Page 1

ART AGAINST THE FLOW


CHICAGO CALLING: ART AGAINST THE FLOW IS PART OF ART DESIGN CHICAGO, AN EXPLORATION OF CHICAGO'S ART AND DESIGN LEGACY, AN INITIATIVE OF THE TERRA FOUNDATION FOR AMERICAN ART WITH PRESENTING PARTNER THE RICHARD H. DRIEHAUS FOUNDATION.

CHICAGO CALLING: ART AGAINST THE FLOW IS FUNDED BY THE TERRA FOUNDATION FOR AMERICAN ART AND THE RICHARD H. DRIEHAUS FOUNDATION.


CURATED BY KENNETH BURKHART AND LISA STONE

ART AGAINST THE FLOW


“THEMES AND ASSOCIATIONS AMONG WORKS IN THE EXHIBITION INCLUDE EXPRESSIONS OF FIERCE RESISTANCE TO SOUL-CRUSHING CIRCUMSTANCES, TO CONVENTIONAL IDEALS OF BEAUTY, AND MUCH IN BETWEEN.”


LISA STONE AND KENNETH C. BURKART

TABLE OF CONTENTS

6-19

Artist Calls, Chicago Answers

6-9

Introduction

10-17

Why (not) Chicago?

18-19

Collectors and Collection

21-25

Collection List

26

Exhibition Dates

5


CHICAGO CALLING: ART AGAINST THE FLOW

“Oh! Frenchie Frenchie Frenchie”. 1970s. Lee Godie. 6


LISA STONE AND KENNETH C. BURKART

ARTISTS CALL, CHICAGO ANSWERS. Presenting works by ten exemplary artists (Henry Darger, William Dawson, Lee Godie, Mr. Imagination, Aldo Piacenza, Pauline Simon, Drossos Skyllas, Dr. Charles Smith, Wesley Willis, and Joseph E. Yoakum) as part of a broad examination of Chicago’s art history from 1871 to the most recent millennium year, through the Terra Foundation for American Art’s Art Design Chicago, is timely, essential, and right.

tion, and even a few works of art. Since that year, every five years or so Intuit has mounted broad exhibitions exploring self-taught and outsider art and artists in Chicago. Insightful essays in accompanying catalogs have, from different vantage points, traced and retraced this particular arc of art history. While it seems redundant, if not wanton, to write it again, we do so for endlessly fresh audiences, humbly referencing writers who laid the path, while offering some fresh perspectives.

The Terra Foundation’s “wide-ranging initiative to explore the breadth of Chicago’s role as a catalyst and incubator for innovations in art and design” recognizes Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art’s 27-year history of artistic inclusion. Catalyzed by artists, art collectors, dealers, educators, and unapologetic appreciators of art from beyond the academic mainstream, Intuit evolved from a scrappy, improvisational start-up in 1991 into an innovative leader in a genre of art that continues to be defined by its relationship to the mainstream mothership. Due to Intuit’s growing presence and impressive record of exhibitions and programming, the artists in the exhibition, and many others, occupy a respected place in Chicago and beyond.

Chicago has evolved into the center for the recognition, scholarship, promotion, collection, and exhibition of non-mainstream art, historically and institutionally as well as geographically. Intuit has been a core part of that evolution, responding to a resounding, and continuing need. Despite the 130 exhibitions Intuit has hosted, and the devoted gallerists who have promoted artists from the folk, self-taught, intuitive, and outsider realms in the city for decades, the artists and the genre have not yet been meaningfully assimilated into the city’s museums. With the exception of the Art Institute of Chicago’s 222 works by Joseph E. Yoakum, non-mainstream art is sparsely represented.

This essay and other sections of the catalog reflect on the historical receptivity of Chicago’s people and institutions to art from beyond the academically sanctioned, self-identified center. In 1991, Intuits’s first exhibition, From Chicago, included many of the artists in this exhibi-

Intuit wisely doesn’t hew to the idea of an “outsider” aesthetic or otherwise marginalize and sensationalize the artists and the genre, as has happened elsewhere. And importantly, Intuit is not a monolith, it’s an organization of inspired 7


CHICAGO CALLING: ART AGAINST THE FLOW

staff, members, supporters, appreciators, and critics who hold widely divergent ideas about the art in question. Intuit supports and mediates an essential, ongoing conversation. This exhibition likewise does not focus on rectifying the art’s multitude of descriptors, including self-taught, outsider, visionary, and the currently condoned non-mainstream. As the exhibition and catalog demonstrate, such designations don’t always hold up, so we refer to the artists here as artists, unqualified.

Godie have been championed as a “French Impressionist,” had she set up shop on the steps of the Met instead of the Art Institute? Would Wesley Willis have been welcomed into and given studio space at the Yale School of Architecture, as he was at Illinois Institute of Technology’s Crown Hall? Suppositions abound, but these ten, and many other artists, appeared in various places and at various times in the city. Their work held up to initial scrutiny and has not diminished over time. It astounded many, and still does. The artists became ensconced, to varying degrees, in Chicago’s elastic art scene, and several have become known, appreciated, exhibited, and collected in wider national and international spheres. For those who have yet to receive broader attention, we’re excited to send this exhibition to partnering European museums.

