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WINTER 10 No 9


What’s on your mind!?

Indy Editors

Laura Beth Waltz

"Above all else, guard your heart for it is the well spring of life."

Paige Blankenbuehler "When i’m caught between two evils, I take the one I’ve never tried."

Emily Tennison

"Paranas, although tasty, contain little meat necessitating the need consume multiple in order to feel full"

Chelsea Flaming "Food zombie rawwrrrr"

Magen Long "Don’t talk about it. Be about it."

Matt Morrison "I am the walrus"

Jessica Tso "My guitar’s name is Joshua"

Jenny Coddington "I got your number."

Katie Haagnestad "My wedding is in less then three weeks and I have no shoes or a veil.. ugh." 2 FLC

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By some miracle, I have actually found time to make some really great recipes within the last week and a half! While I do not want to rave about my cooking, I am impressed with the fact that even though homework has taken over my entire life, I have actually made the time to make some good food. Mom always says it best; there is nothing better than a home cooked meal. Must be the Polish tradition making its way out. We always love good food, good friends, and lots of potatoes and onions. Our bodies do better when we eat well. Take the time to make yourself a nicely cooked meal. You’ll find that it tastes great and it makes you excited to know you made it. I know for underclassmen, it could be a difficult thing trying to make a culinary creation with not much more than a microwave. So, perhaps for those

Online Editor Sassy Kelly

of you who are the quiet shy type, it might be time to get out of that habit and make friends with some upperclassmen. Not only do they make great friends, but you might get lucky and they might let you use their kitchen. Only if you feed them too! It is worthwhile to make a fun night with your buddies a priority. Have everyone pitch in a few bucks and go buy good food from the store and have a fun dinner night. Guys might not think it’s a cool thing to do, but you could make it a fun night by watching an awesome action flick or some of the winter Olympics like skiing and snowboarding. And if

The Price of Pleasure Forum by: Dakota Jones

there is not a guy among you who wants or knows how to cook ask a girlfriend, I am sure she would be happy to help (I am not suggesting guys can’t cook). There is always the issue of the dishes so whoever cooks the meal does not have to do the dishes

Spotlight: New Hired Employees by: Tyrel Karp

afterwards. I think that’s a fair trade. Ladies make it a fun girl’s night by playing board games or sitting and sharing stories about what’s been happening in your lives. For the ladies who haven’t had much experience cooking,

A Night at the Manifesto Ellie Duke

by: Steph Cook

practice makes perfect. I am sure your friends will be happy to test it, college students are always up for food. I know from experience that some of those first few recipes might not turn out the way you think, so keep working on it.

Sage Grey Rio Coyotl Brett Masse

Clare O'Connor Seville Jordan Squiers Lori Badolato Courtney Taylor Mike Eckstein

In2itive Art Display by: Ryan Versaw

It is your night, make it however you want it and remember to have fun. Because while our heads and noses are deep in our textbooks, the college years are flying by and before we all know it we will be off and running into the work force. Just enjoy

Sports Scholarship by: Michael Carr

the simple pleasure of having great friends and food around you! Nothing could be better! I wish you health, happiness and great food, Nazdrowia!

All Drains Lead to the Ocean by: Liz Grogan

Personal Finance

Tanya Marchun Design Editor

by: Brian Govreau Check out these websites for a few quick and easy dinner ideas Cover photo by Sage Grey

Horoscopes

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/BBQ-Chicken-Pizza-II/Detail.aspx http://www.kraftrecipes.com/recipes/chicken-italiano-skillet-75581.aspx

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By Dakota Jones

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eminist Voice hosted the documentary “The Price of Pleasure” on Feb. 11 and 15 to help Fort Lewis College gain perspective on the pornography industry. The documentary profiled the staggering size and power of adult entertainment in the world today. Incorporating a combination of facts and behind-thescenes footage, as well as personal interviews and actual porn scenes, the documentary chronicled the tremendous global fascination with sex. In addition, the motives and impacts of such a large industry were questioned. Many of these influences are negative, Britany Schaffer, president of Feminist Voice, said. “The porn industry impacts our everyday lives in the way

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we view both sex and women,” Schaffer said. “We absorb media and are affected by what we subject ourselves to.” Some Americans may subject themselves to porn. In 2007, the industry made between 10 -14 billion dollars in the US alone, more than the National Football League, National Basketball Association and Major League Baseball combined, according to “The Price of Pleasure”. An estimated 4.2 million pornographic websites exist on the Internet, which is about 12 percent of the entire Internet and it appeals to an audience that is 70 percent male. The industry has become so large that it has begun to shape the market and, subsequently, the consumer’s desires, according to the documentary.


