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FooTprint The Magazine of the Florida Trail Association

Fall 2013

What’s Inside? Fall Regional Conferences 2013 Big O Hike Info Photo Contest Winners Volunteer Trainings


Our Mission

The Florida Trail Association develops, maintains, protects and promotes a network of hiking trails throughout the state, including the unique Florida National Scenic Trail. Together with our partners we provide opportunities for the public to hike, engage in outdoor recreation, participate in environmental education and contribute to meaningful volunteer work.

FLORIDA TRAIL ASSOCIATION 5415 SW 13th St Gainesville Fl. 32608-5037 Phone: 352-378-8823 / 877-HIKE-FLA Fax: 352-378-4550 email: communications@floridatrail.org website: www.floridatrail.org


The Footprint

Contents Fall 2013

In this issue 4 6 7 8 9 10 12 14 14 16 20 22 23 23 24 25 26 27 28

President’s Message Trail Business From the Field Volunteer Program Updates 2013 FTA State Awards Activity Leaders’ Corner FTA Regional Conferences TrailRider Challenge Volunteer Shoutout Special Section - The Big O Hike Day Hiking Ocean to Lake FTA Library Update What is a Trail Dame? Members in the Media Finding the Magic Loxahatchee on the Move The Next Environmental Generation FNST Symposium Summer Photo Contest Winners

Photo Credits Front cover Amos Stoll Big Cypress National Preserve Winner of the Summer Photo Contest Inside front cover Ian Brown Big Cypress National Preserve This page Deb Blick Suwannee River


President’s Message Carlos Schomaker FTA President

I’m certainly not a genius or visionary, but I try to make up for this by chasing after and absorbing lessons and information from many sources. Books, websites, magazines, successful people and organizations, and other media are packed full of ideas and advice about doing things better, either explicitly or by example. All of these are available for the potential benefit of the Florida Trail Association (FTA). I’ve heard it said that FTA and its members are unique, and that therefore it doesn’t pay to emulate other groups or businesses. I don’t buy that. Stand in the wrong place under a tree being felled and it will fall on you, regardless of which forest you’re standing in and despite your good intentions. The laws of physics apply equally. So do the laws of success and failure.

Successful citizen organizations The challenges facing all the volunteer partner organizations thrive because they keep of the National Scenic and Historic Trails are similar: reduced “The Mission” in mind. government funding, unhelpful legislation, the need to increase volunteer capacity and charitable funding, rules and regulations, and a disengaged public. The actual trails might be very different from each other, but the same general principles apply to successfully complete, maintain, protect, and promote them. Here’s where the differences in results show up. Some of the National Trails (NTs) are blessed with vibrant partnerships, strong non-profit primary partners, and ambitious programs and public exposure. This isn’t by accident; it requires forward-thinking leadership, and buy-in and commitment by a bunch of stakeholders, including volunteers, activists, sponsors, and donors. And things change (political support, turnover in volunteers, the economy, etc.), so there’s a constant need to renew commitment and focus. The best NT relationships and partners are worth learning from. The worst ones fall apart—witness the recent demise of the Continental Divide Trail Alliance (CDTA). (Fortunately that Trail’s standard has been picked up by a nascent group called the CDTC. It’s clear they’re trying not to make the same mistakes as their predecessor.) This organization, FTA, faces two options. One path leads to success and relevancy and many more years supporting the Florida National Scenic Trail (FNST). The other leads to the same fate as the CDTA. The success path will largely come from what we learn and apply from the other non-profit partners of the NTs, and what we learn and apply from the best teachers in non-profit marketing, recruiting, management, training, and fundraising. Success will come from making sure we have the financial resources to best do the work. Failure will come from ignoring these opportunities. We’ve already lost a lot of capacity, and could continue to do so. Failure will come from insisting that things haven’t changed, and that we don’t need to step up and improve the way we do business. Failure will come from fear. Fear that keeps people from digging deep and stretching toward a goal, insisting instead that change may not be required. Fear that leads to excuses. Picking the first path is crucial to the success of FTA’s Mission. Absent this Mission (capitalized here to mean our Mission Statement, found on page 2 of this issue and on our website), FTA would be, at best, a hiking club. It wouldn’t be deserving of non-profit status, or support from donors, sponsors, or government agencies. Worse, it would be a repudiation of the dreams and plans of FTA’s founder, the early trail disciples, and all who

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have worked to build the FNST. It would be like a Volunteer Fire Department who stops responding to blazes, because it doesn’t support getting new equipment, training, or personnel. Successful citizen organizations thrive because they keep “The Mission” in mind whenever they train their volunteers, hold activities, talk to the public, host a fundraising event, or meet to plan strategy. They build sufficient resources (cash, staff, expertise, volunteers, tools, etc.) to support that Mission, and they support all efforts that help fulfill it. FTA can and must do a better job of this, beginning with the Board of Directors, Chapter Council, and Chapter leaders. We owe it to ourselves, our founders, and the people of Florida that we claim to serve to step it up. We owe it to them to learn new tricks. Tough choices and hard work are ahead. But they knew that back in the mid-60s, when they started this ball rolling. Now we need to keep moving it forward, with your generosity and support.

TravelCountry staff members Brian and “Krispy Kritter” are avid hikers and backpackers. At TravelCountry, we don’t just talk the talk, we walk the walk!

407.831.0777 ~1101 E Altamonte Drive, Altamonte Springs, FL

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Present this ad to receive 15% off any regularly priced purchase or use promo code “FTA” online.

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The Trail BUSINESS Tom Daniel V.P. Trails

Trail Skills Orientation for Trail Leaders: The Fall 2013 Trail Committee Meeting will be held in Ocala National Forest on Sunday, September 15th. The format is an in-the-field workshop highlighting trail skills. The curriculum includes trail maintenance, design and layout. Participation is being coordinated through the Chapter Trail Coordinators with two slots available per chapter and is limited to active trail leaders. Chapter GPS Coordinators: At the January 2013 Trail Committee Meeting, Trail Coordinators were asked to nominate GPS coordinators for their chapter areas. A few chapters have submitted names but many have not. These GPS coordinators will be working with FTA Trails Resource Coordinator Deb Blick to ensure trail and infrastructure changes are recorded, reported and our maps are up to date. Chapter Chairs, please confirm that a Coordinator’s name has been forwarded to Deb Blick. Florida National Scenic Trail Gap Analysis Workshops: Starting this fall the U.S. Forest Service anticipates sponsoring four region oriented workshops across the State to study and obtain public and agency input of closing gaps in the Florida National Scenic Trail. FTA volunteer input is both welcome and encouraged. Details as to dates and locations will be forwarded when available.

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FROM THE FIELD ERIC MASON TRAIL PROGRAM DIRECTOR

2013/2014 Trainings and Trail Projects The Florida Trail Association is gearing up for an exciting year! We have several projects and trainings in the works. Interested in volunteering on the Florida Trail? Check out our upcoming trainings and projects! To sign up visit our website www.floridatrail.org and go to Volunteer > Volunteer Opportunities. Contact your local chapter for more projects in your area. If you need additional trail-related resources, are interested in scheduling a project, hosting a work day, or need equipment, please contact Eric Mason at emason@floridatrail.org.

Panhandle

Panhandle Region CPR – September 20, 2013 - St Marks Volunteer Center Panhandle Region Wilderness First Aid – September 21-22, 2013 - St Marks Volunteer Center Panhandle Region Chainsaw Course – September 28-29, 2013 (First Aid and CPR required) - Apalachicola NF Spring Creek Trail Construction #1 – November 13-19, 2013 - St Marks Volunteer Center Panhandle Chapter Trail Project- November 15-17, 2013 - Apalachicola NF Spring Creek Trail Construction #2 – December 4-10, 2013 - St Marks Volunteer Center Sopchoppy Bridge Construction – March 7-13, 2014 - Apalachicola NF

North Florida

North Florida Region CPR – October 4, 2013 – Ocala NF North Florida Region Wilderness First Aid – October 5-6, 2013 – Ocala NF North Florida Region Chainsaw Course – October 12-13, 2013 (First Aid and CPR required) – Ocala NF Florida Crackers Trail Care Project – October 11-13, 2013 Halifax St. Johns Trail Care Project- November 14- 17, 2013 Halifax St. Johns Trail Care Project – January 10- 17, 2014 University of Florida Stewardship Project – January 17-20, 2014

South/Central Florida

South Florida Region Chainsaw Course – October 16-17, 2013 (First Aid and CPR required) - Highlands Hammock State Park, Sebring Big Cypress Backcountry Trail Project- January 30- February 6, 2014 - Big Cypress National Preserve

The Future of the Florida Trail Your volunteerism and generous giving enables the Florida Trail Association to fulfill its mission of protecting and maintaining the hiking trails you love. But when you are no longer here to hike with us, how will you ensure that your love of the trail lives on? With planned giving, your gifts can continue forever. Please consider joining the Legacy Circle by including the Florida Trail Association in your will or estate planning. Planned giving helps protect your hiking legacy for many generations to come. Email fta@floridatrail.org or call (352) 378-8823 to learn more.

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VOLUNTEER PROGRAM UPDATES MEGAN DONOGHUE VOLUNTEER PROGRAM COORDINATOR

Gear up for a Great Season Summer is almost over, and although we will miss our sun-kissed Florida tan, we are looking forward to the kind of tan you wash off after a long day of work on the trail. With fall right around the corner, so is Florida’s peak hiking and trail maintenance season. Over the past couple of months we have been making a lot of changes and preparing for an incredible season. We have projects and trainings in the pipeline, a revamped website, new volunteer profiles, the ability to track individual hours online, and new Crew Leader documents and Volunteer Injury Instructions. In addition to all of that, FTA is welcoming its first Regional Representative to the North Florida region! Needless to say, we’re excited. To help everyone gear up for this upcoming season, we’ve compiled a six step guide to help you, our dedicated volunteers, get the information you need to make reporting your work and hosting safe activities a snap! We hope you find the information useful and we’ll see you on the trail! 1. CREATE YOUR VOLUNTEER PROFILE. We eagerly accept all volunteers; young and old, new and experienced. If you are planning on volunteering this season, be sure to fill out a volunteer profile, which can be found on our website (www.floridatrail.org) under “Volunteer!” Your volunteer profile will enable you and your chapter to keep track of all the incredible work you do on the Florida Trail. 2. MARK YOUR CALENDAR. Check out our scheduled projects and trainings on our website under Volunteer Opportunities to see if there is a volunteer opportunity you or your friends and family might be interested in! Many projects are first come, first serve, so plan in advance to make sure you have a spot! 3. TRACK YOUR HOURS. Tracking your volunteer hours accurately is vital to Florida Trail Association’s programs and crucial to protecting, promoting and preserving the Florida Trail. You can submit a Project Report Form to your chapter or crew leader. Your chapter should have one or more people responsible for entering hours. Please enter hours and submit project information to your chapter official as soon as possible following a project. 4. BE PREPARED. Florida can be an unforgiving environment. Make sure you have all of the proper attire, food, water, 1st aid kit, and protective equipment to safely work on the trail! You can download a Crew Leader Packet and Volunteer Injury Instructions from our website under the Volunteer Resources page to help you make sure you have everything you need before heading out to work on the trail. 5. TAKE PHOTOS. We would love to see more photos of volunteers on the trail! Show us your crew, your projects, your accomplishments and your smiles! 6. HAVE FUN. Don’t forget to have fun! Grab your group of friends and get involved on a project! Learn something new, meet new people and experience this unique public resource in a new and exciting way. If you have questions or feedback about volunteer hours, reporting processes, or would like to explore other ways to volunteer with FTA, contact Megan Donoghue at mdonoghue@floridatrail.org. If you need additional trail related resources, are interested in scheduling a project, hosting a work day, need a co-leader or equipment, please contact Eric Mason at emason@floridatrail.org.