To avoid entrapping them in the supposed outsider/academic polarity, we might consider the concept of a semantic ecotone as introduced by Robert Z. Melnick. In his search for a method for understanding vernacular landscapes, he wrote, “The concept of the semantic ecotone is purposefully borrowed from the ecological concept of ecotone, the transition zone between two different plant or ecological communities… An ecotone is characterized by vague borders and boundaries and by the potential for both mutual dependence and competition… A metaphor for examining these ideas might be taken from coastal waters — the oceanic tide pool. The tide pool contains organisms that not only thrive both in and out of water, but also rely upon the cyclical regularity of the varying tides for nourishment and sustenance. In language, as well as in thought, we may learn from this concept. Our understanding of nature and culture in the landscape might benefit from a set of variable conditions, rather than a fixed position. We could think metaphorically of a landscape as a tide pool of the mind, ecologically rich and biologically diverse in a variety of settings, rather than limited to solid ground or robust ocean but never the edge between them.”

Chicago Calling was curated from Chicago collections. The exhibition is by no means an exhaustive look at the artists and collections of art in our region — this is Intuit’s ongoing mission. Of the many artists we could have included, we distillewd the roster to ten artists whose works and whose presence in the city represent fortuitous moments in Chicago’s cultural orbit. Their 80 pieces are a small fraction of the abundance of works held in these collections. Intuit does an exemplary job showcasing art from Chicago holdings in its diverse exhibitions. Chicago Calling is a concentrated core sample. Given this moment in the confluence of appreciation and recognition of these artists and artworks, we felt released from an expectation to sequester each artist within the realm of their own aesthetic. Rather, we chose to let the artworks lead us through dimensions of focus, from expressions of fierce resistance in soul-crushing circumstances, to conventional ideals of beauty, and much in between. Culled from thirty collections (and many more examined), the show seeks to explore the commingled histories of a preponderance of outstandingly original artists. All of them lacked a conventionally accepted connection to the artistic mainstream, but all eventually found a robust audience that accepted them, including the creation of a museum to support them.

Melnick’s idea of a semantic ecotone allows us to reconsider the cultural construct of separate spheres — the academy and the not — that we superimpose on artists who occupy the same geographical and cultural landscape as the self-identified insiders. We might consider a tide pool-like environment of art reception and criticism that accommodates works from converse states of experience, where the designations of insider and outsider become less distinct and an ethic of inclusivity prevails. The perennial question, “Why so many great self-taught/ outsider artists in Chicago?” can be unraveled and clarified by the history of receptivity that has characterized the city and its aesthetic tide pools. We can speculate: Would Lee 8


LISA STONE AND KENNETH C. BURKART

“The Dan Ryan Expressway Past 39th toward 35th St”. 1990. Wesley Willis. 9


CHICAGO CALLING: ART AGAINST THE FLOW

“Memories of the Ladies That Gave Us the Good Life.” Thorton Dial. 10


LISA STONE AND KENNETH C. BURKART

WHY (NOT) CHICAGO? Chicago was described by Thomas Dyja, in his cultural history The Third Coast, as a city “whose purpose was to be in the middle.” What happened in this middle? What is its significance? Dyja wrote,

psychiatric illness. These artists created compelling, expressive inventions of visual language within physical and mental confinement, mostly isolated from society. Extraordinary collections were assembled by Dr. Hans Prinzhorn at the University of Heidelberg (organized into the Prinzhorn Collection) and Dr. Walter Morgenthaler, whose collection is preserved at the Psychiatrie Museum at the Waldau Clinic in Bern. Jean Dubuffet later discovered, acquired, and solidified works by auteurs (his preferred term) who were isolated from society into the category he defined as Art Brut. Dubuffet’s legendary collection was first installed in Paris. He later exhibited the collection in the United States for 10 years (1952-1962) at the East Hampton, New York, estate of artist Alfonso Ossorio, expecting the collection to ignite the interest of Abstract Expressionist artists. They were, for the most part, unmoved. The collection is preserved today in the Collection de l’Art Brut in Lausanne, Switzerland. All three European collections are accessible and brilliantly curated and interpreted.

