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The Voice of Agriculture in Florida

FloridAgriculture VOLUME 79, NO. 3 • APRIL/MAY 2019

FARMERS AT THE STATE CAPITOL EDITING PLANT GENES AG CAREERS FOR MILITARY VETERANS TRAINING YOUNG CHEFS

www.floridagriculture.org | www.FloridaFarmBureau.org


OFFICERS

President Vice President Secretary Treasurer

John Hoblick Brantley Schirard Jr. Steve Johnson Rod Land DIRECTORS

District 1 District 2 District 3 District 4 District 5 District 6 District 7 District 8 District 9 District 10 District 11 District 12 District 13 District 14 District 15 District 16 District 17 District 18 District 19

Jerry Davis Jeff Pittman Henry McCrone Michael Dooner Rod Land Jon Deas Thomas Ford Ed Shadd Brad Etheridge Jeb Smith Kelly Rice J. Daniel Peterson Mark Byrd Steve Johnson Dan West Ken Harrison Mark Sodders Jacob Larson Mark Wilson

STATE WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP COMMITTEE

Chair Vice Chair

Sarah Carte Danielle Daum

CONTENTS

STATE YF&R LEADERSHIP GROUP

President Immed. Past Pres.

Adam Cook Andrew Taylor STAFF

Editor Communications Mgr. Communications Coord. Communications Coord. Videographer/ Graphic Designer

G.B. Crawford Rachael Smith Alex Lucas Amanda Overstreet Corey Darnell

FLORIDAGRICULTURE (ISSN 0015-3869) is published Jan.-Feb., March, April-May, June, July, Aug.-Sept., Oct. and Nov.-Dec. for $3 per year in member dues by the Florida Farm Bureau Federation, 5700 S.W. 34th Street. Periodical postage paid at Gainesville, FL and additional mailing offices. It was established in 1943. Copyright 2019 by the Florida Farm Bureau Federation. Main telephone number: (352) 378-8100. Printed by Panaprint - Macon, GA. POSTMASTER Send address changes to: FloridAgriculture, P.O. Box 147030 Gainesville, FL 32614-7030 For advertising questions, contact our Communications Coordinator by telephone at (352) 374-1535, by e-mail at amanda.overstreet@ffbf.org or by hard copy: FloridAgriculture Amanda Overstreet P.O. Box 147030 Gainesville, FL 32614-7030

18 LEARNING TO BE FARMERS 10 RANCH CONSERVATION 12 BETTER FOOD PLANTS 16 LEGISLATIVE DAYS IMAGES

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18 YOUNG CHEFS 28 CLASSIFIED ADS 29 CROSSWORD PUZZLE

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS April 22-25 2019 Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration Conference, Coral Springs. For more information and to register, visit https://conference.ifas.ufl.edu/geer2019/index.html. May 2  Suwannee River Basin CARES Awards Presentations, Live Oak. For more information, contact cacee.hilliard@ffbf.org. May 14-16 Florida Farm Bureau’s Field to the Hill Trip, Washington, D.C. For more information, visit https://www.floridafarmbureau.org/fieldtothehill/. Cover: Florida Farm Bureau members gathered at the state Capitol March 5-6 to discuss public policy with state leaders. See photos inside.

Non-member subscriptions are not available.

FLORIDAGRICULTURE | APRIL/MAY 2019

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FROM THE PRESIDENT

SALUTING FARMERS WITH CARES ONE OF A FARMER’S DAILY GOALS is to conserve

natural resources. The family livelihood depends upon it. The land and water the Lord has provided are the fundamental ingredients for producing food and making a living. Farmers know this truth firsthand. Their care of resources has allowed many families to grow crops and raise animals on the same acreage for generations. For nearly 20 years, Florida Farm Bureau has highlighted outstanding conservation practices with a special initiative. The County Alliance for Responsible Environmental Stewardship (CARES) program recognizes farmers and ranchers who have implemented strategies that preserve and protect natural resources on their properties. Many of these agriculturists have provided a major benefit for their communities by improving land and water quality. The CARES program is designed to reward farm producers for successful natural resource management. At public events throughout the year a CARES award is presented

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to individuals and families selected as nominees for their outstanding accomplishments. The effectiveness of each recipient’s conservation work is verified by state experts. As of early this year, more than 800 families have received the CARES award. We anticipate that by the end of this year, the program will have recognized more than 1,000. During the 2018 Florida Farm Bureau Annual Meeting last October, we signed a renewal of our memorandum of understanding with the University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) and the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. The university and our state agriculture department are our primary partners in this program. With their help, we will continue CARES into the next century. I am grateful that UF/IFAS Senior Vice President Jack Payne and Commissioner of Agriculture Nikki Fried have both expressed their enthusiastic support for it. We maintain the original purpose of the CARES

John L. Hoblick, Florida Farm Bureau President

initiative by promoting public awareness of the conservation accomplishments of our farm families. We want all Floridians to know the natural resource benefits these families provide for our state. We will soon introduce another group of CARES award recipients who live in the Suwannee River Basin and adjacent areas. On May 2 all of our guests can participate in an awards ceremony at the UF/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center near Live Oak. Each awardee will receive a CARES plaque on stage. There will also be opportunities to sample Florida-grown foods and visit with farmers and their families. The event will begin at 6 p.m. I invite you to join us at one of the best fellowship events of the year.


COMMODITY CORNER

Blueberries A SUPER FOOD!

Southern highbush is the most commonly grown blueberry bush in Florida.

Florida blueberry season peaks in April.

Blueberries are native to North America.

Alachua, Putnam, Marion, Lake and Sumter Counties account for the majority of Florida blueberry production.

Blueberries are filled with cancer fighting anti-oxidants. Source: UF/IFAS http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ac031

LEADING A COMMUNITY

FOOD DONATION The Levy County Farm Bureau Women’s Committee recently collected 150 jars of peanut butter for donations to First United Methodist Church Food Bank in Williston, Living Water Learning Center in Morriston and Another Way in Chiefland. Inez Worthington, left, Tina Garrett, Diane Price, committee chair, and Arlene Bell, LCFB president, organized the project.

Growing with you for 100 years. Farm Credit has been helping growers like you thrive for generations. Let us help deliver a sunny future for you, too.

Call us about financing for:

• Land • Lots & homes • Refinancing

• Buildings & fences • Equipment • And much more!

Loans for land, homes & country living

866.824.5626 / FarmCreditFlorida.com

FLORIDAGRICULTURE | APRIL/MAY 2019

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GROWING A

Legacy By Amanda Overstreet, Communications Coordinator

FORTY YEARS AGO, blueberry growers Jimmy and Vohnda Miller decided to take a chance on their future when they planted their first blueberry bush. This leap of faith would change the course of their lives and their farm would eventually become the largest and now oldest commercial blueberry farm in the state. Their venture began in 1979 when the couple inherited property from Jimmy’s family in Interlachen, located in the south central region of Putnam County. “All we have to worry about are cedar wax wings!” Vohnda clearly remembers her husband’s enthusiastic words like it was just yesterday. “We wanted to do something with the property,” Jimmy said. “We needed to make good use 6

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out of it.” The property, nearly 300 acres of lush landscape with Gum Creek running through its center, has been producing sweet blueberries since that first bush was planted forty years ago. The University of Florida’s blueberry breeding program was in its infancy when the Millers began their operation and Jimmy and Vohnda took advantage of an opportunity to grow blueberries, a relatively new concept at the time.

University researchers continue to work with the Millers and grow trial plots on their farm. “We evaluate the plants that are grown and help the university make a selection on which are the best varieties for Florida,” Jimmy said. Today, more than 140 acres of blueberries grow on their grounds, all of which have been planted by hand. Chickadee, snow chaser, kestrel and primadonna are some

Workers sort through berries in the packing house.


of the different varieties. Miller Blueberry Plantation and Plant Nursery is the definition of family-owned and operated and the Miller’s children all have a role in the operation. The farm also operates a plant nursery, tissue culture lab, packing house and a seasonal U-Pick. Daughter Katie oversees the plant nursery and tissue culture lab, daughter Summer is the office manager and bookkeeper and her husband, Tim, is the farm manager. Jimmy explained that the typical growing season is six weeks long. The Millers utilize mechanical harvesters to pick the berries as well as farm employees who pick by hand. As pioneer Florida blueberry growers, the Miller family has maintained their operation at the height of innovation. The family uses Best Management Practices (BMPs) to keep their farm sustainable for future generations. “We have been using drip irrigation for years now,” Jimmy said. “This method helps us reduce water evaporation and produce disease tolerant plants.” The Millers also installed soil moisture sensors to determine

Jimmy and Vohnda Miller in 2019.

crop water use information and help monitor weather data pertinent to their farm. The Miller’s plant nursery is supported by their tissue culture lab. The lab has the capability of propagating blueberry plants at a fast rate for wholesale marketing to other growers. In the packing house, a produce tract is used for traceability. This system allows the Millers to know which part of the field a blueberry came from. “In the event that a problem arises, we can isolate that particular part of the field instead of the whole farm,” Vohnda explained. Although cultural practices have changed over the course of forty years, the “Miller’s Way” of picking and packing has not.

Miller blueberries have been picked and packed on site since day one. “We used to pack in the barn under the sunshine using pintpulp cups and rubber bands,” said Jimmy. Today, the operation has a state-of-the-art packing facility to get the job done more efficiently. The farm’s U-Pick will open on April 12 and is expected to attract visitors from all over the state. The farm contributes to the local economy and is a sweet spot in the community. Miller blueberries are sold under the Naturipe label and can be found throughout the Southeast. “It’s a wonderful way to make a living,” Jimmy said. “It is what the Lord has called us to do.”

