are just some of the many questions that arise as one has to make the decision of where to spend a college career.

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Plan a Tour By Anthony Bui

College is such a vital stage in a child’s life. It may bring a lot of tears to parents, but for the child, this is a big moment. Where they choose to spend their college career is such a nerve racking decision that could have such a huge impact on their futures.

have. Following that, there will be a campus tour which is usually led by a current student. They will take potential students around campus showing them the main parts of it while answering any questions that may arise.

Jumping blindly into college may be the option some students choose. They will forgo the college tours, and that is totally fine. Others, though, may choose to pursue the latter route to try and get a better feel of finding the school that is best for them. The only problem is where to start and what to expect. These things may seem daunting and confusing, but with a little help, students can properly navigate through the confusion and discover their home for the next few semesters.

It is important to remember that one is never alone in this process. Every college should have an admissions office. They are there to help plan visits and answer any questions that may arise no matter how small. To get the best out of a college tour, one must be sure to never be afraid to ask questions. That will help figure out exactly what the university provides in terms of tours.

Put together a list of schools that the child would be interested in. It is best to organize them in terms of initial interest level as well as take into account distance from home, noting any that happen to be out of state. Those tours would be a bit harder to organize. There are also several different types of tours depending on the circumstances. There are organized group tours, quick sessions, overnight stays, and you could even just go on your own informal visit of campus. No matter the case, one should expect an information session and a campus tour. The information session typically occurs before the campus tour and involves an admissions representative presenting general information to students about the college and answering any questions that they may

For those out-of-state colleges, one could find out information about potentially staying in a dorm overnight to truly get immersed in the college experience. For those concerned about finances, they could potentially meet a financial aid advisor who can help answer any questions. For those interested in potential clubs or sports, they could potentially even be able to sit through a club meeting or a sports practice session. The list goes on and on, so do not hesitate to ask questions. There will most likely be current students walking around; they will be more than happy to answer any questions you have as well. Once there, remember to enjoy the moment. Encourage your student-to-be to explore campus and truly think about whether or not he can walk through this same campus years from now and still be in awe over the fact that he is a student there.

What’s a FAFSA? By Sarah Batrous

www.nolafamily.com | september 2021

Applying for financial aid can be overwhelming for plenty of first-time students, however, with some foreground knowledge, it doesn’t have to be.

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FAFSA stands for Free Application for Federal Student Aid, and it is how the federal government determines if a student is in need of financial aid for college. It helps students apply for federal grants, loans, and work-study programs to help pay for their education. This money can be used to pay for tuition and other college-related expenses.

How do I take advantage of FAFSA? The form is meant to be submitted each year of college. A student will need to create an FSA ID to fill out the application and have access to their Social Security number (SSN), a form of ID like a driver’s license, federal tax information or tax returns, including IRS W-2 information, records of their untaxed income, and information on the amount of money in their savings and checking account. If a student is a dependent, he will need a parent’s FSA ID, SSN, tax records, income records, and savings and checking account amounts.

How can I prepare? Start early! Parents and students often forget how important it is to start prepping for college during the junior year of high school. It is the last year of high school to really pad a GPA and the best time to begin applying for scholarships and grants while prepping college applications and essays. Get familiar with what types of information you and your child will need to have in-the-works for each college being applied for before the end of senior year. Getting an early foot in the door will help a student feel more comfortable with the daunting transition between high school and college. Having all the records and accounts needed to fill out the FAFSA will make the process much smoother. Students and parents should work together to get prepped for college. Having people in their corner who are willing to listen and patiently handle the questions and issues that come up during this period will grant students the confidence they need.


Start Saving! By Sarah Batrous

Is the idea of the cost of tuition for college or K-12 education intimidating? It’s never too early to start saving, and Louisiana has the perfect solution for parents with children entering school through two qualified tuition plans.

accounts, the state allocates Earnings Enhancements (state matching grant dollars). This allows both the deposits and Earning Enhancements invested to earn interest, which altogether maximizes the amount saved.

What Plans?

How Do I Apply?

Administered by the Louisiana Tuition Trust Authority (LATTA), Louisiana’s START program or “529 plan” is a college savings plan that begins saving when your child is in kindergarten and continues until the end of their high school career. The START K12 program allows parents to save for the cost of tuition for kindergarten to high school at eligible schools, both public and nonpublic.

The application process is available online at startsaving.la.gov and deposits can be made through a multitude of options like automatic bank debit, payroll deduction, or direct payment. With no limitation on the frequency of deposits and the minimum deposit amount being $10, it should be easy to accumulate a fair sum of money. To sweeten the deal, deposits are also tax deductible.

How Does it Work?

Ensuring their child’s future is always on the forefront of a parent’s mind and taking advantage of the programs and resources offered. Taking initiative with the START or K12 programs is the place to start.

Anyone who wants to assist in funding a child’s education can establish an education savings account. As they make regular deposits to those

ACT/SAT Scores Do They Still Matter? By Sarah Batrous

questions and examples that a student can work through to help familiarize themselves with how the exams are laid out. Online practice tests through the respective exam’s website are also available. Exam “boot camps” and tutoring are also offered.

What’s the Difference?

How Do I Take Them?

Taking the ACT or SAT does not affect how a student’s application is considered. Most colleges do not have a preference for one test over the other. The ACT has an expansive science section and optional essay portion while the SAT focuses on English-based skills like reading, writing, and language. Students with a strong understanding of Language Arts may prefer the SAT over the ACT, but neither test is easier or more difficult than the other.

The ACT and SAT are offered at various times throughout the year, typically held at schools and testing centers. Registration can be done online through the ACT website and College Board site and even through the student’s school if offered. Students can take these exams as many times as they would like and submit their scores to a host of colleges and universities across the country.

Why Are They Important?

Some colleges are opting to have test-optional semesters, meaning that incoming freshmen can choose whether to submit SAT or ACT standardized test scores. This is meant to help minimize the stress put on students due to the pandemic while allowing colleges and universities to continue to consider all applications equally, no matter if the test scores are included or not.

The ACT and SAT are used to see how well a student performs in certain subjects. Depending on the individual section scores, a college or university might find a student needs remedial courses before taking college-level classes. However, this isn’t all they are needed for. Certain scholarships require these scores to judge whether a student is eligible for their aid.

How Do I Prepare for Them? Students in Louisiana are well-acquainted with LEAP testing and practice SAT or ACT exams, which helps prepare them for the real tests. There are official ACT and SAT prep booklets for sale online with

Stay On the Nose!

While test scores may not be required for all students applying for college, they are still a recommended measure to take. Applications with test scores prove how well students do in an academic setting and are an excellent way for colleges to gauge where new students may need to start.

september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

The ACT and SAT are the foundations of college applications but understanding how they are important, how to prepare for them, and what to do afterwards can be confusing, especially for first-time college students.

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september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

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Fostering Your Children’s Important Bond with Their Grandparents By Sarah Lyons Growing up I had a close relationship with my grandparents and have wonderful memories of our time together. My grandma loved to teach me about plants, to play card games, and to cook together. My grandpa took me camping, fishing, and was always sneaking us extra dessert. Grandparents and their grandchildren have a special bond. This will look different for each family, but there are some ways you can build and encourage the bond between your kids and their grandparents.

www.nolafamily.com | september 2021

Encourage Time Together

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Time spent together will help grandparents and grandchildren to bond naturally. This will look different for each family, but some ideas could include cooking together, running errands, attending the child’s sporting events or school activities, going to the park, playing board games, going to a movie, sitting and talking, or going out to dinner. Some grandparents find that having a set time assures they have time with their grandchildren. For example, every Saturday morning you go to breakfast, or every Tuesday, they babysit while the parents have a date night. If you do not live in the same city, try using a phone or video call at a set time each week. The nice thing about weekly calls is that it allows for following up on the things the next week. Giving your child talking points can help the conversation flow better. If you know your parent is struggling with things to talk about with your child, send them a quick text reminding them to ask about the

big math test or how the playdate went. These are some good examples of ways parents can facilitate the bond between their grandparents from a long distance.

Let the Parents Handle Discipline A common source of conflict between parents and grandparents can be discipline of children. Grandparents may have different disciplinary styles or feel different behaviors deserve reprimanding. Let grandparents know that, in most situations, you will be responsible for any discipline needed. This allows grandparents to enjoy the fun aspects of time with the kids. When bringing up the subject, be kind and patient and explain that you don’t want anything to come between the kids and their grandparents and the special relationship they have. If discipline must be handled by the grandparents, they should try to stay as close to the parents’ disciplinary style as possible or delay punishment for when the parents return.

when they come back home, the kids feel a closeness to their grandparents for allowing them to have a few extra treats. They feel like they share a secret, that really isn’t a secret at all, with their grandparents and it goes a long way to strengthening their bond. That, to me, is worth allowing a few extra treats from their grandparents on occasion.

Set Limits

Allow Your Kids to Be Spoiled a Little

All of these things can help build the grandparent -grandchild bond, but if the parents are not comfortable with what is going on, it will end up creating anger, resentment, and end up hurting the relationship between the grandchildren and their grandparents in the long run. Set limits that everyone understands and can live with. For example, it is okay for grandparents to break the rules and let the kids have ice cream for dinner, but it is not okay for them to ride in the car without a car seat. Make sure that your child and the grandparents know what your unbreakable rules are so that everyone is on the same page.

My kids know that when they spend the night with my parents, they will have donuts for breakfast the next morning. They can also count on any number of sweet treats while they are visiting. When their birthday comes around, they usually get spoiled by gifts from their grandparents as well. At home, sweet treats are limited, toys are purchased on occasion, and donuts for breakfast are not the norm. While I may be cringing at the sugar induced coma that my kids will be in

Grandparents are important because they have life experience and love to share them with their grandchildren. They have the opportunity to share their love and time without the pressures parents face in raising children. If your kids are lucky enough to have grandparents in their lives, foster and encourage them to build their relationship as much as possible. Your kids will cherish the memories for their lifetime.


september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

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SCHOOL SPIRIT

PICKING THE RIGHT SCHOOL FOR YOUR CHILD IS HARD We let the leaders do the talking to help you make the best choice.

ATONEMENT LUTHERAN SCHOOL Douglas C. Molin, Principal Atonement Lutheran School was founded in 1960 with one objective in mind: “To impact lives through Christ” by providing an excellent Christian education and loving environment to families in the metro New Orleans area. Atonement is a place where families can grow together in all facets of life. We are small enough to give parents and children the attention they deserve, but have the faculty, staff, and facilities to provide a great education and school life experience. From the littlest three year olds on their first days of school, to the eighth graders working toward graduation, Atonement is a place where the teachers, faculty, and staff are committed to working for the good of every student. We are passionate about giving students and families personalized attention and care all while maintaining a superb educational climate and creating memorable experiences for all. I continue to hear feedback from area high schools, saying that our students are amongst the most, if not the best, prepared in their student populations. We also offer many opportunities for our children to be involved in extracurricular activities, including a year-round sports program, scouting, talent shows, and a robust music program that has several choirs across grade levels, a band, and performs a spring musical every year.

6500 Riverside Drive, Metairie, 504.887.0225 www.alcs.org

www.nolafamily.com | september 2021

300 Park Road, Metairie, 504.837.5204 mpcds.com

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METAIRIE PARK COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL Rob Hereford, Head of School Established in 1929, Metairie Park Country Day School is a co-educational, non-denominational, independent school where care and cultivation of each child, from Pre-K through Grade 12, come to life with exciting and innovative approaches to teaching. The use of advanced technology and our expansive, rigorous curriculum opens the world to our students. Visit an Admission Open House or email admissions@mpcds.com for a private tour. Upcoming Open Houses are Pre-K, October 21 at 6 p.m. and Grades 6-12, November 9 at 6:30 p.m. Additional visit opportunities are available on www.mpcds.com.


SCHOOL SPIRIT

ECOLE BILINGUE DE LA NOUVELLE-ORLÉANS Pierre-Loïc Denichou, Head of School and Chevalier of the Order of the Academic Palms Founded in 1998, Ecole Bilingue de la Nouvelle-Orléans is a private, French immersion school with experienced faculty from all over the world, a diverse student body, and the best of French and American academics. Now serving close to 400 students from 18 months to 8th grade, Ecole Bilingue is Louisiana’s only private school accredited by both the French government and the State of Louisiana. The mission of Ecole Bilingue is to develop globally literate students through a rigorous bilingual French-American curriculum set in a nurturing and multicultural community. We guide our students to excel academically, foster their curiosity, and prepare them to become creative and innovative contributors to the world. Ecole Bilingue is set up on the principle that the best way to ensure academic excellence is through a variety of proven teaching methods in a nurturing and vibrant environment. Our growing campus includes science and STEM labs, an art studio, culinary space, student gardens, a large green space and multiple playgrounds. With extensive experience in curriculum development, teacher training, and education research, Head of School Pierre-Loïc has strategically elevated the quality of education at the school and continues to enhance the academics, strengthen the community, and embrace the diverse culture at Ecole Bilingue. Prior to Ecole Bilingue, Pierre-Loïc worked at Lycée International de Los Angeles and taught elementary school at a French school in Bolivia.