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FTA STATE AWARDS 2013 CORNELIA BURGE AWARD Presented annually to members who have made extraordinary progress toward meeting the purposes and objectives of the FTA on a statewide basis Melissa Bruneau David Waldrop LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD Presented to those select members who have demonstrated lifetime dedication to the mission and goals of the FTA. This award will recognize those individuals who have participated in all levels of the organization numerous times throughout their years as a member of the FTA. Howard Pardue Jon Phipps CHAMPION OF THE FLORIDA TRAIL AWARD This award is presented to public officials who have provided leadership in advocating on behalf of the Florida Trail, as well as landowners and agencies who have significantly contributed to the completion and protection of the Florida Trail. Jim Wood FRIEND OF THE FTA Presented to non-members or organizations that have made significant contributions to the Florida Trail Association. This may be to a land owner or land manager who has been of noteworthy assistance, or to a monetary donor. The person may incidentally be a member of the FTA but the assistance was made “outside� the organization. Gary Werner Blackwater River State Forest JOHN WEARY TRAIL WORKER AWARD This award is presented annually to members who have made extraordinary efforts as trail maintainers in helping reach our organizational goal of a continuous trail across Florida, and/or those who have worked diligently in building and maintaining the side and loop trails of the Florida Trail System. Lori Burris, Janie Hamilton, Doug Kucklick, Steve Meyers, Shawn Riley and Ronny Traylor SPECIAL SERVICE AWARD This award is presented to members who have made significant contributions to the Florida Trail Association at a state or chapter level. Examples of significant contributions may include leadership, fundraising, recruitment, outreach, or other valuable volunteer service. Marion Finck, Russell Klette, Bill & Mary Ellen Milton, Betty Piper, Holly Porter-Fair and Helen Wigersma ACTIVITY LEADER AWARD Presented to members who have made extraordinary efforts and are highly qualified as Activity Leaders or Activity Coordinators using activities as a means to introduce the public to the Florida Trail. The nominee should have a history of successful and innovative activity leadership displaying a knowledge of the Activity Leader Guidelines and possess skills such as first aid, map reading, local flora & fauna, or culture and history. Peggy Grantham, Liane Plumhoff, Tom Regan, and Joseph Rosenberg

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ACTIVITY LEADERS’ CORNER DEB BLICK TRAIL RESOURCE COORDINATOR

Meeting Our Legal Requirements for FTA Activities While Increasing Publicity Most of you know that there are requirements for becoming an Activity Leader and there are requirements for hosting FTA-authorized activities. But sometimes these requirements get blurred or forgotten in the scramble to get the word out or when confronted by the challendges of using new media outlets such as Facebook, Twitter and Meetup. So the purpose of this article is to re-educate activity leaders (for both fun and maintenance hikes) on our legal requirements and encourage a faster and easier way to comply with these requirements using electronic media. Every activity offered by FTA at a state or local level must be led by an authorized Activity Leader. The state office in Gainesville tracks authorized activity leaders and can provide the chapters with a list upon request. Every chapter should review the list at least once a year and inform the office of activity leaders who are no longer active. Every activity offered by FTA must be submitted by an Activity Leader in advance to the Chapter Activity Chair. The exact format of the notification is not important, but the oversight is. The submittal may be on a paper form or electronic. It’s the job of the Activity Chair to make sure that FTA activities are led by authorized Activity Leaders and that all the necessary information is included in the activity request. Every activity offered by FTA must be submitted in advance to the FTA office. This is a requirement (stated in the FTA Administrative Manual and outlined in the FTA Activity Leader Guide) necessary to meet the Association’s liability insurance. Failture to comply not only opens the individual Activity Leader to significant legal risk but also the chapter and the organization. Once again, the exact format of the notification is not important. This is not a new requirement, it’s been around for many years. Each chapter may work out the lines of communication that serves their particular chapter best, but these 3 requirements MUST be met for every activity that it offered to FTA members and members of the general public. So how can these 3 requirements be met in this electronic age? Most chapters are using Meetup to post their activities. While any Meetup group member may post comments, the ability to post events on Meetup can be limited to specific individuals called Event Organizers. We suggest on chapter Meetup sites the ability to post events should be limited to either the Chapter Activity Chair or (if the Activity Chair agrees) only Chapter Activity Leaders. If Activity Leaders are allowed to post, the Activity Chair can check the events every few days to make sure the appropriate information is posted and that every activity is being led by an authorized Activity Leader. How then should the FTA Office be informed? The Chapter Activity Chair has the responsibility of seeing that all chapter activities are sent to the FTA Office in advance of the activity. The easiest way is to use the Calendar function on the FTA website. This function has been significantly improved with the recent website changes and closely mimics the printed Activity Request form. The Chapter Activity Chairs may do the posting themselves or may delegate the responsibility to another Activity Leader. This not only satisfies the legal requirements, but it opens up your activity to people who otherwise might not hear about it. People who are not yet members of FTA and don’t know about our chapter system. People in adjacent chapters. And members and non-members who do not use Meetup. When most folks want to learn about hiking in Florida, they find the FTA website first – so posting your activities on the FTA website may result in many new hikers, workers and members for your chapter.

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So does that mean that Chapters can’t promote anything except FTA Activity Leader-led events? By no means. Events in your local community or on local land management units, particularly those in support of hiking, are of great interest to FTA members and the general public. Just make absolutely certain that the people reading about them on chapter and state outlets are aware that these events are not being conducted under the auspices of FTA. Simply posting “NOT AN FTA ACTIVITY” in the information should suffice. What about spur of the moment activities, especially maintenance hikes? Proper planning is required for the safety of everyone involved in all FTA activities, that’s why providing advance notification to the FTA Office is a requirement. Saying that you need the latitude to call spur-of-the-moment activities to work on the trail is NOT a substitute for proper planning, preparation and notification. And the way to get new trail maintainers is NOT to limit the people who know about the upcoming work. But we also recognize that trail maintenance needs change throughout the year, after storms or high water, etc. and the exact location and type of work cannot always be scheduled months in advance. Our recommendation is that Section Leaders and Trailmasters establish regular maintenance sessions. For example, first & third Saturday of the month or every other Tuesday morning. These “Activity Blocks” can be posted along with the Activity Leader’s email address and/or phone number for more information. Specific information about each site/type of work to expect can then be sent out to those who have signed up while still meeting the advance notification requirements. The Calendar function on the FTA website has been improved significantly this summer. By now all Chapter Activity Chairs and Chapter Chairs should have received the login information. Remember, posting your activities on the FTA website will not only satisfy your legal obligations of informing the FTA office, but it will also publicize your activities to a broader audience than posting them solely on the Chapter website or Meetup.

The Making of an Activity Leader Requirements for becoming an FTA Activity Leader 1) 2) 3) 4)

Be a member in good standing of the Florida Trail Association Attend leadership workshops that include FTA policies, practices and skills. Participate as a Co-Leader-in-Training in the planning, execution, and followup of at least two activities led by at least two different Activity Leaders. Be recommended in writing by those two Activity Leaders to the Chapter Chair.

Once authorized, new Activity Leaders will be asked to conduct their first two activites with an experienced Activity Leader acting as co-leader. Basic first aid and CPR training through accredited agencies is highly recommended.

Requirements for remaining an FTA Activity Leader

1) Remain a mamber in good standing of the FLorida Trail Association. 2) Lead or assist with at least one activity per year and/or participate in an Activity Leader workshop. Exceptions: State and Chapter Officers are considered Activity Leaders ONLY for the purposes of conducting meetings. Section Leaders are Activity Leaders by virtue of their acceptance to that postion by the FTA President. (Trailmasters who intend to lead others on trail maintenance activities should first be authorized as Activity Leaders.) The V.P. Membership has the authority to make other exceptions.

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Wakulla Walkabout November 8-10, 2013

PANHANDLE REGIONAL FTA GATHERING Camp Indian Springs, 2387 Bloxham Cutoff Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Sponsored by Apalachee Chapter, FTA The Camp is located on 77 wooded acres in Wakulla County, near Wakulla Springs State Park, between the Apalachicola and Wakulla Forests of North Florida.

DIRECTIONS

Via Interstate10: Exit 203/Thomasville Rd./FL-61. Follow FL-61 south for 19 miles (through Tallahassee and beyond—via Thomasville Rd., South Monroe St., Crawfordville Rd./ Hwy., and Wakulla Springs Rd.). Then turn right (west) on Bloxham Cutoff Rd. (FL-267) and go 1/2 mile to Camp Indian Springs on the left (south) side of the road. Via US 98: From Medart, continue 1.5 mi. NE on US 98. Turn north on US-319. Go 11.3 miles (through Crawfordville) and turn right (east) on Bloxham Cutoff Rd. (FL-267). Then go 2.5 miles to Camp Indian Springs on the right (south) side of the road.

LODGING (see registration form for more information)

Bunkhouse: rustic, bunks with mattresses, power. Bathhouses are located near bunk-house areas. Tenting: primitive, bring your own camping gear. RV: 10 spaces to be constructed (50 v. power, no water hookup, no pump-out). Wakulla Springs Lodge: limited number of rooms available at a discount (tell them you’re with the FTA). Reserve directly with the Lodge at (850) 421-2000 before October 6, 2013.

ACTIVITIES and PROGRAMS

Hikes: Florida National Scenic Trail, Leon Sinks, San Marcos de Apalache, and more. Activities: Bird watching, Jungle Boat cruise at Wakulla Springs, Yoga for Hikers, Exhibits, On-Your-Own trips (local trails, paddles, places of historic/scenic interest), and more. Friday Night: Hospitality, Campfire. Saturday Night: Steve Sheridan, first Florida Trail thruhiker; Raffle; Campfire. Watch our website for additional activities!!

       

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MEALS (see registration form for more information) Friday: meatloaf dinner Saturday: breakfast - lunch/box lunch - lasagna dinner Sunday: breakfast Meat and vegetarian friendly. REGISTRATION

The conference is open to the public. Dogs on leash (and picked-up-after) are welcome. Registration with lodging and/or meals must be received by October 25, 2013. Registration with t-shirt order must be received by October 17, 2013. Register online with a credit card, or with a print-and-mail registration form and a check. Registration information and links will be posted on our website as soon as they are available: http://apalachee.floridatrail.org/conferences Onsite registration/check-in: Friday (11/8) 12 noon - 8 pm and Sat. (11/9) 8 am - 12 noon.

QUESTIONS?

Website: http://apalachee.floridatrail.org/conferences Contact: Dawn Griffin (850) 509-6103 griffindd@aol.com Elizabeth Slack (850) 320-2760 elizabeth.a.slack@gmail.com

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Fisheating Creek Outpost Hiking, Canoeing, Fishing, Birding

Nov 15 — 17 Back to the Creek 2.0

Activity Leader Training

FTA South Regional Conference

Explore Fort Center

For more information or to register: www.facebook.com/groups/ fisheatingcreekfta or contact Nina Dupuy at 305-608-6866

Wildlife Talks, Storytelling, Stargazing

7555 N. US Hwy 27, Palmdale, FL www.fisheatingcreekoutpost.com 863-675-5999

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The trailrider chapter challenge Melissa Bruneau-Aldridge, Heartland Chapter The first breath of life for Florida’s Trailrider Program, a program for adaptive hiking and wilderness access, was introduced at the Florida Trail Association’s Annual Conference at Camp McConnell during the weekend of March 15-17. It was there that we displayed the most incredible piece of equipment - the TrailRider. Best described as a “wilderness rickshaw,” the Trailrider can haul up to 250 lbs of human being or equipment and this on unimproved hiking trails. Imported from Canada, it is the only device of its kind on earth. Our appearance at the Conference created a great deal of excitement and it was during the Conference that a benefactor donated funds to pay the remaining balance of our first TrailRider and begin a donor match program of up to $3,500 to bring the next one into the state!

