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AMER IC AN R IVER COLLEGE  COSUMNE S R IVER COLLEGE FOL SOM L AKE COLLEGE  SACR AMENTO CIT Y COLLEGE

M AT T E R S

SPRING 2018

FROM COLLEGE TO CAREER CAREER EDUCATION IN THE SPOTLIGHT

VALUE OF AN EDUCATION THE

LOS RIOS DELIVERS FOR REGIONAL ECONOMY

DRIVE & DETERMINATION AMERICAN RIVER COLLEGE ALUM PERSEVERES

HOLLYWOOD COMES HOME

LADY BIRD HAS LOS RIOS CONNECTIONS


CHANCELLOR’S MESSAGE The Los Rios Community College District is committed to improving the lives of the nearly 75,000 students that attend our colleges each and every year. Our four colleges – American River College, Cosumnes River College, Folsom Lake College, and Sacramento City College – are part of the fabric of our communities and have helped countless students achieve their dreams for generations. Los Rios students become chemists, artists, and engineers. They start businesses, run for office, and lead movements. Our students are smart, creative, and driven. But above all else, Los Rios alumni are instrumental in building and growing a stronger, more vibrant Capital region. On behalf of the Los Rios Board of Trustees, I’d like to thank you for your continued support of public higher education and our colleges. We are dedicated to the success of our students and will never stop looking for new and better ways to help them reach their goals.

AMERICAN RIVER COLLEGE 4700 College Oak Drive, Sacramento, CA 95841 (916) 484-8011 · www.arc.losrios.edu

COSUMNES RIVER COLLEGE 8401 Center Parkway, Sacramento, CA 95823 (916) 691-7344 · www.crc.losrios.edu

Brian King, Chancellor kingb@losrios.edu

Los Rios Matters is published by the Communications Office of the Los Rios Community College District. Copyright © 2018 Editor

Gabe Ross, Los Rios Contributing Editors Scott Crow, ARC Kristy Hart, FLC Kaitlyn MacGregor, SCC Kristie West, CRC

FOLSOM LAKE COLLEGE 10 College Parkway, Folsom, CA 95630 (916) 608-6500 · www.flc.losrios.edu

Contributors Matthew Battershell, FLC Jane Crandell, FLC Teri Gutierrez, Los Rios Joan Kudin, ARC Crystal Lee, SCC Danielle Weast, CRC Graphic Design Jennifer McLane, FLC

Los Rios Community College District 1919 Spanos Court, Sacramento, CA 95825 (916) 568-3041 • www.losrios.edu

2 Los Rios Matters | SPRING 2018

SACRAMENTO CITY COLLEGE 3835 Freeport Boulevard, Sacramento, CA 95822 (916) 558-2111 · www.scc.losrios.edu


NEVER

STOP ACHIEVING LEARNING GROWING

American River College alumna Mollie Chacon is proof positive that perseverance, hard work, and supportive educational champions pay off when it comes to reaching your goals.

When Mollie Chacon graduated from American River College (ARC) with her first associate degree in Electronic Systems Technology in December 2005, she became the first college graduate in her family. Chacon grew up in a rough neighborhood in East San Jose, where few of her classmates went to college and some didn’t even complete high school. After moving to Sacramento, she was determined to forge a fresh path for herself and create a new family legacy.

As Chacon began her educational journey at ARC in 2002, she knew she was interested in studying electronics, but soon discovered that her higher education experience would allow her to broaden her skills and knowledge in other areas. “I learned at ARC that I was capable of a lot more than I actually thought I was,” Chacon said. Chacon credits this insight not only to ARC’s diverse curriculum, but mainly to the accomplished and inspirational faculty that encouraged her Los Rios Matters | SPRING 2018 3 


“I’ll never stop pursuing my education.”

