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flavius budisan ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO

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“We shape our buildings; thereafter they shape us.” - Winston Churchill


Visum Axis Mundi ViDeo Venue Pickathon 2014 SeaBird Island School

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Visum Co-Housing Winter 2014 NW 8th and Couch St, Portland, Oregon This housing project focused solely on developing ideas for affordable housing in the downtown Portland area. The main idea for this housing unit revolved around Co-Housing: affordable living with shared common spaces and a sense of community. In addition to CoHousing, this project also pursued the thought of having a community based around people with similar careers. The target audience for this project was young professionals, with or without families, that would wish to become part of a community with those of similar careers. The diagonal cut of the structure reflects the merge of Oak Street into Burnside. This form creates unique views for the residents looking south and into the park blocks. It was created with the intention that mothers could possibly watch their children play in the park while cooking dinner. The structural system used in the construction is intented to be Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) in an effort to start using local materials to build skyscrapers.

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Site Location Multiple locations were researched and the site that fit the design best was chosen.

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Research Site surroundings will always affect design. In this case, famly and child safety was a priority. Therefore, one of the things we researched was crime. The map on the right depicts the concentration of sex offenders that live around the location of interest.

STATISTICS

SEX OFFENDERS NODE SIZE

NODE COLOR CHILD ABUSE

RAPE

Flavius Budisan January 14, 2014 Arch481-Griffin Statistic: Crime

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Scheme 1 Scheme 1 focused on the building’s awareness of its surroundings. Providing light was essential to both our structure and to those around it. The building was designed to allow natural light to shine not only on our building, but on surrounding buildings as well. The amount of light and the diagonal cut of the structure also allowed for a shared outdoor space in front of the building.

Scheme 2 Scheme 2 continues to be aware of its surroundings, but its main focus was having central access between the east and west wings and ample outdoor space. In this design, the outdoor common areas are located on the top of each wing.

Scheme 3 This scheme takes the developer’s perspective and tries to maximize living space. The front of the structure contains all living spaces and some outdoor space. The back is an outdoor, roof-top space that declines as it reaches street level. It is intended to be a public hill/park in the middle of downtown Portland.

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Scheme 4 This scheme contrasts privacy and transparency. The two structures are living spaces and look away from each other, while the ground floor is intended to be shared retail space and is transparent. The transparency of the ground floor allows for substantial natural light.

Scheme 1.1 We changed the location to site 1 in order to match the cut ouf our building to the city’s overall layout. In the north part of downtown Portland, the streets are laid out horizontally and vertically. In the southern part, past Burnside street,the streets shift west and are diagonal in comparison to the streets in the north. The diagonal façade faces Burnside and North Park blocks. The groundfloor creates a corridor that connects the Historic Distric to the North Park Blocks/ Pearl District. This building is intended to be a mixed-use structure that allows for both retail and residential spaces. This scheme was chosen for its awareness of its surroundings, mixeduse opportunities, shared outdoor space, maximized living space, and a connection between districts.

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West Section

Ground Floor 10

Second Floor

Unit Plan

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Isometric Materials Diagram

Detailed Wall Section

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Axis Mundi Fall 2014 N Broadway and E William St. Wichita, Kansas This team project focused on reviving downtown Wichita, Kansas. The problem addressed was that many people moved out of downtown and into suburbs, creating a ghost town. Our class was assigned to produce a set of documents on how to revive the city and convince young people to move back into the heart of downtown. My team focused on one of the five blocks (Site C5) that were to be redesigned. To revive the city, we decided to create a living room style park. This is where people of all ages can come and hang out, hear live music and relax on the grass. Additionally, a residential mixed-use structure is located south of the park and includes underground parking, a grocery store, clothing stores, and restaurants. Placing a grocery store in this area is important because downtown Wichita does not oer one within two miles from our site. Hosting one in the heart of downtown will become an anchor and help pull people back into the city.

Alley Perspective Flavius Budisan

N Site Plan by Petr Khodakovsky, Flavius Budisan, & Moa Lingga

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Target Audience & Population The revitalization of downtown Wichita depended on two main target audiences. The first target audience was hipsters from all over. Hipsters are generally passionate about art and music. They are also known to create subcultures that attract others to downtown areas. This project also targeted a portion of those who live in the suburbs of Wichita. The majority of the population resides in suburbs because they like their own private space. However, some people do not mind sharing space and crave a sense of community. These people are the type who would benefit from moving into downtown Witchita. Image by Moa Lingga

Infograph by Flavius Budisan

Sea of Parking Our clients asked us to provide parking space on our site. After some research, we discovered that most of downtown Wichita consists of parking lots and parking structures. The map shows that there is enough parking around our site and that there is no need to create more.

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Map by Petr Khodakovsky

Food Desert Creating a food desert map helped us understand the scarce availability of grocery stores in and around downtown. Grocery stores in close proximity are anchors that cultivate urban life.

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Map by Flavius Budisan

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Existing Retail The map and images depict existing retail spaces around our site. These spaces include cafes, bars and other restaurants. It was evident that this area needed more businesses to promote walkability and safety.