Jimmy and Vohnda Miller circa 1979.

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PROVIDING VETERANS THE

Skill to Farm By Rachael Smith, Communications Manager

MEET CHRISTOPHER LUJAN. He does not back down from a challenge. He has a thirst for knowledge, is rooted by family and has a deep passion for agriculture. So it’s not surprising that this former Marine sought out one of the only programs in the country to offer military veterans a paid internship to study and gain hands-on agricultural knowledge from world-renown researchers at Florida’s flagship land grant university. He took advantage of an opportunity in the Veterans Florida Agriculture Program (VFAP). The nine-month paid internship program provides veterans with a learning experience and the opportunity to compete in top agricultural careers. “This program has the right mindset,” said Lujan. “It mixes 8

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applied learning with a real handson approach that gives you the skillset to succeed in agriculture.” VFAP is currently offered at seven University of Florida/ Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Research and Education Centers across the state and is expanding. VFAP is available at no cost to veterans. Jack Payne, UF’s senior vice president for agriculture and natural resources says that as an institution of public higher education, UF/IFAS is all about second chances and creating opportunities. “We see in veterans a motivated, service-oriented

Christopher Lujan, left, credits Simon Bollin’s personal drive and passion for making VFAP a success.

group with one thing between them and success in agriculture – opportunity,” said Payne. Six months of the internship is at the designated research center where students spend the first four-six weeks on rotation with a farm crew and various research faculty learning about plant production, food safety,


agricultural challenges, field preparation techniques, seasonal crop harvesting, pesticide alternatives and advanced research. The last three months of the internship involve working at a farm or ranch or local agribusiness. Throughout the entire nine-month internship, participants are paid a competitive wage of $13 per hour. “There is a lot of opportunity in agriculture that isn’t on the farm,” said Simon Bollin, Agribusiness Development Manager, Hillsborough County Economic Development. “Careers range from selling seeds or chemicals to driving trucks. If you were a logistic sergeant in the military, you can now move grain or strawberries.” According to a 2015 United States Department of Agriculture report, it is estimated that one million new farmers will be needed over the next 10 years due to a retiring workforce. Veterans can help fill that employment gap. Florida has the third largest veteran population in the nation. Bollin saw a need to connect the veteran’s military expertise and skillset to agriculture. It was through his foresight that VFAP was created in 2016. To date, seven veterans have graduated from the program. “We sit down with each veteran after six months and evaluate them. We find out where they want to go from here. We then place them with a farm or agribusiness in the local community,” said Bollin. “We have a 100 percent offer rate from the company they intern with.” Adam Webster completed his internship at the Gulf Coast Research and Education Center

(GCREC) in Balm where he was offered a job in the Weed Science lab. “The program directly translated to positions in agriculture,” said Webster. “The experience and knowledge gained has opened opportunities that were not available to me as a person with no agricultural knowledge.” “I plan on starting a small farm of my own in the future and this would have been much harder to do without the training provided through the program,” added Webster. Lujan says that he researched many programs when he got out of the military in 2010. He said that what drew him to the VFAP at the GCREC was the fact that it focused on mentorship and took a realistic approach to learning.

“Farming is planning. You’ve got to think strategically at the five, ten and twenty marks,” said Lujan. “This program teaches you that and is a good fit for a military mindset.” The program’s partnership with Veterans Florida provides veterans firsthand networking opportunities with business professionals and entrepreneurs throughout the state. After the program, participants are encouraged to pursue various online UF agriculture certificate programs. “This is a multi-tiered program,” said Lujan. “The caliber of mentors, the networking, access to knowledge and the lifelong connections to agriculture is all built into the program.”

TO LEARN MORE about the program or to apply to the program, visit http://www. veteransflorida.org/agriculture/. Participants in the VFAP at the Gulf Coast Research and Education Center experience firsthand the production of emerging commercial crops in Florida such as hops, artichokes and pomegranates.

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Conserving FARM LANDS FOREVER By Alex Lucas, Communications Coordinator

BLACKBEARD’S RANCH is a 4,500-acre working cow-calf operation located on the Myakka Prairie in Manatee County. One of the largest intact parcels of land in the region, it faces many pressures of development and urban sprawl. The owners are committed to the conservation and preservation of this and other farm lands around the state. Managing partner Jim Strickland is committed to pursuing conservation easements with the Rural and Family Lands Protection Program and Florida Forever. Created in 2001 and housed in the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, the Rural and Family Lands Protection Program is an agricultural An aerial view of Blackbeard’s Ranch.

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land preservation program designed to protect important agricultural lands through the acquisition of permanent conservation easements. Under the auspices of the program, these agricultural lands will be protected from development as long as they exist. Similarly, the Forever Florida program is another avenue to sell development rights to the state. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection manages conservation easements through this program. “Simply, through a conservation easement, a landowner may transfer

development rights through many programs provided by the government. There are a lot of avenues and organizations to partner with to get a conservation easement,” said Strickland. Strickland, a passionate advocate for ranching and conservation, says that in his opinion there is no closer thing to natural Florida than cattle ranches. If you drive through the property of Blackbeard’s Ranch, you can see why. With native plants and an oak canopy with a sprinkling of palm trees, it is hard to imagine a place more “Floridian” than this ranch.


University of South Florida on projects related to water quality, burrowing owls, coyotes and soil and forage. Strickland is also the owner of Strickland Ranch and is involved in managing several other properties in the area which are also heavily involved in conservation projects. In all of the ranches that Strickland manages, one thing remains a constant: his desire to see Florida ranches and native lands preserved. He has dedicated his career to conserving the land and doing what is right for the ranches and the environment. While Blackbeard’s Ranch’s primary focus is the cow-calf operation, the ranch has diversified into various agricultural endeavors. This demonstrates the ability of conservation and sustainable agriculture coming together to feed the state and the nation. These additional enterprises include raising Mangalitsa Pigs, operating a brewery and producing wildflower honey.

Upon purchase of the ranch in 2014, an intensive restoration program was implemented. This restoration program included restoring wetlands, which flow from the ranch into the Myakka State Park and waterways downstream. “We work with the water management districts. Anything we do that involves an ecological impact, we have oversight. When we restored the drainage system, it was a system that we needed to make sense. We have corrected the drainage system that creates wetlands where they are meant to be,” said Strickland. Strickland hopes that the ranch will be an example of good environmental stewardship, conservation and a tool for research. He also hopes that the ranch will be a way to educate the public on the importance of ranches to Florida’s wildlife, green space and the quality of life. “On the ranch, we like to do these conservation projects because it is the right thing to do,” said Strickland. After restoration began on the ranch’s wetlands, native species and wildlife flourished, giving opportunity for many research projects to be conducted on the property. The ranch has partnered with the researchers from the University of Florida and the

(PHOTOS COURTESY OF BLACKBEARD’S RANCH)

Jim Strickland, managing director of Blackbeard’s Ranch.

The conservation easements help protect water and provide green space in the state. Florida’s farms and ranches provide natural water filters and also help protect wildlife. “Conservation easements are a tool that ranch owners can utilize to be environmental stewards while maintaining an agricultural operation,” commented Jim Handley, executive director of the Florida Cattlemen’s Association. Strickland stresses the importance of conservation easements around the state. With the human population of Florida growing and placing more pressure on Florida’s water supply and ecosystem, there continues to be a need to protect Florida’s farms and ranches. “Ranchers are excellent environmental stewards. Through entering a conservation easement agreement, they know that their property would be preserved in ranching and farming for future generations,” said Handley.

At work in a pasture.

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TOWARD BETTER

Food Plants By G.B. Crawford, Director of Public Relations

Traditional plant breeding can achieve a desired result, but the process may take many years of trial and error to complete and nurture unwelcome traits. A series of scientific breakthroughs that began in the 1990s has created the opportunity to use a new approach. Researchers discovered that nucleases (enzymes) could remove specific sections of

CRISPR Within the past five years, a new editing technology known as CRISPR has given researchers a more precise way to target a particular gene. (CRISPR is an acronym for an appallingly genetic material within a plant. long description of certain DNA They subsequently found that they sequences: clustered regularly could activate the expression of interspaced short palindromic certain genes. repeats). It is easier and cheaper to As currently applied, the tool use than other editing techniques. relies upon the plant’s natural For farmers, editing promises biology to enhance a preferred increased harvest volumes on the trait without introducing material same acreage at less cost. New from another organism – much plant varieties can reduce the use like traditional breeding. of water and fertilizer as well as Genetic engineering of a plant losses due to pests and disease. can require more than a decade Consumers can benefit from to develop and exact a price tag of larger crop yields with less above $100 million. By contrast, production costs by boosting the researchers note, gene editing costs abundance of nutritious foods and a fraction of that figure and may be moderating their retail prices. completed much more quickly.

This waxy corn developed by Corteva Agriscience has been edited with CRISPR technology.

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(PHOTO COURTESY OF CORTEVA)

SINCE THE DAWN OF AGRICULTURE human societies have sought improvements in food plants. Over time this quest has involved such objectives as a sweeter fruit or better resistance to a pest.


CLOCKWISE: Testing for greening resistance in a UF/IFAS greenhouse; The UF/IFAS team has developed a citrus tree that is close to having complete immunity from canker; Nian Wang, left, and Hang Su, a post-doctoral researcher, are developing several new varieties at the Citrus Research and Education Center in Lake Alfred.