812 General Pershing Street 504.896.4500 ebnola.net

Ecole Bilingue is affiliated with several leading global educational networks, including the AEFE, NAIS, AFSA, and Mission Laïque Française. Ecole Bilingue is now working towards an ISAS accreditation.

3937 Canal Street 504.488.6641 stjohnlutherannola.com 720 Elise Avenue, Metairie, 504.733.0472 kehoe-france.com

ST. JOHN LUTHERAN SCHOOL Bethany Gonski, Principal

Dr. Tanya Price, Head of School

St. John Lutheran School, founded in 1854, is one of the best-kept secrets in Mid City! Located on Canal Street, this parochial school chose the theme “Love Your Neighbor” for the 2021 – 2022 school year. St. John actively and intentionally teaches their students to love their neighbor by having compassion, patience, forgiveness and respect for others. We encourage integrity, teach empathy and expect kindness.

At Kehoe-France School, serving children 8 weeks-Grade 7, children are nurtured in a warm and welcoming environment. With small class sizes in a secure and picturesque 14-acre environment, our degreed and certified staff encourage students to explore their curiosities. As an International Baccalaureate World School in the Primary Years Program and candidate for the Middle Years Program, Kehoe-France is focused on providing an inquiry-based approach to learning. Our students are actively engaged in their development, education, and activities. We focus not only on the academic fundamentals, but also a child’s physical health and wellness through classes and clubs, and a commitment to service as a school community. Our facilities are newly renovated with more improvements to come. Private tours are given daily upon request. We invite everyone to come tour with us and take those first steps onto the path to success.

Head of School, Bethany Gonski, counsels students and teaches them how to be self-empowered people who know they have the ability to make choices that will be beneficial to themselves while not harming others. Rev. Perry Sukstorf leads weekly chapel services and encourages students to grow their faith in God while the dedicated teaching staff works to drive students to excellence in their academics. St. John Lutheran is small enough to know each child as an individual but big enough to provide each with an excellent education.

september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

KEHOE-FRANCE SCHOOL

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Our comprehensive guide to ENRICHMENT ACTIVITIES in the arts, athletics, education, special needs, and more! Studies show that kids benefit academically, emotionally, and socially from just five hours of extracurricular enrichment programming each week, including weekends. So take a look at our list and sign up your artists, athletes, and scholars for an activity or two. We’ve got lots here to choose from that will meet any and all interests.

ARTS

www.nolafamily.com | september 2021

City Park Movement and Art 4300 Dumaine St., New Orleans cityparkmovementandart@gmail.com cityparkmovementandart.com We offer dance, acrobatics, and musical theater classes. Register soon to find out why our classes always fill!

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Longue Vue: Vue Crew After School 7 Bamboo Rd., New Orleans 504.488.5488 education@longuevue.com Students ages 5-10 can spend Tuesday and Thursday afternoons learning about plants and insects, making nature-themed art, and exploring our gardens. Enrollment runs on a monthly basis, or reach out for customized registration. The New Orleans Center for Creative Arts 2800 Chartres, New Orleans 800.201.4836 nocca.com Regional, pre-professional arts training center offering high school students intensive instruction in culinary arts, dance, media arts, music, theatre arts, visual arts, and creative writing. Full-day, half-day and afterschool. Admission by audition only. Non-credit open workshops available for sign-up. New Orleans Museum of Art 1 Collins C. Diboll Circle, New Orleans City Park 504.658.4100 noma.org NOMA offers in-person and virtual program offerings, including online exhibitions, art-making activities, and family festivals. Contact education@noma.org for information. Ogden After Hours, Ogden Museum of Southern Art 925 Camp St., New Orleans 504.539.9650 ogdenmuseum.org We encourage youth of all ages and their families to discover the art of the American South through engaging programming focused on hands-on art education. Posh Paint Pub 3218 Taft Park, Metairie 504.835.4155 poshpaintpub.com Offering wheel-throwing lessons for children ages 8-14 in Sept, Oct, Jan, Feb, & March. Young Aspirations | Young Artists (YAYA) 3322 LaSalle St., New Orleans 504.529.3306 yayainc.org; info@yayainc.org YAYA provides FREE art and entrepreneurial programming for youth ages 5-25. Apply by visiting our website at yayainc.org. Fall Semester starts September 7. Young Rembrandts of Southeast Louisiana 504.533.8485 youngrembrandts.com/selouisiana We teach drawing and cartooning classes for children ages 3-12. Programming includes in-person classes, On Demand classes and workshops, and Live Online classes and workshops.

BASEBALL & SOFTBALL

Carrollton Boosters Various locations throughout New Orleans carrolltonboosters.org A volunteer youth sports organization offering recreational/ intramural programs for boys and girls: baseball, basketball, flag football, soccer, softball, running, and lacrosse.

DANCE

Articulate Motions Dance Academy 337 W. Harrison Ave., New Orleans 504.410.6009 or 504.410.4999 articulatemotions.com Offers a variety of dance classes and styles, including ballet, pointe, hip hop, acrobatics, jazz, modern, tap, adult classes, and competition team. Cindy Ory Dance Studio

9029 Jefferson Highway, River Ridge 504.737.3345 orydance.com Classes for ages three to adult in ballet, tap, jazz, pointe, contemporary, hip hop, Mommy and Me, and gymnastics. A non-competitive learning environment with an emphasis on technical proficiency. Creative Dance & Music Studio 716 Belle Meade Blvd., Gretna, LA 504.390.2552 creativedanceandmusic.com Wide selection of dance and music classes, including speciality classes for preschoolers, music lessons in piano, voice, and guitar, and dance classes of all ages and levels. Dancer’s Pointe 5101 W. Esplanade Ave., Ste. 12, Metairie, 504.220.4401 6268 Vicksburg St., Ste. C & D, New Orleans, 504.220.4401 dancers-pointe.com Spacious studios with marley dance floors and enrollment at an all-time high. Call to schedule a visit. Dancing Grounds 3705 St. Claude Ave., New Orleans 504.535.5791 dancingrounds.org Multigenerational arts organization that brings inclusive and accessible dance programs to New Orleans residents of all ages. Debby Dillehay Dance Studio 3745 Florida Ave., Kenner 504.468.3368 debbydillehaydance.com Classes for all ages include tap, ballet, jazz, hip hop, lyrical, floor gymnastics, and modern Encore Studio of Dance, Tumbling, Music & Theatre 1999 Hickory Ave., Suite 102, Harahan 504.737.5977 dancetumblemusic.com With a focus on education, not competition, we offer dance and tumbling classes, music lessons, and musical theatre (acting/ singing) classes for students ages three-adult. Giacobbe Academy of Dance 6925 Veterans Blvd., Metairie 504.889.0940 giacobbeacademydance.com Home to Delta Ballet Festival, the only resident professional ballet company in the state and the New Orleans Youth Ballet, a pre-professional junior company for dancers 10 years and older. Lelia Haller Ballet Classique 4916 Canal St., New Orleans 504.482.0038 lhballet.com A classical ballet school specializing in instruction for ages three and up. Also offer tap, jazz, contemporary, ballet exercise, and tumbling to provide a complete dance education. Louisiana Academy of Performing Arts River Ridge School of Music & Dance, 2020 Dickory Ave., #200, Harahan, 504.738.3050 Mandeville School of Music & Dance, 105 Campbell Ave., #3, Mandeville, 985.674.2992 Covington School of Music, 1111 Village Walk, Covington, 985.590.4545 laapa.com Programs for kids, teens, and adults include music and dance lessons in piano, voice, guitar, violin, bass, drums, flute, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, trombone, ballet, hip hop, tap, musical theater, and tumbling. Attend in-person or online. Loyola Preparatory Arts Program 6363 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans 504.865.3627 cmm.loyno.edu/prep-arts A comprehensive arts program in the metropolitan New Orleans area, offering a structured program of studies in dance. Mari Milnar Dance Academy 900 Terry Parkway, Ste. 310 & 320, Terrytown 504.362.3503; 504.251.0600 marimilnardanceacademy.com Classes available in creative movement, preschool dance, tap,

ballet, jazz, hip hop, musical theatre, lyrical and contemporary. MOVE! New Orleans’ Best Summer Camp and After School Program 4714 Paris Ave. New Orleans, LA 70122 504-376-7009 neworleansbestafterschool.com; info@neworleansbestafterschool. com Active After School Program. Additional activities include karate, dance, parkour, and other sports and games. Openings available for these schools: Bricolage, Arthur Ashe, Hynes, Homer Plessy. Waiting list for other schools available. New Orleans Ballet Association 935 Gravier St., Ste. 800, New Orleans 504.522.0996 nobadance.com Tuition-free, year-round, comprehensive dance programs provided virtually and at locations throughout the Greater New Orleans area for ages 4-18. The New Orleans Center for Creative Arts 2800 Chartres, New Orleans 800.201.4836 nocca.com Regional, pre-professional arts training center offering high school students intensive instruction in culinary arts, dance, media arts, music, theatre arts, visual arts, and creative writing. Full-day, half-day and afterschool. Admission by audition only. Non-credit open workshops available for sign-up. New Orleans Dance Academy 5956 Magazine St., New Orleans 504.899.3780 neworleansdancelessons.com Instruction in classical ballet, tap, jazz, flamenco, modern, and hip hop in a friendly, noncompetitive atmosphere. 8125 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans Off Broadway Dance Studio 504.861.1749 obdsnola.com We offer classes for ages two and up. Ballet, Pointe, Tap, Jazz, Contemporary, and Hip Hop in a newly renovated studio. The Ryan School of Irish Dance 4732 Sanford St., Metairie, Lydia Spreen Dance Dimensions Studio 504.715.0020 irishdancelouisiana.com Offers weekly classes for boys and girls in the traditional art of Irish step dance, from beginner to championship level. Schramel Conservatory of Dance 920 Terpischore St., New Orleans 504.826.0646 neworleansballettheatre.com The official dance school of the New Orleans Ballet Theatre, offers ballet, tap and contemporary / modern dance classes for children of all ages from beginners to advanced. The Studio School of Dance 3116 N. Arnoult Rd., Ste. N, Metairie 504.941.7345 thestudionola.com Offer classes in Ballet, Pointe/Variation, Adult Ballet, Mommy & Me, Floor Barre, Contemporary, and Pilates.

DRAMA & THEATER

The New Orleans Center for Creative Arts 2800 Chartres, New Orleans 800.201.4836 nocca.com Regional, pre-professional arts training center offering high school students intensive instruction in culinary arts, dance, media arts, music, theatre arts, visual arts, and creative writing. Full-day, half-day and afterschool. Admission by audition only. Non-credit open workshops available for sign-up. Crescent City Lights Youth Theater 504.598.3800 crescentcitylights.org; info@crescentcitylights.org Performing arts training in drama, voice, and dance. Southern Rep Theatre 2533 Columbus Street, New Orleans LA 70119 504.522.6545 A professional theatre acclaimed for its productions, Southern Rep off after-school programs and camps for young people.


EDUCATION: LANGUAGE CLASSES

Alliance Française de La Nouvelle-Orléans 1519 Jackson Ave., New Orleans 504.568.0770 af-neworleans.org Offers French language classes (online and in-person) for all levels and ages and events that immerse New Orleanians in francophone cultures. They’re offering more youth classes than ever this Fall. New Orleans Sign Language Services, LLC 5324 Canal Blvd., New Orleans 504.722.2967 (Voice/Text) 504.273.1152 (Videophone) neworleanssignlanguageservices.com Free Monday ASL Classes for Beginners to Advanced learners. Private Classes and Baby Sign Language Classes are also available. ¡Vamonos NOLA! 600 Elemore St. New Orleans 504.495.2345 vamonosnola.com Personalized Spanish classes for toddlers to 100 years old. On Vamonos NOLA Uptown campus, at your school or virtually from anywhere in the world. Open to all levels. Holiday Camps for kids 5-10, Jr. counselor 11-15.

