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mediapack

media pack

Campaign introduction Key messages Ideas to get you started Using the media Writing a press release Producing a press release Press release example Following up a press release Using photography Letter to the editor

Š2013 KORE

@fleshandblood

fleshandblooduk


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Introduction This guide has been put together to assist anyone interested in promoting the fleshandblood campaign. There should be something in the guide for everyone: whether you are a seasoned campaigner looking for guidance on good practice, or whether you just want to do something to help but have little or no experience gaining publicity or profiling a campaign.

Where to start? Our website fleshandblood.org offers lots of useful information. You may find the following of particular interest:

Information on those involved in the campaign including partners, associates and sponsor. A range of media including logos, posters, leaflets, banners, videos and icons available to download. A range of resources to use and ways to get involved. A blog with up-to-date news on the campaign. More information about blood and organ donation.

Š2013 KORE

@fleshandblood

fleshandblooduk


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Key Messages The key aim in promoting fleshandblood is to encourage the church to see blood and organ donation as a part of its generosity and to increase the number of blood and organ donors in the UK. The campaign is firmly rooted in the narrative of generosity and the impact that the personal gift of donation has on the lives of many. The campaign can be summed up with the following simple messages:

7000 units of blood are needed every day to meet hospital demand with approximately 225,000 extra blood donors needed per year

1000 people die each year waiting for a transplant

THE CHURCH is made up of millions of people, who share in a rich tradition of giving, practice a rhythm of generosity and say YES to a life lived generously.

The church is an ideal advocate with the ability to raise the profile of donation and encourage donation as a personal gift.

The church could make a significant impact on the lives of many and help to support the work of the NHS in caring for our communities.

fleshandblood.org is the hub of the campaign and should be referenced wherever possible as a means to

get involved.

There are 3 calls to action involved in the campaign accessed via the website: Register Online Sign up to give blood or join the NHS Organ Donor Register Make a Date to Donate Book a date to give blood at a venue near you Be an Advocate Lend your voice, raise awareness, find ways to involve others.

Š2013 KORE

Links

@fleshandblood fleshandblooduk

@fleshandblood

fleshandblooduk


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Ideas to get you Started

Promote it Display a poster, add a banner to your website or an icon to your social media.

WHAT IF THE CHURCH SAW BLOOD AND ORGAN

DONATION

AS PART OF ITS

GIVING? fleshandblood.org

Partners Campaign partners

Sponsor Sponsor

In Associates association with

give.net give.net from from

Browse the full range of media available to download at fleshandblood.org/media

Share it Whether you’re on Twitter or Facebook, prefer text, email or a good natter, be an advocate and pass it on. Share the campaign with your friends or followers, email out to your contacts or share your story on the Facebook page. facebook.com/fleshandblooduk

Sunday slots Tell you church by booking a slot in a service; include it in the notices, drop it into a sermon or introduce the campaign to your organisations and groups. The fleshandblood video fits perfectly into these slots as it tells the story of the campaign and how to get involved in less than 2 minutes. Download the video from fleshandblood.org/media.

Awareness day Organise an Awareness Day at your church, C.U. or organisation. It’s a great opportunity to invite others to find out more about blood and organ donation, share stories and involve your community. We’ve designed all the resources you’ll need including quizzes, discussion questions, videos and sample running orders that can be found at fleshandblood.org/awareness-day. News Keep others up-to-date with articles in your newsletter, magazine or weekly bulletin. Interview those involved, give details of local blood donor sessions and share the story of the campaign so far. Sign up online to receive the latest fleshandblood news.