“Porn influences how people see their sex lives,” Johanna Dadisman, sociology major at Fort Lewis, said. “What is normal is being defined by the industry.” The industry works parasitically with executives making money off poor, young, uneducated women who are paid according to the sexual acts they participate in, and they are cut out of the main amount of money generated by the movie, according to the documentary. The documentary also emphasized that these acts have turned violent, as more money is spent on genres such as “horror porn”. Horror porn is porn which imitates horror movies, with sex according to “The Price of Pleasure”. Power is becoming increasingly popular as an erotic stimulant, Audrey De La Rosa, a member of Feminist Voice, said. “The structure of the industry molds violent men and subordinate women in these movies,” De La Rosa said. “Our patriarchal society is turned on by a nonsexual woman being controlled by a powerful man.” Interspersed with the dialogue, during the movie, there were explicit pornographic scenes. These scenes depicted naked women bound by hand and foot while being forced to bow before the man and kiss his feet before having sex with him. According to the documentary, 82.2 percent of pornographic scenes feature physical aggression in some form, with spanking and gagging being the most frequent acts.

The increased objectification of women by such a powerful industry is most worrisome, Dadisman said. “I want to be a sexually empowered woman, and I find this blatant materialization of women extremely offensive,” Dadisman said. “What scares me is that this isn’t just men; women are encouraging these feelings too.” Both Dadisman and Schaffer expressed faith in the ability of the industry to create erotic movies in a more responsible way if it chose to do so, they said. Dadisman and Schaffer cited erotica as a form of “good porn” that focuses less on sex and control and more on romance and personal connection in addition to sex, they said. But porn is not a bad thing at all, Jason Wynne, a psychology major at Fort Lewis, said. Wynne believes with the people interviewed in the documentary that: porn is a choice and not a requirement, he said. Porn is just fine and those who speak against it are trying to control something they personally don’t like, but it isn’t necessarily a bad thing for the general population, he said. “Women don’t have to have sex on camera and people don’t have to watch them if they don’t want to,” Wynne said. “If the business is making money, then people obviously want to watch it enough to pay for it.”

“The porn industry impacts our everyday lives in the way we view both sex and women, “Schafer said. “We absorb media and are affected by what we subject ourselves to.”

- Britany Schaffer, president of Feminist Voice

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A spotlight on some of the Fort’s new faculty Tyrel Karp

For information please call or e‐mail:   Wanda Ellingson, LCSW, 970‐247‐9773 or wellings@du.edu   

Jackie Rakes

   

Darren Mathews

Rakes took a job in the State Classified branch at Fort Lewis because she has always liked helping people and has always been good at business, she said. Rakes now helps with the accounting in the casher’s office, helping when there is an over flow of people, handling of money, giving out scholarships, and approving requests for proposals (RFP) and purchase orders for the college, she said. Rakes’ current job is less stressful than her previous one and is much more comfortable because the students are very polite to her, she said. Richard Miller, another new employee, holds a position in the State Exempt category. “I’m new at the Fort and relocated here from a fairly high end position, overseas. I came here because I wanted to, not because I needed to,” Miller, director of Institutional Research, said. Both Rakes and Miller find the college a nice place to work. Rakes is comfortable working at Fort Lewis, she said. “As an Alaskan Native, I really appreciate the college’s unique mission,” Miller said. Fort Lewis still has job openings to offer, to those who are still seeking a position. Fort Lewis is still hiring, Mathews said. Working at Fort Lewis would provide a respected and comforting work environment, Rakes said.

