__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

JULY/AUGUST 2020

Dealing with major life stressors

perfect day trips from NOLA

Telemedicine: It’s time to try it!

An accidental chef

CHEF KEVIN BELTON


2

www.nolaboomers.com

| july/august 2020


publisher/editor ANN BOWER HERREN  

ann@nolaboomers.com   executive editor   LAURA CLAVERIE

claverip@gmail.com managing editor   TREVOR WISDOM

trevor@nolaboomers.com office  manager   JENNY ZIGLIN 

jenny@nolaboomers.com advertising  sales   DURBAN ZAUNBRECHER  

durban@nolaboomers.com   JORDAN WHITE  

jordan@nolaboomers.com edit  intern SOFIA RIVERA ad production SARA YOUNGBLOOD  contributing photography   TWIRL PHOTOGRAPHY  

For reprint information, contact ann@nolaboomers.com   Business Office: 

8131 Oak St., Ste. 500, New Orleans, LA 70118    

504.866.0555 A publication of  

The opinions expressed in this publication are those of the authors and/or contributors, and do not necessarily reflect those of the magazine or its advertisers. 

As we were discussing this issue of Nola Boomers many weeks ago, we had our theme, story topics, advertising, and distribution in order. In what seemed like out of nowhere – but in hindsight wasn’t – a novel virus called Coronavirus or COVID-19, entered our lives and changed everything. Like the rest of our country, we had to be nimble as we worked remotely and looked at our magazine and our lives differently. Going to press, we are in our fifteenth week of dealing with this virus. We have mastered the art of “social distancing” even with those we love. We wear masks in public. Our grandchildren were homeschooled through the internet, dedicated teachers, and parents. For weeks, only essential businesses were open, and every fundraiser, festival, wedding, and graduation was canceled. Even now, there are times when I feel as if I am in the Twilight Zone. This Nola Boomers issue highlights some of the changes we have made in our lives since the virus arrived. Telemedicine, once thought to be the wave of the future, is now firmly established in our community. Local physicians like Dr. Patricia Farris quickly incorporated computer visits to accommodate many of their patients. Our healthcare workers are the new superheroes of our society. How can we ever thank these brave professionals for risking their own health while caring for others? To healthcare workers, it’s all part of their job descriptions, but to those of us who still need their care, they are mind-bogglingly courageous. Chef Kevin Belton, who hosts New Orleans Kitchen, New Orleans Celebrations, and New Orleans Cooking with Kevin Belton on WYES-TV locally and nationally on PBS, and is the resident chef on WWL-TV Morning News, is our cover feature in this issue. The chef is also the author of three cookbooks. He is a proud graduate of Brother Martin High School and attended LSU, where he was a defensive tackle for the Tigers. His effervescent spirit and hometown cooking have brought fun and comfort to his viewers these past weeks. I’m also delighted to welcome yoga instructor Geoffrey Roniger to this issue. I have been practicing yoga – seriously and enthusiastically – since 1991. During this pandemic, my yoga friends and I created a small private class – socially distanced – in a friend’s backyard, and an aqua yoga class in a private pool. Yoga has kept our group’s stress levels down and our spirits up throughout this quarantine. I have told my children and grandchildren that they are living in an historic time. I hope they are keeping a journal of their lives, thoughts, and special moments, good and bad. Like Katrina, we will be judged by our response, resiliency, and kindness to others. Unlike Katrina, this is an invisible enemy and it will leave its effects for generations. Be kind to one another. Stay sheltered as long as our Governor, Mayor, and health officials tell us to do so. Know that together we will defeat COVID-19. It’s just going to be a bit more complicated and take longer than we ever thought.

Fearlessly Yours,

Laura Claverie

july/august 2020 | www.nolaboomers.com

july/august 2020 volume 3, issue 3

FROM LAURA

3


CONTENTS J U LY/A U G U S T 2 0 2 0

A FEW WORDS 3

From Laura

5

From the Editor

FEATURES 10

Positive Power of Pets

Health Benefits

11

Adoption Tips

Finding the Right Pet

12

Chef Kevin Belton

Accidental Chef

23

Dealing with Major Life Stressors Healthy Mindset Tips

26

Ask Dr. Gramma Karen

Guilt-Tripping

REGULAR TOPICS 6

Freebies

Free and Cheap Things to Do in NOLA

9

Trending

Telemedicine

14

Travel

Travel Industry Changes

16

Quick Get-Aways

18

20

www.nolaboomers.com

| july/august 2020

4

24

25

28

Travel Fitness Controlling Stress with Yoga Health Prescriptions 101 Technology Managing Socially Distant Teams From the Bookshelf The Incomparable Magazine Street

On the Go Where, When, and What to Do

32

Aging In Nola

Hospice Care

33

Aging In Nola

Care Directory


CONTRIBUTORS

VALERIE ANDREWS, is a writer and communication strategist. She has been published in the Journal for Minority Medical Students, the Nursing and Allied Health Journal, and Ascension Parish magazine.

FR OM THE EDITOR Hello there! I’m delighted to join the Nola Boomers team!

SCOTT CAMPBELL, is publisher of Pelican Publishing, a nationally recognized, local publishing company established in 1926. He also is publisher & founder of River Road Press, a local boutique house of local and regional titles.

DARRIN PIOTROWSKI, is owner of RentA-Nerd and, as the original Nerd, has been providing expert service for two decades, making the company the local, reliable goto for business networks, IT services, and computer repair since 1997.

We’re a group very interested in our health - mental and physical - and staying active, especially during this time of COVID-19 and socially distancing. To that end, Nancy Timm gives tips for dealing with major life stressors and developing a healthy mindset. Her mindfulness message is picked up by Geoffrey Roniger of Freret Street Yoga. In his article, he discusses yoga awareness exercises awareness exercises that - having done them myself - I can assure you are effective and can easily be done at home by a novice! Even socially distancing (or self-quarantining), there are plenty of ways to stay active now in New Orleans. Exercise suggestions can be found in our “Freebies” section, ranging from at-home workouts to outdoor walks, and gardening and volunteering opportunities. The New Orleans Recreation Department (NORD), also is giving locals a choice of free, live, on-line exercise classes via Zoom, as well as class offerings at their facilities; all are noted on their website. And saving our dynamic cover story for last: Chef Kevin Belton is an inspiring boomer. He caught the culinary bug by happenstance and quickly rose to local and national prominence first as cooking instructor and host of WYES-TV’s fundraising cooking segments, then guest on many national television shows, and also named as resident chef for WWL-TV Eyewitness Morning News. And his greatest recognition these past few years is hosting his three nationally broadcast cooking series and his accompanying cookbooks. A kind, generous spirit whose enthusiasm for life is irresistible, you can’t help but smile reading his story. Let’s all stay safe out there - masked up - and mentally engaged as we move together through our “new normal” New Orleans.

GEOFFREY RONIGER, is the owner of Freret Street Yoga. He has been teaching full time for nearly two decades and is considered an expert in the field of adaptive yoga. He lives in New Orleans with his wife, three children, and faithful dog.

Thoughtfully Yours,

Trevor Wisdom

july/august 2020 | www.nolaboomers.com

KAREN RANCOURT, PH.D, author of six books, writes the advice column “Ask Dr. Gramma Karen,” hosted by GRAND Magazine and Mommybites.com. Her columns focus on the unique relationships and issues that develop between young parents, grandparents, and grandchildren, and how to resolve them.

As a boomer myself, I recognize what a diverse group we are. I’m definitely a member of the “sandwich generation,” as local therapist Nancy Timm describes those of us who are caring for our parents and also providing emotional (or other) support to our grown children.

5


s e i b e e r F O SEE T S G N I H T P HEA FREE AND C ELY FROM HOME. AND DO SAF

Cooking At Home

Museums and Exhibits

Southern Food and Beverage Museum

#VirtualVue The Longue Vue House and Gardens

Join SoFAB Founder, Liz Williams, for a podcast that explores the intersection of cuisine, cocktails, and museums. Everyone eats - so listen in as they discuss the role of food and drink as an indicator of culture, how museums use food to explore art and industry, and how food itself is an art. See southernfood.org/tip-of-the-tongue.

Fitness Fun

Ogden Museum of Southern Art

“Live From Your Living Room”

The “O” offers virtual live art challenges, curated conversations, Ogden After Hours, and more on their website. ogdenmuseum.org/ogdenmuseumonline.

Join The National WWII Museum for a night of music and dancing with a virtual performance by the Victory Six Swing Band! Date: July 4, 7-8 pm. *LIVE* FitNOLA Classes via Zoom NORD offers free, live fitness classes you can join at home. Visit zoom.us/join, enter FitNOLA Meeting ID: 334-196-3309 and password BeFitNOLA, and click join.

www.nolaboomers.com

| july/august 2020

Cardio Blast (FREE) Live Stream Join Footprints To Fitness for a 30-minute, cardio-inspired class, open to all levels. This class will be led by leader and founder, April Dupré. Classes are held through Zoom on Fridays, 10-10:30 am. Register at FootprintsToFitness.com/schedule.

6

YouTube channel features Louisiana wildlife -from silk moths and sulphur caterpillars to irises and okra. (The gardens also are open again to the public by timed, advance reservations.) See longvue.com for more information on both virtual and public options.

Wild Lotus Yoga is offering classes, special interactive courses, and workshops through Zoom. Continuing their ongoing effort to help make yoga accessible to the community, there will be free access to certain classes via their YouTube channel. Memberships, as well as drop-in classes, are available. See WildlLotusYoga.com.

Learning & Resources Virtual Personal Finance Series New Orleans Public Library NOPL has partnered with Flyte, a New Orleans-based non-profit, to provide two free virtual personal finance series each week about managing money during COVID–19. You can also view session recordings on their website, nolalibrary.org.

Newcomb Art Museum Woldenberg Art Center, Tulane University The museum is currently closed to visitors but their website offers resources including ways to move, virtual tours, and more. newcombartmuseum.tulane.edu. NOMA and Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden The mobile guide features a selection of tours available on the Mobile Guide accessible via your own smart–phone. noma.org/visit/noma-tour.


O SEE T S G N I H T P HEA FREE AND C AROUND NOLA. AND DO Fitness Fun

Volunteering

Northlake Nature Center 23135 Hwy 190 East, Mandeville

Super Saturday, New Orleans City Park, 1009 Harrison Ave.

Enjoy 400 acres of nature preserves with 8+ miles of hiking and biking trails, complete with scenic overlooks and access to the waterways via canoe launch on Bayou Castine. Visit their Facebook page for events. facebook.com/NorthlakeNatureCenter. Couturie Forest New Orleans City Park. Escape from the city without leaving town at this 60-acre haven! Walk the trails for exercise and take in the park’s rich, natural landscape with countless varieties of trees and birds. The entrance is on Harrison Avenue. Enter through the gates, park in the gravel lot, and walk into the forest over the bridge. For more information, visit neworleanscitypark.com/in-thepark/couturie-forest.

Museums and Exhibits New Orleans Botanical Garden Open year-round, this 10-acre cultivated garden with sculptures offers a perfect respite from daily stresses. Free admission for Louisiana residents on Wednesdays, courtesy of the Helis Foundation. Wed., 10 am–8 pm, Thurs.–Sun, 10 am–4:30 pm. Limited admission. neworleanscitypark.com/botanical-garden. New Orleans Jazz Museum Housed in what was previously both a U.S. and Confederate mint, the Jazz Museum is home to a world-renowned Jazz collection and premier performing arts venue. For more information on exhibits and musical offerings, visit nolajazzmuseum.org. Open Tuesday–Sunday, 9 am–4 pm, $8 for adults, $6 for senior citizens. Louisianastatemuseum.org. Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden

Gardening at the Botanical Garden Master Gardeners and volunteers will work at a variety of gardening tasks maintaining the different gardens in the Botanical Garden. Volunteers should bring gardening gloves, hand clippers, and a trowel. Arrive Friday mornings between 9 am-noon and work with LSU AgAgent Chris Dunaway. Audubon Nature Institute Adult Volunteers Volunteers support Audubon’s mission of celebrating the wonders of nature by assisting and engaging visitors, helping with horticulture in the parks and gardens, providing educational chats and animal encounters, and assisting with animal care and welfare. For more information, visit audubonnatureinstitute.org/adult-volunteers. Second Harvest Rescue Runner Program, New Orleans Food Bank The Second Harvest Rescue Runner Program picks up extra food and prepared meals from local restaurants, caterers, and anyone working in the local food service industry. After, volunteers deliver the items to one of the nearby food pantries. To sign-up, contact rescuerunner@secondharvest.org. Catholic Charities, 1000 Howard Ave., 2nd Floor Make a difference in your community and the lives of others. Volunteers provide assistance in many ways, including packing food bags for the food pantry, unloading food deliveries, keeping the pantry clean, and occasionally assisting clients by carrying items to their vehicles. For more information, contact Emily at estieber@ccano.org. All volunteers must attend a Volunteer Information Session. Upcoming dates: July 15, Aug. 13, or Sept. 14, 4 pm.

july/august 2020 | www.nolaboomers.com

The shaded and landscaped 11-acre sculpture garden is open Wednesday through Sunday. Seniors and immuno-compromised only: 9:30–11 am, general public: 11 am–4 pm, and Museum Members only: 4–6 pm. Free to NOMA members, $5 for adults, and $3 for seniors.