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, agriculture must increase productivity by 50% within the next 30 years to supply adequate nutrition for the world’s human population. Most experts warn that current agricultural capability alone cannot meet this need. Susan Jenkins, managing director of the Innovative Genetics Institute at the University of California, Berkeley, has concluded that gene editing offers a key to meeting the challenge. “We have the ability to modify plants to make them have better water use efficiency and also better nutrient use,” Jenkins said. “I am optimistic about how we use this technology, how it will be

applied and the number of people it will benefit,” she added. “Because we can sequence the entire genome very inexpensively right now, we can make a change in a plant by using CRISPR. We can sequence the entire genome of that new organism and we can say exactly where other changes took place.” The California facility has been a leader in developing improved cassava plants. Jenkins noted that researchers across the nation are working with other crops, including citrus and tomatoes.

tree immune to the malady. Microbiologist Nian Wang is employing CRISPR to develop such a tree at the University of Florida/ Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) Citrus Research and Education Center in Lake Alfred. Wang, a pioneer in this research, has directed the project for nearly five years. “We try to optimize gene editing for citrus,” he explained. “We want to identify which genes make the plant susceptible to the pathogen.” Testing plants is a long-term process. “You want to make sure the genes you modify will not cause unwanted side effects,” Wang said. “You want to make sure you do the right thing by moving carefully.” A commercially-viable plant will be forthcoming. But he cannot yet offer a timetable for its availability. “We feel a real responsibility as scientists,” Wang said. “We want to find a solution as soon as possible.” Geneticist Tong Geon Lee is leading a gene editing project with tomatoes at the UF/IFAS Gulf Coast Research and Education Center in Balm. The goal is develop a tomato plant that can be harvested by machine. Lee noted that although this research has already produced new plants for greenhouse testing, he must complete a comprehensive assessment of new varieties before they can be released for general production. “Our first goal is

CITRUS GREENING Citrus growers in Florida anxiously await the development of new varieties in their long battle with greening disease. Gene editing may develop a FLORIDAGRICULTURE | APRIL/MAY 2019

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to reduce plant height without damaging the fruit quality,” Lee said. “We don’t want to sacrifice fruit quality and other important traits for Florida growers.” PRIVATE ENTERPRISE A number of private firms have launched ventures to utilize the technology. Corteva Agriscience, agriculture division of Dow DuPont, has invested in CRISPR research for a number of row crops – especially corn and soybeans. Senior Research Manager Bobby Williams said the company is moving forward with plans for a commercial pilot project with waxy corn. The research team has already developed an edited plant. Kernels of this corn contain high levels of amylopectin, a starch that can be used to thicken foods and make adhesives for labels. Waxy corn is primarily a Midwestern farm commodity. But Williams said gene editing may reinforce traits that allow it to thrive in other locations. He is optimistic that the technology will be widely applied to food crops. “I think there are a lot of opportunities when you get into the fruit and vegetable market,” Williams said. “Those are things that consumers can see and understand their benefits.” A Durham, North Carolinabased firm, 14

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Researchers expect that consumers will receive many benefits from gene editing technology in the next decade.

Pairwise, is applying CRISPR to row crops as well as fruits and vegetables. Haven Baker, the company’s chief business officer, said the “focus is to make noticeable improvements to the produce aisle. We’re trying to make produce more convenient, more affordable and possibly healthier.” CEO Tom Adams pointed out that Pairwise is designed to operate as a food company. “The amazing, exciting opportunity that CRISPR brought was the ability to start doing things with crops that are in the consumer space,” Adams said. He expects that it will have a large-scale impact on fresh produce by the mid-2020s. The United States Department of Agriculture has expressed approval of gene-edited food plants. In 2018 Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue announced that the agency “does not regulate or have plans to regulate plants that could otherwise have been developed through traditional breeding techniques.” Other agencies, such as the Food and Drug Administration, have not yet issued official positions.

COMMUNICATION WITH CONSUMERS Researchers and agribusiness leaders acknowledge the obligation to communicate the value of the technology. “I do believe that the products out there and the things that are nearing production on the market are safe to consume,” the University of California’s Jenkins said. “I would personally consume them. “In the past we as scientists made the assumption wrongly that if we just got out and educated people about what we are doing, they would understand how safe this is, how practical it is and what our intentions are, it would be accepted,” she explained. “It is more about having a conversation with the consumer and what the consumer wants or needs.” Haven Baker of Pairwise is confident consumers will be able to understand the benefits of this work because they will have access to the results in the grocery store. “We think CRISPR will be one of the key tools of this century in meeting the needs of Florida and the rest of the world – to bring better foods to our markets,” Baker said.


TA L L A H A S S E E R E P O R T

Protecting Florida’s Fundamental Law By Adam Basford, Director of State Legislative Affairs

F

or too long the Florida Constitution has been used like a grocery list instead of receiving the respect it deserves. Look, I understand amending my grocery list. Too often I have walked into the grocery store with my wife’s list (which she lists in order from the back of the store to the front, by the way) and made a few strategic amendments. It is one thing to get a little fast and loose with my grocery list, but it is quite another to amend indiscriminately the charter document of the third most populous state in the nation. Since the current Florida Constitution was passed in 1968, 181 amendments have been proposed with 133 of the amendments passing. And while I know the comparison is not entirely fair, I cannot help but contrast that with the 27 amendments to the US Constitution in 241 years. You can chalk that difference up to the five separate ways that are prescribed to amend the Florida constitution.

One is a constitutional convention, which has not been used in recent times. The second is the legislature can send an amendment to voters by a three-fifths vote of both chambers.

balloon with 12 amendments (11 of which passed). It is time for us to start making it more difficult for Florida’s constitution to be amended. That is why I am very happy to see several proposals moving forward in the legislature that would do It is time for us just that. One proposal seeks to start making to eliminate the CRC. it more difficult Another would ensure that all proposed amendments for Florida’s are restricted to a single constitution to subject. The threshold to pass an amendment would be be amended. increased from 60% to 66.6% in a third proposal. Then there is a citizen Finally, a fourth proposal initiative process that allows would protect against outvoters to place amendments of-state interests having on the ballot through petition. access to the ballot while also There is also the Constitution highlighting the economic Revision Commission (CRC), impacts of any amendments. which is appointed by state All four of these proposals leaders and meets every 20 meet Farm Bureau’s policy years. of supporting proposals The Tax and Budget that make the constitutional Reform Commission, which amendment process more meets between the CRC deliberative. We are working meetings, is limited to fiscal hard in Tallahassee to see each matters. of them pass. The legislature, citizen For legislative updates, initiative and CRC all placed subscribe to AgWatch under amendments on the ballot in the Publications menu at 2018, causing your ballot to www.floridafarmbureau.org. FLORIDAGRICULTURE | APRIL/MAY 2019

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VOICING

THE FARMERS’ HUNDREDS OF FLORIDA FARM BUREAU MEMBERS traveled to Tallahassee in March for an important agenda. They arrived there to participate in Florida Farm Bureau’s 2019 Legislative Days. Their purpose was to hold discussions of policy issues that are important to farm families with lawmakers and other state officials. Members welcomed guests during a March 5 reception at Florida Farm Bureau’s State Legislative Office. On the next day, they met for a breakfast meeting at Tallahassee’s convention center, where Florida Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Noah Valenstein and Sen. Ben Albritton delivered briefing addresses. After the morning session, Farm Bureau members made multiple office visits with individual legislators until early evening, including a meeting on the Senate floor. The agenda culminated in the taste of Florida Agriculture Reception in the Capitol Courtyard. More than 1,000 members, lawmakers, sponsors, vendors and guests sampled Florida-grown foods provided by agricultural organizations, businesses and volunteers. The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services co-sponsored the event.

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1 Florida Farm Bureau President John Hoblick welcomed Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried at the Taste of Florida Agriculture Reception. 2 State Rep. Rick Roth enjoyed strawberry shortcake provided by the FFB Women’s Leadership Committee. 3 State Sen. Wilton Simpson warmly greeted Farm Bureau members from various counties. 4 A large group of Manatee County FFA members was on hand for Legislative Days. 5 State Rep. Jennifer Sullivan hosted members of the Orange County Farm Bureau.


PERSPECTIVE 3

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6 Volusia County Farm Bureau visitors held enjoyable discussions with State Rep. Elizabeth Fetterhoff. 7 State Rep. Travis Cummings devoted time to conversations with members from Clay County. 8 Some of the Farm Bureau visitors at the Capitol were ready early for legislative visits. 9 FFB Young Farmers and Ranchers paused for a moment on the Old Capitol steps. 10 State Rep. Keith Perry discussed a number of policy matters with members. 11 Florida Chief Financial Officer Jimmy Patronis, center, greeted FFB State Executive Committee members at his office. 12 State Sen.

2019 LEGISLATIVE DAYS

Ben Albritton presented an overview of current legislative issues at the March 5 breakfast.