Richard Miller

he latest budget crisis has left many people wondering what to do about jobs. Are they available? Where can I get one? What requirements do I have to have? Such questions also apply to new job seekers at Fort Lewis College, but has there been any new hiring? “We haven’t ever stopped hiring, we just put stricter requirements on our hiring process,” Darren Mathews, the director of human resources at Fort Lewis, said. “We look more closely to see if it is really needed and if we can finance that position” “We have had several new hires these last few months,” he said.= Mathews said he is a relatively new hire because he has only been employed for about a year, he said. Fort Lewis has gone on to hire about five new employees a month, he said. “The Fort hires into three different categories,” Mathews said. “Faculty, State Classified, and State Exempt.” Faculty consists of teachers and professors, while the State Exempt is directors and administrations, and State Classified are the wide array of positions such as administrative assistants. Jakie Rakes, a Fort Lewis employee, has been working full time for about six months, but she previously worked as a temporary assistant, she said. Rakes came to work at Fort Lewis after taking a break for family reasons from her previous job at the business end of human services in Durango, she said.


A Night at the Manifesto A People’s Party

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he Fort Lewis College Sociology Club put on a benefit called the Manifesto: A People’s Party at the Summit which took place on Thursday Feb. 18. The 18 and over event, included a concert with dancing and several other activities that took place throughout the night, Kristen Hearst, a Sociology Club member, said. The Sociology Club invited a bunch of different bands to play at the Summit, including the local bluegrass band Waiting on Trial, DJ Codestar, Wesley Jack, and Nate Barrett, Hearst said. The Manifesto also featured live painting by GSI, Splatter Faeries as well as artistic movement with contact juggling, poi, and hooping, Hearst said. The event provided tables and information from various local and regional clubs and organizations including EarthFirst!, Root Force, Rising Tide, Durango Youth Coalition, Animas Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), Food Not Bombs, Women’s Voice, Peace Jam, and several others, Hearst said. The Sociology Club wanted to make the event a buffet of information, Ashley Moody, a Sociology Club member, said. Their motto consists of social connections, social change, and they wanted the Manifesto to reflect that idea, Moody said. Sloan Kodroff, a Fort Lewis student who is not a member of Sociology Club, thought the event turned out awesome and loved the live music and bands, he said.

By Steph Cook

Kodroff heard about the show while he was walking around campus and someone yelled at him to come to the Manifesto that night, so he figured he would check it out, he said. The Sociology Club put on the Manifesto as a benefit for their upcoming event, a play called “Marx in Soho,” Ali Whitten, a Sociology Club member, said. The play, which features Bob Weick as Karl Marx, is a spin off of Howard Zinn’s book, “A People’s History of the United States” and shows Marxism in modern day New York City, Whitten said. After the Sociology Club planned to do “Marx in Soho,” Zinn, who wrote the play, recently passed away, Whitten said. The event will be a tribute to Zinn, and the Sociology Club is hoping that the money raised from the Manifesto will make it so “Marx in Soho” can be free to students as long as they show their SkyCard, Whitten said. The Sociology Club will be showing “Marx in Soho” at the Durango Arts Center on March 4, and will possibly be doing a second showing, Whitten said. In a few weeks, there will be appearances from the Sociology Club during Earth Week and Women’s History Month, Moody said. They will be celebrating Women’s History Month all day at the Vallecito Room on March 3, and are hoping to have a speaker at the Environmental Center’s Earth Week event, Moody said.

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Art & Entertainment

In2itive Art Display By Ryan Versaw

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ixed media paintings and sculptures merge within the In2itive gallery, currently on display at Fort Lewis College’s Art building, with works by Joan Levine-Russell and Sandra Butler. Levine-Russell is both a painter and mixed media artist, and Sandra Butler is a sculptor of her work on film. Although, Levine-Russell was unavailable for comment, Butler described her piece titled “Balancing Act.” Made with a combination of oil paint, a three dimensional wagon wheel, a board balanced horizontally upon it, a black glass

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animal and bottle of similar material and color balanced on opposite ends of the board, “Balancing Act” creates a double toned image of balance beam and oil paint. Butler possesses a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art from the University of Montana, attended graduate school at Virginia Commonwealth University in the sculpture department, and has been creating art for about 25 years, Butler said. There are seven of her pieces in the show, a significant and regular number in every gallery she hosts in, Butler said.