The first FTA Chapter to raise funds for Our main goal is to use the TrailRider to get people who are a new Trailrilrider will receive a matchseverely physically limited or otherwise unable to walk out ing grant from an anonymous donor. onto our trails. The TrailRider even goes over downed trees so we can provide a true outdoor experience to people who would otherwise be unable to share our love of hiking. The TrailRider is also portable at only 58 lbs and foldable so with very few exceptions we can transport a Trailrider to people wherever they may want to go for a hike. We are not limited to just our own trails! We can go anywhere there is a need. This is a great way to introduce many people to the Florida Trail Association who have never heard of us before. Literally, once we got our program into full-swing our TrailRider was paid in full within two months and we have developed partnerships with several other organizations. This is such a wonderful way to bring people into nature and out onto our trails and introduce all kinds of folks to the Florida Trail Association - truly a win-win for everyone. The full cost to get a new TrailRider to your chapter is $7,780. That can be as easy as 78 people at $100 a piece! The payback you’ll receive in what you can do for individuals, your community, your chapter and the FTA as a whole is priceless. Online link to the TrailRider, order information and owner’s manual http://www.kawak.ca/ To see the TrailRider in action with our chapter visit our Youtube channel http://www.youtube.com/user/ heartlandfta Comparisons: TrailRider New - $7,000, Used $5,000, Shipping $780 Giant Trance X Advanced Mountain Bike $7,000 Specialized S-Works Venge Red road bike $8,250 Custom wheelchair $4,000-$11,000 Handcycle $1,000-$6,000

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So this is the Trailrider Challenge that Heartland Chapter is issuing to the other 18 chapters and sub-chapters throughout the state. The first FTA Chapter to raise $4300 will then receive a grant of $3500 from our anonymous donor towards the purchase of a Trailrider. Plus, we will help you arrange for the shipment, train you on use of the equipment, and help you make contact with groups in your area who could greatly benefit from your participaction in Florida’s Trailrider Program. So don’t drag your feet. You can begin raising funds now to start this wonderful program for your chapter and help the FTA become the national leader in statewide adaptive hiking and wilderness access. We are working hard at this time to begin a statewide training program. We plan to travel around to the regional conferences to introduce you to the TrailRider and Trailrider program concepts and show you how rewarding and positive this is and how easy it can be to raise the funds for this program. For more information please contact Melissa at ftamelissa@gmail.com

VOLUNTEer SHOUTOUT Toni Courtier, Apalachee Chapter by Megan Donghue

Toni Courtier joined the Florida Trail Association a little over a year ago, and since has showed an eagerness to get involved. Toni has always loved to hike, but didn’t like the idea of hiking alone in the woods. Toni participated in trail maintenance on the Aucilla River section and was surprised to find how much she enjoyed the trimming, cutting, bending and stooping involved. Her most recent endeavor is volunteering on the site selection committee of Apalachee Chapter’s ‘Wakulla Walkabout’, which will take place November 8-10 and all chapters are welcome! Toni is also on the volunteer recognition committee, which was recently created to enhance FTA’s efforts in “thanking” the volunteers for all of the hard work they do on the Florida National Scenic Trail. “I am so grateful that I found the group because, in addition to making new friends, I’ve also learned about some beautiful places in my own area to hike,” Toni said. When not on the trail, Toni enjoys reading, kayaking and traveling with her husband and dog in their camper. Thank you for all you do, Toni! Do you have a volunteer in mind that you would like to spotlight? Please email your submission to Megan Donoghue at mdonoghue@floridatrail.org. For more information the Wakulla Walkabout see page 11 or contact Dawn Griffin at griffindd@aol.com. To learn more about the volunteer recognition committee contact Megan Donoghue at mdonoghue@floridatrail.org.

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HIKING THE BIG “O” – FELLOWSHIP OF THE KEY RINGS by Cathy Coale “You are gonna get blisters,” a veteran hiker told us, “Everyone does.” I remember hearing his words standing in the small town of Pahokee, Florida, my heart wildly beating, waiting for the hike to begin. We are at the town of Pahokee, Florida, to begin the 109 mile hike around Lake Okeechobee, known as the Big “O” Hike, held each year by the Florida Trail Association, Loxahatchee Chapter. We decided to hike the Big O several months ago after reading an article in Florida Travel and Life Magazine that encompassed the enchantments and challenges the hike has to offer. The lines of the magazine were still racing in my head as we made our way to the front of the group, making the journey seem attainable. For nine days, we circled the 730 square miles of water, mesmerized by the burning sugar fields, unusual, majestic waterfowl, and panoramic views that can only be witnessed from the trail. How do you hike a circle? That’s where the fellowship comes in. Each day a group of hikers walk the trail, backwards, while the main group hikes forward. Meeting in the middle for a quick exchange of car keys, everyone goes back to camp safely. Sounds confusing and yes, it is, but Master The tough paved sections are easier with a buddy. Paul Cummins, who has completed the hike more times than (photo by Sandra Friend) anyone, makes it all come together. Hiking the longest day of the hike, Day 4 (14.7 miles), we turn to see Clyde, a return hiker approaching, just as the sun has melted away most of the chill of the morning. We curse him under our breath, as he is going to pass us again. So, you may think this is not a big deal, but Clyde is 80 plus years old and has been hiking since before we were born. “Beautiful day”, he smiles, “Perfect hiking weather.” He begins with gentle advice about the hike and shows us his exquisite eagle head hiking staff with such pride, I become quite taken. “My son had this one made for me, especially for this trip.” As he elegantly whisked by, my earlier feelings are swept away, as I have now made one of many new friends. Making new friends is what it’s all about. (photo by Sandra Friend)

As the journey ends on Day 9, we stretch our blistered feet upon the grassy shire of South Bay, reflecting and scratching another mosquito bite. The hike was all we had envisioned and filled us with an overwhelming sense of closeness and accomplishment. A new friend and hiker named Jessie materializes with her red flowing hair, and says, “Coming back next year?” I sigh, proudly photograph the elite, small group that completed the Big “O” hike, and say, “Wouldn’t miss it.” “The Elite” (photo by Cathy Coale)

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22 YEARS OF THE BIG O by Sandra Friend “Behind the dike the shallow waters of Lake Okeechobee lay still, ‘the Great Water,’ as aptly named by the Seminole tribes which once roamed its marshes, paddling their dugout canoes amidst its serrated grasses. Along the meandering footpaths and around cabbage palm hammocks, the early Indians hunted and trekked in a Florida which once was. The game was plentiful then, and the skies were emblazoned with waterbirds. The scene was a masterful watercolor of that Florida which the Great Spirit had created ... the sound emanating from that scene was a carillon of the sounds of nature. Whoops, squawks, cries of warning and of joy; the low whumps of frogs and alligators counterpointing the brilliance of a veritable glee club of songbirds which rounded out this cavatina of swamp singers. It was a less-complicated time.” - Gordon Johnson Big Water - Sandra Friend

In 1992, a caravan of cars left the FTA Fall Regional Conference for the shores of Lake Okeechobee, starting a tradition that stretches forward to today: the annual Big O Hike. Led by Gordon Johnson and inspired by Hank and Irma McCall – who shared their 1991 “Big O Hike” adventure with the Loxahatchee Chapter – 20 eager hikers started near Belle Glade to follow the Florida Trail around the big lake. Eight made it the entire 107 miles. Things were different then, I learned, reading Gordon’s many notes on the early hikes and reviewing footage he’d filmed of the early days. Studded with rocks and fossils, the trail surface, a hard-packed mass of lake muck piled up to form the Herbert Hoover Dike, was tough on the feet but a treasure trove of interesting finds, including calcified fossil scallops and conchs and a mammoth tooth that Gordon found on one circuit. Melaleuca formed tall screens, blocking views of the lake. Mounds of Brazilian pepper filled the slopes of the hike. Hikers clung together in groups, helping each other out. There was no sense of urgency unless a storm was brewing. Showing up a decade later for my first Big O Hike, I’ve watched things change since. With the Army Corps of Engineers making an all-out effort to remove invasive species, vast panoramas across the lake and its marshes have opened up, providing some of the best scenic views you’ll find on a Florida hike. The volume of hikers ebbs and flows – we’ve seen upwards of 200 people at the kickoff, and 75 or more at the nightly logistical meetings, with two or three dozen finishing the entire hike each year. Today’s hikers don’t wait for each other all that much: they hit the dike running, dashing out of the shuttle cars to take long strides forward that I, at my ambling pace, will never keep up with. Most of the top of the dike has been paved: good for practiced city walkers, painful for those whose hiking experience is on natural surfaces, especially seasoned backpackers. Blisters are common. And after the hurricanes of 2004 and 2005, the Corps has been rebuilding portions of the dike to strengthen weak spots, closing those segments off to passage, which changes our ability to hike the “whole” loop. We’ve adapted our plans this year to deal with those closures without leading anyone on a multi-mile roadwalk. What hasn’t changed is the camaraderie. We relax in the campground and swap stories. We hang out at the pool or the hot tub. We gather for the daily Happy Hour and share snacks and libations. We get groups together for dinner (and sometimes lunch) to sample the local cuisine, which rarely disappoints. We laugh over the antics at the Thanksgiving Dinner Talent Show. And yes, we hike together. In smaller groups that in the past, more ones and twos and threes, with miles to share conversations and forge strong bonds. There’s nothing quite like the Big O Hike. Come for the kickoff, or a weekend, or plan to walk the entire way. We hope you’ll join us for this year’s event.

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2013 Big O Hike Details Article & photos by Sandra Friend November 22-December 1 Sponsored by the Loxahatchee Chapter of the Florida Trail Association Full information available at: MEETUP: http://www.meetup.com/Florida-Trail-AssociationLoxahatchee-Chapter-PBCounty/events/128090862/ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/ events/315504315251911 KICKOFF Saturday November 23, 9 AM, at Port Mayaca Recreation Area north of the St. Lucie Canal. Arrive at least 30 minutes early to park and register. Snacks and coffee will be available. There are no facilities at this location, so fill up your water bottles before you arrive. This year’s Wimp Walk, a short hike led by Lori Burris of the Tropical Trekkers Chapter, will be a round-trip walk on a portion of the deeply shaded Rafael Sanchez Trail, which shares the same trailhead. HIKE SCHEDULE Nov 23 | Day 1 | Sat 7.8 mi Port Mayaca to J&S Fish Camp, Chauncey Bay Nov 24 | Day 2 | Sun 10.2 mi Chauncey Bay to Nubbin Slough Nov 25 | Day 3 | Mon 9.5 mi Nubbin Slough to Okee-tantie* or 13.5 mi SR 70 to Okeechobee via Okee-tantie Nov 26 | Day 4 | Tue 10.2 mi Okee-tantie to Indian Prairie Canal Nov 27 | Day 5 | Wed 12.5 mi Indian Prairie Canal to Lakeport Nov 28 | Day 6 | Thu 9.4 mi Lakeport to Moore Haven Nov 29 | Day 7 | Fri 5.0 mi Fort Center WMA and 5.4 mi Uncle Joe's Fish Camp to Clewiston Nov 30 | Day 8 | Sat 8.1 mi Clewiston to John Stretch Park Dec 1 | Day 9 | Sun 11.8 mi South Bay to Pahokee* or 11.4 mi Rafael Sanchez Trail, round-trip * Hikes on these days are dependent on dike access; if the particular segment of the dike is closed due to construction at that time, we will switch to the alternate hike. CAMPING & ACCOMODATIONS Our two base camps for the Big O Hike are the Okeechobee KOA and the Clewiston KOA. At both campgrounds, Wagonmaster Mike Nomad will handle campsite assignments and payments for campsites. Please bring CASH or CHECK (payable to Loxahatchee Chapter FTA). You may arrive any time after 12 noon on Friday Nov 22 at the Okeechobee KOA. Our group will move to the Clewiston KOA on Friday Nov 29 after the morning hike. Our group camping rates are $30 per site (two tents or one camper/RV) at Okeechobee KOA, $22 per site (two tents or one small camper) or $33 (RV) at Clewiston KOA. The Wagonmaster will handle all campsite assignments as you arrive. Do not contact the campground about the camp-

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sites; simply tell them you’re here for the Big O Hike as you drive in. You are also welcome to stay in a local hotel and join us each day, or to rent a cabin (independent of our group, make your own reservation) at either of the campgrounds. We hope to have discounted rates available at local hotels for Big O Hikers firmed up soon. Check the website and join our mailing list there for updates. SHUTTLES Each evening at 7 PM (starting Friday Nov 22) we hold a mandatory meeting at the campground to recap the day and work out the next day’s logistics. Shuttling during the Big O Hike is done as a cooperative venture between the participants. Some non-hiking participants volunteer as drivers, but we primarily set up key swaps and ask that if you have a car or SUV that can accommodate 4 or more, to take your turn volunteering as a driver for a few days during the event. Bring your spare keys! For key swaps to work, we need a core group of faster hikers to walk in the opposite direction each day to move cars ahead. If you’re speedy on your feet, volunteer to be one of our “rabbits.” GUIDEBOOK & T-SHIRT Each year, we produce both a limited edition t-shirt and a detailed guidebook with trail maps showing you the daily route. This year, we’ve revamped the guidebook significantly to focus on the new configuration of hike segments in the hike schedule, including the alternate hikes and a few extra nearby suggested hikes for those who want to put in more daily mileage. Preorder guidebooks and t-shirts at http://www.floridahikes.com/ big-o-hike to be shipped to you, or pick them up at the kickoff and during the week, as supplies and sizes last. THANKSGIVING DINNER Having Thanksgiving Dinner as a group is a tradition among the hikers of the Big O Hike, and family members are welcome to attend. A hiker talent show is part of the fun. This year’s venue is not finalized yet but will be in Okeechobee or nearby. COMPLETION CERTIFICATE If you walk each day’s hike during the Big O Hike, you receive a certificate suitable for framing. If it’s your first time to complete the hike, you also receive a Big O patch. If you’re finishing up a Big O Hike worked on over numerous years, you receive the certificate as well. Near the end of the week, we’ll ask for signups for certificates, which will be presented the Saturday before the hike ends.

QUESTIONS? Send your questions to hike leader Sandra Friend at info@floridahikes.com. You can also join us on Facebook or Meetup to ask questions. Send correspondence to PO Box 2958, Sanford, FL 32772.