Join New Orleans City Park staff for a morning of volunteering in the park! Work assignments include maintaining areas around City Park. Make sure to wear closed-toe shoes and sunscreen, and bring a water bottle. To sign-up and get more details, contact Tyler Havens at thavens@nocp.org. Dates: July 11 and Aug. 1, 9 am-noon.

7


CLOG-FREE GUT TERS

OR YOUR MONEY BACK

GUARANTEED!

AF

NATIO

TE

1

’S

GU

T

E

N

TH

BE

ter

fFil

Lea

RD

E FOR

er

Filt

eaf

L TER

R GU

A

INSTALLS ON NEW & EXISTING GUTTERS

LIFETIME WARRANTY

15% OFF YOUR ENTIRE LEAFFILTER PURCHASE* Exclusive Offer – Redeem By Phone Today!

THE LEAFFILTER SYSTEM Micromesh

ADDITIONALLY

10% OFF SENIOR & MILITARY DISCOUNTS

Virgin Vinyl

Hanger

Existing Gutter

PLUS!

THE FIRST 50 CALLERS WILL

RECEIVE AN ADDITIONAL

5% OFF

YOUR ENTIRE INSTALL! **Offer valid at estimate only

FINANCING THAT FITS 1 YOUR BUDGET! Subject to credit approval. Call for details.

1

CALL US TODAY FOR

A FREE ESTIMATE “My only regret is that I wish I had known about LeafFilter sooner.”

www.nolaboomers.com

| july/august 2020

–Doug L.

8

1-844-933-1189 Promo Code: 285

Mon-Thurs: 8am-11pm, Fri-Sat: 8am-5pm, Sun: 2pm-8pm EST

*The leading consumer reporting agency conducted a 16 month outdoor test of gutter guards in 2010 and recognized LeafFilter as the “#1 rated professionally installed gutter guard system in America.” *For those who qualify. **Offer valid at time of estimate only **One coupon per household. No obligation estimate valid for 1 year. CSLB# 1035795 DOPL #10783658-5501 License# 7656 License# 50145 License# 41354 License# 99338 License# 128344 License# 218294 License# 603 233 977 License# 2102212986 License# 2106212946 License# 2705132153A License# LEAFFNW822JZ License# WV056912 License# WC-29998-H17 Nassau HIC License# H01067000 Registration# 176447 Registration# HIC.0649905 Registration# C127229 Registration# C127230 Registration# 366920918 Registration# PC6475 Registration# IR731804 Registration# 13VH09953900 Registration# PA069383 Suffolk HIC License# 52229-H

IF YOU'RE TARGETING

ADULTS 50+, WHY WOULD YOU GO ANYWHERE ELSE? CONTACT US TODAY! info@nolaboomers.com 504.296.9290


TELEMEDICINE Telemedicine gives new meaning to doctors on call. Several months ago – before the word “pandemic” became a part of our vocabulary – our daughter, Stephanie Wimett, a school counselor at Kehoe-France School in Metairie, developed a sinus headache and knew she needed a doctor. She also knew that she wasn’t contagious and leaving the office would be difficult. So, she logged into her Ochsner Medical Center account and found the telemedicine button. At the press of a finger, she entered a whole new world of seeing the doctor. “It was amazing. Within a few minutes, my medical records were sent to the doctor on call and my insurance was verified. I was placed in a virtual waiting room and soon I was talking to a doctor over the computer. She diagnosed my problem, called in a prescription, and I was on my way in 25 minutes,” she says. “And I never left my desk.”

In early March, the Louisiana State Medical Society wisely issued a mandate to physicians limiting services that a physician could perform in his/ her office and recommending that physicians close their offices and see all non-emergency patients through telemedicine when appropriate.

july/august 2020 | www.nolaboomers.com

Telemedicine has been around for at least four decades but has grown exponentially since the COVID-19 pandemic entered our lives. Using technology, patients and doctors can meet, despite the distance. It has created a paradigm shift in the way medical care is delivered.

Patricia Farris, M.D., a dermatologist Medicare and most insurance compawith Sanova Dermatology in Metairie, nies will cover the cost of a televisit. moved quickly to establish a telemedCheck with your provider. ical practice in early March. “I Each physician or medical have found that working this OUR EXPERTS system has its own platform, way is great for continuity of so the process of getting an care, for cases I see throughappointment and visiting out the year. I can examine the with the doctor may vary patient by seeing the problem from physician to physician. on the screen and prescribe Anne Jacob Carrere, Privacy and compliance with M.D. medications,” she says. “It all HIPAA standards are guardoesn’t work nearly as well if I anteed by all reputable physiwere diagnosing a skin cancer cians. Popular platforms such or something suspicious.” as Zoom and FaceTime are In this time of COVID-19, telenot recommended for doctor Patricia Farris, M.D. visits with physicians are espevisits as they do not have the cially recommended to those same privacy standards. most vulnerable: the elderly and those Televisits are not recommended if with pre-existing conditions or coma patient is exhibiting potentially promised immune systems, as they life-threatening symptoms; one should allow the patient to shelter in place call 911 or go to the emergency room and still receive medical attention. immediately. Anne Jacob Carrere, M.D., an interBoth Dr. Farris and Dr. Carrere benist and professor at Tulane Medical lieve that telemedicine is now firmly Center, began seeing many of her embedded in the medical care system patients using telemedicine in early and will be around for a long time. March. “Most of my patients are older They also agree that it won’t replace and many are pretty ill. Using telemedin-person visits with doctors, as these icine, I can keep in touch with them will always be necessary. without exposing them or myself to In our daughter Stephanie’s case, her other contaminates. I can examine telemedicine visit was a godsend. “It patients using computer technology was convenient and the doctor was and see if they have allergies, a cold, very professional. It allowed me to or COVID-19. As they say, ‘a picture is carry on with my day,” she says. “For worth a thousand words.’” small, non-urgent medical issues, it’s One downside is that some patients, perfect.” particularly the elderly or indigent, do Laura Claverie is a mother and grandnot have access to computers; they mother, and NOLA Boomers executive can sometimes communicate with a editor. physician over the telephone.

9


The Positive Power of Pets

Pet ownership goes a long way to improving boomers’ health. Perhaps cartoonist Charles M. Schulz said it best in his beloved cartoon, “Happiness is a Warm Puppy,” with hugging Snoopy and Charlie Brown artwork that emblazoned t-shirts and posters decorating countless 1960s bedrooms. Many boomers today are finding happiness with their own versions of Snoopy, that loveable beagle that had a sixth sense for giving Charlie Brown the love and hugs he needed during his worst moments. And, by equal measure, many of us are finding joy in the company of a special Sylvester the pussycat, who loves nothing more than napping in a warm lap or sunbeam. Dr. Allison Wegmann, DVM at Metairie Small Animal Hospital, agrees, and particularly so with regard to seniors’ pet ownership. “Owning a pet as an older person has been shown to be beneficial both physically and mentally. Physical benefits of pet ownership include reduction in blood pressure and increased daily physical activity needed to walk or care for their pet.” What’s more, Dr. Wegmann continues, “An increase in daily physical activity can have a dual purpose by aiding to fight depression and providing a real sense of worth and responsibility.”

www.nolaboomers.com

| july/august 2020

For those with limited mobility and who want a smaller comfort animal, cats are the perfect choice, as they don’t require daily walks. Older cats especially make good lap pets and don’t require litter training.

10

Particularly during these past few months of stay-at-home orders, pet owners are finding great comfort in their furry companions.

Culinary instructor and chef, Randall Price, owner of a 6-year-old Lavender Point Siamese, says, “Milo has been such a blessing during this quarantine. He’s been so happy to have his human around all day. And he has such a calming effect on the humans.” An avowed cat lover and lifelong cat owner, Price continues, “I don’t feel complete unless a cat is around.” Dr. Wegmann agrees, “Pets are wonderful at combating loneliness by offering companionship.” Local shelters, including Animal Rescue of New Orleans (ARNO) are good sources for pets of all ages and types. Fostering also is an option offered by ARNO, for those who want to help a “between homes” dog or cat, and yet cannot take care of the animal long-term for whatever reason.


“You can’t help but feel love when you have a dog curled up next to you.” Larry Tierney is such an affirmed dog lover, he has been a dog-walking volunteer for multiple local shelters and adoption facilities. He recently adopted Henry, a three-year-old Jack Russell-Chihuahua mix, who landed at ARNO after his Iberville Parish owner died. Larry laughed, “I’m a big fan of dogs, just having one with me all the time makes me feel better. We do our morning walk around 6 a.m. and then a couple of times during the day we get back outside. Especially during this quarantine time, he’s been great for me, while my wife and I have been cooped up in our home.” The ARNO team are experts at matching their shelter animals with new owners, especially matching personalities and activity levels. ARNO Coordinator Rachel Forest explains, “As for an older pet, for our boomer clients, these animals are the best of both worlds; they have a calmer demeanor, which translates to a comforting presence. As much as everyone loves a young puppy, their high energy levels and needs for constant attention and immediate training can be too much for many people.” About the adoption process, Rachel says, “We always find an animal that has lots of love to give, regardless of age. We want these to be matches for life. And we keep in touch with everyone to see how the pets are settling into their new homes.” Whether a dog or a cat – or a parrot or rat – is your choice. The important fact is that you’re not only choosing a companion, you’re also making an investment in your mental and physical wellbeing. Trevor Wisdom is a life-long cat owner and NOLA Boomers managing editor.

Nola Boomers’ Quick Tips on

Rescue Pet Adoption

Your daily routine should determine the most suitable animal for you. •

Ready for several walks each day, regardless of weather? If no, then consider a cat.

Away for long hours? Again, a cat may be a better option.

Ready to housetrain / box-train your pet? If no, then an older pet would be ideal.

Looking for a lap pet? Consider adopting a senior cat.

Adoption costs vary by facility. Fees vary at different times of the year, with featured specials, waived fees, free older animal adoptions, and more. Discounts are given for multiple animal adoptions. Expect to pay in the range of $125 to $200/dog, and $85 to $150/cat, including spaying/neutering, vaccinations, deworming, testing, and microchipping, as needed. Other costs to bear in mind. For instance, new puppy vet visits and boosters can range from $250 to $600/ first year, depending upon the size of the dog. Annual well visits are required for all pets and can range from $60-$90, plus annual vaccinations and incidental costs associated with exams, such as flea and heartworm preventative or other medications. Animals also may need periodic dental care. Depending upon the breed, some cats and dogs also require periodic grooming. And don’t forget food, leashes, and toys!

“Owning a pet as an older person has been shown to be beneficial both physically and mentally.” Dr. Allison Wegmann, DVM at Metairie Small Animal Hospital

Adoption facilities. Metro-New Orleans has multiple rescue pet facilities. All feature on-line browsing of adoptable animals and are currently offering services and adoptions by appointment only.

ARNO: 504-571-1900 Jefferson SPCA: 504-736-6111 Louisiana SPCA: 504-368-5191 Zeus’ Rescue: 504-309-2144

july/august 2020 | www.nolaboomers.com

Supplemental pet care. Ensure that you have someone to rely on who can care for Snoopy or Sylvester if you are unable to tend to them yourself due to illness.