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o me, it is a good sense of mysticism and interest to it as a number,” Butler said. Numerology, the study of numerical interpretation, is a significant part of the creation of this show and remains a tool that exists alongside her inspirations, Butler said. An example of Butler’s use of numbers can be found within her creation titled “transplant,” a sculpture of steel wire, salt and colored rawhide leather. Her sculpture surpasses six feet tall, and portrays a plant with four pink blooms, Butler said. Four flowers made from dyed rawhide represent the number of balance in the world, while a wilted and young bloom on the top of the stalk of the plant signifies the manner in which the young and vulnerable can often die first, Butler said. “The most significant thing that I can think about this piece is that when I was doing it, I had to go back and re-do this flower,” Butler said, as she indicated the bloom. “transplant” features wire twisted together to form a larger vertical cylindrical stem, which was painted with glue and covered with salt, creating a frosted effect. Most of her pieces feature this effect, Butler said. Another piece featured is titled “blue polyp,” a sculpture of a jellyfish inspired by a beautiful and dangerous creature, that appears to protrude from the wall in what Butler describes as a phallic position, with a cone of wire creating the appearance of affluent, Butler said. A highly interactive quality piece, titled “come dance with me,” bore the appearance of a fourlegged spider, Butler said. It is fashioned from welded steel, one-fourth inch rod, and rope sack near the junction of the

legs, she drew inspiration from the nest of a type of African bird called a Weaver, Butler said. Attached to one of the legs is a string connected to a bone, and it serves as a sliding handle that moves left and right to manipulate the sculpture and bring its title to life, Butler said. In2itive encompasses a gallery organization internship designed to instruct artists and business students alike on how to organize and run an art show, Rita Cordalis, In2itive organizer, said. The In2itive gallery’s purpose is to provide examples for class studies, instruction of internship students, and promote the education of student artists, Cordalis said. “Another purpose of the gallery is to have students learn how it works, and start the gallery,” Cordalis said. Levine-Russell’s piece “Civil Disobedience,” mounted upon the wall in several sections, was very difficult to set up, Cordalis said. Citing “come dance with me” as a favorite work, Alex McIntosh, art student, explained why this work leaves much to his imagination. “It just definitely jumps out there, it definitely has no realistic concept whatsoever,” McIntosh said. McIntosh admitted that the images evoked could be different and that it was difficult to describe them, but he took a mental piece of the gallery out the door with him, McIntosh said. “I came in there to see something crazy, and I was a little shocked and puzzled,” McIntosh said. The In2itive show will display Levine-Russell’s mixed media and Butler’s sculptures until March 3.

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Sports Scholarship Competition

By Michael Carr

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rom grants to loans to borrowed parent’s money, there are several ways to pay for an education here at Fort Lewis College. Another way to pay is through scholarship money. In the athletic department, sports scholarships are determined by the coaches, Kent Flint, athletic business manager at Fort Lewis, said. Applying for the scholarship comes with a lot of competition. You need at least a 2.0 G.P.A. just to be eligible, and for cross country, most students need to perform at a 3.0 G.P.A. Flint said. One can join a team if they are not a freshman and this is called walking on to a team, Flint said. The competition for a scholarship is demanding. Some students come out of high school with the “Hot Shot” mentality. They need to understand that the competition is different at a collegiate level, Flint said. There is not a full ride for every individual, but there is aid based on academics. Less than 1 percent actually receives a full ride scholarship, Flint said. When applying for a scholarship, make sure to apply early, and find out about the program. Flint mentioned to also understand the team, and visit the college, if all possible, he said.

