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Fixers

EVALUATION STUDY: THE SOCIAL IMPACT OF ‘FIXERS’ April 2014


Fixers Evaluation Report Fixers Evaluation Report

FOREWORD Then I met Fixers and they said, ‘OK, we’ll help.’ Before long, I found myself in the bizarre scenario of interviewing my own father for a broadcast report on my ‘Fix’ that ultimately appeared on the evening news. Looking back, not only did that help publicise my campaign to a wider audience, it also helped me forge a relationship with my dad that I’d never had.

Sam Thomas, Founder of ‘Men Get Eating Disorders Too’

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hen I signed up to become a Fixer in 2008, I was in recovery from bulimia but it had taken me years to receive appropriate support and I felt strongly I knew the reason why. It was because I am male. Driven by a desire to help others who, like me, might not have realised that men can get eating disorders too I wanted to use my own experiences to make a difference. Time was critical because ‘size zero’ was the aspiration of the day. I tried to start a website, to raise awareness and provide information and advice specific to a man’s needs. However, I couldn’t set one up alone and I was turned down everywhere I went for help. It seemed like everyone had their own agenda and no-one was willing to put their trust in me.

The website launch in 2009 was just the start. With Fixers support and encouragement, I have gone on to become the voice of male eating disorders in the UK. I frequently speak at conferences and give media interviews and have been recognised with funding and awards in my own right. This year we marked five years of my charity ‘Men Get Eating Disorders Too’ and analysis shows my message has reached over 18 million people. Fixers were the first to give me a voice and a platform when I didn’t fit with any other organisation and this evaluation shows while my circumstances were personal to me, as a Fixer I am far from unique.

www.mengetedstoo.co.uk

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CONTENTS 1 Executive summary 2 Methodology 3 About Fixers 4 Impact framework 5 Motivations 6 Direct outcomes 7 Longer term outcomes 8 Areas for improvement 9 Discussion

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Fixers Evaluation Report

SUMMARY Fixers is the public-facing brand of Public Service Broadcasting Trust. It supports young people to run their own social action projects. The aim of this evaluation is to understand the social impact of Fixers during its second phase, which ran from August 2012. 4,170 Fixers joined between August 2012 and September 2013, and more will join in the rest of the phase. The evaluation draws on engagement with 117 Fixers through focus groups and a telephone survey. The sample of young people who contributed to this evaluation is diverse in terms of age, gender and background and issues addressed through the Fixes. It is also important to note that Fixers interviewed are at different stages of project development. We also conducted 12 in-depth interviews with stakeholders. Stakeholders are teachers, youth workers, police, community leaders and other people that supported the Fixers’ work or have a perspective on their social impact. The research was conducted between September 2013 and January 2014.

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central finding from the evaluation is the diversity in Fixers, their experiences and the outcomes they create. The young people who participated in the evaluation are diverse in terms of their backgrounds, interests and life experiences and, through Fixers, seek to address a wide variety of issues. Feedback from young people and stakeholders who work with Fixers demonstrates that the Fixer-led model works in this wide variety of contexts. Among this diversity, the evaluation highlights a number of shared motivations, experiences and outcomes. Together these patterns inform a ‘model of social impact’, which is presented in detail in section 4. A common finding across the cohort of Fixers interviewed is that they are led by a desire to act on an issue that is important to them, which may follow a personal experience or a desire to help others. Many Fixers have had an adverse personal experience (for example homelessness, cyber-bullying or self-harm), and are running a Fix to help others in the same situation. Data identified by PSBT indicates that 9 in 10 Fixers are tackling an issue of which they have personal experience. Others, including some taking part in the evaluation are seeking to address an issue that affects a friend or people in their

community (for example a young person who has noticed local homelessness). Motivations relating to personal development, such as learning skills, building confidence or improving employment opportunities, are not strong drivers. Nonetheless, almost all Fixers reported that they achieved these outcomes, and this often came as a surprise to them. 97% reported benefits such as improved confidence or communication skills. Young people and stakeholders talk with enthusiasm about the social impact of Fixers’ projects. A key outcome, cited by many, is the role Fixers plays in giving young people a voice. Stakeholders and some of the young people interviewed indicate that this outcome is unique to Fixers. They have not encountered other programmes that allow young people to address their own priorities. They described how Fixers enables young people to speak out about ‘their issues’ and in such a way that they become heard, understood and respected by others in their communities. For many, this changes attitudes towards young people and can motivate others to use their voice to effect positive change. Participants in the qualitative sessions describe other social benefits, both for Fixers and wider groups of young people who connect with their projects.

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Fixers Evaluation Report

For those who were motivated by adverse life experiences often reported that Fixers had helped them address and in some cases resolve these experiences. Others report improved relationships within families and peer groups. In addition to personal benefits for Fixers, there are a wide range of social outcomes for a diverse range of groups. For example, some Fixers had evidence of increased awareness of the issues they addressed, increased communications about difficult issues within communities and engagement of senior figures (such as politicians). The involvement of a wide range of groups in projects means that the model is effective in generating social capital. Through the evaluation, partner agencies cited a number of benefits of working with Fixers. Stakeholders interviewed explained that it provided them with access to additional platforms and tools with which to communicate effectively to a wider audience. Other benefits included experience of working with a national partner, learning from young people about the needs of target groups and having access to important resources that they can share with other partners and clients. Overall, Fixers achieves highly positive feedback, with 95% of Fixers in the telephone survey saying they would recommend it to a friend. Fixers has a strong base of support from young people and stakeholders. A small number of interviewees raised issues they would like Fixers to reflect on or address in planning for the future including: > Reducing the time between production and dissemination of resources > Ensuring sustainability: several participants in the evaluation are considering how they might develop their Fix, and welcome conversations they have had with YPCs about different options. > Expansion: several respondents were keen for Fixers to support other young people in their area and would like to see Fixers grow to be able to deliver this. 2