“From 1945 to 1949, an explosion of creativity and destruction and a flood of new faces energized Chicago: migrants and émigrés; planners, architects, and designers; groundbreaking musicians and actors; innovators in technology and communications; leading minds in education, religion and philosophy; European intellectuals and dirt-poor southern blacks — all came to the Third Coast to explore the postwar future…” Curator Katherine Kuh and the Art Institute of Chicago helped explain abstract art to America; artists Leon Golub and the reclusive Henry Darger moved toward figurative styles distinctly unfashionable in the face of New York Abstract Expressionism.” To place Chicago beyond Chicago, into a national and international context, it’s necessary to note that the acceptance, appreciation, and positioning of self-taught artists evolved along different paths in the United States and Europe. The discovery, exploration, and collection of art from outside the academy in Europe emerged with the awareness of work by European artists who were institutionalized with

Dubuffet was heralded in Chicago with exhibitions and acquisitions of his work by public and private collections, and perhaps most notably for his legendary 1951 Arts Club lecture, Anticultural Positions. The lecture was sparsely attended due to an inconvenient blizzard, but its impact has become mythical, despite a lack of consensus about exactly 11


CHICAGO CALLING: ART AGAINST THE FLOW

the East Coast in the early decades of the last century. The ensuing exhibitions, collections, and institutional involvement testify to the robust interest, not only in the many and sundry objects themselves, but in aesthetics that were perceived to parallel modernist aesthetics.

how. In the 1970 catalog for the exhibition Dubuffet and the Anticulture, New York gallerist (formerly Chicago gallerist) Richard Feigen wrote, “It is significant that Dubuffet made more of an impact in one hour on the hard core that pushed through the snow that Thursday morning than he had in five months on all the New York artists. The importance of the Chicago trip was not for Dubuffet but for a small group of artists, critics, and amateurs who at that time formed the only pocket of understanding for the revolution of which Dubuffet’s speech was the manifesto.”

The Great Depression knocked the wind out of the economy and therefore just about everything, but recovery efforts put many artists to work. The Index of American Design, an extraordinary New Deal project (under the Works Progress Administration’s Federal Art Project) set out to establish a non-European “usable past” for America. Beginning in late 1935 and continuing for six years, nearly 1,000 artists were employed and rigorously trained in specific methods of rendering objects in watercolor. The artists eventually created over 18,000 paintings of examples of American folk art, in exceptionally precise, photo-realist detail. The Index, a vast and marvelous trove of trompe l’oeil paintings, was rooted in the idea that folk art was America’s truly homegrown art form. The documentation of this enormous and varied genre was intended to provide a foundation for a national cultural identity.

He continued, musing on the impact his exhibition would have on Chicago artists, “It will show how a tiny group of Chicago artists were teased along the same savage paths where Dubuffet had been, and struggled while New York splashed and dripped out the last easel paintings of the forties and fifties, until Central European expressionism and surrealism were finally dead and Oldenburg went to the Lower East Side and preached the anticulture.”

In 1961 the Museum of Early American Folk Art (now the American Folk Art Museum) was established in New York. Initially it focused on traditional folk art, but founder and early curator Herbert Waide Hemphill, Jr. soon advocated for the recognition and acceptance of works by 20th century self-taught artists (including anonymous works), which was radical at the time and met with considerable resistance. Hemphill and Julia Weissman co-authored 20th Century Folk Art and Artists (1974), which explored works by folk and self-taught artists and vernacular art environments, broadening the scope of folk and self-taught art into previously unrecognized realms.

Dubuffet was in fertile, sympathetic territory. Rather than being the match that lit the fire of receptivity to works outside the academic mainframe, however, the effect was more akin to a slow release fertilizer, nurturing soil in an established garden. As Feigen implied, Dubuffet was preaching to the choir, but his lecture anointed Chicago’s relationship with art from other realms, and was delivered in Chicago, not New York, Los Angeles, or Paris. That mattered. Had Alfonso Ossorio lived on an estate near Chicago, Dubuffet’s collection might still be in America’s heartland. In the United States, attention to non-mainstream art was initially rooted in the discovery and appreciation of folk art, a broad and duly debated term that generally refers to traditional crafts and the functional, or purely artistic, expressions of artists and artisans informed by ethnic, community, family, and/or religious traditions. Folk art implied a connection to a “folk” population, made by and generally for common people, outside of the realms of the academy or high culture. Traditional American folk art encompasses a broad variety of 18th, 19th and early 20th century objects that mostly reflected life in rural, pre-industrial America.

Hemphill notably came to Chicago to do research for the book, which includes images from Chicago collections. Hemphill’s vision in redefining the field was paralleled by his outstanding collection, which ranged from traditional folk art to contemporary self-taught art, now a core collection in the Smithsonian American Art Museum. Chicago’s postwar-to-the-present art history has been thoughtfully chronicled by a number of art historians. Robert Cozzolino’s succinct summation, in his exhibition Art in Chicago: Resisting Regionalism, Transforming Modernism (Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 2006) wrote about artists, the city, and “anti-mainstream instincts” as “the

Extensive studies have chronicled the modernist artists, curators, and collectors who embraced folk art, primarily on 12


LISA STONE AND KENNETH C. BURKART

“Everybody Got a Right to the Tree of Life”. 1988. Thornton Diall. 13


CHICAGO CALLING: ART AGAINST THE FLOW

“We are Lions.” Tarik Echols. 14


LISA STONE AND KENNETH C. BURKART

leitmotif of 20th century art in Chicago.”

fundamental things that art history could teach us — basic and universal truths about design, which all artists have used in all times and places… Miss Gardner… believed devoutly that a choice coin or fabric can express a culture — or move the sensitive viewer — as profoundly as monumental architecture or painting…”

While Chicagoans had first-hand access to what has been considered canonical modernism, its art world consistently fostered assertive individuality rather than a codified style as a measure of modernity. Chicago artists, critics, and collectors valued risk-taking and a dedication to authentic self-expression as evidence of an avant-garde mindset. Many of the city’s artists derided the emulation of fashionable trends and established styles, organizing alternative groups to aggressively reject the status quo. They expected innovative form but demanded that art convey an emotional intensity that approached the visceral.