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Day Hiking the Ocean to Lake Hiking Trail By Kathy Sympson

We entered Jonathan Dickinson State Park last year intending to hike their trails for some conditioning. We never knew the OTLHT existed until we saw FTA maps in the parking lot. The Atlantic to Lake Okeechobee mission hooked us immediately. We could see that a short section of the trail crossed JDSP, but sadly nobody could tell us much about it, nor about the rest of the trail. They certainly didn’t know if we could access it for day hiking, and seemed to think that unlikely. We undertook to figure it out for ourselves. It is totally doable, and very worthwhile. We coordinated 16 day hikes, and actually wound up walking the trail twice, since we only used one vehicle, and had to double back to it each time. Starting September 2012, and ending in May 2013, we hiked segments almost every month during that span, and experienced the “seasons” of hot, cold, wet and dry. The ideal time of year to do OTLHT would certainly be winter when it is comfortable and drier, undoubtedly why the annual OTLHT thru-hike takes place in February (see The Footprint, summer 2013). The trail was fascinating. We learned where to go and to be prepared with old shoes and dry socks for wading. We needed rain jackets on occasion. Hiking poles (laugh if you will) proved ideal for sounding the depths and maintaining footing in water. There were plentiful signs of deer, wild hog, cats (bobcat probably but Florida panther are in the area), dogs, raccoons and birds. Pig diggings are everywhere, and we actually saw deer, pigs (including a sow with three piglets), harmless black racers, wild turkey and many other birds. You smell the slightly medicinal cypress, and see gnarly trees and numerous species of bromeliad. You notice the significant difference inches of elevation makes; those inches spur subtle changes in the plant communities that indicate wet or dry ground. Cypress = watch for wading! My favourite areas are the Loxahatchee Water Management Area east of Beeline highway with its large cypress ponds, the west side of Corbett Wildlife Management Area with its air plants, the Dupuis grassy farmland remnants rich in wildlife, and Riverbend Park with its lush vegetation. An average segment for us was about 10 miles. Not every mile was actually on the OTLHT since sometimes we had to reach the trail from the nearest road. To do the OTLHT in stages, check the following suggestions for parking and segmentation. Approximate mileage is given. Use two cars to prevent doubling back, or simply enjoy the trail twice. We always saw things on the way home that were not there on the way out. On day one we met a FTA volunteer in JDSP. After that we did not meet a soul on the trail. The OTLHT provides a much under-used opportunity to enjoy our environment and it is beautiful. 1.

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Park – Hobe Sound Beach. Hike - from beach through town, cross US1, enter JDSP through fence access. Round trip – 5 miles. OTLHT distance – 2.5 miles. WWW.FLORIDATRAIL.ORG


2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

Park – JDSP Entrance Station. Hike – East Loop Trail. RT 7.6 miles. OTLHT – 1 mile. Park – JDSP Camp Murphy Trailhead. Hike – Scrub Jay Camp loop. RT – 8.3 miles. OTLHT – 3.2 miles. Park – JDSP Eagles View Equestrian area. Hike – red horse trail and power-line road to Scrub Jay Camp, then turn west on OTLHT to Kitching Creek footbridge. Return to parking via red horse trail. RT – 7 miles. OTHL – 2.7 miles. Park – as previous. Hike – red horse trail to Kitching Creek, follow OTLHT to Hobe Groves Canal. RT – 10 miles. OTLHT – 2.6 miles. We hiked on a rainy day and all was flooded. Canal was waist deep and weedy and we chose not to wade it. Park – Riverbend Park. Hike – OTLHT north to Hobe Groves Canal. RT 10.5 miles. OTLHT distance 5.2 miles. Water only knee deep so we forded easily. Park – Riverbend Park. Hike – south through River bend, along the C18 canal, turn west at C18 dike through the Loxahatchee Slough, meet the west leg of C18. RT 10 miles. OTLHT – 4.8 miles. Choose a different Riverbend trail back to parking area. Park – Beeline Highway junction with west leg C18 canal. Hike – south on Beeline’s west shoulder. Blazes on pavement. Enter Loxahatchee WMA and hike northeast to meet C18 west leg. RT 10 miles. OTLHT – 5.4 miles. Return along canal bank to shorten. Park – as previous. Hike – OTLHT through Hungryland to Corbett Wildlife Management Area. We went to the Youth Camp in Corbett. RT – 9.6 miles. OTLHT – 4.7 miles. Check Corbett literature about hunt ing seasons. Park – Corbett Youth Camp. Hike – OTLHT 4 to 5 miles and return. We only went as far as the Eyeglass Ponds since it was cold and we did not want to wade. This made next segment long. Our round trip – 5.7 miles. OTLHT 2.2 miles. Park – Corbett WMA on South Grade Road/ FTA trail sign (about 11 miles from entrance). Hike – OTLHT back to Eyeglass Ponds (or previous stopping point). RT for us was 14.6 miles. OTLHT distance – 7.3 miles. Park – as previous. Hike – west on OTHL past Big Gopher Canal and into cypress strand. Explore Little Gopher Campsite. RT – 9 miles. OTLHT – 4.2 miles. Park – Dupuis Wildlife and Environmental Area. Enter Gate 1, drive 10-12 miles down Powerline Road to OTHL sign. Hike – east under power lines, enter Corbett WMA, follow OTLHT back to previous way point. RT – 6.4 miles. OTLHT – 3.0. Park – as previous. Hike – west on Corbett Connector to south end of Dupuis loop trails. RT – 12.4 miles. OTLHT – 6.2 miles. (Signs say 6.8 but we measured 6.2.). Park – Dupuis Grade Road. Enter gate 1, drive Jim Grade Road to Dupuis Grade and FTA sign. Hike – OTLHT to south end of loop trail 4/meet the Corbett Connector. RT – 9.9 miles. OTLHT – 4.6. We took 4W loop down and 4E loop back. Park – as previous. Hike - Lake O Trail west out of Dupuis, follow berm south then Morningstar Road west to Lake O. End in LOST/NENA parking area and trailhead. Suggested reading: Land from the Sea: The Geologic Story of South Florida by J.E. Hoffmeister River of Grass – Marjory Stoneman Douglas (about the Everglades, written 1947 but a classic) Their Eyes were Watching God – Zora Neale Hurston (novel, Lake Okeechobee hurricane 1928) A Land Remembered – Patrick Smith (novel, life in south Florida 1850s to 1960s)

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FTA Library updated by Robin Luger

“In 1993 Jerry Underwood donated funding in honor Mary Jones to create a library in the Florida Trail Association office. A room was set aside and a conference table, chairs and four large bookshelves were purchased. Additional donations of books, media, photos and artifacts from FTA members have increased the collection. The library’s purpose is for educational and reference material for staff, board members, and all Florida Trail members. This summer, Robin Luger, retired librarian and long-time Florida Trail member (Suwannee chapter), organized the library collection and created an online catalog. Members can now access this catalog on the Florida Trail website under “Volunteer Resources.” Also the subject heading list is available there, so members can get an idea of what types of books & dvds are being collected. Many items in the collection are not available in public libraries and/or are out of print. Some are very old and of archival interest, others provide current information although the collection is short on current books. Categories include a wide range of how-to books: on hiking and backpacking, non-profit management, and trail maintenance. The trail development and public land policy section includes histories on the development of other national scenic trails. The large nature collection includes wildflower, tree, and bird identification, geology, and natural history of Florida. The outdoor recreation section includes general information about trails in Florida (hiking, biking, kayaking, and even horseback riding), trails in other states, and first hand accounts by hikers. Some older but very well-made videos take a tour through Florida’s natural areas. Any Florida Trail member can check out books by coming to the library. Money isn’t available for mailing books, but please stop by when you’re in Gainesville and enjoy an afternoon of browsing! Many members have donated books in the past and hopefully will continue to do so. Any titles that fit into one of the subject headings in the collection would be appreciated. Any donated materials not needed in the collection will be saved for FTA fundraising efforts or donated to the local Friends of the Library. Especially needed in the collection are CURRENT books and dvds in all categories. Also needed are books on the topics of organizing non-profit events, non-profit management, trail maintenance & equipment care, and history books related to sites along the trail. We can always use more information and first hand accounts of trails and hiking, especially in Florida. Stop by and take a look at the library when you get the chance. We hope staff and all members will benefit from this great information resource! Major Subjects: Non-Profit Management - Fundraising, events, etc. Trails in Florida (not just the FT and/or hiking) Outdoor Activities (hike, canoe/kayak, bike, cook) Florida Nature Guides Florida Natural Areas

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Trail & Tool Maintenance How Tos Conservation Outdoor How-To Florida History and Culture FTA and Hiking History


What is a Trail Dame? by Deb Blick

According to founder and CEO Anna “Mud Butt” Huthmaker, Trail Dames grew out of an idea that came to her after an AT thru-hike attempt. “ In 2003 I attempted to hike the Appalachian Trail. I took six months off from work, hiked 700 miles, broke my foot, and met more amazing people then I ever dreamed.”

Women at the 2013 Trail Dames Summit in Tennessee Photo by Tina Tesso

“But there was one thing that bothered me: I was the only overweight woman out there! Where were all my friends and sisters?! I asked around and discovered that lots of women weren’t keen on hiking by themselves. And when given the opportunity to hike with a group, even more of them were worried about being slow! Well, I couldn’t keep all the fun to myself! I decided that I could share.”

And thus was born the Trail Dames. While not limited to “overweight women”, the purpose from the beginning has been to get women who are nervous or unsure about whether they can hike to take that first step and just get out there and have fun with other women. Women who are not young athletes. Women who are not fashion models. Women who have not thru-hiked the Triple Crown. Women who would prefer to enjoy their natural surroundings than race through it. In other words, women like the vast majority of us. From that tiny idea has sprung an organization with 9 state chapters, over 2500 members, and an annual Summit. Trail Dames sponsors hikes through their local chapters as well as educational workshops, trail maintenance, and fund-raising support for women’s organizations and causes. For more information on Trail Dames see their website http://www.traildames.com

Members in the Media

Photo by John Keatley

MARYVILLE, TN, July 14, 2013 -- Sandra Friend received the “Adventurer of the Year” Award at the 3rd Annual Trails Dames Summit. Friend, a resident of Sanford, FL, has been an active hiker for more than 25 years and maintains a website called “Florida Hikes” which encourages all citizens to get out and enjoy Florida’s public lands. Friend is a member of the FLorida Trail Association, Florida Outdoor Writer’s Association, the Society of American Travel Writers, and the author of 27 books. Anna Huthmaker, CEO of Trail Dames, announced “The Trail Dames are so excited to name Sandra Friend our Adventurer of the Year for 2013. When Sandra was brought to our attention, we were all so inspired by the sheer amount of time, work and love she has invested in the hiking community! Her books alone are a great example of what commitment to a cause can accomplish. She has dedicated her life to informing and educating the public about the Florida Trail and hiking in general, and that is exactly the kind of woman that we believe represents the spirit of Adventure.”

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Finding the Magic Steve Duke

“One man’s “magic” is another man’s engineering. “Supernatural” is a null word.” ----Robert Heinlein, author I saw a blurb in the local newspaper about a hiking group. I was just months after a heart attack, mere weeks out of cardiac rehab and knew that I had to find something to help me make the most of the time I have remaining. From the first moment I walked into the dinner meeting I sensed acceptance. There was an aura of simplicity there, a group of unique people sharing a common purpose. I am thankful that my first event was a trail maintenance day. We met under a fire tower on a long stretch of lonely highway. Tools, helmets, vests and gloves were passed out, the crew chief spoke of safety and the workday’s plans, we loaded up the trucks and off we went. For me, it was into the unknown. For the rest, it seemed that they were going to visit and old friend. One of the group’s matriarchs, Wallis M., took me under her wing and spent the day teaching and encouraging me. There was no criticism, impatience or exasperation voiced by her that first day, although I am sure I seemed like a Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court. When we paused for lunch, the veterans all found a tree to lean against, some shade to rest in, and took the proverbial pause that refreshes. The magic was that no one cared about what job you held, what kind of vehicle you drove, where you lived, who you voted for or whether or not you went to church on Sunday. Once again, there was just ‘acceptance,’ nothing more, nothing less. Therein lies the Magic. That’s what brought me back for the second visit and has kept me coming back for over fifty hikes and paddling trips. I know how many kids and grandkids my fellow hikers have. I know what their hobbies are. I sense what their inner gifts are. Our group is like a body, all the different parts work together for the good of the whole. Because of that early magic, I worked to become an activity leader. Now, I take great pleasure in introducing the magic of the trails to others, especially kids, for they will become the workers and the leaders in decades to come. Never, ever, give up in reaching out to others. It may take several tries, but just like watching a performance by famous magician, David Copperfield, the “awe” will come. Be patient, be a teacher, encourager, friend and mentor. Enthusiasm is contagious. The Magic will be revealed.