to not limit her aspirations. “To this day, I keep in touch with Electronics Technology professors Fred Evangelisti and Gary George, not just to catch up, but also for advice about my career and future educational direction,” she said. “My teachers were always straightforward with me. As long as you put effort in, you can get all the help you need.” Her college courses’ use of group work and collaboration have served her well in her career. “Working with a partner or a group is something you’re going to experience regularly in the workplace. You have to know about group dynamics and people’s strengths and how to ask for help,” she said. “Once I entered into my profession, I knew how to work with different types of personalities based on my classroom interactions.” Upon earning an associate degree, she used her experience to land a job with the City of Sacramento in their traffic signal department, while continuing to pursue her academic ambitions at ARC. With an eye towards career advancement, a mentor encouraged her to add computer science classes to her electronics and engineering studies. 4 Los Rios Matters | SPRING 2018

While discussing her educational plan with a counselor, she was informed that many of the computer science classes she had already completed at ARC would apply towards the management information systems (MIS) degree at Sacramento State. “This program was perfect for me as it was a cross between computer science and business and something that many companies are seeking in their employees, people who have both technical and business backgrounds,” she said. It was also during one of these counseling sessions that Chacon learned about Associate Degree for Transfer (AD-T) opportunities that provide those who complete the program requirements with a guaranteed transfer to the California State University (CSU) system. With the knowledge that the MIS program at Sac State was impacted, Chacon knew that


also earning an AD-T in Business Administration was her best option to gain admittance. With this advantage, she was accepted into Sac State’s MIS program in the spring of 2016. Balancing school, a career, and a growing family took a tremendous amount of focus and dedication. “My biggest sacrifice was time with my family. I have a husband and two children. My kids were little when I started ARC and now my son is graduating high school,” she said. But family was what drove her on. “My graduation from Sac State was probably my proudest moment because it was a long journey. I didn’t take any shortcuts, going full-time while working full-time. It took me longer than I would’ve liked, but I finally did it.” With her cumulative degrees, Chacon has advanced with the City of Sacramento and was promoted to a telecommunications technician. “We monitor operations for over 800 traffic signals in Sacramento, doing everything from the design of the traffic signals to monitoring, maintaining, and managing the network.”

“I learned at ARC that I was capable of a lot more than I actually thought I was.” “Right now I’m concentrating on my career and family, but once my son finishes college, I will consider pursuing another degree,” she said. “I want to be a role model for my kids. Because I was the first college graduate from my family, I want them to know that there are no excuses. I’ll never stop pursuing my education.” ▪ To read more student success stories like Mollie’s, go to: smartmove.losrios.edu. If you would like to help other students achieve their educational dreams, visit the Los Rios Foundation website at: foundation.losrios.edu.

Chacon’s broad understanding of the technical, engineering, computer science, and business fields helps her oversee a wide variety of public works projects. “Sometimes I work with people who may not have technical or business backgrounds. They need a liaison who can understand all facets of the project,” she said. As she looks back on her college career, Chacon encourages students not to rush the journey. “Take your time. Find out exactly what you like to do — and what you can do with that degree,” she said. “Find that right mix of something you know you will enjoy doing for the rest of your life and will also provide for you.” Los Rios Matters | SPRING 2018 5 


FROM

CLASSROOM TO

CAREER

Career Education programs propel students on the path to a lucrative future

Sacramento City College’s Youa Xiong credits her current and future success to the Airframe and Powerplant Maintenance Program. PHOTO BY JASON PIERCE