Gardner was in the vanguard of a generation of art historians who learned to appreciate not only modern art with all its surprises but also primitive, aboriginal, and folk art, and the previously overlooked arts of Russia and Hispanic America, which, in spite of high aesthetic quality, had been largely disdained by earlier scholars. Striving to broaden the appreciation rather than to limit it, Miss Gardner reveals in her books a progressively more generous vision that eventually embraced the whole world, all time, and both the major and “minor” arts.

Being outside the mainstream need not always imply ignorance of it. A few artists in Chicago Calling, particularly Lee Godie, Drossos Skyllas, and Pauline Simon, had magnetic relationships to the Art Institute of Chicago, reframing the supposed impassible chasm between non-mainstream artists and the academy. We can look to the histories and legacies of the museum and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and the city’s cultural climate of risk taking (condescendingly referred to as “eccentricity” by art critic Donald Kuspit).

In the same essay Allen describes Gardner’s protégé, artist and art historian Kathleen Blackshear, who taught at SAIC from 1926 to 1961, “Miss Gardner was fortunate to have, during all her time at SAIC, the ideal team teacher, Kathleen Blackshear… Where Miss Gardner was solid in Classical and Renaissance, Miss Blackshear was an enthusiastic missionary for Modern and Primitive. Together they taught History of Art to a generation of SAIC students, and Miss Blackshear continued after Miss Gardner’s retirement till her own… Miss Blackshear, a frequent exhibitor in the Chicago art community, also maintained valuable and intimate connections with the rest of the school and its students. She was for many years among the best and most sought-after teachers of painting and drawing…”

A brief overview of the environment of inclusion that was nurtured here must include renowned art historian and educator Helen Gardner, known for her radical Art Through the Ages, the first history of world art in one volume. The classically trained and accomplished Gardner held various positions at the Art Institute of Chicago from 1919 to 1922 (and periodically after), when she resigned to teach the history of art at the School of the Art Institute until her retirement in 1943. Her unusual approach was to encourage artists to focus on the aesthetic, rather than the historical, details of the art of the past, and to study art history so they could be their own art critics. Professor Harold Allen recalled his beloved teacher and colleague in his essay “Helen Gardner: Quiet Rebel.” He wrote,

Blackshear was a progressive teacher who encouraged her students in expansive studies, and to explore cultures and genres outside their own, particularly non-Western cultures. Following in Gardner’s and Blackshear’s footsteps, Whitney Halstead and Ray Yoshida were profoundly influential, as artists, teachers, prescient thinkers, and collectors who exposed students to a wealth of non-mainstream art as art, unqualified.

“Of many remarkable things Miss Gardner did, her greatest accomplishment by far was writing Art Through the Ages, a pioneering attempt to provide — in defiance of narrow tradition — a one-volume survey of the history of all art… It quickly became, and remained, the standard college text for all art history surveys (there was no other, and never had been, in one volume)… Gardner … told us that although dates can be useful and might be mentioned from time to time, she did not value them as highly as she did the more

James Yood encapsulated the cultural, intellectual, art historical placeness of Chicago, that these educators and many others contributed to, “…it all comes down to an expanded consciousness of what 15


CHICAGO CALLING: ART AGAINST THE FLOW

constitutes culture here, the sense that its possibilities are everywhere embedded in lives all around us, that culture is not something that sits on its ass in a museum, its status confirmed by professional cognoscenti, but can happen anytime anywhere, with its greatest energies coming from the streets, not the boulevards.”

Alain Locke attended the opening and recounted that Pippin asked Dali if he was an artist also, which Dali took as an insult and retreated in a snit. This suggests that insider/ outsider, class, and racial lines were present at that early exhibition. However, the Arts Club deserves credit for showing Pippin’s work in the context of fine art, as opposed to folk, self-taught, or other designations. The perennial argument for isolating work by non-mainstream artists from their mainstream counterparts, among other things, suggests that art is created in cultural cul-de-sacs, and deserves or even benefits from being segregated. In his essay in the catalog for the 2015 exhibition Horace Pippin The Way I See It at the Brandywine River Museum (Chadds Ford, PA), Chicago artist Kerry James Marshall rightly states, “artists do not operate in a vacuum; they never have.” Marshall explores thorny issues of Black artists in relation to the inside/ outside dichotomy, which invites a larger view of the positioning of non-mainstream artists of any color, in relation to modernism or any mainstream “ism.” He writes,