11


Accidental Chef

Delighting television audiences across the country is Chef Kevin Belton, with his upbeat personality and big smile, sharing the spirit of New Orleans with his viewers and telling them how easy it is to make his mouth-watering recipes. He’s a natural-born entertainer and literally larger than life, standing at six-feet nine-inches. “Never in my dreams did I imagine I’d have a TV show airing around the country that teaches people how to cook,” laughs Kevin Belton when asked about early culinary aspirations.

on t l e B n Kevi “I’m blessed to take my ability to bring happiness to someone’s life or their day.”

“You see, I had no clue what I wanted to be when I grew up. My mom was a teacher and advised me to try different things. I learned from my parents to enjoy it, and once it stops being enjoyable, to do something else.” Chef Kevin got his culinary start with Joe Cahn, who founded the New Orleans School of Cooking. And it was also Joe Cahn who, in a quirk of fate, got Kevin in front of the cameras for the first time at WYES, local-PBS affiliate, during their then-annual Showboat Auction fundraiser.

www.nolaboomers.com

| july/august 2020

In 1992, Joe invited Kevin to come with him to the station while he manned an auction board. The station’s producer asked Kevin to come back the next week to read a board himself. That went so swimmingly, they then asked him to do future pledge breaks.

12

About this early start, Kevin said a friend called, having seen him on TV, and saying what a neat job it must be. But Kevin thought to himself, “It’s not a job, I’m not getting paid!” Mom said, ‘Take every opportunity to learn and give back in some way.’ “So, I’m giving back and I’m learning how to do live TV. You can set up a camera and practice all you want, but until you’re live, you don’t know how to do it. I watched the TV production, the angles, and put it all in the back of my mind.”

Kevin Bolton on the set of his WYES-TV series Kevin Bolton’s New Orleans Celebrations Photo: Monica Belton

And so he progressed, with the station asking him to host a Saturday show during pledge drives. Viewers would send in their recipes for Kevin to choose, and then the station invited them in to prepare the recipe on-air. Of his early start, Kevin explained, “I’d pick a recipe and we’d make it together live. It was a fun way for people to see their neighbors, relatives, and friends on live television. And then the show kept evolving, and it became a way for the station to put together a cookbook for donors. We were the pledge breaks and doing everything live. It was fun!”

“Life is like standing at the river’s edge and watching the barges go by. Jump on one, then another until you find the right one.” That’s an apt description for Kevin’s path before he discovered television (or, more appropriately, before television discovered him). We asked him what he did in the years before getting in front of a camera. “I didn’t set out to do it, but this is where I ended up. I try to like everything I do, whether working long hours or putting in the grunt work to learn more. For a while, I played semi-


pro on a team here in New Orleans and then I was in the hospitality business. Before I started at the school with Joe, I began as store manager. He wanted me to learn the business, the products, inventory, and how it worked. He said, ‘Don’t worry about the cooking.’” At that point, Kevin Belton had mostly been cooking for pleasure and dishes he’d learned from his mother and grandmothers. But – with his mom being a teacher – he was quick to pick up cookbooks, read them, and learn techniques and how a particular recipe came into being.

then I’m going to take the time to sign the way I always sign.” Chef Kevin internalized Paul Prudhomme’s message. He frequently goes to WYES to sign stacks of books, from ten to fifteen cases at a time. Each WYES-ordered book is specially inscribed by book. For his first book, the message is “Keep the table blessed,”

Three cooking series have been shot in the WYES studios: New Orleans Cooking with Kevin Belton, Kevin Belton’s New Orleans Kitchen, and Kevin Belton’s New Orleans Celebrations. These continue to re-run not only locally but across the U.S. on multiple PBS stations. He’s also written three companion cookbooks, one for each series.

Being a native New Orleanian and with his father’s family from Lafourche and near Morgan City, Kevin naturally was curious about Louisiana cuisine. “I knew the difference between Creole and Cajun, and just took it from there.” “I’m blessed to take my ability to bring happiness to someone’s life or their day.” As it turned out, Joe Cahn’s hunch was right; Kevin had a natural aptitude for teaching, and he was doing cooking demos soon after starting as store manager. And as time progressed, Kevin found himself in the company of other New Orleans chefs. “I didn’t go to cooking school,” Chef Kevin explained. “I learned the basics from Joe, and then I was meeting different chefs and learning from being with them – Warren Leruth, Michael Roussel (Brennan’s), Paul Prudhomme, Leah Chase. They also taught me about things besides cooking. Miss Leah was always so humble and appreciative of how people enjoy what she was able to do.”

He’s compelled to write and demonstrate recipes to keep them alive.

L to R: Dave Nussbaum, Kevin Belton, Eric Paulsen, Sheba Turk, and April Dupre, WWL-TV Eyewitness Morning News crew, Mardi Gras 2019. Photo: Monica Belton

the second book’s message is “Share your table,” and the last is “Celebrate your table.” Above his signature, he also writes “C’est bon,” (“it’s good” in French). He explains, “If you like the things I do, (then) I’m going to show you how much I appreciate it – and you. You put a little of yourself in every recipe and every dish.” Watch Chef Kevin Belton in action and you’re guaranteed to smile. Anyone who’s seen him cooking on television – or at a live appearance – knows his exuberance firsthand. His enthusiasm for cooking and sharing his love of New Orleans food is absolutely contagious, and has led to multiple guest appearances on other shows, including Emeril Live, and regular cooking demonstrations. Chef Kevin also is affiliated with WWL-TV in New Orleans, and during

“When people say this recipe is a secret, that’s when it dies. I was talking with someone earlier that the world is small. And that’s what recipes are all about, passing it along and keeping it (a legacy) alive.” What viewers may not realize is that Chef Kevin doesn’t use “swaps” or premade dishes on his shows. Everything is cooked in real time. (And then eaten by the crew!) As he says, “I know this will come out (right), I’ve made it in segments, just not altogether. Early in the first series, I decided not to try some of the dishes beforehand. And now that we’re in the third season, that’s what I do. That’s the fun of it! I can explain to people what’s going on, and if I run into a problem, I tell the audience, ‘This is how you fix this!’” He went on to explain, “And that’s how all of us – the whole team – we make it work. It’s not slick, it’s not done with mirrors. It’s a bunch of folks having fun in the kitchen.”

Trevor Wisdom is a native New Orleanian and managing editor of Nola Boomers.

july/august 2020 | www.nolaboomers.com

“There was a time, I was with Chef Paul (Prudhomme) – at the Hilton for a function with a lot of different chefs – and he said, ‘walk with me.’ My crew was gone, the lights were almost off, and people were waiting in line for him to sign his cookbook. I stood over his shoulder, watching him sign. He personalized every book the same way, with his special message, ‘Good eating, good living, good loving,’ and his signature. He told me, ‘If they’re going to take the time to stand in line,

this COVID-19 new normal, he now tapes his Tuesday morning cooking segments remotely from his home kitchen. That relationship started six years ago when he was asked to dedicate the Frank Davis Kitchen at the station with three weeks of cooking demonstrations alongside Frank’s widow Mary Clare. It was around that same time that he was approached by PBS for the WYES series.

13


Ready to Travel? Anticipating travel industry changes

www.nolaboomers.com

| july/august 2020

While the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) continues to stress that only necessary travel is advisable, three facts are certain as we explore Phase Two – and beyond – of reopening the country and the world: • Passenger travel is picking up. • Personal safety remains the #1 top priority for individuals and the travel industry as a whole. • The most vulnerable individuals should continue to shelter in place.

14

And whether you’re planning travel this summer or fall, here are points to keep in mind: It’s a buyer’s market but, as always, buyer beware All travel sectors have taken a beating and deals are to be had. Keep in mind though, all refund and cancellation policies; you may be required to rebook depending upon a future scenario. For the airlines, this means a non-refundable ticket is still non-refundable; the airline is responsible for refunding your ticket only if they cancel the flight. If you cancel your trip for any reason, even a refundable ticket only will be refunded to you as a voucher for future travel, not cash. And travel insurance policies are not written to cover pandemics; read all fine print before purchasing a policy.

U.S.-based airlines are devising their own rules All major airlines require face masks of passengers, staff, and crew, and social distancing will be enforced both in terminals and public areas. Seating also is limited on planes, with many flights eliminating the dreaded middle seats for safer distancing. Also, many airlines are supplying masks and wipes to passengers. Details change daily. Consult your individual airline’s website for all updates. You may not see the beverage cart As a means of limiting crew and passenger contact, many airlines - both US and international carriers - are suspending their service of alcoholic beverages. And in some instances, limiting beverage service to water only. Among the carriers taking this step are Delta (no alcoholic beverages served domestically or on western hemisphere flights) and American (which is limiting food and drink service in the main cabin). Various international carriers (Virgin, British Airways, KLM, to name a few) also are instituting new rules. Inquire before you fly. And looking toward the holidays? Expect to find the usual higher fares. This will always be the travel industry’s sweet spot in terms of revenue.


Key Takeaways 3 A non-refundable ticket is still non-refundable; the airline is responsible for refunding your ticket only if they cancel the flight. 3 Travel insurance policies are not written to cover pandemics. 3 US-based airlines are making their own rules. 3 Expect higher than usual fares around the holidays.

Hotels Hotels are slowly reopening as demand builds. As with the airlines, travelers can expect discounting initially. Individual hotel chains have differing cancellation and discount policies that can be found on their respective websites. Many hotels also are taking this opportunity to initiate deep-cleaning.

Global Travel Europe accounts for 3 There are still restric50% of the global tourtions on entering and ism market, according leaving EU counties. be to the European Union sure to check before mak(EU), in terms of arrivals. ing any reservations. However, this market 3 Expect a minimum of closed its internal and one-two months wait for external borders in passports. mid-March. While some EU countries have lifted border restrictions, entrance to most still is restricted and depends upon the traveler’s citizenship, point of origin, or other specific regulations. Globally, other countries also have closed borders except to citizens. As of this writing, EU officials are debating continuing to exclude US travelers from all entry due to recent virus spikes here at home.

For over 70 years, METAIRIE SMALL ANIMAL HOSPITAL has been committed to providing the highest quality medical and surgical care for pet patients in a humane, compassionate, and caring environment.

BOOK YOUR APPOINTMENT TODAY www msah com

!

.

.

Main Hospital | Freret Street Kenner | Lakeview | West Esplanade| Marigny

2020 SUMMER SEASON

AQUATICS

Need a Passport? The good news: the State Department opened passport processing centers on June 15. The bad news: there was a backlog of 1.7 million passport applications that had not been processed since facilities were closed in March. Oldest applications are being processed first. Should you need a new passport, or are awaiting one from an earlier application, expect a minimum wait of two months and probably longer.

Trevor Wisdom is a native New Orleanian and avid traveler, having lived in Europe, the Middle East, and across the U.S. She has written lifestyles and travel articles for multiple publications.

Now taking reservations for lap swim + water aerobics at select outdoor + indoor pools.

Visit nordc.org to reserve your spot today.

july/august 2020 | www.nolaboomers.com

Real ID The Department of Homeland Security extended the deadline for needing a REAL ID for air travel within the U.S. to October 1, 2021. Starting then, every traveler 18-years and older will need a REAL ID-compliant driver’s license, stateissued enhanced driver’s license or another acceptable form of ID (such as passport).

15


Tired of traveling from your couch, but not yet ready to go far afield?

Get-Aways

Within Quick Reach of New Orleans

www.nolaboomers.com

| july/august 2020

Alternately called a “Dream State” and the “Sportsman’s Paradise,” Louisiana is undoubtedly a state rich with many options for the day tripper in need of a fresh venue and light exercise. It’s easy to forget that many of the wildlife preserves, historic sites, and beautiful parks found throughout the state – run by the National Park Service or Louisiana State Parks – are located within two hours of New Orleans. Too, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and Louisiana Wildlife & Fisheries administer beautiful preserves across the state that also are nearby.