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Loxahatchee on the move Paul Cummings

The Loxahatchee Chapter leads walking activities throughout the year. The people who enjoy walking and the natural beauty of South Florida come out in the summer time as well as the cooler months of the year. We are fortunate that Palm Beach County has an abundance of parks and natural areas to explore (over 80 county parks and over 30 natural areas). In addition to that, we have the National Wildlife Refuges, the Wildlife Management Areas, the Water Management District natural areas, all of the city parks, etc.

Jonathan Dickinson State Park, Jupiter

Yamato Scrub Natural Area, Boca Raton

Apoxee Natural Area, West Palm Beach

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The Next Environmental Generation A letter from The Cushman School Environmental Club Noa Richard, Lidice Vilchez, Hannah Pena and Garcelle Lawson Hiking in the Big Cypress Earlier in the year our Environmental Club hiked the southern portion of the Florida Trail in Big Cypress National Preserve. We learned many interesting facts about the Big Cypress trees and how they survive in their environment. We learned though that climate change could destroy this balance. We observed all the nature and life inside the Cypress dome, and one thing that caught my attention was the Epiphytes. They were plants that hooked on, and wrapped their roots around the Cypress trees for support without harming them. When we visited it was the end of the wet season so we had to wade in water up to our hips! When we returned to school, we created art-work based on Epiphytes and what we saw on our trip.

The Environmental Club with faculty advisor Deborah Mitchell in Big Cypress

Mentioned previously, climate change is a dire problem that affects not only the Cypress Preserve, but crops, animals, and other habitats in Florida. With climate change the water levels are unpredictable and this leads to drying out or overwatering crops. When this happens the animals have barely anything to eat, and the food chain doesn’t function correctly. So especially in the dry season, all these situations are heightened, and it makes it difficult for animals to survive in the Cypress Preserve. The wet and dry seasons are natural processes in nature, but changes brought about by humans have affected the eco-system. Remember, you can help and make a difference by small actions every day, and if everyone comes together, we will get the end result we have all been hoping for. Plants and water Our mission for this winter project was to interview the public about plants and water with these questions, “How does the Biscayne aquifer affect our On the FT in Big Cypress water supply, what effect will the Everglades Restoration have on the plants and water in South Florida, what effect does our annual rainfall have on various species in Florida, and has global warming had an impact yet?” We interviewed a total of 13 people and cross checked their answers to summarize the extent of public knowledge. Most didn’t know about these important issues. In February we read an article in the Miami Herald that said climate change has already started to affect the economy. We also talked about how increasing sea levels are leading to saltwater intrusion in the drinking water. Now more than ever we are aware of the many problems facing this generation and are investigating ways to raise awareness about these Creating biodiversity mural at Cushman local and global issues.

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2013 FNST Symposium - Blazing the Next 30 Years Megan Eno, USDA Forest Service More than just reflecting on the past 30 years of dedicated work on making the Florida National Scenic Trail dream a reality, this year the symposium will highlight the future plans that will make the FNST an even greater outdoor experience in the next 30 years. An active program of speakers will take you into the future of the FNST. This year’s special guest is Steve Elkinton, Program Leader, National Trails System, NPS. WHAT: WHEN: WHERE: WHO: HOW: COST:

Florida National Trail Symposium – “Blazing the Next 30 Years” September 28, 2013 from 8:30 – 12:00 noon Central Florida Zoo and Botanical Gardens, Sanford, Florida Volunteers, Land Managers, Outdoor Media, Outdoor Enthusiasts Pre-registration through www.FLORC.org Free and a continental breakfast and lunch provided.

For additional information go to www.fs.usda.gov/fnst or contact Jim Schmid, FNST Administrator, at 850523-8528 or jimschmid@fs.fed.us . ALSO DON”T FORGET: The Florida Greenways and Trails Council Meeting will be held Friday, September 27th from 1:00 – 5:00, at the Central Florida Zoo and Botanical Gardens. The Florida Greenways and Trails Council serves to advise the Florida Department of Environmental Protection on greenway and trail related issues, promote intergovernmental cooperation and private partnerships for developing the greenways and trails system. This is statewide quarterly council meeting open to the public. No fee or pre-registration required. The 2013 Open Forum on Outdoor Recreation is scheduled for September 28th and 29th, immediately following the FNST Symposium. Anyone with a vested interest in outdoor recreation in Florida, especially in helping map out the future of outdoor recreation in Florida, will also want to participate in this very informative event. Registration and agenda for the 2013 Florida Outdoor Recreation (FLORC) Summit can also be found by going to www.florc.org. This event has a nominal fee of $65.00 per person, but for members of the FTA (or other clubs and associations that are a member of FLORC) pay only $45.00. There are few opportunities like this where user groups, outdoor recreation providers and businesses can get together and become more involved in helping to support outdoor recreation programming in Florida. We hope to see you this weekend!

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FTA Summer Photo The Footprint COver Category

Trail volunte

Trail Volun “Gathering Sign Eglin A

Magazine Cover - 1st Place “Mystery Dome” by Amos Stoll Big Cypress National Preserve

Magazine Cover - 2nd Place “Osceola Oaks” by Madeleine Pinaire Osceola National Forest

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Magazine Cover - 3rd Place “Osceola, June” by Madeleine Pinaire Osceola National Forest

Due to the limited num winner was selected in


o contest winners

eers Category

nteers - 1st Place nposts” by Steve Duke Air Force Base

Trail Magic Category

Trail Magic - 1st Place “Moonrise at Pat’s Island” by Michael Wade Ocala National Forest

mber of entries, only a 1st place n the Trail Volunteers category.

Trail Magic - 2nd Place “Cottonmouth on Trail” by Amos Stoll Big Cypress National Preserve

Trail Magic - 3rd Place “The Serpentine Tree” by Mike Oszust Withlacoochee State Forest - Citrus Tract

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Camping, hiking, hunting and fishing supplies 15001 N Nebraska Avenue Tampa, FL 33613 SouthernWildernessDepot.com 813-977-4702 FTA member discount

An Activity Leader Training will be held during the South Regional Conference.

The Footprint Magazine Submission Guidelines Without the help of FTA members and volunteers, there is no magazine. We strongly encourage your submission of photos and content for every issue. Photos: We are looking for high resolution (300dpi) photos for publication. Make sure that if they are photos of people that they have signed the necessary photo release. We are always looking for cover photos, which need to be vertical format and at least 300dpi. Pictures can include: People hiking on the trail Trail maintenance and work hikes Different trails, signs and blazes Flora and Fauna Articles: We hope for contributions from the various chapters highlighting events and accomplishments, especially those that involve new groups and outreach opportunities. We also look for unique hiking stories from members, and articles regarding anything that pertains to hiking and camping (trail recipes, hiking and safety tips). If you submit a story, please make sure to include photos that you would like to go with it. Word count can be anywhere from 400 to 900 words, depending on photos and page length. Please do not embed photos within a document, but instead send them in as an attachment. Please send all submissions to communications@floridatrail.org. The deadline for the winter issue of The Footprint is November 1, 2013. Deadline for activties is November 15, 2013

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Activity Leader Training is FTA’s basic leadership course which helps prepare members to take others out on hikes and trail maintenance. It is a requirement for all Activity Leaders, Trailmasters and Chapter Activity Coordinators. It’s a good idea for anyone else in a position of leadership within the organization. If your chapter would like to host an Activity Leader training in your area, please contact Deb Blick at the FTA Office.


FLorida Trail Association Florida Trail Association 5415 SW 13th St Gainesville, FL 32608 352-378-8823 877-HIKE-FLA fta@floridatrail.org BOARD OF DIRECTORS Carlos Schomaker, President Tom Daniel, VP Trails Holly Parker, VP Outreach/Development Leslie Wheeler, Secretary Pam Hale, Treasurer Eve Barbour Chuck Barrowclough David Denham Fred Goldstein James Powell FLORIDA TRAIL STAFF GAINESVILLE HEADQUARTERS 877-HIKE-FLA or 352-378-8823 Janet Akerson, Administrative Director Deb Blick, Trail Resource Coordinator Diane Strong, Administrative Asst TALLAHASSEE FIELD OFFICE

Eric Mason, Trail Program Director 906-360-3153 Megan Donoghue, Volunteer Program Coordinator 941-408-3098

1983 - 2013

Celebrating 30 years of a proud partnership in the National Trails System with the USDA Forest Service. The Footprint (ISSN 1064-0681) is published quarterly (December, March, July, September) by the Florida Trail Association, 5415 SW 13th St, Gainesville, FL 32608, 352-3788823. Bulk rate postage paid at Gainesville, FL. Postmaster: Send change-of-address form 3597 to Footprint, 5415 SW 13th St, Gainesville, FL 32608. © 2013, Florida Trail Association All rights reserved. The Footprint is printed with soy-based inks on paper with post-consumer content

FLORIDA TRAIL WEBSITE Deb Blick FLORIDA TRAIL Footprint Deb Blick, Editor Rob Smith, Jr, Cartoonist Contributors retain copyright to their work. Articles are subject to editing for clarity and space. Materials will be returned if accompanied by a selfaddressed stamped envelope. Opinions, observations, and endorsements made within the Florida Trail Footprint do not necessarily reflect those of the board or staff of the Florida Trail Association. Falll 2013 Volume 30, Issue 4

Deadline for the winter issue of The Footprint is November 1, 2013. Deadline for chapter activities to appear in the electronic version of the winter issue of The Footprint is November 15, 2013.

OUR MAGAZINE The Footprint is published by the Florida Trail Association, a volunteer-based nonprofit organization focused on Florida hiking and trail building. Since 1966, the primary mission of our organization has been the care and protection of the Florida Trail, a 1,400-mile footpath across the Sunshine State - Florida’s own National Scenic Trail. The Florida Trail Association also publishes maps and guidebooks to assist hikers in enjoying this public recreational resource. OUR GOAL To provide outreach to our readers through informative articles that express appreciation for and conservation of the natural beauty of Florida; to inform our readers of Florida Trail Association business; and to provide information on Florida hiking and outdoor recreation opportunities. CONTRIBUTORS Contributors are welcome to submit items for our various departments as well as trail and association-related news. Please contact the editor at communications@floridatrail.org to discuss ideas for feature stories prior to submission. MEMBERSHIP If you’re not already a member, join now. As a Florida Trail member, you receive a subscription to The Footprint magazine, membership in a local chapter, a local newsletter with local activities, opportunities for outdoor skills training, participation in regional and annual conferences and more. Commercial and Alliance memberships and event sponsorship opportunities are also available. Call toll-free 877-HIKE-FLA for more information. ADVERTISING Reach a highly targeted demographic of Florida outdoor enthusiasts by advertising with us or becoming a regular sponsor. Your advertising dollars directly support production and publication of this magazine and assist the Florida Trail Association in fulfilling its mission. Call 877-HIKE-FLA or email communications@ floridatrail.org for more details.