In 1974 former students of Whitney Halstead — the Imagist artists Roger Brown, Phil Hanson, Christina Ramberg, and Barbara Rossi — traveled to Europe specifically to visit the Dubuffet collection, then in Paris; the Prinzhorn Collection in Heidelberg, which was not officially open as a museum at the time; and works by Adolph Wölfli in Bern. All artists were deeply impressed by the treasures they encountered. Back in Chicago, Rossi was determined that works from the Prinzhorn and Wölfli collections should be shown in Chicago, where they would be enthusiastically embraced. She urged the director of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago to exhibit Wölfli’s work at the MCA, and the exhibition organized by the Wölfli Foundation was shown there in 1978. Rossi was also determined to bring works from the Prinzhorn Collection to Chicago and was instrumental in securing the exhibition The Prinzhorn Collection at the Smart Museum at the University of Chicago in 1985. Shown in the United States for the first time, works from the Prinzhorn Collection traveled to four museums and included more than 300 objects — a small percentage of the Collection’s holdings but a core sample of iconic works — expanding its sphere of influence across the Atlantic.

“I know Pippin’s work is collected in many of the finest art museums in the United States. But does that mean Pippin’s work is the same as most other artworks we find there?” He dissects the positioning of Black artists in relation to, and by, the mainstream, pondering whose interests are served by the perennial insider/outsider debate. He poses an analogy of Italian Futurists’ dynamic, machine age aesthetic being expressed in Ferrari and Maserati racing cars, embodying modernism across disciplines, and still in currency today, and asks,

The history of exhibitions of non-mainframe work in Chicago museums and galleries reveals local receptivity and national and international mileposts, as well as artists’ involvement in the conversation (as Rossi’s hand in bringing European art to Chicago attests). An early instance of selftaught work presented alongside major mainstream artists occurred in the exhibition of works by Horace Pippin at the Arts Club of Chicago, alongside separate exhibitions of works by Salvador Dali and Fernand Leger, 10 years before Dubuffet presented his Anticultural Positions lecture. The May 24, 1941 opening was reported in the Chicago Herald-American,

“The cost to Black people worldwide for not being the drivers of this kind of modernism has been very high since at least the 15th century. Must we always be passengers carried along on the highways of progress, or can we drive ourselves toward tomorrow?” The artists of color — William Dawson, Mr. Imagination, Joseph Yoakum, Wesley Willis and Dr. Charles Smith—were (or are, in the case of Dr. Charles Smith) acutely aware of race and class discrimination, and they managed their careers and their dignity with care.

A third guest of honor, the quiet, retiring Negro painter Horace Pippin, holding court in his little gallery among his painted lilies and homey snow scenes, but he would be the first to disclaim credit for the box office crowd. The crowd was there to see Dali and his works and they were not disappointed. 16


LISA STONE AND KENNETH C. BURKART

“The Dan Ryan Expressway 33rd St.” 1986. Wesley Willis. 17


CHICAGO CALLING: ART AGAINST THE FLOW

“Picking Cotton.” 1950s. Clementine Hunter. 18


LISA STONE AND KENNETH C. BURKART

COLLECTORS & COLLECTIONS Many Chicago artists engaged with all manner of folk art, objects from material culture, and non-mainstream art. A kind of artist’s museum collecting sensibility emanated from the SAIC, where assembling collections of source materials and living with objects of interest in great density was encouraged. In Chicago, this legacy is preserved and still performing at SAIC’s Roger Brown Study Collection, which Brown referred to as Artists’ Museum of Chicago. Ray Yoshida, who preferred the identity of responder, rather than collector, assembled an extraordinary home collection, which he dubbed Museum of Extraordinary Values. Yoshida’s collection was the progenitor of Roger Brown’s, and likely many other artists’, collections and is preserved at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center.

of curiosity and generosity extends to benevolent lending habits. People are intimate with their art and open-hearted about sharing their treasures. Chicago Calling honors ten artists who lived inventively, and enriched Chicago, immeasurably, with artworks of great originality. Other than Henry Darger, who was reclusive and never connected with the art scene, these artists actively engaged with Chicago’s art-scape. They managed their careers in original ways. Dawson, Godie, and Yoakum took care not to be coopted by their appreciators. Skyllas entered works and was accepted into three Exhibition by Artists of Chicago and Vicinity shows at the Art Institute of Chicago. Most if not all held court with faculty and students, interacted with galleries and collectors and were exhibited in their lifetimes. They took pro-cultural positions. Intuit takes pro-cultural positions. We are transient, the art is not. As Chicago’s relationship with non-mainstream art continues to be explored, we eagerly anticipate how the positions will unfold.