EDUCATION: TUTORING & EDUCATIONAL SERVICES

Kumon Math & Reading Centers Various locations throughout New Orleans kumon.com The Kumon Math and Reading Programs are designed to advance your child’s comprehension and appreciation for learning— providing an edge throughout school. Locations in Gretna, Marrero, Metairie, and New Orleans. Reading Enrichment and Development (R.E.A.D.) Early Literacy Program 921 S. Carrollton Avenue, New Orleans 504.450.3997 readnola.com A dynamic early literacy program built around movement, music, acting, art, and themed activities. Through creative play, children develop their skills and bring books and language into their daily lives.

GYMNASTICS & CHEERLEADING

HORSEBACK RIDING

Cascade Stables 700 East Drive, New Orleans, Audubon Park 504.891.2246 cascadestables.net Lessons in a welcoming environment for horse enthusiasts starting at ages four, trail rides for ages eight and older.

INCLUSIVE NEEDS/ THERAPY Chatternola

2901 Ridgelake Dr., Suite 102, Metairie 504.354.7078 chatternola.com A boutique private practice specializing in speech, language, and behavioral therapy for children. Crane Rehab Center 8300 Earhart Blvd., Suite 100, New Orleans (Pediatric Facility), 504.866.6990 3923 Bienville St., New Orleans (Center for Behavior, Language & Learning), 504.593.6900 cranerehab.com For nearly 20 years, Crane Rehab Center-Pediatrics has provided children and families with comprehensive, evidence-based, high-quality, physical, occupational and speech therapy, and ABA services. Gulfsouth Autism Center 7252 Lakeshore Drive, New Orleans, 504.323.3450 3013 27th St., Metairie, 504.291.6200 9063 Siegen Lane, Baton Rouge, 225.294.1600 17520 Old Jefferson Hwy., Prairieville, 225.300.6710 New Covington location coming soon! gulfsouthautismcenter.com Providing comprehensive treatment for children with autism spectrum disorders. Our early intervention program incorporates one-on-one ABA services with group speech and occupational therapy. Kim4Kids 4317 El Dorado St., Metairie 504.517.5437 kim4kidsnola.com Pediatric Occupational Therapy services for children to address difficulties in fine and gross motor skills, handwriting, self-care skills, sensory processing, feeding, and play. We treat a variety of diagnoses in a fun, outpatient setting. Nola Learning Support 8131 Oak St., Suite 100, New Orleans nolalsp504@gmail.com nolalearningsupport.com/ Dyslexia remediation and support for students in grades kindergarten through college with mild to moderate learning differences. Therapeutic Learning Center 3329 Metairie Rd., Metairie 1520 Kuebel St., Ste 6., Elmwood 504.565.7300 tlcnola.com TLC is a private, pediatric therapy clinic that offers individual speech, occupational, and physical therapy services, along with day programs and group therapy sessions.

MARTIAL ARTS

Church’s Karate Academy 4716 Paris Ave., New Orleans 504.376.7009 churchskarateacademy.com Offers classes to help build confidence and self-esteem in children so they can reach their full potential. Kids love the “ninja” moves, parents love the life skills. Hayashi Judo School 4521 Magazine St., New Orleans. Inside Temple Gym 504.319.9409 nolajudo.com The principles of Judo, such as “Maximum Efficiency” and “Mutual Welfare and Benefit,” can also be used in our dealings with others in life.

Louisiana Karate Association 706 Phosphor Ave., Ste. C, Metairie 504.835.6825 lkakarate.com Students work together to practice techniques & develop communication, respect & teamwork. Your child can apply these skills to all areas of life, school, social, extracurriculars, and more. Martial Arts Institute of Louisiana (Benoit Karate) 7575 Westbank Expressway, Marrero 504.328.4000 benoitkarate.com Teaching kids respect, confidence, integrity, and discipline. Call for a free lesson. New Orleans Shotokan Academy (NOSA) Various locations throughout New Orleans 504.432.8667 nosakarate.com A martial arts school where one can learn karate, aikido, judo, and yoga. Zoom classes available for kids and adults. New Orleans Karate Club 8611 Hwy 23, Ste. 2C, Belle Chasse 504.391.7200 neworleanskarate.net Offering age-appropriate programs for children starting at three years. Also offering traditional martial arts for adults and teens, as well as, kick-boxing and mixed martial arts for adults. NOLA Aikido 3909 Bienville St., New Orleans 504.208.4861 nolaaikido.com Aikido, with an aim of peaceful resolutions of conflict, is an ideal martial art for children, educating the physical, intellectual and emotional intelligences. Our staged approach means kids of all ages can participate at the appropriate level for their development. Children four and older. Currently offering indoor classes, outdoor classes, and Zoom classes. Shogun Martial Arts 5021 Fairfield St., Metairie 504.982.1371 shogunnola.com Kenjutsu is the school of Japanese swordsmanship where one learns determination, discipline, self-control, and how to surpass their preconceived limits. Tiger Rock Martial Arts International 3828 Veterans Blvd., Ste. E, Metairie, 504.455.9699 1813 Veterans Blvd., Ste. A, Metairie, 504.831.1110 tigerrockmartialarts.com Offers youth and adult classes in Taekwondo, Xtreme Martial Arts, grappling, Hanmudo, KisadoInterval Fitness, and YogaFit. Yonsei Martial Arts Academy 2530 Florida Ave., Kenner 504.465.5353 info4yonsei@yonsei.us Exclusive Skillz Worldwide curriculum for kids as well as a proven adult martial arts program, friendly family environment. Proven programs to develop strong minds, bodies, and spirits while developing the focus, respect, confidence, and discipline to empower your success in life.

MUSIC

Beckwith Guitar Systems 2515 Williams Blvd., Kenner, inside C&M Music Center 504.559.5229 beguitarsys.com Ages eight and up can learn to play and understand the guitar in as few steps as possible. Use music theory to connect scales, songs, and riffs together to achieve your goals. Carla’s Musikgarten New Orleans Uptown, New Orleans 504.717.5044 carlasmusikgarten.com Beginning with babies and toddlers with musical play in our early childhood curricula to playing the piano and music literacy in our elementary aged piano classes. Greater New Orleans Youth Orchestra 7100 St. Charles Ave., Ste. 207, New Orleans 504.861.1801 gnoyo.org GNOYO has five orchestras committed to make orchestral music accessible to area youth. GNOYO also holds summer festivals, performances, and retreats for talented young musicians. Lafargue Music School 1828 Veterans Blvd., Metairie 504.831.3008 lafarguepianos.com Lafargue Music School offers private lessons in piano, voice, violin, and guitar to beginners through advanced, and group music from infancy through adulthood.

september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

All Star Gymnastics 2073 Bonn St., Harvey 504.328.3838 allstargymnola.com Junior Olympic training facility offering gymnastics, tumbling, cheerleading, taekwondo, free running, and break dancing. Recreational to competitive teams (level 2-10) for boys and girls, ages two and up. Elmwood Gymnastics Academy 700 Elmwood Park Blvd., Ste. C, Harahan 504.733.4496 ochsner.org/locations/elmwood-gymnastics-academy A member of the Ochsner Fitness Center family, teams and individuals who train here consistently place high and earn national awards and recognition each year. Empire Gymnastics Academy 4925 Jefferson Hwy, Jefferson 504.734.0644 empiregymnastics.net An 8,000-square-foot facility with gymnastics equipment for ages 18 months to 18. Offering birthday parties, Kids’ night out, holiday and seasonal camps and more! NOLA Gymnastics 1725 Dufossat St., New Orleans gretchen@nolagymnastics.com nolagym.com Kindergym and beginner (ages three-five, boys and girls), PreTeam (ages six and up, girls) competitive teams Acro and Artistic (by invitation), and Summer Camps.

Equest Farm 1001 Filmore Ave., New Orleans, City Park 504.483.9398 equestfarm.com Offer riding for all levels. All lessons are English-style Hunter Jumper, taught in a ring with a friendly, experienced instructor that can cater to both beginners as well as riders who want to jump. Pony Tales 156 Bertucci Lane, St. Rose 504.469.0148 ponytalesbirthdays.com/lessons.htm Horsemanship and riding lessons on ponies and horses. Ages three and up. By appointment only. Splendor Farms 27329 Mill Creek Rd., Bush 985.886.3747 splendorfarms.com Students ages six and up learn to groom and saddle horses, then mounting/dismounting and walk/trot, and then progress to loping and pattern work.

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Louisiana Academy of Performing Arts River Ridge School of Music & Dance, 2020 Dickory Ave., #200, Harahan, 504.738.3050 Mandeville School of Music & Dance, 105 Campbell Ave., #3, Mandeville, 985.674.2992 Covington School of Music, 1111 Village Walk, Covington, 985.590.4545 laapa.com Programs for kids, teens, and adults include music and dance lessons in piano, voice, guitar, violin, bass, drums, flute, clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, trombone, ballet, hip hop, tap, musical theater, and tumbling. Attend in-person or online. Love’s Music Therapy 3380 State Street Dr., New Orleans 504.281.8968 lovesmusictherapy.com Serving adults and children with or without special needs. Services include music therapy, music instruction, and program development. Loyola Preparatory Arts Program 6363 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans 504.865.3627 cmm.loyno.edu/prep-arts A comprehensive arts program offering lessons in piano, guitar, voice, strings to children and adults. Musikgarten sessions are offered over the course of the year to children ages birth-six years. New Orleans Children’s Chorus 5580 Canal Blvd., Ste. A, New Orleans 504.482.2883 neworleanschildrenschorus.org Through the singing of high quality music, the singers develop self-confidence, discipline and social skills as well as musical knowledge. No child who truly wants to sing is ever turned away. School of Rock Metairie/New Orleans 1907 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie 504.618.7625 locations.schoolofrock.com/metairie; metairie@schoolofrock.com School of Rock offers performance-based music instruction from the ages of four to adult, with a program for every age and skill level. Upbeat Academy 1225 N Rampart St., New Orleans 504.722.8762 upbeatacademy.org Non-profit, after-school music education program for middle and high school students, with a focus on hip hop and dance music production and performance.

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RUNNING

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Carrollton Boosters Various locations throughout New Orleans carrolltonboosters.org A volunteer youth sports organization offering recreational/ intramural programs for boys and girls: baseball, basketball, flag football, soccer, softball, running, and lacrosse. Girls on the Run New Orleans 5500 Prytania St., Ste. 528, New Orleans 504.272.7786 gotrnola.org We inspire girls to be joyful, healthy and confident using a fun, experience-based curriculum which creatively integrates running. Youth Run Nola 1307 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., Ste. 202, New Orleans 774.253.0243 info@youthrunnola.org youthrunnola.org We create opportunities for our area’s young people to develop healthier lifestyles and build a more interconnected community. Our program offers youth a positive, structured environment to build healthy habits, set and achieve goals, and develop supportive relationships through after-school and park programs.

SCIENCE/STEAM ENRICHMENT Challenge Island 504.913.9451 neworleans@challenge-island.com challenge-island.com/neworleans Challenge Island is a cross curricular STEAM program for students ages 4-14. We engage students in the engineering process through our after school classes, field trips, summer camps, Girl Scout workshops and more! Code Ninja 3501 Severn Ave., Ste. B, Metairie

504.235.4100 codeninjas.com/la-metairie Kids ages 7-14 years learn to code by building their very own video games and gain problem solving, critical thinking, and STEM skills in a fun, safe, and inspiring environment. Electric Girls 612 Andrew Higgins Blvd., 3rd Floor, New Orleans contact@electricgirls.org electricgirls.org Electric Girls offers flexible after-school and summer programs in the greater New Orleans area (ages 5-17) in astronomy, robotics, and electronics. Mad Science of Southeast Louisiana 3911 Post Oak Ave., New Orleans 504.345.2602 madscience.org/sela A leading science enrichment provider, we deliver unique, handson science experiences for children that are entertaining and educational. NOLA Kidsground 5700 Citrus Blvd., Elmwood 504.354.9528 nolakidsground.com Interact, explore, and have fun. NOLA Kidsground is the greater New Orleans area’s premier indoor playground, family edu-tainment play center, and party place.