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CAREER EDUCATION In today’s competitive job market, students need more than just a high school diploma to get ahead. By 2020, 65% of all professions in the U.S. will require training beyond high school. Career Education is a smart, affordable avenue to get the practical skills necessary to succeed in the modern-day workplace. California Community Colleges are the largest provider of workforce training in the nation, serving more than two million students annually and setting them on paths to rewarding careers. Los Rios colleges offer a wide range of Career Education programs designed to meet the needs of employers throughout the region. Classes are taught by faculty who are often industry experts in their fields. Students don’t just attend lectures — they get hands-on experience that sets them apart. These programs are delivering for students in a big way. At Sacramento City College (SCC), students in the Airframe and Powerplant Maintenance program have boosted their earnings by a whopping 151%. “I see many of my classmates are going right into the industry,” said Reuben Meeks, a retired law enforcement officer, who was able to pursue a lifelong dream of working in aviation by completing the two-year program at SCC. “I go back to the hangar every now and then to see how new students are doing, and I tell them to stay in the program, stay focused, stay motivated...and you’ll be getting ahead.” Career Education programs in Los Rios are buoyed by direct connections between faculty and local

Students in American River College’s Automotive Technology program learn from working professionals in the trade. PHOTO BY STEVENSON MEDIA

industry partners. Programs like American River College’s (ARC) Automotive Technology generate rave reviews from employers who go on to hire program completers. “My past 15 years’ experience with the Automotive Technology department at ARC have been nothing less than awesome!” said Mike Latham, Service Director at Maita Toyota. “The candidates for employment have been well-educated and immediately employable. Students have gone on to become Team Leaders for crews of technicians, Assistant Service Managers, and Service Clerical Bookers.” No two Career Education programs look alike, which is one of the reasons they are so successful. At Cosumnes River College (CRC), faculty are integrating the Business Entrepreneurship and ▸ ▸

CAREER EDUCATION CLASSES CONNECT STUDENTS TO INDUSTRY Los Rios Matters | SPRING 2018 7 


Culinary Arts Management programs to help build our region’s growing entrepreneur community. “This will give culinary students who are learning about food preparation the additional skills of conceiving, developing, and managing an enterprise of their own,” said Business Professor Man Phan.

Chef Michael Frigm and Professor Man Phan integrate culinary arts with business skills at Cosumnes River College.

In order to be successful business owners, students will need a broad range of knowledge and training. Phan said this innovative approach will give CRC students the necessary skills to better prepare them for their future. For students in Folsom Lake College’s (FLC) Technical Theatre program, their classroom is the on-site Harris Center for the Arts. “Our students receive valuable hands-on training in this world class facility that features state of the art technology and equipment they would find in any largescale professional performing arts venue,” said Theatre Arts Professor Ian Wallace. As FLC students advance through the program, they get genuine experience learning from and working alongside seasoned theater professionals employed by touring companies that travel the globe. Career education helps students to be competitive and relevant in today’s diverse marketplace and prepares them for the jobs of the future. The Los Rios Colleges offer more than 100 career programs in ten industry sectors that open doors to rewarding jobs in highdemand fields that can lead to immediate employment. ▪

Students in Folsom Lake College’s Technical Theatre program receive hands-on training at the college’s Harris Center for the Arts.


COLLEGE HIGHLIGHTS

AMERICAN RIVER COLLEGE STUDENTS

INSTRUMENTAL TO THE FILM

LADY BIRD American River College’s (ARC) Commercial Music program contributed recording tracks to the critically acclaimed film, Lady Bird. Directed by Sacramento native Greta Gerwig, the Oscarnominated indie paid homage to her beloved hometown. Due to the music program’s reputation for excellence, the movie production team approached ARC Music Professor Dr. Merlyn Van Regenmorter and invited his students to work on the project. The production team utilized one of ARC’s recording studios to produce four songs from the 1980s Broadway musical Merrily We Roll Along to be used in key scenes. AR TWOR K CO

“This was a great opportunity for our students to see a unique avenue for the skills they are learning in our recording classes to be used effectively in the music industry,” said Van Regenmorter. ▪