Collectors have and continue to play a critical role in the self-taught scene in Chicago. Myriad private collections are filled with work by self-taught, outsider, and folk art from many cultures. There’s a very non-formal, non-Miesian living-with-art approach that favors salon style, more-ismore arrangements, where genres are mixed and objects are in conversation. Many collectors are seriously drawn to objects from craft and material culture; Bill Swislow’s essay explores this collective fascination with objects, by artists and others, many of which were created by makers whose names are unknown. Most fortunately, a prevailing spirit 19


CHICAGO CALLING: ART AGAINST THE FLOW

“Log Cabin: Housetop”. 1945. Martha Jane Pettway. 20


LISA STONE AND KENNETH C. BURKART

COLLECTION LIST William Dawson (1901-1990) Flower Bud with Bird, early 1970s Carved and painted wood, varnish 11 x 8 ½ in Collection of Susann Craig

William Dawson (1901-1990) Gorilla, 1970s Carved and painted wood, varnish 10 x 5 ½ x 3 in. Collection of Susann Craig

William Dawson (1901-1990) Horse in Fence, early 1970s Carved and painted wood, varnish 3 x 6 x 2 in. Collection of Susann Craig Included in the original exhibition, Black Folk Art in America, 1930-1980

William Dawson (1901-1990) Totem (with one house and three heads), 1970s Carved and painted wood, varnish 17 ½ x 3 ½ x 2 ½ in. Collection of Susann Craig Included in the original exhibition, Black Folk Art in America, 1930-1980

William Dawson (1901-1990) House, early 1970s Carved and painted wood, varnish 8 ½ x 11 in. Collection of Susann Craig

William Dawson (1901-1990) Man with Striped Shirt, 1970s Carved and painted wood, varnish 10 x 4 x 2 in. Collection of Susann Craig

William Dawson (1901-1990) Black Horse, 1970s Carved and painted wood, varnish 3 ¾ x 6 x 1 in. Collection of Susann Craig Included in the original exhibition, Black Folk Art in America, 1930-1980

William Dawson (1901-1990) Man in White Hat and Yellow Shirt, 1970s Carved and painted wood, varnish 9 ½ x 2 ¾ x 1 ¾ in. Collection of Susann Craig William Dawson (1901-1990) Man in White Pants, 1970s Carved and painted wood, varnish 10 x 2 ¾ x 1 ½ in. Collection of Susann Craig

William Dawson (1901-1990) Brown Dog, 1970s Carved and painted wood, varnish 1 x 2 ½ x ¾ in. Collection of Susann Craig Included in the original exhibition, Black Folk Art in America, 1930-1980 21


CHICAGO CALLING: ART AGAINST THE FLOW

William Dawson (1901-1990) White Dog, 1970s Carved and painted wood, varnish 1 x 2 ½ x ¾ in. Collection of Susann Craig Included in the original exhibition, Black Folk Art in America, 1930-1980

William Dawson (1901-1990) Horse with Orange Halter, n.d. Carved and painted wood, varnish 3 x 3 3/8 x 1 in. Collection of Susann Craig William Dawson (1901-1990) Man, n.d. Carved and painted wood, varnish 15 x 5 in. Collection of Susann Craig William Dawson (1901-1990) Man, n.d. Carved and painted wood, varnish 8 x 2 ¾ x 1 ¼ in. Collection of Susann Craig

William Dawson (1901-1990) Man in Striped Shirt, 1975 Carved and painted wood and hair 9 ½ x 4 ½ x 1 ½ in. Collection of Susann Craig Included in the original exhibition, Black Folk Art in America, 1930-1980 William Dawson (1901-1990) Man in Striped Shirt, 1975 Carved and painted wood and hair 13 x 4 ¾ x 1 ½ in. Collection of Susann Craig Included in the original exhibition, Black Folk Art in America, 1930-1980

William Dawson (1901-1990) Man with Fez Hat and Skirt, n.d. Carved and painted wood, varnish 15 x 4 ½ x 1 ½ in. Collection of Susann Craig William Dawson (1901-1990) Woman in White Skirt, n.d. Carved and painted wood, varnish 10 x 2 x 2 in. Collection of Susann Craig

William Dawson (1901-1990) Bird, 1979 Carved and painted wood, varnish 8 ½ x 5 ¼ x 1 in. Collection of Susann Craig

Thornton Dial (1928-2016) Untitled, 1985 Mixed media 22 x 33 x 23 in. William S. Arnett Collection

William Dawson (1901-1990) Ann, 1980s Carved and painted wood, varnish 15 x 4 ¼ x 2 ¼ in. Collection of Susann Craig William Dawson (1901-1990) Betsey, 1980s Carved and painted wood, varnish 16 ¼ x 4 ½ x 2 ¼ in. Collection of Susann Craig

Thornton Dial (1928-2016) Royal Flag, c. 1997-98 Mixed media 78 x 80 x 7 in. William S. Arnett Collection of Souls Grown Deep Foundation

William Dawson (1901-1990) Suzie, 1980s Carved and painted wood, varnish 17 ¾ x 5 x 3 in. Collection of Susann Craig