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TRAINING FOR

Culinary Careers By Sophy Mott, Correspondent

PORTABELLA MUSHROOMS stuffed with goat cheese. Falafel scotch eggs. Baked ratatouille lasagna. Avocado-filled cherry tomatoes. While any one of these enticing small plates would be at home on the menu of the hottest new “foodie” spot in town, they are coming instead from the sophomore students enrolled in the Institute of Culinary Arts at Eastside High School’s campus in Gainesville. “Being organized in the kitchen – that’s been most helpful to me,” said Yuriko Calva as she readies her creation – chicken-fried mushrooms – for the deep fryer, after carefully rolling them in a savory mix of bread crumbs and spices. A sophomore with aspirations of a culinary career, Yuriko was accepted into Eastside High’s highly competitive, four-year magnet program as a freshman. On average, 85 students apply each year, with about 18

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30 accepted – 75% selected by the school, and 25% by a lottery process. Students are under the training and watchful eye of Chef Pamela Bedford, director of the Institute. Bedford, who proudly identifies as an “Alachua County public school kid,” began her teaching career at Eastside in 2007 after 12 years of industry experience. She manages Eastside’s commercial kitchen, serving room – even the program’s ice-carving club – with ease, sharing teaching duties with Chef Richard Vaughn, himself a 2007 graduate of the program where he now teaches. “This program is a good motivator,” said Bedford. “Kids want to be in this program, so they’ll do whatever it takes to keep their grades up (in other classes) so they can come here and cook.”

Prepped veggies at the Culinary Arts Institute.

Maria Kremer of the Culinary Team selects edible flowers.


During a recent visit, several students were refining their best vegetarian recipes in preparation for an upcoming competition judged by Rotary Club members. The top five chosen dishes are served by Eastside students in the “Veggie Shack” at the popular Rotary Wild Game Feast benefit. Students with the top three dishes will also receive prize money. Spring is quite possibly the busiest season for the Chefs and students because, along with their other work, they must get ready for national culinary competitions like the Annual ProStart® Culinary Team Competition in Orlando. The Institute at Eastside High uses ProStart®, the career and technical education culinary program of the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. This program relies upon the high school classroom and Professional Chefs to teach students culinary skills and restaurant management principles, as well as employability skills. When students meet academic standards and participate in at least 400 hours of work experience, they are awarded the ProStart® National Certificate of Achievement that allows them to earn college credits along with scholarships, giving them the training needed to secure a job or, as with about 90% of Eastside Institute grads, continue their culinary education. “Most of our students go on to Johnson & Wales University in Miami,” said Bedford. And often, she says, when they get there, the instructors will ask her students “Did you go to Eastside?” because

their knowledge is so high. “I’ll have students come back and tell me “the first year was so easy” because of everything we learned here (at Eastside.)” Working in the commercial food industry is commonly a highpaced, high-pressure environment, so earning a spot on the Institute’s prestigious Culinary Team is a perfect training ground. Getting on the team itself is competitive; it consists of just four advanced students (juniors and seniors), and a team manager whose responsibilities, said Bedford, include serving as a “calming factor” during competitions. Brianna Bedford, a member of the Culinary Team, has her sights set on a somewhat magical culinary career. “My goal right now is to be a chef for Disney,” she said. The competitions Eastside students have access to bring tangible rewards beyond experience, too – past winners have brought home $30,000 in scholarship money. Students entering the program often have little or no firsthand cooking knowledge, shares Chef Bedford, and that is just fine with her. Class time typically follows the model of lecture first, then demo, then experience. A crucial part of what makes the Institute of Culinary Arts at Eastside so special is the experiential education factor. “When I graduated from high school, there was no Food Network. Culinary school wasn’t a thing unless you looked for it,” says Bedford. Her father grew up on a farm in Oregon, and later worked for the University of Florida’s

Yuriko Calva is busy making chicken fried mushrooms.

Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences as an “experimental farmer” of sorts. She said she was lucky to have parents who guided her in her culinary career. She is continually motivated to seek out ways to bring her students outside the classroom and gain knowledge about other aspects of the food industry. The Institute’s success has even resulted in “celebrity chef ” status for 2011 graduate Noam Blitzer, who was crowned “Chopped Champion” on the 2018 season premiere of the popular cooking show, Chopped Champions. After filming, he invited Bedford to be his dinner guest at the renowned James Beard House, a center for culinary arts in New York City. “When they call you and say come to the James Beard House, it’s all worth it,” said Bedford, who shows the episode to her current students for inspiration. A taste of the chicken-fried mushrooms proves that the inspiration is working.

FLORIDAGRICULTURE | APRIL/MAY 2019

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WA S H I N G TO N R E P O RT

Farm Bureau’s Season of Grassroots Advocacy By JohnWalt Boatright, Coordinator of National Affairs

W

e are coming off of a successful Farm Bureau Legislative Days event in Tallahassee to kick off the start of the state legislative session, as well as gearing up for our fly-in to Washington, D.C. It’s that time of year again! In mid-May, our membership will once again make the annual pilgrimage to Washington, D.C. for Florida Farm Bureau’s 2019 Field to the Hill Trip. Detailed briefing sessions at the American Farm Bureau office will run the gamut from current water and environmental issues to the current trade wars to hurricane disaster relief to our ongoing pursuit of agricultural labor reform. We work hard to ensure these briefings are accurate and timely. From there, our members will take to the Hill to engage our 29-member Florida delegation in these issues. At these meetings, members are afforded in-person discussions with the officeholders and staff tasked with representing nearly 750,000 constituents. Finally, we typically conclude our trip with an agency visit to meet with the officials responsible for implementing

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Last year U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio held lengthy discussions with Florida Farm Bureau visitors during the Field to the Hill Trip.

the laws passed by Congress. In the past, we have met with officials from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Environmental Protection Agency, as well as other administrative agencies that regulate some aspect of agriculture. My Agricultural Law professor referred to administrative agencies as the fourth branch of government – a title bestowed to convey how powerful they have become over the course of our republic’s existence. Of course, Field to the Hill is a busy, three-day event, but it is important to remind Washington, D.C. that farmers and ranchers are involved constituents. And it is equally important that you are in the room when these meetings take place.

While Florida Farm Bureau works year-round to amplify your voice, we are most impactful when we can borrow you from your farms and families so that you can speak to your challenges directly with our national lawmakers. In fact, the Congressional Management Foundation (CMF) has surveyed congressional offices over the course of a decade to obtain direct feedback on the best ways to communicate a message so that it is heard and understood. Over a period of ten years and three surveys, CMF’s study concluded that “in-person visits from constituents” are the most effective form of interaction with a congressional office, more so than any other method. We are at the apex of our advocacy season, and we need your help to deliver the message. Visit www.floridafarmbureau.org/ fieldtothehill/.


FLORIDAGRICULTURE | APRIL/MAY 2019

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CARING FOR

Land and Community By Corey Darnell, Videographer and Graphic Designer

ALAN JONES, OWNER OF JONES POTATO FARM, is no stranger to the produce world. Jones produces potatoes, green beans, citrus and cattle on 2,500 acres in Southwest Florida. With multiple locations across the area, the main operation is in Manatee County where the focus is on potato and green bean production. Jones has been farming his entire life, but it wasn’t until 1987 that he and his father began farming in the southern region of Florida. He managed the field operations while his father managed the office side of the enterprise. In 2000, Jones bought out his father’s part of the business. “He really gave me a great opportunity and I have been fortunate enough to seize that and really develop the business into something more”, said Jones. About 10 years ago, Jones became involved with his local county Farm Bureau when he was invited to serve on the county board. It was at that time that he learned just how much Farm

“THE BEST THING YOU CAN GIVE SOMEONE IS AN OPPORTUNITY AND TIME.

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Bureau is involved in agriculture, not only locally, but statewide and across the nation. “It’s something that I am proud to be involved with,” he said. “We need help from an agricultural standpoint. We deal with so many day-to-day things that we don’t have time to deal with the legislative and regulatory agencies. It helps to have a spokesperson such as Farm Bureau.” Farmers are the original stewards of the land and Jones believes in that. In 2016, he was recognized with a County Alliance for Responsible Environmental Stewardship (CARES) award. The award recognizes farmers and ranchers for the successful implementation of Best Management Practices (BMPs). “The CARES program for the state of Florida recognizes people for doing the right thing. We are the first stewards of the land” said Jones. “When you see the CARES sign in the community while driving by, it’s kind of like a signature.”

FLORIDAGRICULTURE | APRIL/MAY 2019

On his operation one of the important BMPs that he utilizes is field and soil mapping. This technology allows him to have an in-depth look at the land and soils he is farming so he knows which fields are the best and which ones he should improve. Jones is very involved in giving back to his community. Each year Jones Potato Farm donates a portion of the harvest to Feeding America in Tampa Bay, a food rescue and distribution organization. Every year, Jones also has people from the community come to learn about his operation. The farm invites the community to learn about agriculture firsthand by hosting farm tours for various school groups. Jones said the students always enjoy the trip to the potato fields and even the parents in the community have positive experiences as well. “It’s a real heartfelt feeling when you see the community connecting with agriculture,” he said.

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FARM STATS

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Acres of property in Southeast Florida used to produce potatoes, green beans, citrus and cattle.

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Years since Jones and his father began farming in Southeast Florida.

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2016 The year Alan Jones was recognized for the County Alliance for Responsible Environmental Stewardship (CARES) award. The award recognizes farmers’ commitment to being stewards of the land.

1 Alan Jones standing in front of equipment used to harvest potatoes. 2 Feeding America truck hauling donations from Jones Potato Farm. 3 Sorting line at the Jones Potato Farm packing house where workers sort good produce from bad. 4 A baby green bean picked from the fields. Not quite ready yet. 5 Green bean plants in the fields at Jones’ operation.

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Food Project Receives National Awards

F Buy the AgTag® $20 of your purchase helps educate our kids!

Through your purchase of the Florida Agriculture License Plate, Florida Agriculture In The Classroom is able to provide: • Funds for school gardens • PreK–12 agriculture curriculum • Teacher and volunteer grants • Workshops and farm tours • Florida Agriculture Literacy Day • And much more! Visit www.agtag.org to learn more.