16

Grand Isle State Park CREDIT: LA Department of Culture, Recreation & Tourism

Currently the National Park Service is increasing access and services to its parks on a “rolling open” basis. Visit their website to determine daily status. Many of our state parks feature overnight facilities and tours. With Phase One of Louisiana’s reopening, state park overnight facilities were reopened to residents as of Friday, May 15, with tours available for groups of nine or fewer. FOUNTAINBLEAU STATE PARK Located along the north shore of Lake Pontchartrain, on a 2,800-acre tract that was a sugar cane plantation until 1852, this park features nature trails, bike path, and shoreline beach for sunning and splashing.


Fountainbleau State Park CREDIT: LA Department of Culture, Recreation & Tourism

The facility is run by the National Park Service and features a visitor center with daily tours prior to its COVID-19 closing. As of this writing, even though the gates are currently locked, the park is open and walkways and outdoor spaces have pedestrian access. The ample, shaded land allows for easy social distancing. 8606 West St. Bernard Highway, Chalmette, LA. 504-281-0510.

Bayou Sauvage CREDIT: USFWS

BAYOU SAUVAGE Almost unbelievably, this 26,000-acre national wildlife refuge is just a 15-minute drive from downtown New Orleans, northeast on I-10 to Lacombe. The one-half-mile Ridge Trail is a boardwalk loop, and there are an additional five miles of nature trails.

Bordered on three sides by water – Lake Pontchartrain, and Bayous Cane and Castine – this park is home to over 400 bird species and is a bird watcher’s paradise. Campgrounds and newly renovated cabins for overnight stays by reservation. 62883 Hwy. 1089 Mandeville, LA. 985-624-4443. GRAND ISLE STATE PARK Want to fish? Need to put your feet in the sand? Louisianans usually think of our neighboring Mississippi Gulf Coast when they think “beach.” Yet Grand Isle – Louisiana’s only inhabited barrier island – features a 150-acre state park with sandy beaches and 900-foot pier, perfect for fishing and crabbing.

CHALMETTE BATTLEFIELD

Chalmette Battlefield CREDIT: trover.com

Among the closest New Orleans getaways – and often forgotten – are the Chalmette Battlefield and Chalmette National Cemetery, just south of the city proper in St. Bernard Parish. This is where, in January 1815, General Andrew Jackson’s troops defeated the British and thwarted their efforts to take the strategic Port of New Orleans.

ELMER’S ISLAND Elmer’s Island is a 230-acre wildlife refuge just off Highway 1 on the way to Grand Isle from Port Fourchon. Accessible by winding dirt and Elmer’s Island CREDIT: TRCP.ORG shell road, the island is directly across the Caminada Pass from Grand Isle. Administered by the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, the island gem offers a peaceful respite, excellent for beachcombing and surf fishing. Administered by the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, the island gem offers a peaceful respite for beachcombing and surf fishing. See the Wildlife & Fisheries website (wlf. louisiana.gov), or call their office (800-256-2747) for more information. Trevor Wisdom is a native New Orleanian and avid traveler, having lived in Europe, the Middle East, and across the U.S. She has written lifestyles and travel articles for multiple publications.

july/august 2020 | www.nolaboomers.com

Complete with nearly three miles of hiking trails, the marshes here afford excellent bird watching. Overnight camping is available. Admiral Craik Drive, Grand Isle, LA. 985-787-2559.

The refuge is an important stop in the migratory Mississippi Flyway and is year-round home to 350 bird species, making it ideal for bird watching enthusiasts. One of the last remaining marshes adjacent to Lakes Pontchartrain and Borgne, the refuge also is home to numerous alligator residents and other wildlife. 61389 Hwy 434, Lacombe, LA. 985-882-2000.

17


From Stress to Poise

Yoga awareness exercises can help release stress

Conscious breathing can improve stress responses Reclining, practice observing the natural pause at the end of your exhalations. This pause in the breathing process is a place of stillness and repose. By learning to notice it (not manufacture it!), you will feel a curious sense of calm pervading your body/mind. This simple technique will help you collect yourself. Even though the source of your stress will not have vanished, the way you relate - and your ability to respond - to it will have shifted.

To say that everyone has experienced stress during the past several months of the coronavirus crisis is not hyperbole. And it is a normal fact of life that we all experience stress regularly in some way, shape, or form. Once you accept the inevitability of stress, the question changes from: “how can we avoid stress,” to “how can we release it?” Fortunately, the yoga tradition proposes answers to that highly relevant question for this day and age. The underlying premise of “yoga” (“union” in Sanskrit) is that there is no separation between the mind and body. So when we feel stress, we also experience it as an actual bodily sensation and not solely as a thought or emotion.

www.nolaboomers.com

| july/august 2020

What is that sensation?

18

To understand this, stop and feel into it right this moment; I bet you’ll discover that by merely thinking about a stressful situation, you will feel some sort of contraction or tightening in your body. For instance, I bet you can feel that your shoulders are scrunching up toward your ears, that your jaw starts gripping, or that your abdomen is clenching. You might even notice that your breathing is shallow and erratic. These are but a few of the physical manifestations of the psychological and emotional state that we term “stress.” Lift your arms to help improve your mood Seated or standing, raise your arms overhead without tightening your neck or stiffening the tops of your shoulders. Lifting your arms improves breathing by expanding the rib cage and freeing the diaphragm from constrictions. Stress often presents as a depressed state, where a person’s structure appears collapsed and deflated. By lifting your arms and lengthening your body, you’re lifting your mood and spirit.


By taking this cognitive leap and accepting the reality of psycho-physical unity, we’re able to unlock a critical door to health and well-being. In other words, by identifying where we tend to hold stress, we can then take conscious action or move into different shapes in order to release that excess tension. This in turn allows us to notice a distinct change in mood and outlook. Essentially, the more aware we become of this body tightening, the greater our capacity to free ourselves from it: •

Consciously move your shoulders down away from your ears.

Stretch open your abdomen so that it’s not constricted.

Gently encourage your breathing to become deeper and more rhythmic.

Practice noticing your jaw clenching so keenly that the mere observation begins to spontaneously soften it.

Mind-Body Awareness This awareness was one of the great discoveries of the oldtime yogis: by working in the concrete realm of the physical body, we can favorably influence the more ephemeral realm of the mind. Each Wednesday in my online class, “Yoga for Older Adults,” we explore living in a balanced, light, and harmonious way by bringing our attention to basic activities like standing, sitting, and walking.

Geoffrey Roniger’s

Yoga For Older Adults

Geoffrey’s videos are the perfect way to try yoga from the comfort of your own home. New Orleans native Geoffrey Roniger teaches you the basics in ways that are easy to learn – for all ages! Access the following web address from your phone, tablet or computer and do something healthy for yourself today!

http://bit.ly/YogaOlderAdults

Feeling your feet gets you “out of your head” Standing, lift and spread your toes several times while pressing down into your heels. This will make you more aware of your body’s foundation, thereby helping you feel more grounded, stable and poised. Anchoring yourself in the present moment will help you respond to actual present needs rather than creating “what if” scenarios in your head.

I hope that you find some solace in these awareness exercises as you learn how to change your reaction to stress. By fully embracing your capacity to choose your attitude in any situation, I hope that you may move through the unavoidable ups and downs of life with dignity and grace.

See his latest comprehensive instructional video program made specifically for older adults: vimeo. com/ondemand/geoffreyyogaolderadults. Enter the promo code “NOLABoomers” and download for free!

july/august 2020 | www.nolaboomers.com

Geoffrey Roniger is the owner of Freret Street Yoga. He has been teaching full time for nearly twenty years and is considered an expert in the field of adaptive yoga.

19


www.nolaboomers.com

| july/august 2020

We’ve all heard those pharmaceutical The most effective plan to prevent commercials, listing potential side this, according to Dr. Gillard, is to effects in a voiceover approaching “maintain an open communication Indy 500 speeds. There’s a disclaimer, with their primary care physicians,” of course; not everyone will react that asking questions about health and any way. But how do you know if you’re medications they’re taking, including one of those who might have an over-the-counter products, and even adverse reaction? It’s enough vitamins, which can cause to make you head for a witch OUR EXPERTS adverse effects. doctor to chant away whatYour pharmacist can talk to ever’s ailing you. your other healthcare providers Seniors are wise to be “about adjusting a medication wary. Christopher J. Gillard, dose or finding an alternative Christopher J. Gillard Pharm.D., BCPS, clinical assothat will work better. Some Pharm.D. BCPS ciate professor at the Xavier health plans have medication University College of Phartherapy management (MTM), or macy, says, “Older adults ofprograms that allow an annual ten have more chronic health in-depth consultation with a conditions that require more KiTani Parker Lemieux, pharmacist,” notes Dr. Gillard. Ph.D drug therapies,” which puts Juggling all the variables can be this population at a “higher daunting. Failure to adequaterisk to inadvertently taking medicaly manage correct dosages or notice tions that can cause interactions or negative side effects can result in hosunwanted side effects.” pitalization. In fact, according to the Seniors and caregivers are faced with National Center on Caregiving’s Family the issue of today’s medications and Caregiver Alliance, 25% of nursing their side effects, complicated by home admissions are related to some interactions among various prescribed degree in the inability to correctly drugs and between what the doctor(s) manage prescriptions. ordered and what can be found in Science advances now make it easier over-the-counter (OTC) offerings like to find out how your specific physherbal remedies, alternative mediiological makeup will respond to cines, and even alcohol. A U.S. Departcertain drugs. The science of pharmament of Health and Human Resources cogenomics – the study of how genes report states that almost 60% of affect a person’s response to drugs seniors (65 years and older) take 5-9 – works to “develop effective, safe medications over the course of one medications and doses that will be year, and almost 20% are taking ten or tailored to a person’s genetic makeup,” more over the same time period. The according to the National Institutes of opportunities for contraindications Health. Studying genetic differences and adverse drug events increase with through knowledge gained from the every additional medication. Human Genome Project, researchers

20

will be able to determine what conditions may affect how drugs work for patients. As the field of pharmacogenomics evolves, scientists will be able to treat a broad spectrum of health issues – Alzheimer’s, cancer, heart disease and others – with tailored drugs. KiTani Parker Lemieux, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacogenomics at Xavier University, points to the RightMed® Test (https://oneome. com/) which has, in her opinion “the most reliable medical information from genomics kits.” Like other DNA tests, “this diagnostic approach contains a ‘spit kit/tube’ that the patient mails back to the company. They then receive an email link 6-8 weeks later to make an appointment with a medical genetics counselor” to discuss the results. The patient’s medical provider also is provided the results, enabling them to speak with a specifically trained doctor of pharmacology who can assist the physician with the patient’s care decisions relative to his/ her genome. According to Dr. Lemieux, who teaches pharmacogenomics to pharmacy students and is certified to teach this content to licensed medical professionals, says, “This approach is considered to be a best practice in the field.” The bottom line? Talk to your doctor – or pharmacist – about what you can do to make your prescriptions work best for you. Valerie Andrews is a writer and communications strategist, who has been published in multiple medical journals.

Prescriptions

101

Open communications are key for ensuring medications work best for you.


WALK- IN BATHTUB SALE! SAVE $1,500 Walk-In Tubs

One-Touch Controls

Hand Held Shower

Low Threshold

Comfort & Safety

Lifetime Warranty! Finance Options Available*

44 Hydrotherapy Jets

✓EXPERIENCE YOU CAN TRUST!

Only American Standard has OVER 140 years of experience and offers the Liberation Walk-In Bathtub.

✓SUPERIOR DESIGN! Ultra low easy entry and exit design, wide door, builtin safety bar and textured floor provides a safer bathing experience.

✓PATENTED QUICK-DRAIN® TECHNOLOGY ✓LIFETIME WARRANTY!

The ONLY Lifetime Warranty on the bath AND installation, INCLUDING labor backed by American Standard.

✓44 HYDROTHERAPY JETS! More than any other tub we’ve seen.

FREE!

Savings Include an American Standard Right Height Toilet FREE! ($500 Value)

FREE!