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Welcome New Members May 2013 tHRU July 2013

Richard Abt and Family Salina Agnew-Peet and Family Paul Ahnberg James Ajac Durwood Avery Donnie Berret Bobby Berry Kimberly Bohn Lynne and William Bolton David Bormuth Robert and Joy Bostrom Catherine Bowman Sherri Boyer Brandon Brunhammer Beth Burger Morena Cameron Amy Cantley Elizabeth Canton Nan Carrera John Churchill Jay Colwell Bett Connell Francene Cucchiara Milly Dawson Lillian DeSilvio Cynthia Dove and Family Monica Drouillard Lynn Elliott and Sam Sammelmann Kevin Fairchild and Family Joe Faust John Fenner Carlos Fernandez Nancy Frey Joe Gardner Glenn Gayle Binderow Georgia Mary and David Gessert Debbie Grant Sonja Grogan Michael Grossman Judy Hallock

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Terri Harlan and Family Henry Harrell Susie Hastings and Family Debi Barrett-Hayes and Martin Hayes Nancy Hecker Dorothy Hernandez Manuel Hevia Hannah Hiester Elaine Hines Chuck Hoskin Richard Hudson and Family Stephen Hurm and Family Curtis Ihlefeld and Family Israelle Jacinto Diane and Lee Jacobs Max Jaramillo Dianne Jones Rosemary Jones Mary Ann Keller Howard Kemp Michael Kennedy Sylvia Kleppinger Michael LaMott Currie Leggoe Sherri Lord Tony Mahoney Amber McCann Michael McConihay Norm and Maggie McDonald Shelly McEwen Naomi McLain John and Penela Meade Michael Mill Kenneth Monroe Caterina Morin Robert Mrykalo Carolyn Mullins Joseph Nassau Ed Neu Kathy Newman Suzanne and Rod Niemann

Jerry Nuss and Family David O’Donnell and Family Aria Peirson Wayne Petrovich Jill Piltz David Purdy Nelson Reeves Brian Rice Gary Ridgway and Family Ed Riskosky Leslie Roberts Ginni Ross Becky Routh Ric and Jen Serena Todd Severance Katie Sexton Bick Simpson Ross Sisk Joseph Sliva Judy Smith Kenneth Smith James Speck Carol and Harry Spring Bonnie Stevens John Sutter Pat Swatek Dodi and Todd Sylvester Geraldine Vatovec James Veber Louis Vendl Laura Wagner and Tommy Denham Bryan Wakeman Donald West and Family Melissa Whatley Karen Wilkening and Ken Keene Robert and Barbara Williamson John Wilson Judy Wilson Betsy Woolley Gina Young and Family Joe Young


a special thanks to

our generous donors May 2013 tHru July 2013 Donations of $1000 & Above Elizabeth Ordway-Dunn Foundation Pamphalon Foundation James Powell Carlos Schomaker Donations of $100 to $999 Jim Arrington Dave Cook Robert and Nancy DeLoatch Carl and Sylvia Dunnam Earth Share Sara Gardner Fred Goldstein

Joan Lind Jarvis Buz Livingston Microsoft Matching Robert and Marjorie Saunders Recreation Resource Mgmt Travel Country Outdoors Leslie Wheeler

Donations of $5 to $99 Active Network Randall and Janet Akerson Catherine M Amoss Durwood Avery Leslie and Michael Bard Janet and Alex Bartha Andrea Beauchamp Ken Bergum Sharon and Philippe Bilger Richard Brown Ken Castner Bett Connell Jarey Lee Cortright James Cutler Chris and Julia Daniels Catherine Downs Karl and Betty Ann Eichhorn Grayal Farr Jeff Ernst and Ann Harding

Audrey and Herman Johnson Gordon Johnson L.B. Jones, Jr James Kern Paul and Margaret Kidd Robin Luger Louise Maynard Mary McKinley James Milani Rayanne and Scott Mitchell Barbara Genthner Moritz Pat and Allen Nease Network for Good Hazel Nicholson Michael and Linda Otten Jim Owens Francis and Colleen Poole Ed Riskosky William Robbins

Rosemary Jones Michael and Darlene Robinson Clara Ross Frank Ross & Family Betty Rushton Cindy Russell and David Hunt Barbara Sager Kevin and Dawn Stoppello Diane and Chuck Strong Robert Sugarman and Marilyn Seskin Albert Symes Martha and Verrill Taylor Teresa Taylor Julia Thompson and Mike Jones Carol Trosset Ron and Christina Voll Robert and Barbara Williamson Hugh Wilson

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Local Chapters For chapter websites/Meetups, go to http://www.floridatrail.org/about-us/chapters/ then select the chapter ALLIGATOR AMBLERS CHAPTER Charlotte, Collier, and Lee

PANHANDLE CHAPTER Bay, Calhoun, Gulf, Holmes, Jackson, and Washington

AA Sub Chapter

SUNCOAST CHAPTER Citrus, Hernando, Hillsborough, Manatee, Pasco, Pinellas and Sarasota

Ron Peterson 850-814-0139

Chuck Wilson 239-398-3820 FISHEATING CREEK Glades and hendry

Lenny Chew 813-838-6834

Betty Loomis 863-532-9339 APALACHEE CHAPTER Franklin, Gadsden, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty, and Wakulla

Howard Pardue 850-386-1494 BIG CYPRESS CHAPTER Miami-Dade and Monroe

David Denham 305-284-9861 CENTRAL FLORIDA CHAPTER Orange, Seminole, and Osceola

Tom Regan 407-415-8592

SUwannee CHAPTER Columbia, Dixie, Hamilton, Lafayette, Madison, Suwannee, and Taylor

Irv Chance 386-330-2424

Tropical trekkers CHAPTER Martin, Okeechobee, and St. Lucie

Bridget Kean 850-212-2262 Western gate CHAPTER Escambia and Santa Rosa

Helen Wigersma 850-484-0528

CHOCTAWHATCHEE CHAPTER Walton and Okaloosa

Paul Kellum 850-654-1172

FLORIDA CRACKERS CHAPTER Alachua, Levy, Gilcrist, and Marion

Mitch Sapp 352-332-2065

HALIFAX-ST JOHNS CHAPTER Flagler, Putnam, and Volusia

Linda Taylor 386-837-0469 HAPPY HOOFERS CHAPTER Broward

Esther Muram 954-742-7572 HEARTLAND CHAPTER DeSoto, Hardee, Highlands, and Polk

David Waldrop 863-605-3587 HIGHLANDERS CHAPTER Lake and Sumter

Rollin Patrick 407-469-3638

FTA Chapters

Indian RIVER CHAPTER Brevard and Indian River

ALLIGATOR AMBLERS

Richard Loudon 321-638-8804

APALACHEE

LOXAHATCHEE CHAPTER Palm Beach

BIG CYPRESS

Margaret Brabham 561-588-3077 North Fla Trailblazers CHAPTER Baker, Bradford, Clay, Duval, Nassau, St. Johns, and Union

Leslie Wheeler 904-386-2186

CENTRAL FLORIDA CHOCTAWHATCHEE FLORIDA CRACKERS HALIFAX-ST JOHNS HAPPY HOOFERS HEARTLAND HIGHLANDERS INDIAN RIVER LOXAHATCHEE NORTH FLORIDA TRAILBLAZERS PANHANDLE SUNCOAST SUWANNEE TROPICAL TREKKERS

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WESTERN GATE

Florida Trail activities are organized by our local chapters and led by authorized volunteer activity leaders throughout the state. They can be found online under Activities>Find an Activity at www.floridatrail.org and on our local chapter websites. Participants in activities must sign an Assumption of Risk form and agree to accept personal responsibility for their safety and the safety of accompanying minors. Always contact the activity leader in advance for more information, to let them know you are attending, and to find out any special requirements for the trip.


MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION AND GIFT FORM

MY GIFT TO THE FLORIDA TRAIL DESIGNATIONS

ORDER BY PHONE 877-HIKE-FLA

ORDER BY FAX 352-378-4550

ORDER ONLINE www.floridatrail.org

Name ___________________________________________________ Daytime Phone Number ______________ Address _________________________________________________ Email ____________________________ City ____________________________________________________ State _______ Zip __________________

e ANNUAL FUND Provides funds to ensure a steady income stream for Florida Trail Association operations. It’s how we keep the lights on and The Footprint coming.

MEMBERSHIP CATEGORIES Please mark one of the boxes below if you are joining or newing your membership in the Florida Trail Association

Name _____________________________________

$35 Individual $50 Family* $125 Sustaining* $250 Supporting* $1000 Individual Life $1500 Family Life* $30 Senior (65+) or Student (18-23) $45 Senior (65+) or Student (18-23) Family

Address ___________________________________ City ______________________________________

*Includes spouse and children under 18.

I do not want my address shared with FTA-affiliated organizations

e ENDOWMENT FUND Provides an ongoing endowment to the Florida Trail Association from interest earnings. It is the gift that keeps on giving.

Please send a gift membership to:

re-

State _____________ Zip _____________________

Employer/Occupation ___________________________

Daytime Phone Number _______________________

Spouse Name _________________________________

Email _____________________________________

Spouse Occupation _____________________________

Ship membership package to

Number of children _____________________________

The Footprint magazine?

Me Digital

New Member Printed

I learned about the Florida Trail from _____________________________________________________________

MY GIFT TO THE TRAIL I am making a gift to the Florida Trail Association and want my gift designated to:

e TRAIL PROTECTION FUND Supports land acquisition and trail construction projects with the ultimate goal of protecting the trail corridor and completing the entire Florida Trail. Independently funds programs like F-Troop, trail crews, and outreach to implement programs wherever they are needed within the Florida Trail System.

Annual Fund My gift is

Endowment Fund

Trail Protection Fund

Map Fund

In Memory of _____________________________ In Honor of ______________________________ FUND

AMOUNT

MEMBERSHIP TOTAL _______________ SEND FORM AND PAYMENT TO:

GIFT TOTAL _______________

FLORIDA TRAIL ASSOCIATION 5415 SW 13th St., Gainesville, FL 32608

GRAND TOTAL _______________

PAYMENT OPTIONS:

CHECK: Make checks payable to “Florida Trail Association”. CREDIT CARD:

Visa

Mastercard

American Express

Discover

Credit Card Number: ____________________________________________________________ Exp. Date: _____________

e

Signature: ________________________________________ Security Code (3 or 4 digits): ________

MAP FUND Provides funding for updating the Florida Trail’s maps and databook.

www.floridatrail.org

To order merchandise from the Florida Trail General Store, visit

or call the Florida Trail office at 1-877-HIKE-FLA.

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FTA Chapter-LED activities October - December, 2013

Alligator Amblers Chapter - meetup.com/Alligator-Amblers/ Sunday, Nov 10 – Day hike on Estero River Scrub Preserve. Leisurely 3 miles through gopher tortoise areas, pinelands, salt marsh flats (home for the fiddler crabs). These marsh flats can be wet and muddy so bring old shoes, repellent, water and a hat. Leisure. Leader: JoAnn Luce joannl1960@yahoo.com Saturday, Nov 23 - Day hike at Lover’s Key State Park. Hike 1.8 miles at Lovers key on Black Island— State Park fee applies. Leisure. Limit 10 people. Leader: Pat Hasting, pathastings@hotmail.com Wednesday, Dec 18 - Day bike ride on Sanibel Island. Bike the trails of Sanibel Is.-stop for lunch at an island restaurant-bike some more approx. 12 miles-bridge toll $6 per car. Leisure. Limit 10 people. Leader: Pat Hasting, pathastings@hotmail.com Tuesday-Wednesday, Dec 31, 2013 - Jan 1, 2014 - New Years Eve Campout. Starts at 4 pm at 1721 Rock Road, Naples, Fl 34120. Bring a dish to share, a lawn chair, beverage of choice and camping gear. Have dinner, gather around the campfire and ring in the NEW YEAR! Leisure. Leader: Betty Wilson wilgoson@aol.com & Chuck Wilson flswampeagle@aol.com  

Apalachee Chapter - meetup.com/Apalachee-Florida-Trail-Hiking Wednesday, Oct 2 - “Wednesday Walkabout.” Grab your water bottle and good walking shoes and join us in the early evening to eliminate stress, meet folks of similar interest, build a little endurance and just get a little more exercise! This is not a trail running group, but we will maintain a minimal power walking pace (approx. mph and walk between 3 and 4 miles). Pets are welcome but must be on leash & owner cleans up after them (park rules). Parking lot has a bathroom and plenty of room for changing clothes. Meet at 5:15 p.m. for meet, greet and warm- up -- then we hit the trail at 5:30 p.m. (sharp). Meet at the Miccosukee Canopy Road Greenway - Edenfield Trailhead parking lot at the Miccosukee Greenway trails (near the intersection of Miccosukee and Edenfield Road). Location may change based on daylight savings time and closure of park at sunset. Sign up on www.meetup.com/Apalachee-Florida-Trail-Hiking or call leader for any last minute updates, location change or cancellations (due to weather or change in leader schedule). Dawn Griffin (850) 509-6103, Griffindd@aol.com Thursday, Oct 3 Thursday - Weekday Warrior Trail Maintenance. Working on a segment of the FNST. Wear sturdy shoes, dress for the weather in “trail work” clothes, bring water, bug spray, personal medications, lunch. Moderate. No limit. To sign up, contact Howard Pardue or hpardue@comcast.net. Saturday, Oct 5 - Trail Care Apalachicola National Forest East. Trail clearing and blaze repainting on a segment of the FNST. Wear sturdy shoes, dress for the weather in “trail work” clothes, bring water, bug spray, personal medications, lunch. Modersate. No limit. To sign up, contact Richard Graham at rdgraham@ centurylink.net. Saturday, Oct 5 Saturday - Phipps Park Invasive Plant Education and Removal. Strenuous. Enjoy the camaraderie of participating in a joint FTA/ FNPS (Florida Native Plant Society-Magnolia Chapter) endeavor for hikers, runners, cyclists, native plant and other wildlife enthusiasts, and anyone else interested in learning and “giving back!.” This program is using Elinor Klapp-Phipps Park’s extensive invasion of coral ardisia to develop a continuing series of hands-on education and removal opportunities. Each session continues from the previous one during which we will be working in a selected test area of the park. Learn how to identify and safely