SOCCER

Carrollton Boosters Various locations throughout New Orleans carrolltonboosters.org A volunteer youth sports organization offering recreational/ intramural programs for boys and girls: baseball, basketball, flag football, soccer, softball, running, and lacrosse. FNA-NOLA Various locations throughout New Orleans playfna.com Football-N-America is a non-contact, youth, co-ed flag football league for children in grades K-10. Leagues provide a safe, positive, competitive, and family-friendly environment to learn the game the right way and have fun doing it. Junction Place Sports 5620 Crawford St., Elmwood 504.356.1812 junctionplacesports.com Enrichment programs consist of Flag Football Skills Session, Basketball Basics, Simply Soccer, Baseball Basics, and Sports Hour. Louisiana Fire Juniors 1918 18th St., Kenner 504.465.8224 lafiresoccer.com Soccer provides the best education through teamwork, confidence, discipline, and more. We have created a “PATHWAY FOR ALL” that benefits all players, at all ages and stages. of development. Soccer Shots 2920 Kingman St. 116, Metairie (main office) 504.441.9216 soccershots.org/neworleans An engaging soccer program with a focus on character development. We positively impact lives on and off the field through our best-inclass coaching, communication and curriculum.

SPORTS FACILITIES

Junction Place Sportsplex 5620 Crawford St., Elmwood 504.356.1812 junctionplacesports.com Enrichment programs consist of Flag Football Skills Session, Basketball Basics, Simply Soccer, Baseball Basics, and Sports Hour. Ochsner Fitness Center KIDSPORTS 1200 S. Clearview Pkwy, Harahan 504.733.1200 ochsnerfitness.com/kidsports Offering a variety of exciting programs that combine fun and fitness in a safe and friendly atmosphere for children ages 6 weeks to 13 years. YMCA of Greater New Orleans Belle Chasse: 8101 Highway 23, Belle Chasse, 504.392.9622 East Jefferson: 6691 Riverside Dr., Metairie, 504.888.9622 West St. Tammany: 71256 Francis Road, Covington, 985.893.9622 Educational Services (YES!): 219 Loyola Ave., New Orleans (New Orleans Public Library) 504.596.3842 ymcaneworleans.org/locations After-school programs serve K-middle school children with multiple options to explore and develop their interests and talents. Includes homework assistance, snacks, organized games, free fun time, arts and crafts, and outdoor recreation.

SWIMMING

Harry’s Dive Shop-Swim Smart 4709 Airline Drive, Metairie 504.909.2220 swim-smart.com Be at home in the water. Swim Smart offers a comprehensive range of classes for babies, kids, and adults. No prior experience necessary. Little Fins Swim Academy 325 Colonial Club Drive, Harahan littlefinsnola@gmail.com littlefins.net Offering outdoor two-week swim sessions and private lessons at home by arrangement. Voted NolaFamily’s Family Favorite in 2018, 2019, and 2021. Love Swimming 5221 S. Front St., New Orleans 504.891.4662 loveswimming.com The year-round, Uptown swim school offers lessons from ages six months to adult. Specializing in teaching the fearful to become expert swimmers, as well as special needs instruction for all ages. NU WAVE Swim Club Various locations around New Orleans 719.649.1606 teamunify.com/team/lawave/page/home Nu Wave Swim Club is a non-profit swim team for people of all ages and levels. Competitive swimming instruction and coaching, from stroke school through adult masters swimming. Ochsner Fitness Center Aquatics 1200 S. Clearview Pkwy, Ste. 1200, Harahan 504.733.1600 ochsnerfitness.com/kidsports/kids-aquatics-1 From Waterbabies to Arthritis Aquatics, the first-class aquatics facilities at Ochsner Fitness Center–Harahan allow us to offer a wide variety of programs for all ages. South Louisiana Swim Team 4828 Utica St., Metairie 504.256.6554 teamunify.com/team/laslst/page/home Year-round swim lessons, competitive swimming, and development classes for all ages. Also offer instructional education through Red Cross: Lifeguard and Swim Coach Certification, CPR, First Aid and WSI Instruction.

TENNIS

Audubon Park Tennis 6320 Tchoupitoulas St., New Orleans, Audubon Park 504.895.1042 audubonnatureinstitute.org/tennis-courts Ten well-manicured clay courts available for singles or doubles rental by reservation; group, semi-private, and private lessons available for all ages. City Park / Pepsi Tennis Center 5900 Marconi Dr., New Orleans 504.483.9383 neworleanscitypark.com/in-the-park/pepsi-tennis-center Twenty-six lighted hard and clay courts. Private and group lessons available for all ages. Pros listed here are independent contractors who use the Tennis Center’s courts for instruction. Premiere Tennis Nola, Henry Crocker, 504.919.5599, premiertennisnola.com

YOGA

City Park Movement and Art 4300 Dumaine St., New Orleans cityparkmovementandart@gmail.com cityparkmovementandart.com We offer dance, acrobatics, and musical theater classes. Register soon to find out why our classes always fill! Kidding Around Yoga with Bella New Orleans, LA 504.909.8881 bellab@kiddingaroundyoga.com kiddingaroundyoga.com/bella A complete, age-appropriate Yoga practice including breathing instruction, relaxation techniques, stretching and strengthening poses, all using fun-filled music, games, and imagination. Lolo’s Youth Yoga + Art Studio 6117 Magazine St New Orleans 415.786.3317 lolosstudio.com Art, fun fitness, yoga, and mindfulness are used to nurture confidence, friendship, strength, persistence, gratitude, kindness, and a positive attitude. After school classes: M/Th Ages eight and up; Tues ages five-seven.


2021 SCHOOL LISTINGS Jefferson Parish Alfred Bonnabel Magnet Academy High School 2801 Bruin Dr., Kenner, 504.443.4564, jpschools.org/bonnabel Public/Co-ed Principal: Sharon Meggs-Hamilton Grades Taught: 9th–12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 23:4 Number of Students: 1,285 Alice Birney Elementary School 4829 Hastings St, Metairie, LA 70006, 504.885.1044, jpschools.org/ birney Public/Co-ed Principal: Deborah Dantin Grades Taught: Pre-K–5th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Number of Students: 526 Archbishop Chapelle High School 8800 Veterans Memorial Blvd., Metairie, 504.467.3105, archbishopchapelle.org Catholic/Female Head of School: Connie Dantagnan, ‘88 Grades Taught: 8th–12th Tuition: $9,450 Student/Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Number of Students: 595 Open House: Nov. 4, 6 p.m. Virtual: not available at press time Archbishop Rummel High School 1901 Severn Ave., Metairie, 504.834.5592, rummelraiders.com Lasallian/Male Principal: Marc Milano, ’90 Grades Taught: 8th–12th Tuition: $9,450 Student/Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Number of Students: 634 Open House: Nov. 9, 6 p.m. Virtual: not available at press time

Arden Cahill Academy 3101 Wall Blvd., Gretna, 504.392.0902, ardencahillacademy.com Private/Co-ed Principal: Mary Kevin Cahill Grades Taught: 6 weeks–12th Grade Tuition: $700/month (Infant Centre); $7,500 (Pre-k3); $7,700 (Prek5–8th); and $8,300 (9th–12th) Student/Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Number of Students: 245 Open House: Sept. 30 Virtual: Open House on school’s website Athlos Academy of Jefferson Parish 979 Behrman Hwy., Terrytown, 504.290.2510, athlosjp.org Charter/Co-ed

Atonement Lutheran Church and School 6500 Riverside Dr., Metairie, 504.887.0225, alcs.org Lutheran/Co-ed Principal: Doug C. Molin Grades Taught: PreK3–8th Tuition: $3,475–5,785 Student/Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Number of Students: 187 Open House: Oct. 13 from 5-7 p.m. Virtual: See website for more information. Beary Cherry Tree 3117 Lake Villa Dr., Metairie, 504.455.1950, bearycherrytree.com Private/Co-ed Director: Paula Polito and Colleen Eddington Ages Taught: Birth–4 years Tuition: $185-200/week Student/Faculty Ratio: 4:1 (Infants), 5:1 (1&2 years), & 10:1 (3&4 years) Number of Students: 215 Open House: Middle of January Virtual Open House: not available at press time East Jefferson High School 400 Phlox Ave., Metairie, 504.888.7171, jpschools.org/eastjefferson Public/Co-ed Principal: Benjamin Moscona Grades Taught: 9th–12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 23:27 Number of Students: Approximately 1,168 Ecole Classique 5236 Glendale St., Metairie, 504.887.3507, ecoleclassique.com Private/Co-ed Head Master: Sal Federico Principal: Greg Federico, David Federico Grades Taught: 2 years–12th Grade Tuition: $3,000–8,700 Student/Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: not available at press time Freeman Learning Center (for students with learning differences) 1383 Napoleon St, Baton Rouge, LA 70802, 225.387.8531 Grades Taught: not available at press time Tuition: not available at press time Number of Students: 180 Open House: not available at press time Grace King High School 4301 Grace King Pl., Metairie, 504.888.7334, jpschools/king.org Public/Co-ed Principal: Dr. Gerod Macon Grades Taught: 9th–12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 21:41 Number of Students: 1,381 Haynes Academy for Advanced Studies 1416 Metairie Rd., Metairie, 504.837.8300, jpschools/haynes.org Magnet/Advanced Studies/Co-ed Principal: Karla Russo Grades Taught: 6th–12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Number of Students: About 950 Virtual: See website for more information. Jewish Community Day School of Greater New Orleans 3747 W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie, 504.887.4091, jcdsnola.org

Jewish/Co-ed Head of School: Dr. Brad Philipson Grades Taught: PreK–6th Grade Tuition: $9,850-12,335 Student/Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Number of Students: 80 Open House: Oct. 24, noon Virtual: Possible, still finalizing. John Calvin Presbyterian Playschool 4201 Transcontinental Dr., Metairie, 504.888.1378, johncalvinchurch.org/playschool Presbyterian/Co-ed Director: Lauren Crisler Oufnac Grades Taught: 1 year–Transitional Kindergarten (turning 5 by Dec. 31 of current school year) Tuition: $1,825-3,600 Student/Faculty Ratio: 7:2 Number of Students: 150 Open House: Jan. 8, 9-10:30 a.m. Virtual: Private virtual tours are available. John Curtis Christian School Upper School: 10125 Jefferson Hwy, River Ridge, 504.737.4621, johncurtis.com Christian/Co-ed Headmaster: J.T. Curtis Jr. Principal: Leon Curtis Grades Taught: 7th–12th Tuition: $7,750-8,500 (does not include transportation fees) Student/Faculty Ratio: 21:1 Number of Students: not available at press time Open Houses: Oct. 18, 5-6:30 p.m. Call 504.737.4621 to register. Virtual: See website for more information. Lower School: 10931 Jefferson Hwy, River Ridge, 504.737.0208, johncurtis.com Christian/Co-ed Principal: Deborah Curtis Eutsler and Steve Curtis Grades Taught: 15 months–6th Grade Tuition: $6,100-6,900 (does not include transportation fees) Student/Faculty Ratio: 21:1 Number of Students: not available at press time Open Houses: Oct. 18, 5-6:30 p.m. Call 504.737.4621 to register. Virtual: See website for more information. Kehoe-France School 720 Elise Ave., Metairie, 504.733.0472, kehoe-france.com Private/Co-ed Head of School: Dr. Tanya Price Grades Taught: 6 weeks–7th Grade Tuition: not available at press time Student/Faculty Ratio: 14:1 Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: not available at press time Virtual: not available at press time Kenner Discovery Health Sciences Academy Maine Campus: 2504 Maine Ave., Metairie, 504.233.4720 (Grades K-4th), discoveryhsf.org Vintage Campus: 201 Vintage Dr., Kenner, 504.233.4720 (Grades 5th-7th) Loyola Campus: 3837 Loyola Dr., Kenner, 504.233.4720 (Grades 8th-12th) Dr. John Ochsner Discovery Health Sciences Academy, Jefferson Campus: 2012 Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson, 504.233.4720 (Grades K-4th) Charter/Co-ed Head of School: Patty Glaser, Ph.D Grades Taught: K–12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Back to School Nights: Aug. 24 (5th-8th) Aug. 25 (1st-4th) (for current students only) Virtual: Open House Kinder Haus Montessori 5201 W. Napoleon Ave., Metairie, 504.454.2424, kinderhausmontessori.com

september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

Archbishop Shaw High School 1000 Salesian Lane, Marrero, 504.340.6727, archbishopshaw.org Catholic/Male Director: Fr. Steve Ryan, SDB Principal: Mrs. Terri Ducote Grades Taught: 8th–12th Tuition: $10,800 Student/Faculty Ratio: 19:1 Number of Students: 461 Open House: Nov. 14, 6-8 p.m.

Principal: Cheryl Martin(K-4) & Dr. Jordan Sanchez (5-8) Grades Taught: K–8th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: 900+ Open House: not available at press time Virtual: Tuesday, Dec. 1st, 6-7 p.m.