An In-Home Evaluation Will Be Scheduled At Your Earliest Convenience

1-888-405-0447 Or visit: www.walkintubinfo.com/nola

Discount applied at time of purchase. Terms and Conditions Apply. * Subject to 3rd party credit approval. Minimum monthly payments required. Receive a free American Standard Cadet Toilet with full installation of a Liberation Walk-In Bath, Liberation Shower, or Deluxe Shower. Offer valid only while supplies last. Limit one per household. Must be first time purchaser. All offers subject to change prior to purchase. See www.AmericanStandardBathtubs.com for other restrictions and for licensing, warranty, and company information. *CSLB B982796; Suffolk NY:5543IH; NYC:HIC#2022748-DCA. Safety Tubs Co. LLC does not sell in Nassau NY, Westchester NY, Putnam NY, Rockland NY.

july/august 2020 | www.nolaboomers.com

Limited Time Offer! Call Today!

21


ADVANCED HEARING AID TECHNOLOGY $ For Less Than 200

“I was amazed! Sounds I hadn’t heard in years came back to me!” — Don W., Sherman, TX

How can a hearing aid that costs less than $200 be every bit as good as one that sells for $2,250 or more?

The answer: Although tremendous

strides have been made in Advanced Hearing Aid Technology, those cost reductions have not been passed on to you. Until now...

www.nolaboomers.com

| july/august 2020

MDHearingAid® uses the same kind of Advanced Hearing Aid Technology incorporated into hearing aids that cost thousands more at a small fraction of the price.

22

Over 300,000 satisfied MDHearingAid customers agree: High-quality, FDAregistered hearing aids don’t have to cost a fortune. The fact is, you don’t need to spend thousands for a hearing aid. MDHearingAid is a medical-grade hearing aid offering sophistication and high performance, and works right out of the box with no time-consuming “adjustment” appointments. You can contact a licensed hearing specialist conveniently online or by phone — even after your purchase at no cost. No other company provides such extensive support. Now that you know... why pay more?

Can a Hearing Aid Delay or Prevent Alzheimer’s and Dementia? A study by the National Institute on Aging suggests older individuals with hearing loss are significantly more likely to develop Alzheimer’s and dementia over time than those who retain their hearing. They suggest that an intervention — such as a hearing aid — could delay or prevent this by improving hearing!

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR

45-DAY RISK-FREE TRIAL!

Hearing is believing and we invite you to try this nearly invisible hearing aid with no annoying whistling or background noise for yourself. If you are not completely satisfied with your MDHearingAid, return it within 45 days for a FULL REFUND.

For the Lowest Price Call

866-497-1181 Use Code

HQ97

and get FREE Batteries for 1 Year Plus FREE Shipping DOCTOR DESIGNED | AUDIOLOGIST TESTED | FDA REGISTERED

Proudly assembled in America!

Nearly Invisible

BIG SOUND. TINY PRICE.

BATTERIES INCLUDED!

READY TO USE RIGHT OUT OF THE BOX!


DEALING WITH MAJOR LIFE STRESS 5 Tips for a Healthier Mindset

Nancy B. Timm, LCSW and BACS and a clinician on staff with Pelts, Kirkhart & Associates, has been counseling patients of all ages in her daily practice for over 35 years. Specifically of our readership, Timm notes, “The ‘sandwich generation,’ that’s what I think of when I think of boomers,” of which she is one. We talked of the difficulties boomers face in everyday life, and how those difficulties have been amplified by COVID-19 illness, quarantine, and new economic realities since March. “We are taking care of our parents much longer and we are taking care of our adult children and what they’re struggling with now themselves. Work is harder for them (our adult children) to find, housing is more expensive, they have childcare and the pressure of being working parents, or divorced parents being the sole provider.”

Nancy B. Timm, LCSW and BACS and a clinician on staff with Pelts, Kirkhart & Associates, has been counseling patients of all ages in her daily practice for over 35 years

Timm is seeing extremes among her patients these past few months. “I’m finding people who were doing good work before are now taking a break, they just want to get through the day. But then people who I haven’t heard from in a while, want to do that work now and dive right in.” Nancy Timm laughed when asked for tips, “In tips, one size doesn’t fit all.” But she shared the advice that she’s been giving her patients recently to help them get through this new Coronavirus normal. BE CAREFUL OF YOUR “SHOULDS” “This is the main one I’m telling people,” Timm said. “Don’t take that critical inner voice that says, ‘I’m not doing well enough or taking care of what I should be doing.’ That’s cognitive distortion and a harmful pattern, thinking you should be more productive.” “Instead,” she emphasized, “We need to have more self-compassion.” IT’S IMPORTANT TO STAY UP-TO-DATE WITH TECHNOLOGY Timm said it’s important boomers be current with all new modes of communications, both during and post-quarantine. She’s had to move her sessions away from personal contact; she’s now a “wiz on Zoom and tele-platforms for business.” And while, “The eye contact is different, it’s the next best thing.”

GIVE YOURSELF PERMISSION TO INTUITIVELY KNOW WHAT IS BEST FOR YOU “Experts and others’ opinions may not be what you need or may not fit your needs. Feel free to let go. For instance, if you work better having less structure to your day, sleep until 10 a.m.” DON’T GET CAUGHT UP IN THE FINANCIAL CRISIS Don’t look at your investments or account balances daily. “I think boomers are facing a financial crisis, they’ve worked hard and now their savings are not where they should be, in terms of inflationary pressures, etc. This is a snapshot; review it in a year,” Timm stressed. MINDFULNESS “The way I’ve been framing it for people is, when you start getting upset, it’s all inside your head. Get out of the self-perpetuating cycle; start noticing what’s in your head and stay in the moment.” Timm especially stressed that, “When you start worrying about everything from this quarantine, it becomes an endless loop. Cut the loop, go to something immediate and you’ll have a better chance to break the obsessive thoughts.” And in closing, Nancy Timm imparted, “Sometimes with tips, people feel pressure. So, go back to that gut feeling and just ease into it.”

july/august 2020 | www.nolaboomers.com

“In my own personal experience, my 92-year-old mother is living alone and her sitter who had been with her for years – they’ve been friends – her sitter died of COVID-19. That’s been so hard on her. And one of my daughters and a son-in-law have been laid off. So,

I’m personally having this whirlwind.”

23


Five Tips for Effectively Managing Socially Distanced Teams KEEPING YOUR TEAM OPERATING AT OPTIMUM EFFICIENCIES WHILE WORKING REMOTELY You’ve probably grown tired of hearing the words “adjusting to the new normal” during this time of social distancing. This pandemic has permanently changed our work environment, whether you’re already back in the office or your team is still working remotely. One constant, however, is that business owners and top managers must have a reliable system to manage network security and maintain productivity across a widespread team. Our checklist for best remote management:

1.

No personal systems. If you allow your staff to utilize their personal systems for work, you’re just asking for a data breach. You need to control all systems in order to log in to perform updates, ensure the latest virus definitions/intrusion prevention, monitor work, and wipe the drive if they leave or are terminated. It’s safer to send employees home with a documented work computer. This is a safer bet than letting someone go rogue (intentionally or unintentionally) on an unmanaged personal machine.

2.

www.nolaboomers.com

| july/august 2020

Clear Expectations. There is a difference between working from home and lounging on the couch with a laptop. If you expect your team to be effective remotely, then set clear expectations for their work setup and communicate them clearly.

24

Can they utilize their cell phone for business calls or do they need a VoIP/softphone tied into your network?

How often must they check in?

If you can’t reach them, how long do they have to respond?

Are meetings via phone or is video required?

How do they connect to your secure information? VPN? Firewall?

3.

Signed Employee Agreement. Whether working remotely is temporary or a permanent shift, institute a clear remote worker agreement. This should lay out all of the expectations that we listed above and others that are important to you. If you’re expecting employees back in the

office, reiterate the temporary nature of the arrangement. Working from home is one of those things that initially seems appealing but, depending on the worker, it may or may not be effective. As the employer, you want the option to bring them back into the office as necessary.

4.

Regular Communication. We recommend touching base via video at least once daily and scheduling another touchpoint – video, phone, email recap – with each and every employee. You cannot underestimate the power of “water cooler conversation;” these daily touches replace those in-person encounters and keep your employees engaged and effective.

5.

Keep it Positive. In our organization, we open every meeting with a “good thing.” Every team member shares something good (personal or professional) happening in their lives. When you’re in the thick of it, sometimes it’s hard to come up with something good. But having this seque sets a positive tone for the meeting and allows you - the boss - to get to know your team better as individuals. We also encourage shenanigans for self-expression. For remote teams, think about setting up a chat feed for funny memes, allowing people to use filters on their video calls, or anything else to bring a little levity to the meeting. This allows people to connect outside of their daily tasks and set roles. Ultimately, adapting to this new normal of social distancing is all about effective administration. Have the right policies in place, communicate the standards and expectations and follow up with your employees regularly. And partner with an IT company that specializes in creating secure, remote workspaces for managerial peace of mind. Darrin Piotrowski is owner of Rent-A-Nerd and, as the original Nerd, has been providing expert service for two decades, making the company the local, reliable go-to for business networks, IT services, and computer repair since 1997.


FROM THE BOOKSHELF: A perfect staying-in or going-out book about a favorite New Orleans street.

Audubon Institute, Mr. Perlis of Perlis men’s store, Lauren “Fleurty Girl” Haydel, Aiden Gill of Aiden Gill for Men, as well as interviews with interesting residents. And yes! The book is available on Magazine Street at shops and emporiums along the way.

The Incomparable Magazine Street By John Magill Photographs by Margot Landen Published by River Road Press $45.00 About the author:

road that curves between stately St. Charles Avenue and the Mississippi River. Once host to neighborhood service businesses, like grocers, druggists, and cleaners, Magazine today is a destination for browsers and shoppers, with its fashion boutiques, gift shops, antique stores, and galleries. It is also one of the most important dining and drinking streets in town. Still home to little neighborhood eateries, Magazine now hosts some of the city’s most renowned restaurants. Yet even with the street’s transformation, the soul of Magazine retains its residential charm.

Such being the case, I have the perfect book recommendation for both staying home and starting to venture out, The Incomparable Magazine Street. This beautiful coffee table book, full of gorgeous photography, is great for learning the wonderful history of this favorite New Orleans street and also serves as a guide for planning your dining and shopping adventures.

A stroll through the pages of The Incomparable Magazine Street immerses readers in history and nostalgia while introducing them to the people and places that make the six-mile-long street one of New Orleans’ greatest assets. Glowing photographs capture the small details, the varying streetscapes, and the unique people that make Magazine one-of-a-kind. The book is populated with insightful interviews with shop owners and luminaries like Ron Forman, director of the

The Incomparable Magazine Street traces the history and culture of the

About the Photographer: Born and raised in Louisiana, Margot Landen is the founder of Margot Landen Photography. A nationally honored photographer, she has worked with major film and editing production companies and advertising agencies across North America. She has photographed high-profile celebrity weddings, and her images have been featured in People, InStyle, Town and Country, Rangefinder, The Knot, Where Magazine, and Gambit. T

Scott Campbell is publisher of Pelican Publishing, a nationally recognized, local publishing company established in 1926. He also is publisher & founder of River Road Press, a local boutique house of local and regional titles.

july/august 2020 | www.nolaboomers.com

As things slowly start to return to normal and people slowly begin getting back to their regular routines, they’re splitting their time between staying home and going out. Restaurants and stores are reopening, and people are going out more. When you think of stores and restaurants in New Orleans, certainly Magazine Street comes to mind. This iconic six miles of residential neighborhoods, dining, shopping, parks, and attractions - bracketed between downtown Canal Street and uptown Audubon Park - is the ideal place to go for the return back to normal life.

John Magill retired in 2016 as senior curator with The Historic New Orleans Collection. A nationally known urban historian and New Orleans expert, he has penned articles for New Orleans magazine, Louisiana Cultural Vistas (now called 64 Parishes), and The Historic New Orleans Collection Quarterly. He contributed to Charting Louisiana: 500 Years of Maps and is the co-author of Canal Street: New Orleans’ Great Wide Way and Christmas in New Orleans. Magill has been honored by the Press Club of New Orleans, the Gulf South Historical Association, and the Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities.