Sam Doyle (1906-1985) Lincoln in Frogmore, c. 1981 House paint on roofing tin 52 ½ x 25 ¾ in. Collection of Robert A. Roth

William Dawson (1901-1990) Woman Red Spattered Dress, 1989 Carved and painted wood, varnish 17 ½ x 6 x ¾ in. Collection of Susann Craig

Sam Doyle (1906-1985) Miss Lucky Food Stamp, 1983 Paint on metal sheets 46 ½ x 49 in. The Arient Family Collection

William Dawson (1901-1990) Brown Horse, n.d. Paint and carved wood 3 ¾ x 6 x 1 in. Collection of Susann Craig

Tarik Echols (b. 1973) Fly Away, 2012 Watercolor, crayon and collage on paper 21 x 24 x 1 in. Little City Arts 22


LISA STONE AND KENNETH C. BURKART

William Edmondson (1874-1951) Angel, n.d. Carved limestone 18 ½ x 13 x 5 ½ in. Collection of Robert A. Roth

Joe Minter (b. 1943) Untitled, 1990 Mixed media 84 x 19 x 16 in. Collection of William S. Arnett

William Edmondson (1874-1951) Two Doves, n.d. Carved limestone 10 x 13 x 9 in. Collection of Lael and Eugenie Johnson

Sister Gertrude Morgan (1900-1980) Lazarus Come Forth, 1965-1975 Ink and acrylic on paper 13 x 25 ¼ in. Collection of Susann Craig Included in the original exhibition, Black Folk Art in America, 1930-1980

William Hawkins (1895-1990) 5 Horses, n.d. Enamel on board 51 x 73 x 2 ½ in. Collection of Lael and Eugenie Johnson

Sister Gertrude Morgan (1900-1980) A Poem of My Calling, 1972 Ink and acrylic on paper 8 ¼ x 15 in. Collection of Susann Craig Included in the original exhibition, Black Folk Art in America, 1930-1980

William Hawkins (1895-1990) The Pen 150 Tears of Crime, n.d. Enamel on board 52 x 52 x 2 ½ in. Collection of Lael and Eugenie Johnson

John Bunion “J.B.” Murray (1908-1988) Untitled, 1980s Ink and watercolor 33 x 27 in. Collection of Robert Grossett

Lonnie Holley (b. 1950) You Alley Thing, 2007 Mixed media 52 x 61 x 16 in. Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art Gift of Lonnie Holley, 2007.7.1

Martha Jane Pettway (1893-2005) Blocks and Stripes Work- Clothes Quilt, 1940s Cotton, denim and corduroy 67 x 72 in. William S. Arnett Collection of Souls Grown Deep Foundation

Lonnie Holley (b. 1950) Untitled, 2015 Mixed media 80 x 19 x 18 in. Collection of William S. Arnett

David Philpot (b. 1940) Geometric Staff, 1981 Carved wood and rope 78 x 3 in. Courtesy of David and Marsha Philpot

Shirley Hudson (b. 1959) Mind Portrait, n.d. Acrylic on board 25 x 19 in. Courtesy of the Artist

David Philpot (b. 1940) Harlequin Staff, 1995–2010 Mixed media 73 x 2 in. Courtesy of David and Marsha Philpot

Clementine Hunter (1886-1988) Caring for Elderly Man, c. late 1960s Oil on canvas panel 13 ¾ x 25 ¾ in. Collection of Scott H. Lang

David Philpot (b. 1940) Africanus Staff, 2004 Mixed media 76 x 3 in. Courtesy of David and Marsha Philpot

Ronald Lockett (1965-1998) Rebirth, 1987 Wire, nails and paint on Masonite 24 x 30 in. Collection of William S. Arnett

David Philpot (b. 1940) Diamond Staff, 2008 Mixed media 76 x 3 in. Courtesy of David and Marsha Philpot

Ronald Lockett (1965-1998) Untitiled (Horse), 1987 Mixed media 43 x 51 x 6 in. Collection of William S. Arnett 23


CHICAGO CALLING: ART AGAINST THE FLOW

Mose Tolliver (1919-2006) Untitled (Large male/small female), n.d. Acrylic on wood 22 x 23 ½ in. Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art Gift of Phyllis Kind, 2006.22.10

David Philpot (b. 1940) Spiral Snakes Staff, n.d. Mixed media 71 x 4 in. Courtesy of David and Marsha Philpot David Philpot (b. 1940) Stool, n.d. Mixed media 27 x 27 x 21 in. Courtesy of David and Marsha Philpot

Bill Traylor (c. 1854-1949) Untitled, c. 1939-1942 Poster paint and pencil on cardboard 26 7/8 x 18 ¾ in. Private Collection

Elijah Pierce (1892-1984) Jesus Calming the Storm, 1965 Carved and painted wood relief 21 ½ x 12 ½ in. Collection of Mike and Cindy Noland

Bill Traylor (c. 1854-1949) Man Leading Dog, n.d. Poster paint and pencil on cardboard 27 x 26 x ½ in. Collection of Angie Mills and Jan Petry