©2013 KORE

@fleshandblood

fleshandblooduk


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Using the media Media coverage offers the most affordable communications activity for campaigns and while we cannot involve everyone in local events and activities, many thousands will read or hear about what you are saying or doing if it gets good media coverage. The key to good media coverage is to give them what they need – in a form they can use. A newspaper story will be used more prominently if you can offer them a suitable picture, while TV stations will need something to film and radio stations someone to interview. Local media will want a local angle: a local donor, recipient or campaigner. Local stories, community spirit and taking action all make great local news. The publicity created by local media coverage will also make it easier for people in your community to engage with fleshandblood in order to raise the profile of the campaign and the activities that your church, C.U. or organisation will be involved in, building trust and awareness of the vital role the church has in the life of a community. Decide: Why do you want media coverage? Who is your target audience? What’s the story? Put these together and you should have a clear publicity aim. Remember that you are the story, fleshandblood is the initiative, but your local media is more interested in your story. This is an effective medium to impact and reach your local community and in turn raise awareness about the generous gift of donation.

Do your research Watch the TV, listen to the radio, read magazines and newspapers – the better you understand what makes news and how it’s put together, the more likely you will be able to provide information in a way that suits different media. Work out the type of audience they are looking to attract, the style of the programme or writing and look out for any regular slots. News bulletins, for instance, may cover announcements, events and activities. Read the local paper(s) to identify useful sections: every week there may be a community events section in which your activity or story could be featured. Keep any relevant articles you find and note the author’s name so you can drop them a line directly. Does your local radio station offer a “thought for the day”? Or find out if longer feature programmes may be interested in covering a topic in depth or organising a studio discussion.

Get together a list of contacts Start by putting together a list of contacts for the media you want to cover your story. Most broadcast organisations and newspapers now have their own websites that will usually give details of how best to contact them.

Stay local The fleshandblood press office will handle all national media to avoid stories from the campaign bombarding national news outlets, leaving you the ability to focus on local media including: Your local daily and/or weekly newspaper Local radio station (if relevant to your local area i.e. Camden Community Radio) Local news websites Local community newsletters or magazines Don’t forget to send us your stories so that we can profile what’s happening at a local level in the national media.

©2013 KORE

@fleshandblood

fleshandblooduk


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Writing a press release Press releases are a very effective way of getting your story into newspapers, magazines, on radio or television. Writing a release is not difficult, however it requires some imagination and the application of a few basic rules. Releases should be clear, concise and factual. They should be written in a simple, direct way. Keep sentences short, no more than 25 to 30 words, and avoid complex language, jargon and clichés. The whole release should be no longer than two typed pages of A4 including any notes to editors. Press releases need to be written objectively and without personal opinion so write in the third person keeping personal opinion restricted to quotes and sentences such as ‘John Smith, Pastor of local church XXX said that....’ Remember news editors can receive hundreds of releases every day so it is worth taking time to ensure that your release is one they’ll print. Busy editors don’t have time to rewrite and won’t bother. The release will go into the bin. If your story is to grab attention, the first paragraph or the “intro” is crucial. It should contain the main facts of the story. It should tell the news editor, at first glance, what the story is about and whether it is of interest. A simple rule to writing a news release to cover the five “Ws” in the first paragraph:

What is happening? Who is doing it? Where is it happening? When is it happening? Why is it happening? Subsequent paragraphs should expand on these points and provide background information. Organise the paragraphs so the most newsworthy are at the top and they go down in descending order of importance. If there is not enough room to print the whole of your release, it will be cut from the bottom up. People are more interesting than things so try to personalise your story. Journalists are always looking for the human angle in stories. Also look for a strong local angle and use it high up in the release. Including a quote in your release is an excellent way of reinforcing the story. If writing a quote for somebody else, get their approval before using it. Write a first draft of the release and then go through it to tighten, edit and improve, check spellings and punctuation. It’s a good idea to get someone else to read it before it goes out as careless presentation, mistakes and bad grammar damage credibility. Do keep an eye on local trends or stories, which you might be able to attach your story to for more impact. The key is to be timely and ensure you share your news, when it is still considered to be ‘newsworthy’. Promote fleshandblood.org wherever possible, so that it can be printed or broadcast at every opportunity.