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FLORIDAGRICULTURE | APRIL/MAY 2019

lorida Farm Bureau members have earned a solid reputation for supporting their communities. One example of their service during the past year has received national recognition. Their contributions to assist food-insecure families in our state earned top awards from the American Farm Bureau Federation. The Floridians earned the Harvest for All award for the most pounds of food donated, the Harvest for All Friends award for most volunteer hours served and the Harvest for All Most Innovative award for the “Fresh from Florida Challenge.” Local Farm Bureau volunteers across the state, Young Farmers and Ranchers, Women’s committees and Florida Farm Bureau employees worked to provide all 12 Feeding Florida food banks with fresh food products. The challenge provided the charitable facilities with more than 20 million pounds of produce as well as fresh milk. Several county Farm Bureaus supplied local food banks with 10 gallons of milk each week for the entire year. Volunteers also raised more than $6,000 for the challenge and donated more than 10,000 hours of service. Adam Cook, president of the Florida Farm Bureau Young Farmers and Ranchers Leadership Group, praised the members’ collective effort. “We are honored to receive these awards,” Cook said, “but the real prize is the fact that we have helped to provide good nutrition for Floridians in need. I am privileged to be part of a network of volunteers who take positive action to improve their communities. “Our work on the Fresh from Florida Challenge shows what Farm Bureau people can accomplish by working together. I thank all of them for their commitment to this project and for making it an outstanding success.”


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makes tough tasks look easy, whether you’re working on the job or heading out on a weekend of recreation. F-150 outperforms every other truck in its class when hauling cargo in the bed or towing a trailer.**

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*Class is Full-Size Pickups under 8,500 lbs. GVWR based on Ford segmentation. **Max payload on F-150 XL Regular Cab, 8’ box, 5.0L V8 4x2, Heavy-Duty Payload Package and 18” heavy-duty wheels (not shown). Max towing on F-150 XL SuperCrew®, 6.5’ box, 3.5L EcoBoost® 4x2, and Max Trailer Tow Package (not shown). ***Farm Bureau Bonus Cash is exclusively for active Farm Bureau members who are residents of the United States. This incentive is not available on Shelby GT350®, Shelby® GT350R, Mustang BULLITT, Ford GT, Focus RS and F-150 Raptor. This offer may not be used in conjunction with most other Ford Motor Company private incentives or AXZDPlans. Some customer and purchase eligibility restrictions apply. Must be a Farm Bureau member for 30 consecutive days prior to purchase and take new retail delivery from dealer by January 2, 2020. Visit FordFarmBureauAdvantage.com or see your authorized Ford Dealer for qualifications and complete details.

FLORIDAGRICULTURE | APRIL/MAY 2019

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Mediterranean Salad with Florida Tomatoes

J

ust like forward-thinking culinary artists, many at-home chefs seek out the next trendy flavor to provide friends and family gathered around the table. When pondering which trend you’ll dive into in the future, consider incorporating tastes from an especially influential international location – the Mediterranean Sea region. Considered by the experts at Les Dames d’Escoffier International (LDEI) in the organization’s 2018 Trends Report to be one of the most influential parts of the world on the contemporary U.S. food scene, flavors from the Mediterranean Sea focus on a diet heavy with fruits, vegetables, grains, beans, seeds and nuts. Because the fare is typically lighter, small bites

Tomato, Feta and Basil Salad

SERVINGS: 15-20

INGREDIENTS:

• 8 medium size tomatoes, sliced into 1/8-inch slices • 1 block (8 ounces) feta cheese, sliced into 1/8-inch pieces • 2 small packages fresh basil, leaves picked off stems • 3 teaspoons sea salt • 2 teaspoons fresh ground pepper • 1/4 cup olive oil DIRECTIONS:

• On large platter, arrange slices of tomato and feta so they overlap. Place basil leaf between each tomato and Feta slice. Repeat. • Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Drizzle with olive oil. Serve immediately. (Courtesy of Family Features)

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and salads such as this Tomato, Feta and Basil Salad provide easy-to-prepare versions of Mediterranean cuisine. Incorporating Florida tomatoes along with basil and the salty, milky flavors of feta cheese makes the salad a Mediterranean dish. In addition to Mediterranean food, the trends report highlighted Middle Eastern cuisine and Latin American flavors as areas of the world that will influence dining here in the next year. Additionally, LDEI highlighted these regions as likely to be influential in the next three years: 1. East Africa 2. The Balkans 3. The Caribbean Sea Find full results from the report and learn more about the organization at LDEI.org.


Florida Sweet Corn and Sausage Stuffing INGREDIENTS:

• 1 ear Florida sweet corn, kernels removed • 3 cups cornbread, crumbled • 1 pound ground sausage • ¾ cup carrots, chopped fine • ¾ cup celery, chopped fine • 1 medium onion, chopped fine • 2 tablespoons fresh herbs (such as parsley, thyme, sage) • 1 tablespoon all-purpose seasoning (your favorite) • 1 egg, beaten • 1 cup vegetable broth • Sea salt and fresh ground pepper, to taste DIRECTIONS:

• Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Preheat a large cast iron skillet (or other oven-safe pan) over medium-high heat. • Brown the sausage then add in corn, carrots, celery, onion, all-purpose seasoning, fresh herbs and sauté for five minutes or until vegetables begin to soften. • Remove from heat and pour mixture into a large bowl. Add crumbled cornbread and toss to combine.

• Add vegetable broth until mixture is moistened. • Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper if needed before adding the beaten egg. Pour back into cast iron skillet and bake for 45 minutes or until golden brown. • Serve warm. (Courtesy of Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services)

FLORIDAGRICULTURE | APRIL/MAY 2019

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$$$ WANTED $$$ Tractors, Mowers, Farm Equipment and Related Parts Any Condition. Call 813-626-2609. 5 V-crimp GalvaLume Roofing & Accessories For Farms & Ranches. Cypress Feed Trough & Mineral Boxes Call: 772-473-1714 tripsonmt@aol.com Ask for Mark.

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FOR SALE John Deere Chisel Plows 16ft $2000 and 20ft $3000 Lockwood/Renke Center Pivot $8000 Call/Text 904-509-2589 1997 Crowley/Thermo King 30’ Produce Cooler, $11,000 OBO. Call 352-551-0481 or tpeshek@promisefarms.net 2017 Avery Weigh-Tronix Harvest Scale with ID Scanner & Printer $6,000 OBO. Call 352-551-0481 or tpeshek@promisefarms.net 2 row 500 lb. Fertilizer distributor $3,000 OBO. Call 352-551-0481 or tpeshek@promisefarms.net 2002 Savannah drum chopper $6,500 OBO. Call 352-551-0481 or tpeshek@promisefarms.net

FEED & HAY COASTAL BERMUDA HAY Barn stored-$50, Field kept-$40 Irrigated and fertilized. Frank Quincey Levy County 352-538-7077 or 352-463-2953 PREMIUM HAY & SPRIGGING SERVICE: Jiggs, Tifton85, Perennial Peanut, Coastal. Horse-quality square bales (limited rolls), fertilized & irrigated fields. Feed stores welcome. Clean digging stock. Call Haystack Farms at 386-963-3505 or 855-326-8873. www.haystackfarms.com.

FISHERIES FLORIDA FISH FARMS Bass, Bluegill, Catfish, Grass Carp (Permit Req.) & Koi (Ornamental Carp) Contact: Florida Fish Farms, 9684 CR 705, Center Hill, FL 33514. 352-793-4224. Visit our website: www.floridafishfarms.com. PONDSTOCKER Bass, Bream, Catfish, Tilapia, Koi, Grass Carp, Shinners and Gambusea Minnows. Pond Supplies. Licensed and experienced. Call today! Cal Trotter. 1-321-952-9176. Palm Bay, FL. SHONGALOO FISHERIES Channel catfish, certified Florida bass, bluegill, grass carp, shellcrackers, warmouth, koi, and gambusia for stocking. See complete list at www.shongaloofisheriesinc.com. Hampton, FL. 352-468-1251.

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FLORIDAGRICULTURE | APRIL/MAY 2019

SERVING SOUTH FLORIDA Native Fish Stocking - Grass Carp - Tilapia Fountain & Aeration Systems Complete Lake Management ALLSTATE FISH & WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 1-800-270-6558 www.allstatemanagement.com

GOOD THINGS TO EAT FARM BUREAU BUYER’S CLUB Check out the back page of the magazine for the Buyer’s Club June Sale. We’re offering Coloma Fresh Frozen Fruits and Vegetables along with a variety of Farmland products!