25


Dear Dr. Gramma Karen, I babysit for my daughter Fiona’s two children, and I don’t want to do it any longer. You’ll probably say, “So then, stop already,” but it’s not that simple. When my now-deceased husband and I were raising our two daughters, I worked full-time as an attorney. I loved my job that helped pay for our family’s nice lifestyle. However, my job meant I missed a lot of my daughters’ sports and extra-curricular activities. I told Fiona that to make up for being an absentee mother when she was growing up, I would help in any way she needed me. Long and short is that I have become a full-time nanny. I love my granddaughters but my whole life revolves around taking care of them. When I told Fiona that I didn’t want to do it any longer, she made me feel guilty and reminded me that I had promised to make up for being an absentee mother. I made a commitment and I guess I have to honor it. Right? Ask Dr. Gramma Karen

Grandmother Wants Help Dealing with Guilt

“Absentee mom” suggests you were an inadequate parent, now obligated to make it up to your daughter by being an enslaved grandmother. When you say, “Fiona made me feel guilty,” perhaps it is more accurate to say, “I let Fiona make me feel guilty.” Both you and Fiona, either wittingly or unwittingly, have been complicit in keeping you mired in destructive guilt. The result is that you unnecessarily indentured yourself. But the good news is that you can un-indenture yourself! It really is that simple once you decide to throw off the yolk of destructive guilt. Tell Fiona you’re giving her notice to make other arrangements and won’t be available to take care of your granddaughters as you have been doing. You’ve decided…you want to travel, do volunteer work or whatever it is you wish to do. Fiona may not be happy with your decision, yet over time you can hope she adjusts. Will she try to use guilt again to change your mind? Maybe, but it won’t work because you’re out of the destructive guilt game! And in fairness to both you and your daughter, you need to be clear about what you will and will not do with regard to your time with your granddaughters.

Dr. Gramma Karen:

www.nolaboomers.com

| july/august 2020

You say your daughter made you feel guilty. In general, guilt acts as a moral compass, alerting us that we’re disappointed in ourselves, or that we’ve let ourselves and/or others down. Psychologists talk about two main forms of guilt: constructive (“good guilt”) and destructive (“bad guilt”). Guilt can be constructive when it results in our doing some soul searching, owning our mistakes, and making changes to keep us on the right path. Constructive guilt is healthy, productive, and pushes us to make our lives better by prompting us to do something or stop doing something.

26

Destructive guilt is unhealthy, unproductive, and can be debilitating. It can weaken our resolve to do better and be better. It can render us stuck, emotionally immobilized, and unable change and move forward. Destructive guilt can make us vulnerable to being controlled and manipulated by others. I recommend you think of your former self as a working mom and not as an absentee mom. Karen L. Rancourt, Ph.D., author of six books, writes the advice column “Ask Dr. Gramma Karen,” hosted by GRAND Magazine and Mommybites.com. Her columns focus on the unique relationships and issues that develop between young parents, grandparents, and grandchildren, and how to resolve them.

Be sure to talk with the children so they understand that they haven’t done anything wrong, now that you won’t be spending as much time taking care of them. Explain to them that you love them and will treasure the special time you’ve had with them, but now it’s time for you to branch out and do some other things. You’ll still be spending special time with them, but in different ways. Good luck, and I hope you enjoy your newfound freedom!


BE FEATURED

Senior Care Directory

(STARTING AT $299)

info@nolaboomers.com 504.296.9290

july/august 2020 | www.nolaboomers.com

IN OUR

27


o G e h T On A L O N IN OPENINGS & HAPPENINGS AROUND TOWN “OUT & ABOUT” JULY 3 FRI O-RIGINAL ART ACTIVITIES (VIRTUAL) Ogden Museum of Southern Art. Ogden Museum has art activities for all ages that can be downloaded from the O Blog every Friday. See ogdenmuseum.org. Continues each week through August 28.

5 SUN

www.nolaboomers.com

| july/august 2020

FREE FAMILY SUNDAY

28

Longue Vue House & Gardens, 7 Bamboo Rd. Louisiana families will be admitted to Longue Vue FREE of charge. Bring a picnic, and explore the 8-acre gardens and the children’s Discovery Garden. Reservations are required, longuevue.com/events. 9:30 am-5 pm.

NOLA MOVIE NIGHT: THE PRINCESS AND THE FROG (VIRTUAL) The Historic New Orleans Collection is hosting a movie night and providing historical context via Twitter as you watch. Watch this Disney movie with

FREE events are in BLUE


the grandkids while following the tweets for everyone to learn about New Orleans history together. hnoc. org/history-home/nolamovienight.

Orleans cocktails, led by Dr. Kristen Burton. See their Facebook page for tickets. 6-7:30 pm.

SUNDAY BRUNCH FROM THE BOTANICAL GARDEN (WEEKLY) Botanical Garden, New Orleans City Park, 5 Victory Ave. Pre-order and pick up your boxed meal, find a favorite spot in the garden, and enjoy an artful day amongst the art and nature. Chef Pat White prepares delicious menu offerings weekly. Paid admission or a Friends of City Park Membership is required to enjoy this feature. Admission: $10/adult, $5/child. Free age 3 and under. Sunday menu posted on Thursday prior for pre-orders: kitcheninthegarden.square.site. 10:30 am-1:30 pm.

TUES 7 GARDEN DISTRICT BOOK SHOP: MEET MARIAN KEYES (VIRTUAL) Tune into a virtual “Reader Meets Writer” session with author Marian Keyes to discuss her new book, Grown Ups. gardendistrictbookshop.com.

8 WED NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART (NOMA) REOPENING NOMA is open and admission by online ticketing only in order to limit capacity. E-tickets will be emailed for presentation upon arrival. Members are free, $15.00 for adults, $10.00 seniors (65+). Tickets include admission to the Besthoff Sculpture Garden. noma.org/visit/. Wednesdays through Sundays. 10 am-5 pm (10-11 am reserved for seniors and immuno-compromised visitors).

NOMA, in partnership with Magnolia Dance & Company, presents an outdoor performance in the Besthoff Sculpture Garden featuring works by New Orleans-based choreographers of color. Masks required. Advance tickets at noma.org/event/ voices-of-color. 7 pm.

CRADLE THE COCKTAIL (VIRTUAL) Hermann Grima + Gallier Historic Houses hosts an online history of New

CRUISIN’ THE CASTINE CAR SHOW Pelican Park, 63350 Pelican Drive, Mandeville. Join this fun evening full of cars, vendors, local food, fireworks, and more. This show is open to all antiques, classics, customs, hotrods, all-terrain, ratrods, and motorcycles. pelicanpark.com. 5-9 pm.

ARTS MARKET ON LEE LANE Lee Ln, Covington. St. Tammany Art Association hosts this local art market in downtown Covington. 10 am-2 pm.

17 FRI SUNSET AT THE LANDING CONCERT Concert on the banks of the Bogue Falaya at the Columbia Street Landing in downtown Covington. 6 pm.

23 THURS - 25 SAT INTERNATIONAL GRAND ISLE TARPON RODEO (3 DAYS) Participate in the oldest fishing tournament in the U.S., or show up just to enjoy local food and entertainment during this special weekend. tarponrodeo.org.

25 SAT ARTS MARKET NEW ORLEANS The popular Palmer Park market is slated to go live in July after being virtual since March. Purchase works by artists and creative vendors, food and beverage, and hear live, local music. 10 am-4 pm.

july/august 2020 | www.nolaboomers.com

VOICES OF COLOR DANCE PERFORMANCE

11 SAT

29


28 TUES

26 WED

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART BOOK CLUB

SIP SIP HOORAY! FOR CASA JEFFERSON

Contact education@noma.org to join the NOMA book club in order to discuss Viet Than Nyguen’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book, The Sympathizer: A Novel. RSVP beforehand and arrive early. 12-1 pm.

Fulton Alley, 600 Fulton St. The primary fundraiser for CASA Jefferson benefiting the Jefferson Parish children in foster care.Wine bourbon, rum, vodka and gin tastings; small bites, auctions and live music. casajefferson.org/ sip-sip-hooray-casajeff. $150/person. 6-8pm.

AUGUST 1 SAT ARTS MARKET ON LEE LANE Lee Ln, Covington. St. Tammany Art Association will host a local art market in downtown Covington. 10 am-2 pm.

21 FRI SUNSET AT THE LANDING CONCERT A live concert in downtown Covington on the banks of the Bogue Falaya at the Columbia Street Landing. 6 pm.

27 THURS NOMA BOOK CLUB Contact education@noma.org to join the NOMA book club for Joan DeJean’s The Queen’s Embroiderer: A True Story of Paris, Lovers, Swindlers, and the First Stock Market Crisis. 12-1pm.

29 SAT COCHON COTILLION XXIV The ever-popular Bridge House/Grace House fundraiser is at Mardi Gras World. Dress in costume for a festive evening, including music, a mini parade, food and open bar, auction,

and raffle. Tickets at bridgehouse.org. $100. (Patron Party 6-7 pm. $150). 7-11 pm.

ARTS MARKET NEW ORLEANS The Palmer Park Arts Market is slated to be live in August. See works by artists and creative vendors, purchase food and beverage, and hear live, local music. 10 am-4 pm.

ONGOING AUDUBON ZOO Audubon Zoo is open Wednesdays through Sundays. All visitors must reserve and pre-purchase tickets online (free for members). 10 am-5 pm, last entry at 3:30 pm.

CITY PARK FISHING Fish the eleven miles of City Park’s scenic waterways, including from the pier on Marconi and Fillmore. Valid freshwater fishing license from the LA Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is required. Bring a pole, bait, and patience. No fishing allowed on golf courses and no outside boats in park waterways. Catch and release is encouraged. neworleanscitypark.com. Daily.

www.nolaboomers.com

| july/august 2020

EVERY WEDNESDAY

30

CRESCENT CITY FARMERS MARKET DRIVE-THRU Wednesday Markets are pick-up with online pre-order Saturdays through Mondays, crescentcity farmersmarket.org. Drive-thru pick-up at Bucktown Harbor (325 Metairie Hammond Hwy, on Lake Pontchartrain), 8 am-noon.

EVERY SATURDAY

GRETNA FARMERS MARKET 4th St. and Huey P Long Ave., Gretna. Enjoy local produce, arts, and crafts every Saturday, rain or shine. 8:30 am-12:30 pm.


CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER DIGITAL GALLERIES (VIRTUAL) Visit cacno.org to explore two virtual collections, “Femmes Féroces: Material Life X Femmes Noires” and “Cecilia Vicuña: About to Happen.” Ends September 18.

CRESCENT CITY SUNDAY FARMERS MARKETS (WEEKLY) Sunday Markets are pick-up with online pre-order Wednesdays through Fridays, crescentcityfarmersmarket. org. Drive-thru pick-up at Parkway Bakery and Tavern (538 Hagan Avenue at Jeff Davis), Sundays. 8 am-noon.

CRESCENT CITY WEDNESDAY FARMERS MARKET DRIVE-THRU (WEEKLY) Wednesday Markets are pick-up with online pre-order Saturdays through Mondays, crescentcityfarmersmarket. org. Drive-thru pick-up at Bucktown Harbor (325 Metairie Hammond Hwy, on Lake Pontchartrain), Wednesdays. 8 am-noon. *Note: Crescent City Farmers Markets intend to reopen their regular markets

GARDEN TOURS Longue Vue is open for self-guided tours through the gardens and grounds, and the Discovery Garden. Available by paid, advance reservations, longuevue.com. Tuesdays through Saturdays 9:30 am-5 pm. Wednesdays 9:30 am-7 pm.

THE GOLF CLUB AT AUDUBON PARK

GRETNA FARMERS MARKET (SATURDAYS) 4th St. and Huey P Long Ave., Gretna. Enjoy local produce, arts, and crafts every Saturday, rain or shine. 8:30 am-12:30 pm.

HERMANN-GRIMA COURTYARD TOURS 820 St. Louis Street. Beginning at 10am every day of the week, you can visit

NEWCOMB ART MUSEUM TOURS (VIRTUAL) Tulane University’s Newcomb Art Museum features digital exhibits on newcombartmuseum.tulane.edu, including the Tiffany Window Tour and other collections.

NEW ORLEANS JAZZ MUSEUM BALCONY SERIES (TUESDAYS) Catch a live, weekly, virtual concert featuring local musicians playing from the museum’s back balcony. Facebook. com/nolajazzmuseum/live. 5 pm.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART (NOMA) Wednesdays are FREE admission for Louisiana residents, courtesy of The Helis Foundation (not including admission to the Besthoff Sculpture Garden). Obtain tickets online at noma.org/visit/. Wednesdays, 10 am-5 pm (10-11 am reserved for seniors and immunocompromised visitors).