UR TE SY OF A2

4 FIL MS


COLLEGE HIGHLIGHTS

COSUMNES RIVER COLLEGE ALUMNUS FINDS

INSPIRATION EVERYWHERE Cosumnes River College (CRC) alumnus and budding music artist DeWayne Ewing, Jr. (stage name “Consci8us”) was raised in East Oakland, a neighborhood facing social and economic challenges. “Growing up there, it came to a point where I had to make a decision about the life I wanted to live — to rise above or to assimilate to the culture of my city,” Ewing said. “I decided to take an alternative route and moved to Sacramento to attend Cosumnes River College. In hindsight, that was one of the best life decisions I’ve made so far.” Ewing transferred from CRC to Sacramento State in 2016 and is majoring in Sociology. He also gives back to his adopted community as a youth mentor and outreach coordinator at the Oak Park Community Center. “I know there has been divine intervention in my life because my progression and growth has all been directed towards the work I do. I’m now able to utilize the lessons I’ve learned to have a positive impact on others’ lives.” Through his music, Ewing delivers inspirational messages he hopes will speak to many, especially those back in East Oakland. ▪

ZUHRI 10PHOTO LosBY Rios Matters | SPRING 2018


COLLEGE HIGHLIGHTS

FOLSOM LAKE COLLEGE SOCCER STAR EARNS

NATIONAL AWARD

Folsom Lake College (FLC) student-athlete Britney Johnson, a defender for the Women’s Soccer team, was selected as the 2017 United Soccer Coaches National Scholar Player of the Year for the Junior College Women’s division.

PHOTO BY ALAN ISHAM PHOTOGRAPHY

“Britney is a talented student-athlete who leads by example and has an exceptional work ethic. Her pursuit of academic and athletic excellence should be commended,” said Head Coach Donny Ribaudo. Johnson was recently honored at the United Soccer Coaches AllAmerica Luncheon in Philadelphia, PA. The Falcons, who are four-time conference champions, are currently the #7 ranked soccer program in the nation. ▪

Los Rios Matters | SPRING 2018 11 


COLLEGE HIGHLIGHTS

SACRAMENTO CITY COLLEGE ALUMNA MAKES

CAPITAL CONNECTIONS

Sacramento City College’s (SCC) participation in the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) enabled alumna Susana Barraza to take part in the 2017 Capitol Forum in Washington, D.C. last April during her final semester at SCC. This experience advocating for the higher education success of the nation’s youngest and largest ethnic population inspired her to pursue a related internship this spring.

“I want to build a career and a future, not just a job. From there I want to pay it forward and provide a roadmap for others to follow.” – Susana Barraza 12 Los Rios Matters | SPRING 2018

Susana has returned to our nation’s Capital to participate in the Congressional Hispanic Leadership Institute’s internship program. This program prepares future leaders in the areas of public service, leadership development, and business and academic excellence. During the 14 week program, Susana will split her time between working in a Congressional office and in the corporate sector. After returning home and graduating with her bachelor’s from Sacramento State, she will put her accumulated knowledge and connections to use as she plans to pursue a career in public policy or the political field. ▪


COLLEGE HIGHLIGHTS

COSUMNES RIVER COLLEGE BASKETBALL COACH COMES FULL CIRCLE Cosumnes River College (CRC) Kinesiology Professor and Men’s Basketball Head Coach Jonathan James has returned to his alma mater. A graduate of Valley High School in Sacramento, James chose to attend nearby CRC, where he played basketball for the Hawks. After receiving his associate degree, he transferred to the University of West Georgia on a full athletic scholarship. James received his bachelor’s degree in Business Marketing and a master’s in Exercise Science. “The amount of work, sacrifice, and discipline it took to obtain my degree was a challenge, but somewhere along the way, I fell in love with learning.” James said.