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eradicate coral ardisia, not only at Phipps Park, but wherever you hike (including the FNST), from experts. Get some great exercise removing these invasive plants in this test section, and feel good about giving back! The activity begins promptly at 9:30am at the Meridian trailhead. Enter the park at 4000 N. Meridian Rd. (Youth Sports Complex/baseball fields); the trailhead is located 0.1 mile in, on the left. Bring water, bug spray, gardening work gloves, and wear shoes appropriate for hiking. Although some tools will be provided, please bring a clipper and/or a shovel (pointed type is best) if you own them. Lunch will be provided. Important note: This type of activity is not appropriate if you are severely allergic to poison ivy. IvyBlock barrier cream will be provided for those who wish to use it. Questions? Contact Karen Berkley (850) 570-5740 kjberkley@gmail. com or Chuck Goodheart: (850) 933-6631 Charles.Goodheart@talgov.com Tuesday, Oct 8 Tuesday - Chapter Meeting: “Dave Cook, “Turtles and Gators and Snakes, Oh My!!” Join Dave Cook, FWC Wildlife Biologist extraordinaire, who will share some special wildlife friends you may encounter while hiking and paddling in North Florida. Get up close and personal with a variety of species who share Florida’s wonderful natural resources. Leisure. Early Learning Coalition, Suite 70, Northwood Centre, 1852 N. Martin Luther King Blvd., Tallahassee. For information, contact Liz Sparks at liz.aparks57@gmail.com. Wednesday, Oct 9 - “Wednesday Walkabout.” See Oct 2 for full details. Sign up on www.meetup.com/ Apalachee-Florida-Trail-Hiking or call leader for any last minute updates. Dawn Griffin (850) 509-6103 or Griffindd@aol.com Saturday, Oct 12 - Canoe/Hike. Canoe from Yancy Bridge to Magnolia Bridge--about 10 miles--stopping half way down for a 4-mile hike at the new Hinson Tract Trail. Leigh Brooks (Naturalist) will join us to share local botanical knowledge. Meet at 8:00 a.m. (EST) at McDonalds (next to Harvey’s supermarket on Hwy 90/ Capital Circle) for carpooling. Bring shoes for hiking, bug spray, water, lunch, canoe and safety equipment. Moderate. Limit 12 people. To sign up, contact Mike Tucker (850) 545-3489 tuckems@hotmail.com or Gwen Beatty gfbeatty@yahoo.com Sunday, Oct 13 - Day Hike in the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. This series of hikes is designed primarily for hikers who would like to increase their endurance on the trail. We will start with an 8-mile hike and gradually increase to 12-14 miles by the end of winter. We will hike over flat ground and maintain a relatively brisk pace. Bring water and trail snacks for several hours. This activity is also appropriate for anyone wishing to train for a backpacking trip. Bring your pack loaded with 50-60% final load. Strenuous. No limit. To sign up, contact Dawn Brown at dbrown1948@embarqmail.com. Wednesday, Oct 16 - “Wednesday Walkabout.” See Oct 2 for full details. Sign up on www.meetup.com/ Apalachee-Florida-Trail-Hiking or call leader for any last minute updates. Dawn Griffin (850) 509-6103 or Griffindd@aol.com Saturday, Oct 19 Saturday - Trail Care Apalachicola National Forest East. Trail clearing and blaze repainting on a segment of the FNST. Wear good shoes, dress for the weather in “trail work” clothes, bring water, bug spray, personal medications, lunch. Moderate. No limit. To sign up, contact Richard Graham (850) 878-3616, rdgraham@centurylink.net. Sunday, Oct 20 – Day Hike “Red Hills Ramble”. Who doesn’t like to “ramble” along a beautiful county road! Join us for our first 8-mile ramble on the entire length of Old Centerville Road from Centerville Road to the Florida/George state line (hike on a canopied road, half on paved road and half on hard packed clay; it’s an easy hike.) The Red Hills has been identified for special conservation efforts and the Nature Conservancy has designated the Red Hills as one of America’s “Last Great Places.” Wear comfortable clothes, walking shoes and bring water, trail snacks for several hours. Meet at 9 a.m. at Bradley’s Retreat, 9002 Bradley Road. Take Centerville Road north to Bradley’s Country Store, then across the street to the parking lot of Bradley’s Retreat (approximately 5.7 miles beyond Bradfordville / Roberts Roads). Afterwards plan on enjoying a sausage dog and drink at the country store. Leisure. No limit. To sign up, contact John Laney at John@john-laney.com or Dawn Griffin at Griffindd@aol.com Wednesday, Oct 23 - “Wednesday Walkabout.” See Oct 2 for full details. Sign up on www.meetup.com/ Apalachee-Florida-Trail-Hiking or call leader for any last minute updates. Dawn Griffin (850) 509-6103 or

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FTA Chapter-LED activities --- Continued ---

Apalachee Chapter - meetup.com/Apalachee-Florida-Trail-Hiking/ Griffindd@aol.com Thursday, Oct 24 - Weekday Warrior Trail Maintenance. Working on a segment of the FNST. Wear sturdy shoes, dress for the weather in “trail work” clothes, bring water, bug spray, personal medications, lunch. Moderate. No limit. To sign up, contact Howard Pardue at hpardue@comcast.net. Saturday, Oct 26 - Day Hike at Maclay Gardens State Park, Tallahassee. Mid-morning 4-mile hike around Lake Overstreet then eat lunch at Lake Hall. Those who want can stay afterwards and paddle in Lake Hall, swim and/or tour the botanical gardens. Moderate. No limit. Sign up by October 24 by contacting Wendy Dial at wbdial@gmail.com providing your full name and contact information. Sunday, Oct 27 Sunday - Day Hike in the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. This series of hikes is designed primarily for hikers who would like to increase their endurance on the trail. We will start with an 8-mile hike and gradually increase to 12-14 miles by the end of winter. We will hike over flat ground and maintain a relatively brisk pace. Bring water and trail snacks for several hours. This activity is also appropriate for anyone wishing to train for a backpacking trip. Bring your pack loaded with 50-60% final load. Strenuous. No limit. To sign up, contact Dawn Brown at dbrown1948@embarqmail.com. Wednesday, Oct 30 - “Wednesday Walkabout.” See Oct 2 for full details. Sign up on www.meetup. com/Apalachee-Florida-Trail-Hiking or call leader for any last minute updates. Dawn Griffin (850) 509-6103 or Griffindd@aol.com Saturday, Nov 2 - Trail Care in the Apalachicola National Forest. Trail clearing and blaze repainting on a segment of the FNST. Wear sturdy shoes, dress for the weather in “trail work” clothes, bring water, bug spray, personal medications, lunch. Moderate. No limit. To sign up, contact Richard Graham at rdgraham@ centurylink.net. Saturday, Nov 2 - Phipps Park Invasive Plant Education and Removal. Strenuous. See Oct 5 for full details. Questions? Contact Karen Berkley (850) 570-5740 kjberkley@gmail.com or Chuck Goodheart: (850) 933-6631 Charles.Goodheart@talgov.com Sunday, Nov 3 Sunday - Day Hike in the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. This series of hikes continues the training started in October. This series of hikes is designed primarily for hikers who would like to increase their endurance on the trail. We will start with an 8-mile hike and gradually increase to 12-14 miles by the end of winter. We will hike over flat ground and maintain a relatively brisk pace. Bring water and trail snacks for several hours. This activity is also appropriate for anyone wishing to train for a backpacking trip. Bring your pack loaded with 50-60% final load. Strenuous. No limit. To sign up, contact Dawn Brown at dbrown1948@embarqmail.com. Wednesday, Nov 6 - “Wednesday Walkabout.” See Oct 2 for full details. Sign up on www.meetup.com/ Apalachee-Florida-Trail-Hiking or call leader for any last minute updates. Dawn Griffin (850) 509-6103 or Griffindd@aol.com Friday-Sunday, Nov 8-10 - Wakulla Walkabout: An FTA Gathering at Camp Indian Springs in Wakulla County. Florida Panhandle Regional FTA Event! Discover the natural beauty of the wondrous treasures found only in this unspoiled “other” Florida. Join others who have a passion for the outdoors and hiking. The event includes day hikes, canoe trips, speakers and presentations highlighting the area’s unique outdoor resources. Check out the website for event details and registration-- http://apalachee.floridatrail.org/

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conferences . Volunteers Needed! Dawn Griffin at Griffindd@aol.com Tuesday, Nov 12 - Chapter Meeting: “Samantha Sexton, Pew Charitable Trusts.” Discover why Pew Charitable Trusts got involved in ocean conservation, its efforts to end and prevent overfishing and the campaign’s expanded focus to protect forage species important to a healthy marine food web. Samantha will share ways FTA members can get involved. Early Learning Coalition, Suite 70, Northwood Centre, 1852 N. Martin Luther King Blvd., Tallahassee. For information, contact Liz Sparks at liz.aparks57@gmail.com. Wednesday, Nov 13 - “Wednesday Walkabout.” See Oct 2 for full details. Sign up on www.meetup. com/Apalachee-Florida-Trail-Hiking or call leader for any last minute updates. Dawn Griffin (850) 509-6103 or Griffindd@aol.com Saturday, Nov 16 - Trail Care, Torreya Challenge Trail, Torreya State Park. Enjoy hiking some of the hilliest terrain in Florida and help maintain the Torreya Challenge Trail. We’ll clip unwanted vegetation and remove fallen limbs. Bring loppers if you can, water, and lunch. We will meet at 7:30 a.m. in Tallahassee for carpooling. Moderate. Limit 10. To sign up, contact Jerry Herting (850) 878-3426 or Bob Gilley (850) 5571536. Sunday, Nov 17 Sunday - Day Hike in the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. This series of hikes continues the training started in October. This series of hikes is designed primarily for hikers who would like to increase their endurance on the trail. We will start with an 8-mile hike and gradually increase to 12-14 miles by the end of winter. We will hike over flat ground and maintain a relatively brisk pace. Bring water and trail snacks for several hours. This activity is also appropriate for anyone wishing to train for a backpacking trip. Bring your pack loaded with 50-60% final load. Strenuous. No limit. To sign up, contact Dawn Brown at dbrown1948@embarqmail.com. Wednesday, Nov 20 - “Wednesday Walkabout.” See Oct 2 for full details. Sign up on www.meetup. com/Apalachee-Florida-Trail-Hiking or call leader for any last minute updates. Dawn Griffin (850) 509-6103 or Griffindd@aol.com Sunday, Nov 24 - Day Hike in the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. This series of hikes continues the training started in October. This series of hikes is designed primarily for hikers who would like to increase their endurance on the trail. We will start with an 8-mile hike and gradually increase to 12-14 miles by the end of winter. We will hike over flat ground and maintain a relatively brisk pace. Bring water and trail snacks for several hours. This activity is also appropriate for anyone wishing to train for a backpacking trip. Bring your pack loaded with 50-60% final load. Strenuous. No limit. To sign up, contact Dawn Brown at dbrown1948@ embarqmail.com. Sunday, Nov 24 - Day Hike “Prep for the Holiday”. Join us for an early afternoon hike at the local Apalachee Regional Park Trail located about 4.5 miles east of US-319 on US-27. The trail was designed to give users the opportunity to walk on several types of surfaces and for its scenic beauty and accessibility. Moderate. No limit. Sign up by contacting Wendy Dial at wbdial@gmail.com or Dawn Griffin at Griffindd@aol.com providing your full name and contact information.  

Florida Crackers Chapter - meetup.com/crackers-fta Saturday, Sep 21 – Winery and Meadery Tour. Meet at 11:00 am at the Royal Manor Vineyard and Winery. 22 Royal Avenue, Interlachen, FL 32148. We’ll tour the vineyard and winery, learn how the grapes and fruit are grown and mixed, and how the wine and mead is created. Deb Blick leading dblick@floridatrail.org or 352-378-8823.