Pre-order a boxed meal at kitcheninthegarden.square.site and pick up to dine in the gardens before sunset. Cocktails available. Menus change weekly and posted Monday prior. 5-8 pm

WOODLANDS CONSERVANCY HIKING TRAIL 449 F. Edward Hebert Blvd., Belle Chasse. Find hiking trails that are free and open to the public from dawn to dusk. Visit woodlandsconservancy.org for more information.

YOGA WITH A VUE (WEEKLY) All-levels yoga in the Longue Vue Gardens, Tuesdays and Thursdays. Reservations required at info@longuevue. com, class size limited, and participants must bring their own yoga mat. Admission to the gardens is included. $15. 9:30-10:15 am.

NEW ORLEANS RECREATION DEPARTMENT (NORD) VIRTUAL CLASSES NORD has a full slate of virtual exercise classes, Mondays through Fridays, June 8 to August 29. See nordc.org/ home for schedules and Zoom access.

SUNDAY BRUNCH FROM THE BOTANICAL GARDEN (WEEKLY) New Orleans City Park, Botanical Garden. Pre-order a boxed meal at kitcheninthegarden.square.site and pick up to dine in the gardens. Menus change weekly and posted Thursday prior. $10/adult, $5/child, free age 3 and under. 10:30 am-1:30 pm.

THE HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION COURTYARD TOURS 533 Royal Street. Discover New Orleans history and enjoy the HNOC courtyard tours. Visit hnoc.org for information.

WEDNESDAY EVENINGS IN THE BOTANICAL GARDEN (WEEKLY) New Orleans City Park, Botanical Garden. Extended hours and free admission for Louisiana residents, compliments of the Helis Foundation.

july/august 2020 | www.nolaboomers.com

The 18-hole course and pro shop are open; only one person per golf cart. Food & beverage available at the snack bar. Book tee times online audubonnatureinstitute.org/golf, or (504) 3135980. Tuesdays through Sundays. 7 am-2 pm.

the historic Hermann Grima courtyards for tours. Masks required. Tickets available online at hgghh.org.

31


Soothing Care at the End of Life For the general public, hospice care has certain connotations about the prognosis of a patient, but what exactly does it mean? While hospice care isn’t specific to age, according to the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, in 2017 about 64 percent of Medicare hospice patients were 80 or older, making it a very real end-of-life care option for your aging parents. About 42,000 people die in Louisiana a year. Of those, 90 percent experience some kind of terminal phase — more than half go through hospice care. A patient may be referred to a hospice program if it has been determined that they have six months or less to live because of a terminal illness. It doesn’t treat the illness, but the comfort of the patient. Hospice usually isn’t a facility, though some healthcare providers in New Orleans offer inpatient services, but a type of in-home care that employs palliative care, or the mental, physical, and spiritual comfort of a patient. “All of hospice is palliative care,” says Jamey Boudreaux, executive director of the nonprofit Louisiana-Mississippi Hospice and Palliative Care Organization. But palliative care can begin at diagnosis, in addition to treatment. Hospice care begins after treatment of the disease has ended.

Hospice Care Resources

www.nolaboomers.com

| july/august 2020

Louisiana-Mississippi Hospice and Palliative Care Organization 888.546.1500 lmhpco.org

32

Hospice Foundation of America 800.854.3402 hospicefoundation.org Medicare medicare.gov/hospicecompare

Covered by Medicare Part A, Veterans Affairs benefits, Medicaid, and most private insurances, hospice patients could qualify for doctor and nursing services, medical equipment, medications related to symptom control and pain relief, speech therapy, social work services, bereavement counseling, and more. “Hospice is much more than just managing a condition until a patient dies,” Boudreaux says. “It’s easing the process for the patient — emotionally, spiritually, and physically.” According to Boudreaux, palliative care techniques could be coming to patients with chronic conditions like crohn’s disease and cystic fibrosis, too. A pilot program rolling out to 26 states in 2021 could offer the same soothing-type pain and symptom management used by hospices, but in a hospital setting for patients who visit the daoctor at least two to three times in a 12-month period for their condition. The program is currently accepting applications and final details won’t be available until late this summer.

Hospice Care Programs AmeraCare Home Health & Family 303 W. 21st Ave., Covington 985.893.3301 ameracare.com - Outpatient Care

Louisiana Hospice and Palliative Care of New Orleans 3500 N. Causeway Blvd. #650, Metairie 504.483.9792 lhcgroup.com - Outpatient Care - Accepts Private Pay/Insurance

Canon Hospice - New Orleans 3600 Prytania St. #46, New Orleans 504.818.2723 canonhospice.org - Outpatient Care - Accepts Private Pay/Insurance

Notre Dame Hospice 1000 Howard Ave. f10, New Orleans 504.227.3600 notredamehealth.org - Outpatient Care - Accepts Private Pay/Insurance

Community Hospice 3600 Chestnut St., New Orleans 504.899.2011 communityhospice.us - Outpatient/Inpatient Care

Sanctuary At Passages Hospice 617 Dublin St., New Orleans 504.556.0770 passages-hospice.com - Outpatient Care - Accepts Private Pay/Insurance

Compassus 1301 W. Causeway Approach, Mandeville 985.639.8000 compassus.com - Outpatient Care - Accepts Private Pay/Insurance

St. Joseph Hospice 507 Upstream St., New Orleans 504.734.0140 thecarpenterhealthnetwork.com - Outpatient/Inpatient Care - Accepts Private Pay/Insurance


Nursing Home Directory Nursing homes aren’t just nursing homes anymore. There isn’t a one-size-fits-all definition — a facility could focus on one type of care, but another provides several levels or a combination of care. Rearching what’s best for or your aging parents can be daunting. And for that, Nola Boomers presents our Nursing Home Directory. Here, you’ll find definitions of need-to-know-terms, local and state resources, and a directory of area nursing homes from the Southshore to the Northshore. The directory is formatted by the type of home first, then by the zip code of the address.

Adult Daycare Centers *Plan to re-open when conditions allow Facilities that provide meals, structured activities, transportation, and social interaction for people with cognitive or functional impairments, usually serving those 80 and older. Adult daycare centers also offer a safe place to go when family caregivers are at work, run errands, or just need a break. On-site and on-call medical professionals, transportation, and field trips and activities are provided.

PACE Greater New Orleans 4201 N. Rampart St., New Orleans 70117 504.941.6507, pacegno.org Total # of Beds: N/A Payment Accepted: Medicaid, Medicare John J. Hainkel, Jr. Home & Rehabilitation Center 612 Henry Clay Ave., New Orleans 70118 504.891.7400 Total # of Beds: 102, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare, VA Contracts

Assisted Living Focused on daily living tasks, including bathing, dressing, and eating. Residents usually live in their own rooms and share common areas. They have access to three meals a day; help with medications, housekeeping, and laundry; 24-hour supervision, security and on-site staff; and social and recreational activities. Sunrise of Metairie 3732 W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie 70002 504.273.4366, sunriseseniorliving.com Total # of Beds: 72, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay The Atrium Assisted Living 6555 Park Manor Dr., Metairie 70003 504.454.6635 Total # of Beds: 78, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay

july/august 2020 | www.nolaboomers.com

Poydras Home 5354 Magazine St., New Orleans 70115 504.897.0535, poydrashome.com Total # of Beds: 110, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay

Kingsley House 1600 Constance St., New Orleans 70130 504.523.6224, kingsleyhouse.org Total # of Beds: N/A Payment Accepted: Private Pay, Medicaid, VA Contracts

33


Laketown Village 1600 Joe Yenni Blvd., Kenner 70065 504.467.1000, pegasusseniorliving.com Total # of Beds: 25, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay

Avanti Senior Living at Covington 2234 Watercross Pkwy., Covington 70433 985.317.6110, covington.avanti-sl.com Total # of Beds: 98, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay

Tranquil Living 4500 Leo St., Marrero 70072 504.304.9925, tranquelliving.net Total # of Beds: 10, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay

Christwood Retirement Community 100 Christwood Blvd., Covington 70433 985.898.0515, christwoodrc.com Total # of Beds: 223, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay

St. Margaret’s at Belleville 813 Pelican Ave., New Orleans 70114 504.362.7166, bellevilleno.org Total # of Beds: 53, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay

St. Anthony’s Gardens 601 Holy Trinity Dr., Covington 70433 985.288.1075, stanthonygardens.org Total # of Beds: 99, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay, VA Contracts

HomeLife in the Gardens 1101 Aline St., New Orleans 70115 504.894.6100, homelifeinthegardens. com Total # of Beds: 95, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay, VA Contracts Ville St. Marie Senior Living Community 4112 Jefferson Hwy., New Orleans 70121 504.834.3164, villestemarie.com Total # of Beds: 87, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay

| july/august 2020

Vista Shores 5958 St. Bernard Ave., New Orleans 70122 504.288.3737, vistashores.com Total # of Beds: 162, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay, VA Contracts

www.nolaboomers.com

Good Samaritan Rehabilitation & Nursing Center 4021 Cadillac St., New Orleans 70122 504.246.7900, goodsamaritanrehabandnursing.com Total # of Beds: 180, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare

St. Francis Villa Assisted Living 10411 Jefferson Hwy., River Ridge 70123 504.738.1060, stfrancisvilla.com Total # of Beds: 65, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay, VA Contracts

34

The Trace 19432 Crawford Rd., Covington 70433 985.241.4310, thetraceseniorliving.com Total # of Beds: 77, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay Village in the Oaks 75520 Highway 1081, Covington 70435 985.871.0111, villageintheoaks.com Total # of Beds: 34, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay Beau Provence 100 Beau West Dr., Mandeville 70471 985.778.0755, beauprovence.com Total # of Beds: 46, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay Brookdale Mandeville 1414 N. Causeway Blvd., Mandeville 70471 985.200.0203, brookdale.com Total # of Beds: 107, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay The Windsor Senior Living Community 1770 N. Causeway Blvd., Mandeville 70471 985.624.8040, windsorseniorliving.com Total # of Beds: 136, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay


Retirement Communities/ Continuum Of Care Retirement Communities A retirement community is a residential community or housing complex designed for older adults who are generally able to care for themselves. Activities and socialization are often provided. Continuing care retirement communities offer different levels of service in one location, which varies by facility. A resident might move from level to another depending on their specific needs. Healthcare services and recreation programs are also provided. Nouveau Marc 1101 Sunset Blvd., Kenner 70065 844.292.0638, holidaytouch.com Total # of Beds: 110, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay Laketown Village 1600 Joe Yenni Blvd., Kenner 70065 504.467.1000, pegasusseniorliving.com Total # of Beds: 25, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay Landing at Behrman Place 3601 Behrman Pl., New Orleans 70114 504.208.1075, sunshineretirementliving. com Total # of Beds: NA, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay Woldenberg Village 3701 Behrman Pl., New Orleans 70114 504.367.5640, touro.com/woldenberg-village Total # of Beds: 120, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Medicaid, Medicare, V.A. Contacts

St. Anna’s at Lambeth House 150 Broadway, New Orleans 70118 504.865.1960, lambethhouse.com Total # of Beds: 72, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay

Chateau de Notre Dame 2832 Burdette St., New Orleans 70125 504.866.2741, cdnd.org Total # of Beds: 171, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Medicaid, Medicare JoEllen Smith Living Center 4502 General Meyer Dr., New Orleans 70131 504.361.7923, jesliving.com Total # of Beds: 176, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare, V.A. Contacts Christwood Retirement Community 100 Christwood Blvd., Covington 70433 985.898.0515, christwoodrc.com Total # of Beds: 223, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay The Trace 19432 Crawford Rd., Covington 70433 985.241.4310, thetraceseniorliving.com Total # of Beds: 77, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay Village in the Oaks 75520 Hwy 1081, Covington 70435 985.871.0111, villageintheoaks.com Total # of Beds: 34, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay St. Anthony’s Gardens 601 Holy Trinity Dr., Covington 70471 985.288.1075, stanthonysgardens.org Total # of Beds: 99, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Insurance, Private Pay, V.A. Contacts The Windsor Senior Living Community 1770 N. Causeway Blvd., Mandeville 70471 985.624.8040, windsorseniorliving.com Total # of Beds: 136, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay

july/august 2020 | www.nolaboomers.com

Poydras Home 5354 Magazine St., New Orleans 70115 504.897.0535, poydrashome.com Total # of Beds: 110, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay

Ville St. Marie Senior Living Community 4112 Jefferson Hwy, Jefferson 70121 504.834.3164, villestemarie.com Total # of Beds: 87, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay

35


Memory Care Homes Memory care is a distinct form of long-term care designed to meet the specific needs of a person with Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, or other types of memory problems.