PHOTO BY ANGELINA RAMIREZ

James went on to play professional basketball overseas, earning contracts in Ireland and Australia. Following his retirement from the pros, he returned home to coach local college and high school teams. In 2011, James returned to CRC, this time as a teacher, coach, and mentor, where he inspires student-athletes to achieve their goals. James believes in helping younger athletes as well. He founded a community-based organization which aids in the development of young players both mentally and physically, emphasizing academics, nutrition, and model citizenship, both on and off the court. “I will go the extra mile as a professor and a coach simply to see a kid succeed,” he said. “I want the students on this campus to know they can achieve any and everything they choose to do. If I only change one life, I am okay with that, because that one life has the potential to change many more.” Like the students he coaches, he is back in the classroom and will earn a second master’s degree in Social Science this spring. ▪

Los Rios Matters | SPRING 2018 13 


COLLEGE HIGHLIGHTS

FOLSOM LAKE COLLEGE

INNOVATORS GO

INTERNATIONAL Folsom Lake College (FLC) students Nathaniel Adams and Rebekah Keely were selected for the prestigious University Innovation Fellows program run by Stanford University’s Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (also known as d.school), joining the cohort of 229 students from 62 higher education institutions in ten countries. “Rebekah and Nathaniel represent the best and brightest. Their hard work, determination, creativity, and commitment to innovation have been invaluable in the development of makerspace programs and services that will benefit FLC and its students for years to come,” said Innovation Center Coordinator Zack Dowell. ▪

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Nathaniel Adams and Rebekah Keely at the global headquarters of Google in November 2017 as part of the University Innovation Fellows Silicon Valley Meetup.


THE ECONOMIC VALUE OF THE LOS RIOS COMMUNITY COLLEGES The Los Rios Community Colleges create a significant positive impact on the regional business community and generates a return on investment to its major stakeholder groups—students, taxpayers, and society. IMPACT OF

IMPACT OF

ALUMNI

OPERATIONS

ADDED INCOME OF FORMER STUDENTS CURRENTLY EMPLOYED IN THE REGION

$1.5 BILLION

LOS RIOS EMPLOYED

ADDING A NET IMPACT OF

3,780

$398.8 M

TO THE SACRAMENTO REGION

FULL- & PART-TIME EMPLOYEES

IMPACT OF

IMPACT OF

CONSTRUCTION SPENDING

STUDENT SPENDING

Added income to the region resulting from Los Rios construction projects

$6.4 M

IN TOTAL, LOS RIOS & ITS STUDENTS ADDED

12% of Los Rios students moved here from outside areas. Others stayed because of Los Rios. These students added

$208.7 M

TO THE SACRAMENTO REGION

$2.1 BILLION IN INCOME TO THE SACRAMENTO REGION

RETURN ON INVESTMENT STUDENTS’

FUTURE EARNINGS

$1

IN STUDENT INVESTMENT

$3.40

IN HIGHER FUTURE EARNINGS

BENEFITS TO

TAXPAYERS

$1

IN TAXPAYER COSTS

$2.30

IN BENEFITS TO TAXPAYERS

BENEFITS TO THE STATE

$1

IN SOCIETY SPENDING

$10.70

IN ADDED STATE REVENUE & SAVINGS Results of the analysis reflect fiscal year (FY) 2015-16.

STUDENT RATE OF RETURN AVERAGE RATE OF RETURN FOR LOS RIOS STUDENTS

BY COMPARISON:

10.1%

12.8%

0.8%

INTEREST EARNED AVERAGE STOCK MARKET 30-YEAR ANNUAL RETURN* ON SAVINGS ACCOUNT (National Rate Cap)**

* Forbes’ S&P 500, 1987-2016 **FDIC.gov, 7-2017

Los Rios Matters | SPRING 2018 15 


1919 Spanos Court Sacramento, CA 95825 (916) 568-3041 www.losrios.edu

RESIDENTIAL CUSTOMER

Non- Profit Org US POSTAGE PAID Sacramento, CA Permit No. 2917 ECRWSS

Rooting for myself and finding my advocates.

Smart move. smartmove.losrios.edu

Marianna S., Sacramento City College

Los Rios Matters - Spring 2018  
Los Rios Matters - Spring 2018