LEGAL SERVICES Charles F. Woodhouse, Esq. MBA, JD, MS Food Safety Graduate Certificates in Food Law and Packaging Attorney Specializing in Agriculture and Food Law Food Safety Modernization Act Compliance PACA and Florida Broker/Dealer Complaints Crop Insurance and Risk Management Programs Representation before County Committees, State Committee, and National Appeals Division Matters Woodhouse Shanahan PA Agribusiness Industry Regulatory Compliance Washington, DC & Cedar Key, FL E-mail: cfw@regulatory-food-science.com Website: www.seafood-and-produce-law.com Blog: www.food-label-compliance.com Tel Cedar Key, FL 352-278-1110 Tel Washington, DC 202-293-0033 FAX 202-478-0851 Michael Martin Martin Law Office Agricultural & Environmental litigation Defective products and seeds Crop insurance All litigation issues state or federal 863-686-6700 Lakeland, FL Representing four generations of farm and ranch families. Email: Mike@martinpa.com Website: www.martinpa.com

LIVESTOCK REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS BULLS for sale 2 bull calves 9 + months $1,000.00 each Solid Performance Bloodlines 813-713-6345 BEAUTIFUL SURI ALPACAS FOR SALE Choose from show, breeding, pet/fiber quality alpacas. Good livestock investment potential. Easy on pasture. www.SweetBlossomAlpacas.com Dade City, FL 813-335-7387 Registered Angus Cattle For Sale Ohana Farms Bull Calfs, Cows, Heifers, Pairs 386-212-1006

MISCELLANEOUS AKC REGISTERED BEAGLE PUPPIES FOR SALE in NW Florida. Call 850-554-1062 or email Allenmanning59@gmail.com. www.thebeagleman.com A.K.C. Registered lab puppies for sale, in jacksonville area, they have hunting bloodline, 6 females, 3 males, yellow and black, call 904-599-7338, lrrdobbs@gmail.com


April 2019

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE Registered Texas Heeler Puppies Hanging Tree Lineage, Working Stock Dogs Available Now 904.351.8118 Alternative Fruit Crops

All of the latest and greatest varieties of avocado, dragon fruit, guava, longan, lychee, macadamia nut, mango, peach, pomegranate, and more. Call Pine Island Nursery (305)233-5501. www.PineIslandNursery.com

PLANTS AND SEEDS $50. GIANT TIMBER BAMBOO Plants Clumping Tropical (Bambusa Vulgaris) Florida Native Seller! FASTEST GROWING PRIVACY PLANT! Easy care! Reaches over 60 ft tall w/ 5” diameter culms. Great canopies & shade. This is for 1 plant from 2-4 ft high w/ 1-2 culms/stalks. zones 8-12. Delivery usps 2-3 day priority. Pictures & order online www.buy-bamboo.com Questions, James @ 352-577-2012

REAL ESTATE Suwannee County 19 acres with 1700 feet high way frontage on SR 129, $83,000. David Mincey, 386-590-0157 MLS#103258 5/2 on 5 acres with inground pool, 1 paddock $250,000. David Mincey, 386-590-0157 MLS#103757 Multiple Dwellings, 2 2017 “Big foot homes adjacent to Twin Rivers Forest $325,000. David Mincey, 386-590-0157 MLS#98572 North Florida Horse Ranch 20 Acres, 4/4 home, pool, riding area & horse barn $439,900. Call Kellie Shirah 386-208-3847 MLS#101126 55+ Acres, 2 story 4/3 home, pool, 4 bay detached garage. Pasture. $550,000. Call Kellie Shirah 386-208-3847 MLS#100610 80acre weekend farm retreat. This gentleman farm has 40acre orchard with underground drip irrigation, trellises. Grow blueberry, grapes, peaches etc. Has 3456sqft up to date food grade processing facility, includes bathroom, shower and room to stay the weekend with a motorhome hookup. Has a 40acre platted subdivision that could be sold off. $595,000. Ronnie Poole, 386-208-3175 MLS#102106 Sundown Creek Road Ranch. 164acre farm in the rolling hills of Madison County Florida. 3/2 two store home 1700sqft with quest house. Several water features for wildlife. Pasture, 2800ft of paved road frontage. $779,500. Ronnie Poole, 386-208-3175 MLS#103738 (Continued on next column...)

REAL ESTATE POOLE REALTY, INC 127 HOWARD STREET LIVE OAK, FL 32064 Office: 800-557-7478 All Realty Services www.myallrealty.com 0.34 acre, lakefront cottage on Cherry Lake, fully furnished. 1br/1ba. Madison, FL. $120,000 95.93 acres, gorgeous land with pond and solid home. 3br/2 ba. Madison, FL. $490,000 150 acres, gorgeous home & barn on rolling land with planted pines. Greenville, FL. $549,000 98 acres, perfect hunting/farming land with open cypress ponds. Greenville, FL. $425,000 33.26 acres, wooded area for hunting or clearing for homesite. Jennings, FL. $92,900 55 acres, freshly cleared land, great for planting crops or development. Madison, FL. $154,000 305 acres, cattle ranch with 3br/2ba home. Madison, FL. $1,500,000 440 + acres, working cattle farm with wellbuilt cattle coral and 4 br mobile home. Greenville, FL. $995,000 345 acres, cattle ranch with 1250 square ft. home and out-buildings. Madison, FL. $1,150,000 180 acres, hunting tract in Madison County. Greenville, FL. $486,000 17 wooded acres, good for future homesite. Greenville, FL. $50,000 Gary Silvernell, Realtor Associate 334-355-2124 CAPITAL GAINS TAX FORGIVEN CAPITAL GAINS tax legally forgiven, on the sale of Real Estate, Stocks, C-Corps, S-Corps, Livestock, Family Businesses, and even if selling to family members without having to do a 1031 exchange. We have the capability of converting taxable income to tax Free, lifetime income. INHERITANCE TAXES ELIMINATED-Maintain 100% control of your current assets. Magnify the value of your estate for your heirs TAX FREE. Hoffman Associates (754) 755-1212 Poultry Layer-Breeder Hen Facility in NE Florida. 49.19 ac.; five, modern and updated, cage-free layer houses capable of conversion to breeder hen houses; generators; a 40’ x 100’ equipment building; and a four-bedroom, two-bath manufactured home. The farm is certified organic, Egg-Land’s Best, Publix, and numerous other certifications. Contact Larry Saucer @ 386-365-1794. Saucer Realty & Capital.

APRIL/MAY 2019 CROSSWORD Crossword

by Margie E. Burke

1 2 3 4 5 ACROSS 1 Wait state 14 6 Normal 17 beginning? 10 Lot size, maybe 20 14 Archer's ammo 15 Erelong 24 25 16 Type of rug 28 29 17 Crowning ceremony 32 19 Tattered duds 35 20 Part of BTU 21 Grant 39 40 41 23 Director's cry 47 48 24 Over-the-hill horse 51 25 Bee or Em 26 Take on, as a 55 56 challenge 59 60 28 Shocked 30 Prophetic 63 32 Engrave on 66 glass 33 Make a sweater 34 Coastal bird 35 Blue hue 65 Speck in the sea 37 Have a hunch 66 Fender bender 39 ___-ran result 42 Vegan no-no 67 Fortune teller 44 Office note 68 Over yonder 47 Feature film preceder, once DOWN 49 Sarcastic 1 Manuscript gap 51 Move unsteadily 2 Period when 52 Forest dweller forging began 54 Chic getaway 3 Dream guy 55 Polished off 4 Tony Lama item 56 Strip 5 Part of MYOB 58 Study all night 6 Eucharistic plate 59 Name as a 7 "Friends" source actress 61 Breakfast melon 8 ___ canal 63 "I had no ___!" 9 Comment on, in 64 Get the pot going a way

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10 Berne's river 11 One of a cereal trio 12 Bar fixture? 13 Tampa's time zone 18 Have an edge against 22 WWII female 25 Pale as a ghost 27 Butcher's offering 29 Approach boldly 31 Break in relations 33 Kind of pad 36 NBC show, "______ Got Talent"

38 Ruler of the east 39 Stomach remedy 40 Danger for small boats 41 Add sugar to 43 How some prefer their pasta 45 Govern badly 46 In theory only 48 Roulette bet 49 Software test version 50 Germ cell 53 Aromatic compound 57 Wind instrument 58 Brit's bludgeon 60 Chow down 62 Liquored up

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REAL ESTATE Lake County - Eustis, Fl 73 +/- Acres Active blueberry Farm with residential 3/2 home, farm office, mobile home, storage building, pole barn, two 12” irrigation wells. Ideal land for multiple farming use or prime residential developments. Asking Price: $1,900,000. Glenn Tyre, Broker Tyre & Taylor Commercial Realty, Inc. 352-636-0937 Oakwood Realty Group Real Estate Brokerage Advisory and Consulting Services Hunter Brant, 904.813.4508 OR Toby Anastasio, 386.965.6452 www.oakwoodrealtygroup.com hunter@theoakwoodcompanies.com DR Ranch Beautiful cattle ranch with 300 acres of fully-fenced pasture and over 400 acres of uplands with 1.5 miles of frontage on Alligator Creek. Property was formerly part of a large dairy operation, additional acreage available. Although this property is currently being used for cattle, Alligator Creek and other woodlands provide ideal habitat for turkeys and any of the numerous fenced pastures could be used as a dove field. Development potential of this property is bright and will continue to add value to the property Located in Callahan in Nassau County, FL just 13 miles from the Jax Int’l Airport. $3,250/AC. $1,712,750

SOLD! Hidden Creek Farm SOLD! Hidden Creek Farm is a wellmanaged, productive, turnkey blueberry farm and packing operation that includes all equipment and facilities to continue growing, packing and selling fruit. Located on two sites, the fields and facility are near major travel corridors US 98 and US 27. Five 16” irrigation wells between the two farms with between 15 and 20 years remaining on their permits providing ample water for irrigation. 220 total acres of high bush blueberries with irrigation and freeze protection, an additional 145 acres are cleared and ready to plant. $3,500,000. Miller Blueberry Farm NEW PRICE! The Miller Farm represents the very best in a family owned farm, it is the oldest commercial blueberry farm in Florida. The farm is turn-key and includes everything needed to produce, pack and sell blueberries and its north central Florida location is ideal for its thriving U-pick operation as well as the perfect climate for timing the early Florida market. The farm totals 333 acres with 143 acres of irrigated blueberries. Improvements include a 10,000SF Packing Facility with Office, Tissue Culture Lab and Nursery for growing new plants. Seven 12” wells provide drip and overhead irrigation as well as freeze protection to the entire farm. $5,850,000