Wynhoven Healthcare Center 1050 Medical Center Blvd., Marrero 70072 504.347.0777, wynhoven.org Total # of Beds: 166, p rivate/semi-private rooms available Payment: Medicaid, Medicare

Sunrise of Metairie 3732 W. Esplanade Ave., Metairie 70002 504.273.4366, sunriseseniorliving.com Total # of Beds: 72, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay

The Suites at Algiers Point 813 Pelican Ave., New Orleans 70114 504.362.7166, algierspointsuites.com Total # of Beds: 53, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay

Academy House 4324 Academy Dr., Metairie 70003 504.884.1063, theacademyhouse.net Total # of Beds: 6, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay

Woldenberg Village 3701 Behrman Pl., New Orleans 70114 504.367.5640, touro.com/woldenberg-village Total # of Beds: 120, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Medicaid, Medicare, V.A. Contacts

St. Anthony’s Healthcare & Rehab Center 6001 Airline Dr., Metairie 70003 504.733.8448, stanthonynh.com Total # of Beds: 124, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare, V.A. Contacts The Atrium Assisted Living 6555 Park Manor Dr., Metairie 70003 504.454.6635 Total # of Beds: 78, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay Bayside Health Care 3201 Wall Blvd., Gretna 70056 504.393.1515, baysidehealthcare.net Total # of Beds: 150, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Medicaid, Medicare

www.nolaboomers.com

| july/august 2020

Laketown Village 1600 Joe Yenni Blvd., Kenner 70065 504.467.1000, pegasusseniorliving.com Total # of Beds: 25, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay

36

Harvard House 5304 Erlanger Rd., Kenner 70065 504.884.1063 Total # of Beds: 8, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay Marrero Healthcare Center 5301 August Ave., Marrero 70072 504.341.3658, nexion-health.com/marrero-healthcare Total # of Beds: 105, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare

HomeLife in the Gardens 1101 Aline St., New Orleans 70115 504.894.6100, homelifeinthegardens.com Total # of Beds: 95, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Insurance, Private Pay, V.A. Contacts Poydras Home 5354 Magazine St., New Orleans 70115 504.897.0535, poydrashome.com Total # of Beds: 110, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay St. Anna’s at Lambeth House 150 Broadway, New Orleans 70118 504.865.1960, lambethhouse.com Total # of Beds: 72, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay Vista Shores 5958 St. Bernard Ave., New Orleans 70122 504.288.3737, vistashores.com Total # of Beds: 162, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Insurance, Private Pay, V.A. Contacts St. Joseph Nursing & Rehab Center 405 Folse Dr., Harahan 70123 504.738.7676, stjosephofharahan.com Total # of Beds: 192, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare Peristyle Residence Lakeview House 858 Mouton St., New Orleans 70124 504.517.3273, peristyleresidences.com Total # of Beds: 7, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Insurance, Private Pay, V.A. Contacts JoEllen Smith Living Center 4502 General Meyer Dr., New Orleans 70131 504.361.7923, jesliving.com Total # of Beds: 176,


private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare, V.A. Contacts Our Lady of Wisdom Healthcare Center 5600 General de Gaulle Dr., New Orleans 70131 504.394.5991, olwhealth.org Total # of Beds: 138, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay, Medicaid, V.A. Contacts West Bank Lighthouse New Orleans 1712 Holiday Dr., New Orleans 70131 504.931.6048, westbanklighthouse.com Total # of Beds: 7, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Insurance, Private Pay

Nursing Homes Nursing homes provide a wide range of health and personal care services, which varies by location. Their services focus on medical care, 24-hour supervision, three meals a day, and assistance with everyday activities. Most nursing home residents live there permanently. Bayside Health Care 3201 Wall Blvd., Gretna 70056 504.393.1515, baysidehealthcare.net Total # of Beds: 150, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Medicaid, Medicare

Avanti Senior Living at Covington 2234 Watercross Pkwy, Covington 70433 985.317.6110, covington.avanti-sl.com Total # of Beds: 98, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay

Maison De’Ville 2233 8th St., Harvey 70058 504.362.9522 Total # of Beds: 100, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare, VA Contracts

Christwood Retirement Community 100 Christwood Blvd., Covington 70433 985.898.0515, christwoodrc.com Total # of Beds: 223, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay

West Jeff Healthcare Center 1020 Manhattan Blvd., Harvey 70058 504.362.2020 Total # of Beds: 104 Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare

The Trace 19432 Crawford Rd., Covington 70433 985.241.4310, thetraceseniorliving.com Total # of Beds: 77, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay

Chateau Living Center 716 Village Rd., Kenner 70065 504.464.0604, chateaulivingcenterkenner.com Total # of Beds: 250, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare

Pontchartrain Healthcare Center 1401 Hwy 190, Mandeville 70448 985.626.8581, pontcare.com Total # of Beds: 127, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare

Heritage Manor of Mandeville 1820 Causeway Approach, Mandeville 70471 985.626.4798, heritagemanormandeville.com Total # of Beds: 145, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare The Windsor Senior Living Community 1770 N. Causeway Blvd., Mandeville 70471 985.624.8040, windsorseniorliving.com Total # of Beds: 136, private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay

Wynhoven Healthcare Center 1050 Medical Center Blvd., Marrero 70072 504.347.0777, wynhoven.org Total # of Beds: 166, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Medicaid, Medicare Covenant Nursing Home 5919 Magazine St., New Orleans 70115 504.897.6216, covenantnursinghome.org Total # of Beds: 96, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare, VA Contracts

july/august 2020 | www.nolaboomers.com

Brookdale Mandeville 1414 N. Causeway Blvd., Mandeville 70471 985.200.0203, brookdale.com Total # of Beds: 107 private/semi-private rooms available Payment: Private Pay, V.A. Contacts

Marrero Healthcare Center 5301 August Ave., Marrero 70072 504.341.3658, nexion-health.com/marrero-healthcare Total # of Beds: 106, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare

37


St. Jude’s Health and Wellness Center 1539 Delachaise St., New Orleans 70115 504.895.3953 Total # of Beds: 116 Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare, VA Contracts

Carrington Place of New Orleans 5301 Tullis Dr., New Orleans 70131 504.394.5807 Total # of Beds: 160, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Medicaid, Medicare

John J. Hainkel, Jr. Home & Rehabilitation Center 612 Henry Clay Ave., New Orleans 70118 504.891.7400 Total # of Beds: 102, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare, VA Contracts

Our Lady of Wisdom Healthcare Center 5600 General de Gaulle Dr., New Orleans 70131 504.394.5991, olwhealth.org Total # of Beds: 138, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay, Medicaid

St. Margaret’s at Mercy 3525 Bienville St., New Orleans 70119 504.321.6555, stmmercy.org Total # of Beds: 112, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay, Medicaid

St. Luke’s Living Center 4201 Woodland Dr., New Orleans 70131 504.378.5050, stlukesno.org Total # of Beds: 101, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare, VA Contracts

Jefferson Healthcare Center 2200 Jefferson Hwy., Jefferson 70121 504.837.3144, jeffersonhealthcarela.com Total # of Beds: 220, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare

Heritage Manor of Mandeville 1820 Causeway Approach, Mandeville 70471 985.626.4798, heritagemanormandeville.com Total # of Beds: 145, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare

Good Samaritan Rehabilitation & Nursing Center 4021 Cadillac St., New Orleans 70122 504.246.7900, goodsamaritanrehabandnursing. com Total # of Beds: 180, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare

www.nolaboomers.com

| july/august 2020

St. Joseph Nursing & Rehabilitation Center 405 Folse Dr., Harahan 70123 504.738.7676, stjosephofharahan.com Total # of Beds: 192, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare

38

Lafon Nursing Facility of the Holy Family 6900 Chef Menteur Hwy., New Orleans 70126 504.241.6285, lafonnursingfacility.com Total # of Beds: 148, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare, VA Contracts Ferncrest Manor Living Center 14500 Hayne Blvd., New Orleans 70128 504.246.1426, ferncrest.com Total # of Beds: 258, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay, Medicaid, Medicare

Personal Care Homes Assisted living and personal care homes offer seniors many of the same services as independent living communities, but with the addition of assistance with daily needs. These are usually smaller, more private facilities, providing beds for around five to 20 residents. Lake Villa House 4212 Lake Villa Dr., Metairie 70002 504.884.1063 Total # of Beds: 6, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay Serenity Senior Residences 3949 Meadowdale St., Metairie 70002 504.495.5522, serenityres2.com Total # of Beds: 12, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay Academy House 4324 Academy Dr., Metairie 70003 504.884.1063, theacademyhouse.net Total # of Beds: 6, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay Fidelis Care IV 4801 Tartan St., Metairie 70003 504.304.7862, fideliscaregroup.com Total # of Beds: 8,


private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay Schouest House 7004 Schouest St., Metairie 70003 504.884.1063 Total # of Beds: 6, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay Fidelis Care I 916 Martin Behrman Walk, Metairie 70005 504.301.2123, fideliscaregroup.com Total # of Beds: 8, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay Fidelis Care II 4000 Kent Ave., Metairie 70006 504.218.7951, fideliscaregroup.com Total # of Beds: 8, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay Harvard House 5304 Erlanger Rd., Kenner 70065 504.884.10163 Total # of Beds: 8, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay Peristyle Residence Lakeview House 858 Mouton St., New Orleans 70124 504.517.3273, peristyleresidences.com Total # of Beds: 7, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay, VA Contracts

Resources Louisiana Department of Health ldh.la.gov, 225.342.9500 On its website, you can find regional offices’ locations, apply for services, file a complaint, report fraud, and more. According to the department, there is currently a moratorium in place for nursing facilities in Louisiana. No new nursing homes will be built or licensed in the near future. Louisiana Nursing Home Association lnha.org, 225.927.5642 The LNHA is a nonprofit headquartered in Baton Rouge, and represents more than 250 nursing facilities and assisted living communities by providing public policy advocacy, education, professional development, quality initiatives, and other services. Nursing Home Rating System medicare.gov/nursinghomecompare Medicare and Medicaid-certified only nursing homes are subjected to annual surveys and a five-star rating system. A nursing home’s overall rating is based on health inspections, staffing, and quality measures. Ombudsman ltcombudsman.org Also directed by the Governor’s Office of Elderly Affairs, the Ombudsmen are trained advocates for residents of nursing homes and assisted living facilities. Their services are confidential and free of charge. Ombudsman Coordinator for the New Orleans region Tanya Hayes, 504.736.6519

West Bank Lighthouse New Orleans 1712 Holiday Dr., New Orleans 70131 504.931.6048, westbanklighthouse.com Total # of Beds: 7, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Insurance, Private Pay

Note: Long-term or permanent-stay facilities are included only.

july/august 2020 | www.nolaboomers.com

Solution Care Homes, River Forest Home 5 S. Division Dr., Covington 70433 504.278.0309, solutioncarehomes.com Total # of Beds: 8, private/semi-private rooms available Payment Accepted: Private Pay

39


Profile for nola family magazine & nola boomers magazine

Nola Boomers Magazine - July/August 2020  

Chef Kevin Belton tells Nola Boomers how he became an accidental chef! Plus, we've got tips on dealing with major life stressors and the ben...

Nola Boomers Magazine - July/August 2020  

Chef Kevin Belton tells Nola Boomers how he became an accidental chef! Plus, we've got tips on dealing with major life stressors and the ben...