All students need to become NCAA (National College Athletics Association) eligible in order to compete, and students can not compete until they get that eligibility, Flint said. These students also have to have academic amateurism because athletes are here to learn. Flint said that if one is at a professional level it would be unfair, he said. A student can only have one or the other and if they are earning money from competing at a professional level they are not eligible, Flint said. Doug Manske, a Fort Lewis Golf scholar, who works in his sport three days out of the week, gets all his tuition from the Junior Foundation, he said. “The school gives me nothing,” Manske said. However, not all of the scholars receive their compensation from organizations like the Junior Foundation. Garrett Hoanin, a cross country scholar, is a second year student at Fort Lewis who lives off campus, has a membership on the team. Hoanin said that he receives $999 from the school, and more financial aid can be received by out-of-state applicants, he said.


All Drains Lead to the Ocean By Liz Grogan

My goldfish, Kurt and Dave, have requested I write an appeal for the fish. They may be happy and healthy fish, living in a tank on my desk, but they know there are plenty of fish in the sea who are not as lucky. You may be asking: What does Colorado, a landlocked state, have to do with the sea? As any person who has watched “Finding Nemo” should know, all drains lead to the ocean. Every time we take our cars somewhere, the friction of the road rubs tiny bits of rubber off your tires. Water samples from the middle of the ocean show that rubber particles have made their way through the streams and rivers and into oceans, thousands of miles from the nearest car. Heavy metals from abandoned mines, hormones, fertilizers, even oil and waste pollute Colorado’s own rivers every day due to carelessness. If these pollutants go untreated, they eventually show up in the ocean. The Colorado River and its tributaries, for example, drain into the Gulf of California, home to whales, sea turtles, rays, and whale sharks. According to one study, in 40 years there could only be jellyfish in our oceans. I think jellyfish are pretty neat, but not nearly fascinating enough to be the only animals left in the oceans. With all those venomous tentacles, I can’t imagine they’d taste very good either. There are some simple ways to reduce the pollutants in water. The most important thing to do is to dispose chemicals properly. Anything from prescription drugs to pet waste can have devastating effects on the water quality. If you still don’t think there’s enough reason to protect the oceans, fine. You can wait a couple of years for the oceans to raise enough for Colorado to become a coastal state. As for me, I’m not about to face the wrath of my goldfish for being too lazy to protect the oceans.

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Personal Finance New Gen-Ed? By Brian Govreau

Personal Finance, offered as Economics 201 at Fort Lewis College, is in the works to become a social science general education credit, however, the approval process is proving to be a challenge. In order for a course to become part of the general education curriculum, it has to be approved at both an institutional and state level, Luke Miller, assistant professor of law and finance at Fort Lewis College, said. Miller said that everyone would benefit from taking his Personal Finance course and he’s appealing to the state of Colorado for approval, he said. “I’ve been trying to get that approved since I first got here,” Miller said. Miller said that college under prepares students to understand finance, he said. In 2001, Colorado Legislature passed House Bill 01-1263, also known as the Student Bill of Rights, to establish a common curriculum of general education courses according to the Colorado Department of Higher Education, CDHE. The Student Bill of Rights calls for all public institutions of higher education in the state of Colorado to accept the transfer of all lower division general education courses approved by the Colorado Department of Higher Education, according to CDHE “There’s a formal process and the course has to be proposed