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Private/Co-ed Director: Jade H. Grades Taught: 1 year–K Tuition: not available at press time Student/Faculty Ratio: Toddlers 6:1 (ages 1–2), Preschool 8:1 (ages 2–4), & PreK & Kindergarten 12:1 (ages 3–6) Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: not available at press time Virtual: not available at press time The Little School 2216 Metairie Rd., Metairie, 504.835.9964, thelittleschoolmetairie. com Episcopal/Co-ed Director: Renée Hemel Grades Taught: 2-5 years Tuition: $2,950–6,100 (fees for extended hours not included) Student/Faculty Ratio: 6:1 (2 year olds), 7:1 (3 year olds) and 1:5 (pre-k 4) Number of Students: 62 Open House: Oct. 7th, 6 p.m. Virtual: Contact school for more information Metairie Park Country Day School 300 Park Rd., Metairie, 504.837.5204, mpcds.com Private/Co-ed Head of School: Rob Hereford Grades Taught: PreK–12th Tuition: $16,980–23,110 Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: 700 Open House: Oct. 21, (Pre-K) Jan. 6, (Grades K-2) Nov. 9, (Middle and Upper School) & Jan. 13, (Grades 6-12), 8:30 a.m. See website for additional open house and tour opportunities. Virtual: not available at press time Mount Olive Lutheran Preschool 315 Ridgelake Dr., Metairie, 504.835.3891, mountolivelutheran.net Lutheran/Co-ed Director: Virginia Crawford Ages Taught: 3–4 years Tuition: $375/monthly Student/Faculty Ratio: 7:2 Open House: not available at press time

www.nolafamily.com | september 2021

Patrick F. Taylor Science and Technology Academy 701 Churchill Pkwy, Avondale, 504.838.2249, jpschools.org/ domain/1122 Public-Magnet/Co-ed Principal: Sharmeika Daniels Grades Taught: 6th–12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Virtual: not available at press time

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Phoebe Hearst Elementary School 5208 Wabash St., Metairie, 504.887.8814, jpschools/hearst.org Public/Dual Language/Co-ed Principal: Brian Wahl Grades Taught: PreK–5th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: not available at press time Ridgewood Preparatory School 201 Pasadena Ave., Metairie, 504.835.2545, ridgewoodprep.com Private/Co-ed Headmaster: M.J. Montgomery Jr. Grades Taught: Pre-K–12th Tuition: $5,300-7,400 (fees not included) Student/Faculty Ratio: 8:1 Number of Students: 300 Open House: not available at press time Riverdale High School 240 Riverdale Dr., Jefferson, 504.833.7288, jpschools/riverdalehigh.org Public/Co-ed

Principal: Danielle Yunusah Grades Taught: 9th–12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: 1,160 St. Angela Merici School 835 Melody Dr., Metairie, 504.835.8491, stangelaschool.org Catholic/Co-ed Principal: Paige Bennett Grades Taught: PreK2–7th Tuition: not available at press time Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: not available at press time St. Ann Catholic School 4921 Meadowdale St., Metairie, 504.455.8383, stannschool.org Catholic/Co-ed Principal: Lindsay S. Guidry Grades Taught: PreK2–7th Tuition: $2,620–5,850 (fees not included) Student/Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: not available at press time St. Catherine of Siena Catholic School 400 Codifer Blvd., Metairie, 504.831.1166, scsgators.org Catholic/Co-ed Principal: Maria Ward Grades Taught: PreK3–7th Tuition: $6,052–6,737 (fees not included) Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: Jan. 13, 2022 St. Clement of Rome School 3978 W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie, 504.888.0386, scrschool.org Catholic/Co-ed Principal: Ms. Kimberly Downes, M.Ed. Grades Taught: PreK2–7th Tuition: not available at press time Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: not available at press time St. Edward the Confessor School 4901 W. Metairie Ave., Metairie, 504.888.6353, steddy.org Catholic/Co-ed Principal: Thomas E. Becker, Ph.D. Grades Taught: PreK1–7th Tuition: $6,100-6,400 Student/Faculty Ratio: 1: 6 (Prek 1), 1:8(Prek 2),1:13 (PreK 3), 1:20 (PreK4), 22 (1st-7th) Number of Students: 370 Open House: Nov. 18, 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. Virtual: Check website for more information. St. Elizabeth Ann Seton School 4335 Sal Lentini Pkwy, Kenner, 504.468.3524, seasschool.org Catholic/Co-ed Principal: Joan Kathmann Grades Taught: PreK1–7th Tuition: $5,525–5,825 Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: not available at press time St. Francis Xavier School 215 Betz Pl., Metairie, 504.833.1471, school.stfrancisxavier.com Catholic/Co-ed Principal: Jessica A. Dwyer, M.Ed. Grades Taught: PreK2–7th Tuition: $5,550–6,425 (fees not included) Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: not available at press time Virtual: not available at press time St. Louis King of France School

1609 Carrollton Ave., Metairie, 504-833-8224, slkfschool.com Catholic/Co-ed Principal: Pamela K. Schott Grades Taught: 6 weeks–7th Grade Tuition: not available at press time Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: not available at press time St. Martin’s Episcopal School 225 Green Acres Rd., Metairie, 504.733.0353, stmsaints.com Episcopal/Co-ed Head of School: Ford Jones Dieth Jr. ‘89 Grades Taught: 8 weeks–12th Grade Tuition: $12,100–24,650 Student/Faculty Ratio: 1:5 Total Number of Students: 600 Open House: not available at press time Virtual: not available at press time Thomas Jefferson High School for Advanced Studies 17 Gretna Blvd., Gretna, 504.363.4300, jpschools.org/jeffersonhigh Public/Magnet Academy/Co-ed Principal: Shawn Rome Grades Taught: 6th–12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: not available at press time West Jefferson High School 2200 8th St., Harvey, 504.368.6055, jpschools.org/westjefferson Public/Co-ed Principal: Vanessa Brown-Lewis Grades Taught: 9th–12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: 1,465 Open House: not available at press time

Orleans Parish Abeona House Child Discovery Center 3401 Canal St. New Orleans, 504.486.0510, abeonahouse.org Public/Co-ed Executive Director: Amelia Singleton Grades Taught: 6 weeks–5 years Tuition: $985-1,070 Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students Enrolled: not available at press time Open House: not available at press time Abramson Sci Academy 5552 Read Blvd., New Orleans, 504.373.6264, asa.collegiateacademies.org Public/Charter/Co-ed Principal: Anthony McElligot Grades Taught: 9th–12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: Sept. 15 Academy of the Sacred Heart Rosary Campus (Grades 5th–12th): 4521 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans Mater Campus (Ages 1–4th Grade): 4301 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans 504.269.1213, ashrosary.org Catholic/All Girls Interim Head of School: Micheline Dutil Tuition: $10,215–21,005 Grades Taught: Ages 1–12th Grade Student/Faculty Ratio: 6:1 Total Number of Students: 746 Personal Tours available online: ashrosary.org/tours Algiers Point Montessori 621 Bouny St., New Orleans, algierspointmontessori.com Private/Co-ed


Director: Grace Millsaps Grades Taught: PreK3-K Tuition: $535-1,015 Student/Faculty Ratio: 1:7 Number of Students: 12 Open House: No open house available at the moment but private tours are available. Alice M. Harte Charter School 5300 Berkley Dr., New Orleans, 504.373.6281, aliceharte.inspirenolacharterschools.org Public/Charter/Co-ed Principal: Desmond Moore Grades Taught: PreK–8th Tuition: Free, one PreK class is tuition based. Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: not available at press time Audubon Charter School - Uptown Lower School: 428 Broadway St., New Orleans, 504.324.7100, uptown.auduboncharter.com Public/Charter/Montessori/French/Co-ed CEO: Steve Corbett Principal: Missy Forcier Grades Taught: PreK3–3rd Tuition: $5,100 (PreK) Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Upper School: 1111 Milan St., New Orleans, 504.324.7110, uptown. auduboncharter.com Public/Charter/Montessori/French/Co-ed CEO: Latoye Brown Principal: Adrienne Collopy Grades Taught: 4th–8th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of students: not available at press time Open House: N/A Audubon Charter School - Gentilly 4720 Painters St., New Orleans, 504.309.9434, auduboncharter.com Public/Charter/Montessori/French/Co-ed CEO: Latoye Brown Principal: Tania Coleman Grades Taught: PreK3–5th Tuition: Free (K–2nd) & $5,100 (PreK3–K4) Student/Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Number of students: not available at press time Open House: N/A Arthur Ashe Charter School 1456 Gardena Dr., New Orleans, 504.373.6267, firstlineschools.org/ arthur-ashe-charter-school/ Public/Charter/Co-ed School Director: Shanda Gentry Grades Taught: K–8th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 30:2 Number of Students: 800 Open House: Sept. 16, 4:30-6:30 p.m.

Benjamin Franklin High School 2001 Leon C. Simon Dr., New Orleans, 504.286.2600, bfhsla.org Public/Charter/Co-ed Head of School: Dr. Patrick Widhalm Grades Taught: 9th–12th

Bricolage Academy of New Orleans 2426 Esplanade Ave., New Orleans, 504.539.4505, bricolagenola.org Public/Charter/Co-Ed CEO: Antigua Wilbern Principal: Antigua Wilbern Grades Taught: PreK–7th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: N/A Brother Martin High School 4401 Elysian Fields Ave., New Orleans, 504.283.1561, brothermartin.com Catholic/Male Principal: Ryan Gallagher Grades Taught: 8th–12th Tuition: $10,990 (interest free) Student/Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Number of Students: 1,086 Open House: Nov. 4, 4–7 p.m. Cabrini High School 1400 Moss St., New Orleans, 504.482.1193, cabrinihigh.com Catholic/Female Principal: Yvonne L. Hrapmann‘76 Grades Taught: 8th–12th Tuition: $11,400 (including deposit) Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: Oct. 7, 3:30–6:30 p.m. Virtual: not available at press time Cathedral Montessori School 9 Fortress Rd., New Orleans, 504.252.4871, cathedralmontessori.org Montessori/Co-ed Head of School: Billie Andersson Grades Taught: Ages 3–6 & Grades 1st–5th Tuition: $8,359 (Primary) & $9,990 (Elementary) Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Virtual: not available at press time Christian Brothers School (504) 486-6770, cbs-no.org Catholic, PreK-7 President: Joey Scaffidi Student/Faculty Ratio: 11:1 Total Number of Students: 800 City Park Campus: 8 Friederichs Ave., New Orleans 504.486.6770 Boys’ Middle School Principal: Michael Prat Grades 5-7, all boys Tuition: $8,350. Open House: Saturday, Oct. 16 Small Group Tours at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., and 1 p.m. Registration Required: visit cbs-no.org to sign up. Canal Street Campus: 4600 Canal St., New Orleans 504.488.4426 Girls’ Middle School Principal: Richard Neider Grades 5th-7th, all girls Tuition: $8,100 Open House: Saturday, Oct. 23 Small Group Tours at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., and 1 p.m. Registration Required: visit cbs-no.org to sign up Canal Street Campus: 4600 Canal St., New Orleans Co-Ed Elementary School Principal: Richard Neider Grades PreK-4th, boys and girls Tuition: $7,950 Open House: Saturday, Oct. 23. Small Group Tours at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., and 1 p.m. Registration Required: visit cbs-no.org to sign up. Registration Required: visit cbs-no.org to sign up.