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REAL ESTATE 5 acre residential lot in Lucerne Valley, California. Nice area, $85,000. Close to both Los Angeles and Las Vegas. 305-323-3910 Five acres in Interlachen. One block off S.R.20. Beautiful, high and dry. Must see. $25,000. Contact Danny at 386-867-3478. Maury L. Carter & Associates, Inc. Licensed Real Estate Broker CONTACT Daryl Carter or John Evans 407-422-3144 - www.maurycarter.com HAW CREEK RANCH & TIMBERLAND, PRICE REDUCED Flagler County-1200± Acres - Located in Flagler County, Florida, Middle Haw Creek Ranch and Timberland offers a variety of uses. Whether you are an avid outdoor enthusiast, a hunter, a cattle rancher, or a timber investor, this property offers it all. The property is located near large metropolitan areas and Florida’s east coast, making it easily accessible. The land can be described as “Old Florida” Pine Flatwoods with scattered cypress heads, oak hammocks and palmetto stands. This property is teeming with wildlife. Deer, turkey, hogs, and other Florida wildlife species call this property home. Hunting, fishing, camping, and other outdoor activities are readily available and ideal for this site. BRING OFFERS!!! NOW $4200/ acre or $5,040,000 - WAS $5,880,000 or $4,900/acre INDIAN RIVER CITRUS GROVE, UNDER CONTRACT - Indian River County, 491± acres. Active citrus grove and engineered agricultural land perfect for all types of farming operations. This property is fully engineered and currently operated as a fresh fruit citrus operation. Potential uses include continued farming for citrus or conversion into other agricultural ventures. Grove was set and has been reset through the early 80s through the 90s. NOW: $ $1,900,000 ORIGINALLY: $2,405,900 LAKE HARNEY PINES - 123+/- acresLocated SE of Lake Harney, Volusia County, FL-This 123+/- acres is perfect for timber investment, recreational uses, hunting and other outdoor activities. Conveniently located 45 minutes from Orlando, make this your own perfect weekend getaway. The property is secluded and offers ultimate privacy. Deer and turkey are abundant. Located minutes away from the St. Johns River, which offers additional recreational boating and other opportunities. Long term timber investment opportunity. ASKING PRICE: $367,770 or $2,990/acre. For Sale located in Hollister,Fl. Pasture land-130 acres; 30 acres planted pines. Fenced and cross-fenced. House has 1bed/2b, garage, very large LR, new metal roof. Currently zoned agriculture. $600,000. No owner financing. Interested call 386-328-4016, 386-350-0532, or 386-972-0156.

FLORIDAGRICULTURE | APRIL/MAY 2019

REAL ESTATE MAGNOLIA BLOSSUM’S FARM A Family Retreat and Retirement Property 229 Acres+/- of rolling timberland just East of the Alapaha River located an easy hour and a half from Tallahassee, and Jacksonville and Gainesville. Has everything needed to operate a hunting preserve or exclusive club or family hunting retreat! • Lots of deer, turkey, small, and migratory game. • 147 Acres in Timber 19-24 years old. All timber has cruised value $166K. • 20 A pasture • 4 Acre Dove field • 10 Acres +/- in 5 feed plots with permanent stands. • Home: 2700 Square Feet appraised at $250,000. • 3 BR-2 1/2bath-Separate DR-LR with fireplace. Renovated kitchen, Breakfast Room, Separate Den/TV Room. • Office with cabinets, Large Screened Porch with amazing view. • Barn/Workshop on concrete with shed roof for equipment • Pole Barn on concrete with enclosed storage • 5 Run dog kennels • Grain Bin • 3 Stall Stable • Managed for Quality Deer Management last 10 years-Four 8-point bucks were harvested this year plus five does. • Managed and licensed as quail hunting preserve since 2005. • Two tractors and all the farm equipment necessary for planting of food plots, dove field, and timber management. Additional property available. Price: $ 875,000. Contact RB Davis @ davisrb1@windstream.net

REAL ESTATE MADISON CO. 365 ACRE COW/CALF RANCH, FENCED & CROSS FENCED. 3 PONDS WITH ONE STOCKED WITH BLUEGILL & BASS. CUSTOM 4BR & 2 BATH HOME WITH FAMILY ROOM, FIREPLACE AND SCREEN PORCH. LARGE POLE BARN WITH LARGE WORKSHOP, STABLES WITH TACKROOM. (ALL WITH ELECTRIC & WATER) 2 ACRES OF BLUEBERRIES. LOTS OF TURKEYS AND DEER IN THE WOODS. A MANAGERS 2/1 MH ON SITE TOO. $1,290,000. FAUST REALTY GROUP 239.298.6473

REAL ESTATE Southern Pine Plantations North and Northwest Florida 377 Acres, Jackson Co, 148 acres Cultivated farm land, Irrigated, 15,400 sq. ft. packing shed, 2,400 Sq. ft. Cooler. $2,950/acre 484 Acres, Lafayette Co, The area is well known for its fantastic hunting and fishing, Pave Road, Pines and Hardwoods. $1,350/acre. 1,152 acres in Lafayette Co. Managed Timberland, Planted Pine, mixed with Hardwood Bottoms, Excellent Hunting. $1,500/acre. 7,588 acres of high quality timberland, Planted Pine, Hardwood Bottoms, Excellent Hunting. $1,450/acre. Call Pat Duane at 352-867-8018 Southern Pine Plantations of Fla. Owns the property it sells. FREE MOUNTAIN, LAKEFRONT, RURAL PROPERTY GUIDE TN-GA-AL homes, farms, acreage 423-462-2700 ALACHUA COUNTY Family farm 30 acres and 2 homes with 2900 sq. ft. utility building, large well capacity for irrigation. Continuously used for agriculture. Near Gainesville, FL visit www.gainesvilleflblueberriefarm.com Where will you be next spring? Bristol Park Realty 352-367-2669 145 Acre Sod Farm / Gadsden Co FL Zoned for 40+ houses. 120+,- Acres / Jackson Co FL - Will divide. 25 Acres / Grady Co, Beachton, GA close to Tallahassee & Thomasville 51 Acres / Grady Co, GA - Close to Cairo, Thomasville & Tallahassee 607 Acres / Thomas Co, Georgia 35 Acre floodable duckpond 75 Acres / Liberty Co, FL - on the Ochlockonee River. Access by way of the river D. E. BILLINGSLEY Lic Real Estate Broker AL / FL / GA / MT FL - 850.510.3309 MT - 406.203.4191 Fax - 1.866.593.0228 DE@debillingsley.com www.debillingsley.com


REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

CROSBY & ASSOCIATES, INC. Real Estate Brokerage 863-293-5600 * www.crosbydirt.com

Longleaf Land Company L.L.C. Alabama & Northwest Florida www.longleafland.com

FARM LEASE- OKEECHOBEE, FL450+/- Irrigated Farmland...Total property acres are +/-640 acres. Land is irrigated via wells and a large surface water pond on the south property line. Farmland formerly used for silage corn crops, with the last crop harvested in May of 2018.. http:// properties.crosbydirt.com/415655-lease

9 tracts.. 5 to 101 ac. tracts on US 84 and US 331 bypass in Opp Alabama. Major beach route. Call for prices.

North Central Florida business for sale. Pastured chicken, turkey, pork and eggs. Farmers market sales average 6 figures last 4 years. Loyal customer base. Established 2009, Salatin model. Will train. 352-372-2684. 150K.

POLK COUNTY- FROSTPROOF, FL12 acres Recreational Property with ATV Trail Access—$549,000 Gorgeous home on 12 acres connected privately to Indian Lake Estates and River Ranch ATV/Bike trails. 3,600 sf insulated metal utility/shop with 3 garage bay doors (one for an RV), 2,452 sf, 4 bedroom, 3 bath home. http:// properties.crosbydirt.com/409925-sale CHARLOTTE COUNTY, PUNTA GORDA, FL- 650 Irrigated Acres— $3,390,000 This Charlotte County agricultural tract is a former citrus grove with expensive irrigation infrastructure. Much of the grove has been removed and burned, allowing for quick transition to other crops, if desired. https://crosbydirt.com/ property/650-irrigated-acres-multiple-uses (Continued on next column...)

202 acres, loaded with timber, great hunting, awesome duck pond, home and barn only 45 minutes from beaches of south Walton. Located east of Florala Alabama. $575,000 20 acres with 2300 h&c, 4/2 home. Beautiful home with pond hayfield and timber..$360,000. 34 AC - Cultivation and woodland. U. S. Hwy 84 frontage. $90,000. 180 AC stocked with mature timber. Highway frontage on two sides and adjacent to the city of Florala Alabama. Great hunting or development potential. 45 MINUTES TO BEACHES OF SOUTH Walton. $425,000. Longleaf Land Company L.L.C. Jody J. Jones Broker/Owner 28583 County Road 30, Opp, AL 36467 Phone: 334-493-0123 www.longleafland.com

{

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED HERE (352) 378-8100 Ext. 1535

}

Loans made for farmers by farmers, since 1916. Farm Credit is the nation’s leading provider of credit to agriculture and rural America.

866.824.5626

FarmCreditFlorida.com Loans for land, homes & country living

Vidalia Onion

SALE!

Direct from the farm! “Super Sweet” Jumbo Size!