Timing Timing is crucial for some stories. Find out the copy deadlines for the newspapers and radio programmes you want to target. It may make the difference between whether or not your material is used. If you are able to target certain times of the week the chances of getting your story used improve considerably. Friday is a poor time to target newspapers, as papers tend to be smaller on Saturdays with less space for news. Fewer journalists tend to work on Saturdays and they welcome help in the form of stories for the Monday paper.

©2013 KORE

@fleshandblood

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Producing a press release Presenting the release in the correct way will greatly improve your chances of getting it into print. Here are some tips:

DO’S Give it a date and a snappy headline that tells the story in brief. Include your church / C.U. / organisation name in the first few sentences - the first sentence if possible. Use less than ten words for your headline and no more than 30 words for your first paragraph. Type it but keep it short, simple and preferably on a single sheet. Use approximately three sentences per paragraph. Use size 11-point font size and 1.5 line spacing. Include a ‘quote’ and remember to give the person’s full name and title. Use “said” for quotes instead of “say”, “commented” or “added”. Provide contact names and phone numbers - make sure all your key people have a copy, and that at least one person is available outside office hours (with a copy of the release and any useful background information). If the story is a photo opportunity, give details of what can be photographed and when and where photographs can be taken. Add brief extra background of your activity in a ‘Notes to Editors’ section at the end if necessary. Check deadlines in advance - make sure your release arrives in time for journalists to follow it up. Include a link to the fleshandblood website, Facebook page, Twitter account and email address at the end of every release so people know how they can find out more or get involved. Use the fleshandblood press release example as a guide template. Always use the key messages for fleshandblood, in your Notes to Editor section at the end of any press release. Always ask for the parent’s permission if including photos of children from an event.

DONT’S Don’t assume the reader will know all about your concerns. Don’t assume the reader understands Christian jargon - keep it in everyday language. Don’t ramble – keep to the important points. Never make claims you cannot prove and avoid exaggeration. Don’t make claims or share opinions on behalf of the fleshandblood campaign. All statements, news releases for national, London regional news, faith based and broadcast media will always be managed by the main fleshandblood office. Don’t try and be controversial, negative or critical about local councillors, community leaders or politicians. Focus on the positives of what you are doing to love and support communities in the name of fleshandblood. Never promise or arrange interviews on behalf of the campaign, please refer media requests directly to the fleshandblood press office to consider.

Brand rules

fleshandblood is always written as one word in lower case with both ‘flesh’ and ‘blood’ in bold. fleshandblood is a collective unit so should be referred to in the singular i.e. fleshandblood is… Always use the approved fleshandblood logo provided, it must not be edited or altered in any way.

©2013 KORE

@fleshandblood

fleshandblooduk


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PRE REL SS E EXA ASE M PLE

NEWS RELEASE For immediate use

February 4, 2013

LOCAL CHURCH SWAPS ITS SUNDAY SERVICE FOR BLOOD DONATION Yesterday witnessed an unusual morning at St Mark’s Church in Walsall, when for the �irst time in

its 20 year history the entire congregation decided to transform their usual 10 a.m. Sunday service and instead give blood at their local blood donor session.

A total of 86 members aged between 17 to 73, donated blood as part of �leshandblood, a new

campaign encouraging the UK church to include blood and organ donation as part of their personal giving.

The church had pre-arranged their Sunday morning group visit with the Charlotte Street donor

session, with nurses saying this was the largest number of donations they had experienced in any single day.

The Rev John Thornton, Vicar of St Mark’s said, “We believe that our church needs to be an active

member in the Walsall community and we support a number of different projects like Food Bank

and our homeless shelter, working with the needy and vulnerable in the area. But when we heard of the �leshandblood campaign, we knew there was the opportunity to give not just of our time and money, but also physically through blood and organ donation.”

The campaign, a joint partnership between creative agency Kore and the NHS Blood and Transplant, is the �irst time the NHS has partnered with the UK church on an initiative of this kind and hopes to raise the pro�ile of blood and organ donation within the Christian community.