De La Salle High School 5300 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans, 504.895.5717, delasallenola.com Catholic/Co-ed President: Paul Kelly Principal: Perry Rogers Grades Taught: 8th–12th Tuition: $9,850 Student/Faculty Ratio: 23:1 Number of Students: 576 Open House: Tues., Nov. 2 (4-7 p.m.) Ecole Bilingue de la Nouvelle-Orléans 812 General Pershing St., New Orleans, 504.896.4500, ebnola.net Private/French/Co-ed Head of School: Pierre-Loïc Denichou Grades Taught: 18 months–8th Grade Tuition: $10,050–17,355 Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Virtual: not available at press time Edna Karr High School 4400 General Meyer Ave., New Orleans, 504.302.7135, ednakarr.org Public/Charter/Co-ed Principal: Ingrid Jackson Grades Taught: 9th–12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: 1,082 Edward Hynes Charter School Lakeview Campus: 990 Harrison Ave., New Orleans, 504.324.7160, hynesschool.com Public/Charter/Co-ed CEO: Dr. Michelle B. Douglas Principal: not available at press time Grades Taught: PreK-8th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: No planned open house at the moment UNO Campus: 6101 Chatham Drive, New Orleans, 504.359.7700, hynesschool.com Principal: not available at press time Grades: K-2nd Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: No planned open house at the moment. ENCORE Academy 2518 Arts St., New Orleans, 504.444.2224, encorelearning.org Public/Charter/Co-ed/Arts Focused CEO/School Leader: Terri Smith Grades Taught: Pre-K4–8th Tuition: Free (Pre-K–8th), Pre-K is LA4 (free) and tuition based Student/Faculty Ratio: 12:1 Number of Students: 500 Holy Cross School Middle and High School Campus (Grades 5th-12th): 5500 Paris Ave., New Orleans Primary School Campus (Grades PK-4): 5601 Elysian Fields Ave., New Orleans 504.942.3100, holycrosstigers.com Catholic/Male Headmaster: Eric DesOrmeaux Chief School Officer: not available at press time Dean of Primary School: Brian Kitchen Dean of Middle School: Ronnie Kornick Dean of High School: Phillip White Grades Taught: PreK–12th Tuition: $8,725–9,315 Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: Call the Admissions office at 504.942.1871 or 504.942.1859. Holy Name of Jesus 6325 Cromwell Pl., New Orleans, 504.861.1466, hnjschool.org

september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

Benjamin Franklin Elementary Mathematics & Science School Jefferson Campus (Grades PreK–5th): 1116 Jefferson Ave., New Orleans Nashville Campus (Grades 6th–8th): 401 Nashville Ave., New Orleans 504.304.3932, babyben.org CEO/Principal: Charlotte Matthew Grades Taught: PreK–8th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: not available at press time

Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 20:1 Number of Students: 1,020 Open House: Oct. 7, 5:30–8 p.m.

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Catholic/Co-ed Principal: Kirsch Jones Wilberg, M.A. Grades Taught: PreK3–7th Tuition: $7,210–9,265 Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: 529 Open House: Oct. 21 Virtual: Not one planned at the moment International High School of New Orleans 727 Carondelet St., New Orleans, 504.613.5703, ihsnola.org Public-Charter/Co-ed Head of School: Sean Wilson Principal: Adierah Berger Grades Taught: 9th–12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: on website Dixon Campus - French and Spanish language immersion 4040 Eagle St., New Orleans, 504.934.4875, isl-edu.org Public/Charter/Co-ed Principal: Rosa Alvarado Grades Taught: K–2nd Tuition: Free Uptown Campus - French and Spanish language immersion 1400 Camp St., New Orleans, 504.654.1088, isl-edu.org Public/Charter/Co-ed Principal: Laura Adelman-Cannon Grades Taught: 3rd–8th Tuition: Free Westbank Campus - Spanish language immersion 502 Olivier St., New Orleans, 504.274.4571, isl-edu.org Public/Charter/Co-ed Principal: Brandon Ferguson Grades Taught: K–5th Tuition: Free Isidore Newman School 1903 Jefferson Ave., New Orleans, 504.899.5641, newmanschool.org Private/Co-ed Head of School: Dale M. Smith Grades Taught: 6 weeks–12th Tuition: $20,712–26,987, includes fees Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: 1,200 Open House: not available at press time

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KIPP Frederick Douglass High School 3820 St. Claude Ave. (Douglass), New Orleans, 504.373.6255, frederickadouglass.kippneworleans.org Public/Charter/Co-ed School Leader: Mrs. Towana Pierre-Floyd Grades Taught: 9th–12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time

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La Escuelita 1519 Dumaine Street, New Orleans, 504.784.0364, aescuelitaneworleans.com Private Day Care/Co-ed/Spanish Immersion Head of School: not available at press time Grades Taught: not available at press time Tuition: not available at press time Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: not available at press time Lake Forest Elementary Charter School 11110 Lake Forest Blvd., New Orleans, 504.826.7140, lakeforestcharter.org Public/Charter/Co-ed School Leader: Mardele S. Early Principal: not available at press time Grades Taught: PreK–8th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: Over 600 Open House: Aug. 26

Livingston Collegiate Academy 7301 Dwyer Rd, New Orleans, 504.503.0004, lca.collegiateacademies.org Public/Charter/Co-ed Principal: Evan Stoudt Grades Taught: 9th–12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: 600 Louise S. McGehee School 2343 Prytania St., New Orleans, 504.561.1224, mcgeheeschool.com Private/Female (Little Gate is co-ed) Headmistress: Dr. Kimberly Field-Marvin Grades Taught: Infants–12th Grade Tuition: $7,200-23,350 Student/Faculty Ratio: 8:1 Number of Students: 458 Open House: Oct. 7 Virtual: Tour available online, Oct. 13 Lusher Charter School Lower School: 7315 Willow St., New Orleans, 504.862.5110, lusherschool.org Middle and High School: 5624 Freret St., New Orleans, 504.304.3960, lusherschool.org Public/Charter/Co-ed President/CEO: Kathy Riedlinger Grades Taught: K–12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 16:1 Number of Students: 1,761 Open House: not available at press time Lycée Français de la Nouvelle Orléans Patton Campus (Grades PreK4–2nd): 5951 Patton St., New Orleans Johnson Campus (Grades 3rd–9th): 1800 Monroe St., New Orleans 504.620.5500, lfno.org Public/Charter/Co-ed CEO: Danielle Dufauchard Lower School Principal: Danielle Dufauchard Upper School Principal: Chana Benenson Grades Taught: not available at press time Tuition: not available at press time Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: 817 Open House: not available at press time Virtual: Check the school’s website. Mary McLeod Bethune Elementary Charter School 2401 Humanity St., New Orleans, 504.324.7076, bethunenola.org Public/Charter/Co-ed Principal/CEO: Mary Haynes-Smith Grades Taught: PreK–8th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Morris Jeff Community School Elementary and (Grades PreK–6th): 211 S. Lopez St., New Orleans, 504.373.6258 Middle School (Grades 6th-8th): 2733 Esplanade New Orleans, 504.503.0730 High School (Grades 9th–12th): 1301 N. Derbigny St., New Orleans, 504.355.0210 morrisjeffschool.org Public/Charter/Co-ed Head of School: Patricia Perkins Grades Taught: PreK4–12th Tuition: not available at press time Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: Virtual. Check the school’s website. Mount Carmel Academy 7027 Milne Blvd., New Orleans, 504.288.7626, mcacubs.com Catholic/Female President: Sr. Camille Anne Campbell Principal: Beth Ann Simno Grades Taught: 8th–12th

Tuition: $9,800 Student/Faculty Ratio: 9:1 Number of Students: 1,250 Open House: Oct. 14, 3-7 p.m. Virtual: not available at press time New Orleans Center for Creative Arts (NOCCA) 2800 Chartres St., New Orleans, 504.940.2787, nocca.com Public-Arts/Co-ed President: Kyle Wedberg Grades Taught: 6th–12th Student/Faculty Ratio: 1:15 Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: Not one planned at the moment. New Orleans JCC Nursery School and Pre-K 5342 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans, 504.897.0143, nojcc.org Jewish/Open to all/Co-ed Director: Adrienne Shulman Grades Taught: 13 months–5 years (including Pre-K) Tuition: $6,900–11,990 Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies by age Virtual: Virtual meet-and-greet available. Contact the director for more information. New Orleans Military & Maritime Academy 425 O’Bannon St., New Orleans, 504.227.3810, nomma.net Principal: Daniel Garbarino Grades Taught: 8th–12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 23:1 Number of Students: 1,000 Open House: Virtual, TBD Nola Nature School 1009 Harrison Ave New Orleans, 504.442.0481, nolanatureschool. com Private/Co-ed Founder/Director: Clare Loughran Grades taught: PreK-2nd Tuition: $3,600–9,000 Student/Faculty Ratio: 5:1 Number of Students: not available at press time Open Houses: not available at press time Royal Castle Child Development Center 3800 Eagle St., New Orleans, 504.488.1045, royalcastlekids.com Private/Co-ed Director: Pearlie Harris Grades Taught: 6 weeks–5 years Tuition: Varies by age. Student/Faculty Ratio: Low; meets NAEYC/National Standards Number of Students: 100 Open House: Tours arranged daily; call to schedule. Samuel J. Green Charter School 2319 Valence St, New Orleans, 504.304-3532, firstlineschools.org/ samuel-j-green-charter-school Public/Charter/Co-Ed Director: Ava Lee Grades: PreK–8th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: not available at press time Sophie B. Wright Charter School 1426 Napoleon Ave., New Orleans, 504.304-3916, sophiebwrightschool.com Public/Charter/Co-ed Principal: Sharon L. Clark Grades Taught: 9th–12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: not available at press time St. Andrew the Apostle Roman Catholic School 3131 Eton St., New Orleans, 504.394.4171, sasno.org Catholic/Co-ed


Principal: Katherine Marchese Grades Taught: 8 weeks–7th Grade Tuition: not available at press time Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at time of press Number of Students: not available at time of press Open House: not available at press time Tours by appointment given every Wednesday at 9 a.m. St. Andrew’s Episcopal School 8012 Oak St., New Orleans, 504.861.3743, saesnola.org Episcopal/Co-ed Head of School: Kathryn Fitzpatrick Grades Taught: 12 months–8th Grade Tuition: $14,240–15,440 (PreK–8th) Student/Faculty Ratio: 15:1 Number of Students: 228 Open House: Oct. 21, 9-11 a.m. (PK3-8th) Virtual: Admissions Information Session Nov. 10, noon St. Augustine High School 2600 A.P. Tureaud Ave., New Orleans, 504.944.2424, staugnola.org Catholic/Male President/CEO: Kenneth St. Charles, Ph.D. - ‘81 Grades Taught: 8th–12th Tuition: $9,175 Student/Faculty Ratio: 13:1 Number of Students: 512 Open House: Dec. 7 (Virtual and in person) St. George’s Episcopal School 923 Napoleon Ave., New Orleans, 504.891.5509, stgnola.org Episcopal/Co-ed Head of School: Dr. Joseph Kreutziger Grades Taught: Nursery–8th Grade Tuition: Preschool and PreK3: $6,355–13,700 PreK4-8th grade: $11,495-23,255 (fees not included) Student/Faculty Ratio: 5:1 Number of Students: 385 Open House: Oct. 7 (Age 1-Kindergarten) 8:30-10:30 a.m., Nov. 13 (all grades) 9-11 a.m., Jan. 20 (all grades) 8:30-10:30 a.m. Virtual: Virtual Tours Available St. John Lutheran School 3937 Canal St., New Orleans, 504.488.6641,stjohnlutherannola.com Lutheran/Co-ed Principal: Bethany Gonski Grades Taught: 3 years–8th Grade Tuition: $6,100-6,600 Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies by grade Number of Students: 140 Open House: Call to schedule a tour.

St. Paul’s Episcopal School 6249 Canal Blvd., New Orleans, 504.488.1319,stpauls-lakeview.org Episcopal/Co-ed Head of School: Charleen Schwank Grades Taught: 6 weeks–8th Grade Tuition: $12,110–15,475 Student/Faculty Ratio: 7.5:1 Number of Students: 290 In-Person Open Houses: TBD St. Pius X Catholic School 6600 Spanish Fort Blvd., New Orleans, 504.282.2811, school. stpiusxnola.org

St. Rita Catholic School 65 Fontainebleau Dr., New Orleans,504.866.1777, stritanola.org Catholic/Co-ed Principal: Shanda Theriot Grades Taught: PreK–7th Tuition: $5,200-11,700 Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: N/A Stuart Hall School for Boys 2032 S. Carrollton Ave., New Orleans,504.861.1954, stuarthall.org Catholic/Male Head of School: Brian Moscona Grades Taught: PreK3–7th Tuition: $13,150–15,750 Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies by grade level Number of Students: 357 Open House: Private tours available by appointment. Contact Libby B. McGinn, Director of Admissions for more information. (lmcginn@stuarthall.org) Trinity Episcopal School 1315 Jackson Ave., New Orleans, 504.525.8661, trinitynola.org Episcopal/Co-ed Headmaster: The Rev. E. Gary Taylor Grades Taught: 15 months–8th Grade Tuition: $5,925–23,915 Student/Faculty Ratio: 6:1 Number of Students: 301 Virtual: Contact the admin office for a virtual Open House tour. University Montessori School 7508 Burthe St., New Orleans, 504.865.1659, umsnola.org Montessori/Co-ed Director: Teddi Locke Grades Taught: 20 months–6 years Tuition: $7,550–12,500 Student/Faculty Ratio: Varies by age group Number of Students: 40 Open House: Aug. 29, 4-6 p.m. School tours are offered during the week.