Photos by Moa Lingga

Diagram by Flavius Budisan

Axis Mundi Axis Mundi is latin and means the center of the world. We named our site, Axis Mundi because we wanted our site to become the center of downtown Wichita. My team discovered four main alleys that would become pathways and lead people to our site. Each alley would be painted a different color depending on its direction from the axis - east, west, north, and south. The center will contain a display of all four colors. The design of these alleys in Axis Mundi is intended to promote tactical urbanism.

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Diagram by Flavius Budisan

Bringing the Prairie Back to Wichita The final step in our plan to revitalize the city was to create a shared space with a mixed-use structure. The structure we designed has ground level retail spaces and upper floor office and residential spaces. Parking spaces are located underneath the site to keep the flow of human interaction uninterupted. The shared space includes a park with both artificial and prairie-like grass, trees providing shade, a stage for live performances, food carts, seating, an interactive water fountain, nighttime lighting, elevators, and restrooms.

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Street Section Petr Khodakovsky & Flavius Budisan

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Access Perspective Flavius Budisan

Site Section Petr Khodakovsky & Flavius Budisan

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Video Venue winter 2013 N Broadway and E William St Portland, ORegon The video venue was produced through a different design process than usual. We first looked at video games that MoMa had listed as works of art. The game that was chosen as inspiration for this project was Zelda. We gained an understanding of the game’s interactions and noted main design concepts. We used these concepts as a base for this structure. The site for this structure was Burnside and 7th Street, which is currently a parking lot. This project required the structure to become a media center for events centered around video games. We designed the video venue to function like a video game. The overall layout and design mimics a linear plot where the goal is to get to the top of the building. Throughout the journey, materials are used as guides to direct people to the top. The direction of the wood grain points the way, while the grass gives hints of what is at the top of the building. At the top, visitors are rewarded withbeautiful views of downtown Portland and the Willamette River.

SITE PLAN

SCALE: 1/16” = 1’-0”

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Ground Floor STO.

OFFICE UP

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Second Floor

STO.

FIRST FLOOR STO.

SCALE: 1/8” = 1’-0”

UP

STAGE

STO.

STUDIO/GALLERY SPACE

COURTYARD

MENS LECTURE/EVENT SPACE

DOWN

Third Floor

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WOMENS

SECOND FLOOR SCALE: 1/8” = 1’-0”

DOWN BELOW

CAFE

STO.

DOWN

MENS

COURTYARD

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WOMENS

THIRD FLOOR

SCALE: 1/8” = 1’-0”

South Section

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Pickathon 2014

Summer 2014 pendarvis farm, happy valley, oregon The School of Architecture at Portland State Unversity was tasked to design and build a stage for the Pickathon.The Pickathon is a folk festival that is held at the Pendarvis Farm over the course of three days. The overall purpose of this project was to promote sustainability and reuse. Wooden pallets became our choice as the main material because they allowed light in and created a unique space. As we laid the pallets down, we had to level the dirt carefully and do it with as minimal damage as possible. The pallets sat a couple of inches away from each other and created a pattern that would allow the visitor to see inside the stage. My main responsibility in building this stage was to make sure the pallets were laid out properly, balanced, and secured with water resistant deck screws. In order to prevent lateral forces from collapsing the wall, we installed and secured columns to it. Everything was done early and finished a day before the festival began.

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photos by Michael Puckett

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SeaBird Island School Winter 2012 Agassiz, BC, Canada Patkau Architects The Seabird Island School was designed by Patkau Architects. As part of our architectural tectonic study, we sought out to understand the structural system of the school. Everyone in my team took part in researching construction plans and building the model. Afterwards, my team focused on compiling the presentation while I drafted the front and detailed wall sections. When our work was complete, we came together as a group and presented our findings to the class. The complex forms of the roof resemble the outline of the surrounding mountains. However, the structure as a whole is inspired by the aerodynamics of a seabird in the midst of strong winds. The model we built was meant to expose the building’s structural system. the structure features a Post and Beam construction with a reinforced concrete pile foundation (both shown in the detailed wall sections). The timber used in the construction is paralam - a form of glulam that is made up of veneer strands held together by adhesive. The front array of columns are in tension to the roof and pull it down to prevent uplift.

people involved: Flavius Budisan, Alison Evershed, Ben Mounce, Saira Scott 25


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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Front Entrance Section

A 16" CEDAR SHINGLES

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

A. Detailed Roof Section

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

FROST-PROOF FLASHING

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PLYWOOD 6X14 RAFTER

12X24 TIMBER BEAM

STEEL JOINT

B. Detailed Wall Section C. Detailed Pile Foundation Section

2' DIAMETER TIMBER COLUMN

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

STEEL MECHANICAL JOINT

GROUT

WHITE PLYWOOD CLAD GYPSUM BOARD

PLYWOOD

BATT INSULATION FLASHING

2' DIAMETER TIMBER COLUMN

2X4 STUDS 2X10 STUDS

1/8" DOUBLE PANE GLASS

REINFORCED CONCRETE FOOTING

3/4" IRON REBAR

REINFORCED CONCRETE PILE 1/2" IRON REBAR

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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C

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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WALL PARTITION DETAIL


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flavius budisan 503.539.0626 fbudisan@gmail.com

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Architecture Portfolio