Esther Brown aged 60, a long-term member of the church who lives locally said, “Though it was a very different Sunday morning than normal, we all felt that it was the right thing to do. It was

refreshing and inspiring to be able to support a real need within our community that is more than just giving money. This will de�initely not be the last time I give blood!”

©2013 KORE

@fleshandblood

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PRE REL SS E EXA ASE M PLE

Every day 7,000 units of blood are needed to meet hospital demand, with approximately 225,000

extra blood donors needed each year to maintain consistency. More than 1,000 people die each year in the UK waiting for an organ transplant.

The campaign believes that the Church, which has a long history of giving and generosity with

millions of members across the country, is ideally placed to raise awareness and help to meet the need for blood and organ donation in the UK, impacting the lives of many in our communities. -EndsContact: Helen Smith Email: helen57@emailprovider.com, Telephone: 01922 524XXX, Mobile: 07968 22XXXX.

For more information about the campaign visit: �leshandblood.org or contact: press@�leshandblood.org Twitter: @�leshandblood Facebook: �leshandblooduk

Notes to Editors: Founded as a partnership between KORE and NHSBT, the campaign seeks to create a network of associates committed to supporting the campaign and providing further distribution in order to engage with a broad spectrum of the church in the UK.

Kore is a creative agency that builds socially good ideas. They operate a small team committed to collaboration and draw upon the creative energy and expertise of a growing global network. Acting as a broker, architect and translator they also work with charities and organisations helping them to build ideas and develop strategy. NHSBT is a Special Health Authority in the NHS with responsibility for optimising the supply of blood, organs, and tissues and raising the quality, effectiveness and ef�iciency or blood and transplant services. There are three calls to action involved in the campaign accessed via the website: 1. Register Online: Sign up to give blood or join the NHS Organ Donor Register 2. Make a date to donate: Book a date to give blood at a venue near you 3. Be an advocate: Lend your voice, raise awareness, �ind ways to involve others.

Mobile blood donor units will also be present on-site at a number of festivals and events throughout 2013/14. Over the campaign’s two-year duration its effectiveness and impact will be monitored through registration statistics measured by NHS Blood & Transplant and research polls conducted by Christian Research.

©2013 KORE

@fleshandblood

fleshandblooduk


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Following up a press release Don’t assume that sending out a bulk email to all your contacts will guarantee you coverage. Follow up releases with calls, prioritising the most important outlets. Often the person who is covering the story will not have seen your release and will ask you to re-send. If you send a press release to a generic ‘newsroom’ email address, it’s likely to get lost in the masses of releases received. Try to get a named contact that you think would be interested in what you have to say. It’s fine to ring up first to ask who the news editor or producer of a particular radio or TV show is. Be persistent and confident – but remember to be polite and respect the fact that people may be on deadline. It often helps to have the two or three most important points written down in front of you before you make any calls. A good site for finding general contact numbers for local media is www.mediauk.com. For a daily local paper, news website or radio show, it’s best to call a couple of days beforehand, following up the day before you want the piece to appear to check whether the release has been read and if it is of interest. For weeklies, call the week before. Make sure you know when the press day is for a weekly paper, and don’t call them then. Try to avoid calling from mid-afternoon onwards, as most (daily print) journalists will be on deadline and unreceptive to new stories. Many media outlets also have a planning meeting mid-morning, when they discuss and decide what will be featured over the next day or week. It’s a good idea to get in earlier than that so your story can be part of the planning meeting. For radio, don’t call for five minutes either side of the hour, when the news team will be doing their news bulletins.