Tuition: $11,655 Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press timNumber of Students: not available at press time Open House: not available at press time Virtual: Contact Becky McLellan, Director of Admissions, at 504.866.5292, admissions@uanola.org, or visit uanola.org for digital tour package information. Waldorf School of New Orleans Main Campus (Nursery–8th Grade): 2539 Columbus St., New Orleans, 504.525.2420, waldorfnola.org Early Childhood Center: 2010 Peniston St., New Orleans, 504.345.2236, waldorfnola.org Waldorf/Co-ed Head of School: Joseph Peychaud Grades Taught: 18 months–8th Grade Tuition: $6,621–13,301 Student/Faculty Ratio: 10:1 Number of Students: 146 Open House: No open house planned due to COVID-19. Warren Easton Charter High School 3019 Canal St., New Orleans, 504.324.7400, wechs.org Public/Charter/Co-ed Principal: Mervin Jackson Grades Taught: 9th–12th Tuition: Free Student/Faculty Ratio: 17:1 Number of Students: 989 Open House: N/A

If you don’t seeyour school here, email jenny@nolafamily.com.

Ursuline Academy 2635 State Street, New Orleans, 504.861.9150, go.uanola.org Catholic/Female President: Dr. Margarita O’Byrne Curtis Grades Taught: 1 year–12th Grade

september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

St. Mary’s Dominican High School 7701 Walmsley Ave., New Orleans, 504.865.9401, stmarysdominican.org Catholic/Female President: Dr. Cynthia A. Thomas Principal: Carolyn Favre Grades Taught: 8th–12th Tuition: $10,700 Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: Oct. 21, 3:30-6:30 p.m. Register online.

Catholic/Co-ed Principal: Deirdre D. Macnamara Grades Taught: PreK3–7th Tuition: $5,925–6,175 Student/Faculty Ratio: not available at press time Number of Students: not available at press time Open House: Visit website for more information. Virtual: Visit website for more information.

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september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

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SPOTLIGHT

Glass Half Full From Humble Beginnings to a Greener Future By Anthony Bui Glass Half Full was started by Franziska Trautmann and Max Steitz with the intention of reimagining recycling by diverting waste from landfills, turning it into a resource for the community, combating environmental racism, and creating high-quality green jobs in our local economy. Since starting their company in January 2020, they have diverted over one million pounds of glass from landfills. What initially started in a small backyard has blossomed into a 40,000 square foot facility on Louisa Street. This all could not be done without the help of the New Orleans community, though. When they shared about their initial startup, they expressed much gratitude for the community and how crowdfunding campaigns helped drastically.

Understanding the Process With free drop-off glass recycling for all Louisiana residents three days a week, as well as a paid door-to-door pickup service for Orleans residents and businesses, Glass Half Full is able to divert 100,000 pounds of glass each month.

www.nolafamily.com | september 2021

With all of this glass, they then take it and convert it into a resource that actually benefits the community that recycles it. Trautmann explains the process, “Once the glass reaches our warehouse, it is crushed into fine sand or glass gravel which can be utilized to solve a host of

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other challenges, from disaster relief sandbags, to research for coastal restoration and bioremediation, to green construction, and even Mardi Gras beads.” Environmental racism is another issue that Glass Half Full tackles. This is done by decreasing landfill waste and educating the community. The best way to tackle any problem is by first understanding it. Through strategic partnerships with community organizations, they are able to properly and effectively do this. This leads to a win for the Earth and for future generations.

Cheers To the Future The future is definitely looking a lot greener, and the plans and dreams of both Trautmann and Steitz only look to improve on that. With plans to expand drop-off sites as well as open up locations all across the state of Louisiana and the country, ambition is definitely not lacking. The yearning to grow and expand to cities is the mentality that this planet needs to ease the stress that landfills can cause. Giving cities that do not recycle their glass an opportunity to do so significantly reduces the stress on the land. What started in their backyard has already blossomed into something so beautiful. One can only imagine how much greater Glass Half Full can become in the future.


GEAR TO GET

BACK TO SCHOOL Stainless Steel Lunch Boxes “A lunchbox for every appetite!” Choose different box sizes and customize with inserts, decorative magnets, and carrying bags. Planetbox.com, $32.95 and up.

WonderSip Reusable Straws Do you love straws but hate the waste? Now you can enjoy the world’s first, easy-to-clean, “one-click open” reusable straw. Crafted with a one-piece design that’s eco-friendly, hygienic and more! Wondersip.com, $19.99.

Reusable Cloth Face Mask Set This fun set features five vibrant face mask designs for each day of the school week. Plus, one mesh laundry bag, a daily mask schedule, and a designated space on the mask to write your child’s name! Shop.crayola.com, $29.99.

Midliner Highlighters

BlueFire Kids Headphones These headphones offer a vivid sound field, sound clarity, sound shock feeling, and ambient noise isolation - perfect for those enrolled in virtual classes! Amazon.com, $15.99.

september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

More than just your simple everyday highlighter, the dual ends allow for multiple line weights and thicknesses, and the translucent ink makes it perfect for layering with other colors and products. Zebrapen.com, $9.95-$29.95.

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5

MOM ABOUT TOWN

THINGS

I’M LOVING RIGHT NOW

SARAH MCCALL

FUN We became members of the Audubon Nature Institute this year. We have enjoyed countless trips to the zoo. Monkey Hill is always one of our favorite stops. Audubon Nature Institute, audubonnatureinstitute.org

EXPLORE I lived in New Orleans for years before I learned about Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve. It’s hard to believe that such a quiet, secluded wilderness is so close to the city. We love hiking there with our kids and looking for alligators.

www.nolafamily.com | september 2021

Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, nps.gov/jela/index.htm

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STYLE Michelle Bryan at Glenda’s Cuttin’ Loose on Maple Street has been cutting my hair for many years. When my oldest son was ready for his first haircut, she was the obvious choice. She’s the official stylist for the whole family now.

Glenda’s Cuttin’ Loose, 7927 Maple St., cuttinloosenola.com

LUNCH DATE

Sarah McCall has been the Director of Production for the New Orleans Opera for six years. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the company continued to produce opera–both filmed and live. This fall, a full season of live opera will return to the Mahalia Jackson Theatre and other venues around town. When not overseeing the moving parts and details involved in producing an opera, she and her husband, Grant, enjoy exploring the city with their three children Adrian, four, and twins, John and Caroline, two.

Saba, 5757 Magazine St., eatwithsaba.com

My husband and I love the convenience of a lunch date rather than a full evening out–no need for a babysitter, no late nights (our kids are early risers!), no reservations needed. Most recently, we enjoyed an amazing lunch at Saba on Magazine Street.

MUSIC During the pandemic, I missed making music with the New Orleans Civic Symphony. I have been playing in this community orchestra for more than 10 years. I am excited to reunite with them this fall. New Orleans Civic Symphony, neworleanscivicsymphony.org


september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

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www.nolafamily.com | september 2021


OUT & ABOUT

September

1 WEDNESDAY

Louisiana’s Bullying Prevention Law Families Helping Families of Greater New Orleans. Join as Louisiana’s Bullying Prevention law is discussed. This law applies to all public school students, regular education, and special education. Registration required, fhfofgno.org. Free. Noon-1 pm.

2 THURSDAY Special Needs Cooking Class Culinary Kids Mandeville, 915 Marigny Ave., Mandeville. For ages 10-adult (developmental ages), students will practice independent living skills, social skills, kitchen safety and confidence in the kitchen. culinarykidsns.com. Weekly classes, Thursdays, 5:30-7:30 pm. $165/month.

Parents’ Night Out Culinary Kids Mandeville, 915 Marigny Ave., Mandeville. For ages 5-12, parents can drop off their kids for a 3-hour, movie themed dinner/dessert/pajama party. Reservations required. culinarykidsns.com/Kids-Programs/ParentsNight-Out. Weekly, Fridays, 6-9 pm. $35/child.

4 SATURDAY Back to School Bash Barn Hill Preserve, 11342 Highway 955 E, Ethel. Celebrate the end of summer at Barn Hill Preserve. Admission includes: animal shows, petting zoo, games, kangaroo joey

Live Virtual Storytime New Orleans Public Library. Read, sing, talk, write, and play together via Zoom in a format designed by the NOPL team of children’s librarians for children ages 2-5 and their caregivers. Siblings welcome. nolalibrary.org. Free. 10:30-11 am.

Open Canoeing & Fishing Joe W. Brown Rec Center, 5601 Read Blvd. Sign out canoeing equipment or fishing tackle for a self-guided experience at Joe W. Brown Park. Staff and volunteers will be on hand to provide paddle and fishing lessons. Free and open to all ages. Registration required, nordc.org/outdoors. Continues every Saturday Nov. 6, 10 am-2 pm. Science Saturday: Rocketry INFINITY Science Center, One Discovery Circle, Pearlington. During this 2 hour Rocketry class, you’ll get to build a model rocket and learn some of the science behind rockets. $30/non-members, $15/members. Register at: eventbrite.com/e/science-saturday-rocketry-tickets-166096173125. 1-3 pm.

5 SUNDAY Free Family Sunday Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road. Pack a picnic, explore the children’s Discovery Garden, or simply bring your facial covering and walking shoes to stroll the eight acres of beautiful gardens. longue.com. Free. 1-5 pm.

7 MONDAY - LABOR DAY 8 WEDNESDAY

Brushes, Buddies, and Beyond Belle Chasse YMCA, 8101 Highway 23, Belle Chasse. This “painting party” specifically for individuals with diverse abilities from ages 5 to 18 years old (adults welcome as well) is held weekly in a safe and relaxing environment. Artists get to create their own unique paintings, which can be used for keepsakes or gifts after the session is completed. Registration required, ymcaneworleans.org. Wednesdays, Sept. 8-Nov. 11, 6-7 pm. $80/person.

9 THURSDAY Open Archery Joe W. Brown Archery Range, 5601 Read Blvd. Swing by NORD’s archery range every Thursday to unwind, learn a new skill, or both. A certified archery instructor will be on hand providing safety instruction and tips about technique and form. Ages 8+, equipment provided. Reservation required, nordc.org/outdoors. 4-7 pm.

10 FRIDAY Hello, Dolly! Rivertown Theaters, 325 Minor St., Kenner. This Tony award winning classic bursts with humor, romance, energetic dance, and some of the greatest songs in musical theatre history. rivertowntheaters.com. Showtimes vary by date. Ticket prices vary by seating selection.

september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

3 FRIDAY

encounter, and more. barnhillpreserve.com. $15/adult, one free child per paying adult. 8 am.

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Kids Night Out West St. Tammany YMCA, 71256 Francis Road, Covington. Kids enjoy a pizza dinner, activities, and movies will relate to each week’s theme (Fairytale Fantasy). ymcaneworleans.org. /$20/non-member, $10/member. Drop off: 5:45-6:15 pm; Pick up: 10 pm. Zoo-To-Do For Kids Audubon Zoo. Presented by Children’s Hospital, this transforms Audubon Zoo into a magical playland featuring animal encounters, low/no-touch activities, food, and entertainment. events.audubonnatureinstitute.org/ztdk. 5-8 pm. $25/person.

11 SATURDAY Art Market Presented by Arts Council New Orleans Goldring/Woldenberg Great Lawn, City Park. Take a stroll and discover a variety of artworks from jewelry and ceramics to paintings and woodworks. artsneworleans. org/event/arts-market-of-new-orleans. 10 am-4 pm.

www.nolafamily.com | september 2021

Dog Days on the Bayou Bayou Paddlesports, 1101 Florida Ave. Bring your pooch or furry friend for a fun and adventurous paddle adventure. bayoupaddlesports.com. Pricing varies. 9 am-5 pm.