Elijah Pierce (1892-1984) Goat, c. 1975 Carved and painted wood, glass, and chicken bones 8 ½ x 8 ½ x 2 ½ in. Collection of Scott H. Lang Included in the original exhibition, Black Folk Art in America, 1930-1980

Bill Traylor (c. 1854-1949) Woman with Basket and Bird, n.d. Poster paint and pencil on cardboard 17 x 16 x 1 ½ in. Collection of Lael and Eugenie Johnson Inez Nathaniel Walker (1911-1990) Untitled (Man), 1977 Mixed media 16 ½ x 14 in. Collection of Angie Mills and Jan Petry

Elijah Pierce (1892-1984) Leopard, c. 1975 Carved wood, ink and rhinestones 6 x 9 ¾ x 3 ½ in. Collection of Scott H. Lang

Inez Nathaniel Walker(1911-1990) Untitled (Pink-faced woman with purple dress), 1977 Mixed media 12 x 18 in. Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art Gift of Margaret Robson, 2006.25.3

Elijah Pierce (1892-1984) Tiger, 1981 Carved and painted wood 8 ¾ x 15 ¼ x 1 ¾ in. Collection of Scott H. Lang Included in the original exhibition, Black Folk Art in America, 1930-1980

Mr. Imagination (Gregory Warmack) (1948-2012) Carved Sandstone Head, 1986 Sandstone carving 13 x 10 x 4 ½ in. Collection of Joel Hall and Craig L. Davis

X (1892-1984) Biblical Lion and Lamb, 1983 Carved and painted wood relief 12 x 17 in. Collection of Mike and Cindy Noland Prophet Royal Robertson (1930-1997) Untitled, late 1980s Mixed media 28 x 22 in. Collection of Susann Craig

Mr. Imagination (Gregory Warmack) (1948-2012) Mr. I.’s Hands, 2001 Concrete Right hand: 9 ½ x 4 ¼ x 1 in. Left hand: 10 x 5 x 1 in. Collection of Joel Hall and Craig L. Davis Mr. Imagination (Gregory Warmack) (1948-2012) Women of Somalia, n.d. Bottle caps, whisk brooms, wood putty, paint, paint brushes, buttons, and shells 90 x 20 x 10 in. Collection of Cleo F. Wilson

Dr. Charles Smith (b. 1940) Butler Boys, n.d. Plaster or cement 28 ½ x 19 ½ x 7 in. / 26 x 16 x 5 in. Collection of Patric McCoy

24


LISA STONE AND KENNETH C. BURKART

Wesley Willis (1963-2003) Get Beeped Go Becker, 1993 Marker on poster board 28 x 41 in. Wesley Willis (1963-2003) Wrigley Field, 1993 Marker on poster board 28 x 41 in. The Arient Family Collection Joseph E. Yoakum (1890-1972) Biscian Bay St. Nazair France by Joseph E. Yoakum, c. 19651972 Black ballpoint pen and watercolor on wove paper, varnish 18 7/8 x 25 15/16 in. Roger Brown Study Collection, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago Included in the original exhibition, Black Folk Art in America, 1930-1980 Joseph E. Yoakum (1890-1972) The First Steam Engine to be assigned to the service of the Kansas City Fort Scott and Memphis Run between Kansas City and Springfield Missouri on the St. Louis and San Francisco Rail Road pulling the Kansas City and Florida special from Kansas City to Jacksonville Florida in year 1901 by Joseph E. Yoakum, c. 1965–1972 Black ballpoint pen, colored pencils and colored chalk on wove paper 19 x 12 in. Roger Brown Study Collection, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago Included in the original exhibition, Black Folk Art in America, 1930-1980 Joseph E. Yoakum (1890-1972) Mounds on Sugar plantation of Maui Valley Island shaped Hawaii Island in Hawaii National Park by Joseph E. Yoakum APR 24 1970, 1970 Black ballpoint pen, colored chalks and colored pencils on wove paper 12 3/16 x 19 in. Roger Brown Study Collection, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago Included in the original exhibition, Black Folk Art in America, 1930-1980

25


CHICAGO CALLING: ART AGAINST THE FLOW

EXHIBITION DATES

JUNE 29 2018-JANUARY 6 2019

Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art

APRIL 2019-JULY 2019 La Halle Saint Pierre, Paris

SEPTEMBER 2019-JANUARY 2020 Pronghorn Collection, Heidelberg

FEBRUARY 2020 -MAY 2020 Collection d’l Art Brut, Lausanne

MAY 2020-AUGUST 2020

Outsider Art Museum, Amsterdam

26


CURATED BY KENNETH C. BURKHART, AN INDEPENDENT CURATOR, AND LISA STONE, CURATOR OF THE ROGER BROWN STUDY COLLECTION OF THE SCHOOL OF THE ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO. DESIGNED BY RUBY BAEK

INTERMEDIATE TYPOGRAPHY 2018


Chicago Calling  
Chicago Calling  
Advertisement