©2013 KORE

@fleshandblood

fleshandblooduk


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Using photography Photos can be a good way of gaining publicity, particularly in local papers that want to show the people behind the story. You can either send your own photos to a paper or you can arrange a photocall to invite newspaper photographers along to an event. The best way to do this is with a press release so that the newspaper has all the details about the story and your contact information. Phone picture desks a day or two beforehand, to make sure the event is in everyone’s diaries. If you are setting a time 11am is usually a good time, meeting the needs of both morning and evening papers.

Making it interesting Whether you decide to take your own photos or arrange a photocall you will need to make your pictures interesting. You cannot guarantee that a paper will use your photo, but you can find ways of making it more likely. The composition of your photo is important: Don’t use too many people. If appropriate, get them to smile, readers are more attracted to “friendly” pictures with smiling faces. Think about the background, make sure it’s “clutter” free. Choose an outside location if possible, one that’s easy to get to and where there’s space for a photographer to stand without causing problems. Always take pictures with the light behind you. Use the fleshandblood branding and display the fleshandblood logo if possible. Contact the press office for more details.

Your own digital images You cannot guarantee that a newspaper photographer will turn up to your photocall. Arrange for your own photographer to take pictures, so you have a record of the event and can also send to the media if they cannot send a photographer themselves. If you take your own photographs make sure you set your camera to a high resolution as they can always be reduced later. Usual practice is to email the photos to the media outlet with your release but some journalists cannot receive large files so it is worth checking that they have got them. Always make sure you have permission from both the people taking part in the photo and the premises/location it is being taken at. If you’d like to take pictures at a local blood donor session, please contact the NHSBT press office pressoffice@nhsbt.nhs.uk to get permission, giving at least a week’s notice if possible. Don’t forget to send us your images too so that we can use them on the website and social media.

Captions A short, snappy and relevant caption should be attached to each image that you submit to a publication. This should include names and job titles, if relevant, and a credit to the photographer.

Permissions If you are taking or commissioning photos to be used for publicity purposes, whether it’s to send to the media or for use in a newsletter, other publication, or on your website, it is important that you get permission from each of the people being photographed. Ask for signed permission from parents if including photos of children. If you intend to use the same photograph at a future date it is good practice to contact the subject to let them know. Although you will already have had their permission to use the image, their circumstances may have changed since the picture was taken. At all times, seek to respect the dignity and rights of those you capture in a photo.

©2013 KORE

@fleshandblood

fleshandblooduk


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Letter to the editor The purpose of letters pages in newspapers is to give people an opportunity to publish their views and respond to the issues of the day. This makes writing a letter to the editor one of the easiest ways to talk about fleshandblood and the local church to thousands of readers and opinion formers in your local area who monitor letters pages closely.

Make it relevant Newspapers particularly want interesting and emotive letters on topics of interest to their readers. If you are responding to something that appeared in the newspaper, you need to send your letter to the editor that very day or, at the latest, the next day – and reference the article in your letter. If you are not responding to something, think about whether there have been any related issues in the paper or on the news recently. If you can tie your letter into a current issue that is relevant to fleshandblood you will have a better chance of getting it published. Where appropriate try and always include a call to action for fleshandblood at the end of your letter and encourage readers to visit the website or get involved locally.

Keep it brief and tailored Letters to the editor should be short, snappy and to the point – no more than 130 words. Take a look at previous letters pages and tailor your letter to the style of that particular publication. It’s vital you also include all your contact details. You don’t need to refer to yourself as a spokesperson for fleshandblood, simply include your normal name and address/email details in order for the letter to be published. If your letter is published send a copy or link to the fleshandblood office as we’d love to see the media coverage you have achieved.

©2013 KORE

@fleshandblood

fleshandblooduk


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For more information please visit fleshandblood.org or email press@fleshandblood.org. Address: fleshandblood PO BOX 237 Southend-on-Sea Essex SS3 3AB

PLEASE NOTE: NHS Blood and Transplant branding cannot be used without permission. Any queries regarding the use of other branding relating to the campaign should be sent to press@fleshandblood.org.

Š2013 KORE

@fleshandblood

fleshandblooduk

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