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Fall Garden Festival New Orleans Botanical Garden, City Park. This annual festival features exhibits, sales throughout the garden, a Children’s Fun Fest activities area, educational programs, cooking demonstrations, music, arts & crafts, and more. neworleanscitypark.com/events/fall-garden-festival. $10/ adult, $5/children (5-12), Free/children under 4 years old and Friends of City Park members. 9 am-5 pm. Continues Sept. 12, 9 am-4 pm. Fallin’ for Christmas Market Pontchartrain Convention & Civic Center, 4545 Williams Blvd., Kenner. The 27th annual market will feature arts, crafts, artisans, and boutiques. steinhauerproductions.

com. 10 am-5 pm. Continues on Sept. 12. Free Family Day & COVID-19 Vaccination Opportunity Ogden Museum of Southern Art, 925 Camp St. Enjoy a Passport to the South Scavenger Hunt, take-home Art Activity Bag with supplies, and more. While there, receive your COVID-19 vaccination and 4 FREE admission tickets to Ogden Museum to use at a later date, a 20% off coupon to the Ogden Museum Store, and more! ogdenmuseum.org. 10 am-5 pm. Jazz’n Vines Featuring Sam Warren as “Ray” Pontchartrain Vineyards, 81250 Highway 1082, Bush. Enjoy this fall concert series featuring Sam Warren’s tribute to Ray Charles. pontchartrainvineyards.com. $10/person, under 17 are free. Gates open at 5 pm, music from 6:30-9 pm. Junior Historians Fall Course Longue Vue House and Gardens, 7 Bamboo Road. This four-week course for ages 11-16 will build upon our Junior Historians volunteer program, by offering deeper historical content and curatorial training for students interested in more independent work. longuevue.com. Saturdays, Sept. 11, 18, and 25 and October 2, 10 am-12:30 pm. $200/ non-members, $180/members. Live Virtual Storytime New Orleans Public Library. Read, sing, talk, write, and play together via Zoom in a format designed by the NOPL team of children’s librarians for children ages 2-5 and their caregivers. nolalibrary.org. Free. 10:30-11 am.

New Orleans Saints vs. Green Bay Packers Caesars Superdome. The Saints kick off the regular season vs the Green Bay Packers in the Superdome. caesarssuperdome.com. 3:25 pm.

13 MONDAY Girls Who Code (Virtual) New Orleans Public Library. Build coding and creativity skills with Girls Who Code, a weekly club for 6th-12th grade students to learn about computer science in a fun and safe environment. 4-5 pm.

17 FRIDAY Hancock Whitney Zoo-To-Do Audubon Zoo. This adult-only fundraiser will celebrate Audubon’s conservation efforts for whooping cranes and features delectable cuisine from local restaurants and Audubon Catering and premium cocktails. auduboninstitute.org/zootodine. 7-11 pm. Kids Night Out East Jefferson YMCA, 6691 Riverside Drive, Metairie. Kids enjoy a pizza dinner, activities, and movies will relate to each week’s theme (Mad Scientist). ymcaneworleans.org. /$20/non-member, $10/member. Drop off: 6:30-6:45 pm; Pick up: 10 pm.

18 SATURDAY

12 SUNDAY

Family Day Paddles Bayou Paddlesports, 1101 Florida Ave. Introduce your child to the world of paddling. Pricing varies. 9 am-5 pm.

Arts for All Louisiana Children’s Museum, 15 Henry Thomas Drive. Enjoy free admission to the Louisiana Children’s Museum thanks to the Arts For All Program sponsored by The Helis Foundation. lcm.org. Free, registration required. 11:30 am-4:30 pm.

Live Virtual Storytime New Orleans Public Library. Read, sing, talk, write, and play together via Zoom in a format designed by the NOPL team of children’s librarians for children ages 2-5 and their caregivers. Siblings welcome. nolalibrary.org. Free. 10:30-11 am.


Pink Tutu Run Fountainebleau State Park, 62883 Group Camp Road, Mandeville. Grab your family and friends and enjoy the 3rd annual event. Wear a pink tutu in support of the event and take plenty of photos. pinktuturun.com. $25/person. 8:30 am. “¿Que Vola, NOLA?” Book Reading Algiers Regional Library, 3014 Holiday Drive. Explore the commonalities of New Orleans and Cuba with “¿Que Vola, NOLA?” authors Ramiro Diaz and Abigail Isaacoff at this outdoor storytime. For ages 3-8. Siblings welcome. nolalibrary.org. Free. 2-3 pm. Smithsonian Museum Day Museum Day is a one-day event in which participating museums and cultural institutions across the country provide free entry to anyone presenting a Museum Day ticket. Participants are allowed to download one ticket per email address. The ticket provides free general admission for two people. Visit smithsonianmag.com to find a participating museum near you.

19 SUNDAY JCC Block Party New Orleans JCC, 5342 St. Charles Ave. Hang out on the back field, enjoying live music and family-friendly activities. Food and drinks will be available for purchase. nojcc.org. Free and open to the public, RSVP is appreciated. 4-6 pm.

21 TUESDAY Teen Advisory Board New Orleans Public Library. Teens, make your voice heard at the first meeting of NOPL’s new virtual Teen Advisory Board (TAB). Share your thoughts about how the Library can better serve you. nolalibrary.org. Free. 4-5 pm.

24 FRIDAY Love in the Garden 2021

Presented by Hancock Whitney New Orleans Museum of Art. Celebrate the visual and culinary artists of New Orleans with a festive evening featuring New Orleans cuisine, spirits, and entertainment. noma.org. Patron Party (7-8 pm): $125/non-members, $100/member; Garden Party (8-11 pm): $75/non-member, $50/member.

25 SATURDAY Beignet Fest Festival Grounds, City Park. From traditional treats covered in powdered sugar to savory options, Beignet Fest features 30+ beignet dishes from local restaurants, caterers, and food trucks. Proceeds benefit the Tres Doux Foundation to raise awareness and funds for autism programs. Advanced ticket purchase required. beignetfest.com. $20/person, under 4 free with paid adult. 10 am-6 pm. CHAIRish the Children Louisiana Children’s Museum, 15 Henry Thomas Drive. Celebrate 35 years of play with gourmet cuisine and spirits, exciting auction packages, one of a kind chairs, live entertainment, and more. one.bidpal.net/lcmgala. $100/ non-member, $85/member. 8:30-11 pm. Jazz’n Vines Featuring Charmaine Neville Pontchartrain Vineyards, 81250 Highway 1082, Bush. Enjoy this fall concert series featuring Charmaine Neville. pontchartrainvineyards.com. $10/person, under 17 are free. Gates open at 5 pm, music from 6:30-9 pm. Live Virtual Storytime New Orleans Public Library. Read, sing, talk, write, and play together via Zoom in a format designed by the NOPL team of children’s librarians for children ages 2-5 and their caregivers. Siblings welcome. nolalibrary.org. Free. 10:30-11 am. “¿Que Vola, NOLA?” Book Reading Children’s Resource Center Library, 913 Napoleon Ave. Explore the commonalities of New Orleans and Cuba with “¿Que Vola, NOLA?” authors Ramiro Diaz and Abigail

Isaacoff at this outdoor storytime. For ages 3-8. Siblings welcome. nolalibrary.org. Free. 2-3 pm. Sensory Friendly Mornings National World War II Museum. Individuals of all ages with special needs and their families will enjoy early access to the Museum with modifications to make the experience more sensory friendly. nationalww2museum.org. 8 am-5 pm.

27 MON Urban Enslavement Tour Opening Hermann-Grima + Gallier House, 820 St. Louis St. Visitors will learn about the experience of enslaved women, men, and children in urban settings and how they differentiate from that of rural plantations. hgghh.org/events/ urbanenslavement-tour. $15/adult, $12/children (8-12), under 8 free. 10 am-4 pm.

28 TUES Teen Take & Make Craft Workshop New Orleans Public Library. Starting on the first of the month, stop by any Library location to pick up your craft kit. Then, assemble the craft with your favorite teen libraries on Zoom. Register at nolalibrary.org. Free. 4-5 pm.

30 THURS French Quarter Festival Various locations, French Quarter. More than 20 stages celebrating local sounds from traditional and contemporary jazz to R&B, New Orleans funk, and more. frenchquarterfest.org. Continues through Oct. 2. WYES The Worlds of Hemingway Gala WYES Paulette and Frank Stewart Innovation Center for Educational Media, 916 Navarre Ave. Enjoy an evening inspired by the American novelist, short-story writer, journalist, and sportsman - Ernest Hemingway. Proceeds benefit WYES. wyes.org. Gala: $200/person; unior Gala: $100/person. 8-11 pm.

september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

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IN THE KNOW

EXPECTING, BABIES, & TODDLERS Child Safety Seat Inspection Station Louisiana State Police Troop B 2101 I-10 Service Rd., Kenner. Wednesdays, 1–4 pm. Walk-in or call 504.471.2780 for an appointment. Free.

Ochsner Baptist To register: ochsnerstore.org/collections/events-andclasses. Breastfeeding Class New moms will learn the basics of breastfeeding. Sept. 13, 6:30–8 p.m. Free.

Ochsner Kenner

To register: ochsnerstore.org/collections/events-andclasses. Breastfeeding Class Discuss breastfeeding techniques and AAP recommendations. Sept. 14, 6–8 p.m. Free. Baby Care Class Learn information on basic baby care, normal behavior, comforting baby, and how to keep baby safe. Sept. 22, 6–8 p.m. Free.

West Jefferson Medical Center Pre-registration is required: wjmc.org/events-calendar. Labor and Birth Learn the process of labor and birth. Sept. 4, 9 a.m.–2 p.m. Free.

www.nolafamily.com | september 2021

ABCs of Breastfeeding Get help from experienced lactation consultants. Sept. 14, 7–9:30 p.m. Free.

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Caring For Your Newborn Learn how to care for your newborn. Sept. 18, 1–4:30 p.m. Free. Family and Friends CPR Basic instruction course. Sept. 28, 7–9:30 p.m. $15/person; $25/couple.

Touro’s Family Birthing Center For information or to register, call 504.897.7319, or see touro.com/events. Happiest Baby on the Block Learn to turn on a baby’s “calming reflex” using five simple steps. Sept. 11, 10 a.m.–noon. Free. Prenatal Breastfeeding Class Designed to teach mothers the basics of breastfeeding. Sept. 16, 6–8 p.m. Free. Infant/Child CPR Training Basics technique of CPR and relief of choking for a child and infant are covered. Sept. 23, 6–7 p.m. Free. Understanding Your Newborn Class Designed for first time expecting parents to gain skills needed to care for baby at home. Sept. 27, 6–8 p.m. Free.

Tulane Lakeside Hospital To register: tulanelakeside.com/calendar. Birth and Beyond Stages of pregnancy, stages of labor, and types of anesthesia, plus vaginal and cesarean births are discussed. Sept. 9, 7–9 p.m. Free. Breastfeeding Basics Learn the benefits of breastfeeding. Sept. 16, 7–9 p.m. Free. Infant Care and Safety Review basic newborn care, safety, and newborn health. Sept. 23, 7–9 p.m. Free. What to Expect for Dads and Support Persons Includes hands-on demonstrations of burping, diaper changing, and swaddling the newborn. Sept. 30, 7–9 p.m. Free.

Parenting Center at Children’s Hopsital To register: call 504.896.9591, or see chnola.org/ theparentingcenter. Calming Your New Baby (Prenatal–4 months) (Virtual) Learn what to expect from the first few months, also known as “the fourth trimester.” Sept. 11, 10–11. Free, pre-registration required. Car Seat Fitting Appointment Have your car seat installed or checked over by a nationally certified technician. Drop-ins welcome, appointments preferred. Sept. 21, 9–11 a.m. Free.

KIDS & TEENS Touro’s Family Birthing Center For information or to register, call 504.897.7319, or see touro.com/events. Sibling Class Ages 4–11 years will learn what to expect when a new baby enters the family. Sept. 18, 9–10:30 a.m. Free

PARENTS & GRANDPARENTS Ochsner Baptist To register: ochsnerstore.org/collections/events-andclasses. Grandparents Class (Virtual) Learn about the new definition of active labor, skin-toskin care, breastfeeding, safe sleep, and more. Sept. 9, 6:30–8:30 p.m.

Want to see your class or event here? Send calendar submissions to calendar@nolafamily.com.


nola family

SCHOOL OPEN HOUSES September - October SUNDAY

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Abramson Sci Academy

Arthur Ashe Charter School 4:30-6:30 pm

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Arden Cahill 9 am-8:00 pm

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Louise S. McGehee Virtual Tour: October 13

Cabrini High School 3:30-6:30 pm Age 1-Kindergarten Benjamin Franklin High School 5:30-8:00 pm

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13 Atonement Lutheran 5:00-7:00 pm

14 Mount Carmel Academy 3:00-7:00 pm

Christian Brothers City Park Campus (Boys Middle) Small Group Tours at 9:00 am, 11:00 am and 1:00 pm Registration Required: visit cbsno.org to sign up

september 2021 | www.nolafamily.com

St. George’s Episcopal 8:30-10:30 am

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Profile for nola family magazine & nola boomers magazine

Nola Family Magazine - September 2021  

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