10 lb. bag $7.45 25 lb. bag $15.45 Call your County Farm Bureau to order by May 13th Delivery: May 20th – May 31st

Also Available: Microwave Onion Cookers (set of 4): $9.95 Onion Blossom Kit Cutter, Batter and Blossom Sauce! $11.45 per set Back by Popular Demand!

(PHOTO COURTESY OF STEPHEN AUSMUS, USDA/ARS)

Vidalia Sweet Onion Relish Full Case: 12/16 oz. $42.00 Half Case: 6/16 oz. $22.25

At the USDA Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology in Gainesville, scientists test how effective different compounds are at protecting against mosquitoes and stable flies.

“It Pays To Be A Farm Bureau Member”

FLORIDAGRICULTURE | APRIL/MAY 2019

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HURRY! Order by May 20th. Finest Quality-Super Savings! Delivered to your County Farm Bureau June 10th - June 28th

Stock your Freezer with Coloma Michigan Fresh Frozen!

Packed by Coloma Frozen Foods

Peach Slices - Freestone peaches, tree ripened, peeled, sliced 4/2.5 lb. pkgs .......... Was $32.45 NOW $29.95

Mixed Vegetables - peas, corn, green beans, carrots and lima beans 6/2.5 lb. pkgs .......... Was $28.45 NOW $25.95

Apple Slices - Prepared for easy use, peeled, cored and sliced! 4/2.5 lb. pkgs .... $19.95 Cinnamon Apples - Cinnamon, white & brown sugars, butter and other spices 4/3 lb. pkgs ....... $29.45 Blackberries - Marion Variety. No core, just big, sweet & juicy! ... 4/2.5 lb.pkgs ..... $30.95 Black Raspberries ........................................................... 2/2.5 lb. pkgs .... $34.95 Blueberries - Medium sized for pies, muffins, or as a snack! ....... 4/2.5 lb. pkgs .... $30.95 Cranberries - Whole ............................................................ 6/20 oz. pkgs .... $16.95 Mango - Chunks - Imported ...................................................... 4/2.5 lb. pkgs .... $30.45 Michigan Fruit Mix - Apples, sweet cherries, peaches, strawberries and pineapples 4/2.5 lb. pkgs .... $32.45 Berry Patch Fruit Mix - Strawberries, blueberries and red raspberries 4/2.5 lb. pkgs .... $32.45 Pineapple Chunks - Imported ............................................ 4/2.5 lb. pkgs .... $25.95 Red Tart Cherries - Pitted pie cherries ................................ 4/2.5 lb. pkgs .... $26.95 Red Raspberries - Whole .................................................... 4/2.5 lb. pkgs .... $39.95 Sliced Strawberries - Sliced ............................................... 4/2.5 lb. pkgs .... $30.45 Tropical Fruit Mix - Peaches, mangos, pineapple & strawberry halves 4/2.5 lb. pkgs .... $32.45 Whole Strawberries ......................................................... 4/2.5 lb. pkgs .... $31.45 Rhubarb Chunks ............................................................... 4/2.5 lb. pkgs .... $28.95

Baby Lima Beans .............................................................. 4/2.5 lb. pkgs .... $25.95 Broccoli Florets ................................................................. 6/2 lb. pkgs ....... $29.95 Brussel Sprouts ................................................................ 4/2.5 lb.pkgs ..... $24.45 Cauliflower - Florets ............................................................ 6/2 lb. pkgs ....... $30.95 Corn - Yellow, super sweet, tender ............................................ 6/2.5 lb. pkgs .... $27.45 Super Sweet White Corn - tastes like sugar, but naturally sweet! 6/2.5 lb. pkgs .... $28.45 Fajita Mixed Vegetables - onion green, red & yellow pepper strips 6/2 lb. pkgs ....... $26.45 Green Beans - Cut ................................................................ 6/2 lb. pkgs ....... $22.45 Mushrooms - Sliced ........................................................... 4/2.5 lb. pkgs .... $28.95 Pepper and Onion Variety Pack - diced onions and green pepper 4/2.5 lb. pkgs .... $20.95 Green Garden Peas ............................................................... 6/2.5 lb. pkgs .... $27.95 Stew Vegetables - celery, carrots, potatos and onions ....... 4/2.5 lb. pkgs .... $21.45 Stir Fry Vegetables - broccoli, shoestring carrots, onions, celery, red peppers and 6/2 lb. pkgs ....... $29.45 pea pods Sugar Snap Peas - Great steamed or stir fried! .............................. 5/2 lb. pkgs ....... $30.95 Hashbrowns - Shredded ...................................................................... 6/3 lb. pkgs ....... $29.45 Seasoned Potato Wedges - Just bake and serve! ..................... 3/5 lb. pkgs ....... $31.95

Country Smoked Sausage

Fresh Frozen Amish Desserts

Packed by Nettles Sausage

Variety Pack includes 1 pack of each variety Mild ....................................................... Hot ........................................................ Jalapeno .............................................. Andouille ............................................

4/2.5 lb. pkgs. ....................... 4/2.5 lb. pkgs. ....................... 4/2.5 lb. pkgs. ....................... 4/2.5 lb. pkgs. ....................... 4/2.5 lb. pkgs. .......................

$37.95 $37.95 $37.95 $37.95 $37.95

Farmland Meats Packed by Farmland

Last chance to purchase until out Autumn Sale Black Angus Ground Chuck Patties - (Raw) 78% Lean 10 lbs. (30-1/3 lb. patties) ...................................... $57.95 Gold Standard Pork Pattie Sausage - Great taste at a great value! (2oz patties) 10 lbs. (1/10 lb. pkg) ........................ $38.95 Jones Farms Breakfast Sausage Links - (Fully Cooked) 10 lbs. (30 1/3 lb. links) ......................................... $37.95 Bacon Wrapped Pork Fillets - (Raw) Lean, well-marbled,wrapped in Hickory Smoked Bacon, vacuum packed, frozen individually

9.3 lbs. (30/5 oz. fillets) ........................................... $62.95 Precooked Bacon Slices - Thin and crisp, uniformly sliced. Will not shrink or splatter when heated (approx. 300 slices) ................................... $49.95 Black Angus Beef Franks - (100% USDA Choice, 50 per case) 10 lbs. (1/10 lb. pkg) ................................................ $43.95 KC Wild Wings - Fully cooked, seasoned pork shanks. Grilled, smoked or oven-roasted, sure to please! 3 lb. bag (12/4 oz. shanks) .......................................... $26.95

Carrot Cake Roll - w/cream cheese filling ....... 2 3/4 lb. (2/22 oz. Rolls) Pumpkin Roll - w/cream cheese filling .............. 2 3/4 lb. (2/22 oz. Rolls) Strawberry Cream Roll - w/cream cheese filling 2 1/8 lb. (2/17 oz. Rolls) Chocolate Roll - w/cream cheese filling ........... 2 1/8 lb. (2/17 oz. Rolls)

Troyers Cheese from Amish Country!

...... ...... ...... ......

$13.95 $13.95 $13.95 $13.95

Packed by Troyer Cheese from Millersburg, OH June is National Dairy Month

Mild Cheddar Cheese .... 3 lbs. (6/8 oz. pkgs) Was $17.95 Now $14.95 Sharp Cheddar Cheese .................... 3 lbs. (6/8 oz. pkgs) .................. $20.95 Variety Cheese Pack - Contains 2 Mild, 2 Colby and 2 Sharp blocks 3 lbs. (6/8 oz. pkgs) .................. $20.95 Green Onion .................................. 3.5 lbs. (6/9.5 oz. pkgs) ............ $17.95 Cheddar Garlic ............................... 3 lbs. (6/8 oz. pkgs) .................. $25.95 Hickory Smoked Cheddar .......... 3 lbs. (6/8 oz. pkgs) .................. $15.95 Farmers Block - Semi Soft, smooth, creamy white, mild to mellow flavor 3 lbs. (6/8 oz. pkgs) .................. $22.95 Marble Cheese .............................. 3 lbs. (6/8 oz. pkgs) .................. $17.95 Colby Cheese ................................. 3 lbs. (6/8 oz. pkgs) .................. $17.95 Pepperjack Cheese ...................... 3 lbs. (6/8 oz. pkgs) .................. $21.45 American Cheese Slices ............. 5 lbs. (120 slices) ...................... $16.95 Baby Swiss Cheese ...................... 2.8 lbs. (6/7.5 oz. pkgs) ............ $20.95 Summer Sausage ......................... (4/12 oz. pkgs) .......................... $19.45

NUTS .... Stock Up!

Brittle Bites Peanut Brittle Squares .................. Cashews ............................................................. Mixed Nuts ................................. Milk Chocolate Pecans .............. Chocolate Peanuts ................... Honey Roasted Pecans .............. Butter Toffee Peanuts ............. Honey Krunch Peanuts ............ Almonds ...................................... Glazed Mixed Nuts .........................................

12 oz. can ................... 16 oz. can ................... 16 oz. can ................... 12 oz. can ................... 12 oz. can ................... 8.5 oz. can .................. 12 oz. can .................. 12 oz. can .................. 9 oz. can ..................... 16 oz. can ...................

$4.00 $9.95 $6.95 $6.95 $3.50 $6.95 $3.50 $3.50 $3.95 $8.95

Orange Blossom Honey ................................ 2 lb. Squeeze Bottle .. $11.00 Wildflower Honey ................................ 2 lb. Squeeze Bottle .. $11.00 Palmetto Honey w/comb ................... 1 lb. jar ........................ $10.00

Profile for FloridAgriculture

April/May 2019  

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