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FTA Chapter-LED activities --- Continued ---

Florida Crackers Chapter - meetup.com/crackers-fta Saturday, Oct 5 – Alachua County Forever Series. Hike Barr Hammock South for our First Saturday hike with Alachua County. We’ll be accompanied by an Alachua County land manager. Space limited, you must sign up to attend. Contact Mitch Sapp at mesapp1941@gmail.com to sign up and for more information. Friday – Sunday, Oct 11-13 - Florida Crackers F-Troop The Florida Crackers Chapter will be hosting a trail maintenance event along the breathtaking Suwannee River. Free camping will be available at Stephen Foster State Park for everyone who pre-registers. Meals, tools and protective equipment will be provided. Join us for some fun and food! To signup go to this link: http://www.floridatrail.org/volunteer/volunteeropportunities/ or www.floridatrail.org > Volunteer > Volunteer Opportunities. Saturday, Oct 12 - A Day at Prairie Creek Lodge. 9:30 am to 2 pm. Florida Cracker Chapter of the Florida Trail Association invites you to enjoy a fun and friendly day at Prairie Creek Lodge, 7204 SE County Rd 234, Gainesville, FL 32641. Join the group for a 3-4 mile hike on Prairie Creek Preserve Trails beginning at 10 AM followed by a pot-luck lunch (bring a dish and/or drink to share), and chapter meeting. Enjoy the beautiful lodge and grounds where the offices of Alachua Conservation Trust are located. E-mail Mitch Sapp at mesapp1941@gmail.com to confirm your attendance or for more information. Saturday – Sunday, Oct 26-27 – Beginning Backpack Trip. Join us in Stephen Foster State Park in White Springs for an overnight pack trip along the beautiful Suwannee River. This trip is not just suitable for beginners, it is geared towards them. Contact Karie at iluvfla@bellsouth.net to sign up or for more info. Saturday, Nov 2 – Alachua Forever Series. Meet at Mill Creek Preserve (north of Alachua on County Road 236) at 9:00 am for our First Saturday hike with Alachua County. We’ll be accompanied by an Alachua County land manager. Go to Meetup to sign up and for more information or e-mail Judy Trotta at judytrotta@ gmail.com. Thursday, Nov 7 – Day hike on San Felasco. Join Dot for a day hike on the San Felasco Blue Trail. Contact Dot at dotlesslou@aol.com for more info. Saturday, Nov 9 – Dog Hike on the Cross Florida Greenway. Leash up your favorite pooch for a hike on the Cross Florida Greenway. Meet at the Land Bridge trailhead at 10 am. Bring water, poop bags, and treats for your pup. All dogs must be on leash throughout the activity. Dog-reactive and people-reactive dogs must wear red bandana. Contact Deb Blick at dblick@floridatrail.org or 352-378-8823 or see Meetup for more info. Saturday – Sunday, Nov 16-17 – Beginning Backpack Trip. Join us in Gold Head Branch State Park near Keystone Heights for an overnight pack trip. This trip is not just suitable for beginners, it is geared towards them. Contact Karie at iluvfla@bellsouth.net or go to Meetup to sign up or for more info. Thursday, Nov 14 – Day hike on San Felasco. Join Dot for a day hike on the San Felasco North Trail on the north side of Gainesville. Contact Dot at dotlesslou@aol.com for more info. Thursday, Nov 21 – Day hike on Hatchett Creek. Join Karie for a day hike on Hatchett Creek, east of Gainesville. Contact Karie at iluvfla@bellsouth.net to sign up or for more info. Thursday, Nov 21 - Chapter Meeting at Brasington’s Adventure Outfitters in Gainesville. 6 pm, social;

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6:30 program and meeting. Thursday, Dec 5 – Day hike at Mill Creek. Join Dot for a day hike on Mill Creek in Gainesville. Contact Dot at dotlesslou@aol.com for more info. Saturday, Dec 7 – Alachua Forever Series. Join our Monthly Alachua County hike this month on Turkey Creek. We’ll be accompanied by an Alachua County land manager. Contact Karie at iluvfla@bellsouth.net to sign up or for more info. Thursday, Dec. 12 - Day hike at Prairie Creek Preserve Trails. Contact Judy Trotta at jetrotta@bellsouth.net to sign up and for more information. Saturday – Sunday, Dec 14-15 – Beginning Backpack Trip. Join us in O’Leno State Park near High Springs for an overnight pack trip. This trip is not just suitable for beginners, it is geared towards them. Contact Karie at iluvfla@bellsouth.net to sign up or for more info. Thursday, Dec 19 – Day hike at Green Acres. Join Dot for a day hike at Green Acres in Gainesville. Contact Dot at dotlesslou@aol.com for more info. Thursday, Dec. 19 - Chapter Holiday Party. Location TBD. Bring a holiday supper dish and drink to share. Contact Judy Trotta at jetrotta@bellsouth.net to sign up and for more information.

Highlanders Chapter - highlanders.floridatrail.org/activities.htm Wednesday-Monday, Oct 16-21 Camping Trip, Hiking. Camp at Torreya State Park arriving on Wed. Oct 16 and departing on Sat. Oct 19. Hike on Thurs/Friday on the park trails. On Saturday move to St. Joseph Peninsula State Park for Saturday and Sunday nights leaving on Monday morning. Contact bobbiszoo@yahoo. com for further details Thursday, Oct 24 - Highlanders Chapter Meeting: We meet at the Leesburg Public Library 100 East Main Street in the meeting rooms at the front of the library. Meeting starts at 6:00 PM. Come earlier for social time. Please bring your aluminum cans to recycle in non-dripping plastic bags and a snack to share. Open to the Public. Any questions, call Bobbi at 352-787-8654 or email bobbiszoo@yahoo.com Tuesday-Monday, Nov 12-18 - Camping Trip, Hiking: Camp at Florence Marina State Park on Tues and Wed and visit Providence Canyon and then on Thursday move to F. D. Roosevelt State Park and hike the trails in the area. Contact bobbiszoo@yahoo.com for further details Thursday, Nov 21 - Highlanders Chapter Meeting, NOTICE THE DATE CHANGE DUE TO THANKSGIVING We meet at the Leesburg Public Library 100 East Main Street in the meeting rooms at the front of the library. Meeting starts at 6:00 PM. Come earlier for social time. Please bring your aluminum cans to recycle in nondripping plastic bags and a snack to share. Open to the Public. Any questions, call Bobbi at 352-787-8654 or email bobbiszoo@yahoo.com

Indian River Chapter - meetup.com/SpaceCoastHiking/ Saturday, Oct 5 - Trail Maintenance Hike. Three Lakes/Prairie Lakes WMA. Meet 7:30 a.m. at Sam’s Discount Club, 4255 W New Haven Ave, Melbourne. Activity Leader: Dale Weddle, Phone: 321-729-9162, e-mail: daleweddle@msn.com Monday, Oct 7 - Monthly Chapter Meeting. Meet at 6:30 p.m. at the Melbourne Public Library on Fee Avenue in Melbourne – Socializing, Program (TBD) followed by a short business meeting.

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FTA Chapter-LED activities --- Continued ---

Indian River Chapter - meetup.com/SpaceCoastHiking/ Sunday, Oct 13 - Leisure Hike at Tosohatchee WMA. Meet at 7:00 am. at the Viera MacDonald’s. Must call Activity Leader: Tony Flohre – Phone: 321-723-6339 for details. Sunday, Oct 13 - Paddle (canoe or kayak) 1000 Islands - Meet at the Ramp Road boat launch at 9:00 a.m. You must contact activity leader to participate and provide your own vessel for additional details. Richard Louden-321-693-3820. Note this event is for FTA members only Saturday, Oct 19 - Leisure Hike at Wekiva. Meet at 6:30 a.m. at the Viera MacDonald’s. Must call Activity Leader: Tony Flohre – Phone: 321-723-6339 for details. Monday, Oct 21 - Bi-Monthly Planning Meeting. Meet at 6:45 p.m. at the Melbourne Public Library on Fee Avenue in Melbourne. Leader: Richard Louden, Phone: 321-693-3820, e-mail: lindaglouden@cfl.rr.com Saturday, Oct 27 - Day Hike at Bull Creek WMA. Meet at 7:00 A.m. at Sam’s Discount Club, 4255 W New Haven Ave, Melbourne. Must call Activity Leader: Tony Flohre – Phone: 321-723-6339 for details. Saturday Nov 2 – Florida Forever Patrick Smith Day. Leisure. Meet at 7:00 a.m. at Sam’s Discount Club, 4255 W New Haven Ave, Melbourne. Must call Activity Leader: Tony Flohre – Phone: 321-723-6339 for details. Sunday, Nov 3 – Day Hike at Prairie Lakes South Loop. Leisure. Meet at 6:30 a.m. at Sam’s Discount Club, 4255 W New Haven Ave, Melbourne. $6.00 PER CAR ENTRY FEE APPLIES. Must call Activity Leader: Tony Flohre – Phone: 321-723-6339 for details. Monday, Nov 4 - Monthly Chapter Meeting. Meet at 6:30 p.m. at the Melbourne Public Library on Fee Avenue in Melbourne – Socializing, Program (TBD) followed by a business meeting. Contact. Richard Louden-321-638-8804 for additional details. Wednesday, Nov 6 – Day Hike on Sandhills Cons. Area. Meet at Lone Cabbage Fish camp at 8:30 am. Saturday, Nov 9 - Trail Maintenance Hike. Three Lakes/Prairie Lakes WMA - Meet 7:30 a.m. at Sam’s Discount Club, 4255 W New Haven Ave, Melbourne. Please note that there is hunting in Three Lakes. We will wear safety vests and stay away from the hunters as much as possible. Activity Leader: Dale Weddle, Phone: 321-729-9162, e-mail: daleweddle@msn.com Wednesday, Nov 13 – Day Hike on Sebastian River Buffer. Meet at Sams Discount Club at 4255 West New Haven in Melbourne at 8:30 am. Sunday, Nov 17 - Leisure Evening Hike at Turkey Creek. Meet at 8:00 p.m. at the entrance to Turkey Creek Park just off Port Malabar Road. Activity Leader: Tony Flohre, Phone: 321-723-6339 Wednesday, Nov 20 – Day Hike on Tosohatchee Loop Trail. Meet at Lone Cabbage Fish Camp at 8:30 am. Wednesday, Nov 27- Day hike at Salt Lake. Meet at West entrance of Lowe’s parking lot in Titusville at 8:30 am Monday, Dec 2 – Monthly Chapter Meeting. Meet at 6:30 p.m. at the Melbourne Public Library on Fee Avenue in Melbourne. This is the annual Chapter Christmas Event. Sue Small, Director of Florida Wildlife

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Hospital and Sanctuary, will present the program which will feature some birds from the sanctuary. Instead of exchanging gifts, we bring gifts for the animals at the hospital and sanctuary. Following is Sue’s wish list: Home Depot, Lowes, Publix or Wal-Mart Gift cards, paper towels, bleach, laundry detergent, trash bags, postage stamps, bird seed, sunflower seed, Purina Puppy chow, gardening tools (hedge trimmers, shovels, etc.), and of course Cash is always welcome. Wednesday, Dec 4 – Day Hike on Econ River Loop Trail. Meet at Lone Cabbage Fish Camp at 8:30 am. Saturday, Dec 7 - Trail Maintenance Hike. Three Lakes/Prairie Lakes WMA. Meet 7:30 a.m. at Sam’s Discount Club, 4255 W New Haven Ave, Melbourne. Please note that there is hunting in Three Lakes. We will wear safety vests and stay away from the hunters as much as possible. Activity Leader: Dale Weddle, Phone: 321-729-9162, e-mail: daleweddle@msn.com Wednesday, Dec 11 – Day Hike on Prairie Lakes Trail. Meet at Sams Discount Club at 4255 West New Haven in Melbourne at 8:30 am. Saturday, Dec 14 – Day Hike on Pine Island Trail. Call Richard Louden, Phone: 321-693-3820 or Eric Gratze 321-452-6558 for details. Monday, Dec 16 - Bi-Monthly Planning Meeting Meet at 6:45 p.m. at the Melbourne Public Library on Fee Avenue in Melbourne. Leader: Richard Louden, Phone: 321-693-3820, e-mail: lindaglouden@cfl.rr.com Wednesday, Dec 18 – Day hike on Seminole Ranch. Meet at west entrance of Lowe’s parking lot in Titusville at 8:30 am Tuesday, Dec 31 – Tony’s Annual New Years Eve Hike. Meet 8:00 p.m. at Viera McDonald’s – Hike in South Tosohatchee. Activity Leader: Tony Flohre (321-723-6339) Wednesday, Jan 1, 2014 - Tony’s Annual New Year’s Day Hike. Meet at 7:00 a.m. at Viera McDonald’s- Hike in South Tosohatchee – Activity Leader: Tony Flohre (321-723-6339)

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Florida Trail Association 5415 SW 13th St, Gainesville FL 32608

Nonprofit Organization U.S. POSTAGE PAID Permit No. 702 Gainesville, FL

Dates to Remember! Panhandle CPR Sept. 20, 2013 Panhandle WFA Sept 21-22, 2013 Panhandle Chainsaw Sept 28-29,2013 North CPR Oct. 4, 2013 North WFA Oct 5-6, 2013 North Chainsaw Oct 12-13, 2013 South/Central Chainsaw Oct 16-17, 2013 Panhandle Regional Conference Nov 8-10, 2013 South Regional Conference Nov. 15-17, 2013

Allison Williams

Profile for Florida Trail

2013 Fall FTA Footprint  

The Footprint - the state-wide magazine of the Florida Trail Association. Fall 2013 Issue.

2013 Fall FTA Footprint  

The Footprint - the state-wide magazine of the Florida Trail Association. Fall 2013 Issue.

Profile for flatrail
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