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to the curriculum committee,” Paul McGurr, assistant dean of the Fort Lewis School of Business Administration, said. Before a class can enter the Fort Lewis course catalog, a department must first send it before a curriculum committee who can approve it for review by the faculty, senate, and eventually, the provost, McGurr said. “I facilitate the movement of the courses through the process,” McGurr said. “Personal Finance has been along for a very long time.” Twice each year, the CDHE holds a review session to approve, defer, or reject courses for General Transfer pathway credit, McGurr said. The course has to meet specific state competency and content criteria, McGurr said. “To get approved as a GT pathways course the faculty member must submit a syllabus and a course nomination form,” he said. The question the CDHE wants answered is if Personal Finance reflects the standards of a liberal arts education according to the Student Bill of Rights. Personal Finance covers 80 percent of all the financial material most people need to know in their lifetime, Miller said. Personal Finance is a 3-credit course designed to introduce students of all disciplines to personal financial management, according to the Fort Lewis College 2009-2010 course catalog. Recent events have indicated that now, more than ever, is the most financially dangerous period in the United States, according to the Personal Finance winter 2010 semester course syllabus. In 2001, there were 1.1 million divorces in the United States, but there were even more bankruptcies, that amounted to 1.5 million, according to the Administrative Office for the United States Courts and the course’s syllabus. The course syllabus continues that more people in the United States will file for bankruptcy this year than graduate from college. The course is structured to instruct young professionals to better grapple with their own finances, Miller said. Miller’s course addresses financial goal-setting, tax, asset, and risk management, investment, estate and retirement planning, according to the syllabus. “At the end of the course I think the students do have a working conversational knowledge of finance,” Miller said. “It will never be a wasted credit.” In November 2009, Personal Finance was reviewed by the GT pathways subcommittee and ultimately deferred, McGurr said. In April 2010, it will go forward again for approval, McGurr said.


Horoscopes Aries- March 21 to April 19 Obstacles will come your way but if you keep your eye on the road you can steer around them. Tonight: stay in and cuddle with someone close.

Taurus- April 20 to may 20 Fight low energy by doing something active, swim, ski, snowboard, or go to the gym. Tonight: Eat, drink, and be merry.

Gemini- May 21 to June 20 Good luck will come to you this week if you hold onto that attitude of gratitude! Tonight: Look at the stars for inspiration.

Sudoku Sudoku 2

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Cancer- June 22 to July 22 8

Leo- July 23 to August 22

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You will make a new friend this week by maintaining an open mind. Tonight: Eat good food.

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Virgo- August 23 to September 22

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Fun surprises are in store for you. Remember to slow down and have fun this week. Spring break is almost here so don’t get distracted yet. Tonight: Eat pizza.

Sagittarius- November 22 to December 21 Stay focused on a couple of specific goals this week. Spring break is almost here don’t get distracted yet. Tonight: Go dancing!

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Aquarius- January 20 to February 18 Don’t get stressed this week save your energy for more important things. Tonight: Take it easy.

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Re-connect with your inner child, go have a snowball fight or build a snowman! Tonight: Watch a movie with a friend.

Cook something new this week; the stars say it will be delicious. Tonight: Go out and have fun!

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Capricorn- December 22 to December 19

Pisces- February 19 to March 20

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Libra- September 23 to October 22 It may be time for a change. Put yourself out there and good things will come. Tonight: Go out and laugh with your friends.

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Things may get rough this week. Keep smiling, things are not as bad as they seem. Tonight: Stay in and collect your thoughts.

Scorpio- October 23 to November 21

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Trouble with a friend may cause turbulence in your life this week. Talk to him or her to work through it. Things will go your way! Tonight: Do something new.

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Sudoku Puzzles created by Matt Morrison Puzzle created by Benjamin Downing

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Your responses to the

National Survey of Student Engagement will provide important information for improving student success at

Fort Lewis College.

Make Your Opinion Count!

Sponsored by: Office of Institutional Research, Planning and Assessment

You could win an IPOD touch! (FLC employees including work study and student wage are ineligible)

Watch for an e-mail containing your login information, or have it sent to you by visiting

www. nssesurvey.org.

http://www.nssesurvey.org

259-0298 810 E. College Dr. Durango, CO Next to CJ’s Diner

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Legal Aid offered

March 3rd & March 17th Brought to you by the ASFLC Associated Students of Fort Lewis College FLC

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Make changes to Fort Lewis that will benefit students for years to come. Make friends, build leadership skills, and impress future employers! Make a name for yourself, and give yourself something to be PROUD of!

Your Student Government Wants YOU!

Nominations open Monday, February 15th and close Thursday, March 18th, pick up packet at the CUB info desk or the Senate Office! For more information contact Michael Lewismust at mtlewis@fortlewis.edu “You be the change you wish to see in the world." Mahatma Gandhi  

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Independent Winter 2010 Issue 9