Dante (22) Stockwell: Stopping gang stereotypes

The evaluation did not involve a review of other youth work and volunteering initiatives that may be considered peers of Fixers. However, participants in the research often had experience of other initiatives and were able to draw comparisons. Three areas of differentiation emerged: > The Fixers model is based around the young person, meaning they are able to define their own goals and choose what activities they will undertake. Stakeholders and some young people compare this to other schemes that are prescriptive in terms of issues they want young people to address, or the profile of young people they engage with. > Fixers is open to all, while other initiatives focus on a particular demographic or target group. Fixers’ flexible and supportive model is considered suitable for all young people including those who have experienced difficult life experiences. > The impact can be transformative. Some young people reported a step-change in their personal situation, confidence, health and mind-set as a direct result of their involvement in Fixers. Several reported securing a job or accessing a course. Others described feeling that they are now ‘in a different place’, with a different perspective on their life and future as a result of working on their Fix.


Fixers Evaluation Report

METHODOLOGY

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his evaluation was conducted by Firetail between September 2013 and January 2014, with the objective of understanding the mechanisms through which Fixers create a social impact, and the extent of the social impact. ‘Impact’ has been explored at the level of individual Fixes (projects run by young people), through engagement with Fixers (young people participating) and other people that have been involved in their work. The evaluation covers the period of Fixer’s funding from the Big Lottery Fund, which started in April 2012. Fixers were first recruited in August 2012. Methods Given the diversity in Fixers’ experience and the wide range of social outcomes, a primarily qualitative approach to researching impact was most appropriate. We aimed to capture perspectives from both Fixers and other stakeholders that were involved in the Fixes, and to develop high-level quantitative insight into distribution of these experiences across the cohort. The evaluation used a methodology with six stages:

1. Review of outputs and metrics. The review of outputs and metrics was based on PSBT’s database of projects and participants. 2. Focus groups with Fixers. Three groups were run, in Glasgow, London and Bristol, each with between seven and nine Fixers. Each group lasted two hours and discussion focused on Fixers’ motivations for involvement and their perceptions of impact on themselves, their peers and wider groups. 3. Development of a ‘framework of impact’. Based on the findings from the focus groups, we developed a framework to describe the types of impact that Fixes create, and how Fixers’ journeys lead to these changes. 4. Quantitative survey with Fixers. Based on the findings from the focus groups, we developed a questionnaire to help us understand the distribution of different experiences among the whole group of Fixers. The survey was run over the phone with a sample of 94 Fixers. The sample was not fully randomised, as Fixers were not included in the sample if PSBT felt they were to be too early in their journey to be able to answer all of the questions. 5. Engagement with stakeholders. ‘Stakeholders’ are individuals that were involved in a Fix or have a perspective on the impact of the Fix. We conducted in-depth interviews with 12 stakeholders, including youth workers, teachers, local politicians and police.

Richard (19) Manchester: Tackling discrimination against disabled people in the music industry

6. Other opportunities for Fixers to input. As the focus groups and telephone interview included a relatively limited number of young people, all Fixers had an opportunity to provide feedback on their experience via SMS. 3


Fixers Evaluation Report

Birmingham: First Good Gestures Day 2013, spreading positivity with a hug, high five or handshake.

Limitations The main limitations of the methodology were the following factors...

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Some types of impact could not be evaluated: > Longer term impacts: Many of the projects that were included in this process were still underway or had finished recently. Impacts that take longer to develop, such as improved life chances for the young people, could therefore not be fully evaluated. > Some ‘wider’ impacts: Fixes often aim to engage a wider audience through broadcast media. The evaluation did not engage with these audiences. > Issue or sector-level impacts: Many Fixes have common subject matter (e.g. body image, crime), and in some cases PSBT has organised issue-level campaigns, such as a campaign around road safety in Autumn 2013 that involved Fixers from across England. This evaluation did not explore the combined impact of Fixes at issue level.

Anonymity of informants (particularly young people) had to be maintained. This meant that some feedback could not be included in this report because it could be attributed to the informant. This feedback has, however, informed the discussion of the findings. Fixers and stakeholders involved in the evaluation were selected by PSBT. Some Fixers and stakeholders have not been involved for long enough to contribute meaningfully. PSBT selected participants based on their ability to contribute to the evaluation, and not based on them having positive or negative views. This may mean that the experiences of Fixers that were more peripherally involved in their projects have not been captured.


Fixers Evaluation Report

ABOUT FIXERS

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ixers is the public-facing brand of PSBT. Through Fixers, PSBT supports young people to run their own social action projects. Its second phase has been funded by the Big Lottery Fund from April 2012, and started recruiting Fixers in August 2012. Its first phase was funded by ‘v’ and was called ‘ITV Fixers’. This evaluation focuses on the second phase of Fixers. Fixes are set up and run by ‘lead Fixers’, with support from other Fixers, who are often peers, school friends or other young people interested in the issue. There have been 4,170 Fixers in the first 13 months. This section outlines the numbers of Fixers and projects run during this time, and the demographic breakdown of Fixers. Where possible, Fixers have been benchmarked with the general population of young people. The following text, provided by PSBT, gives a description of Fixers.

Lorna(19) Bridgewater: Stopping the cycle of crime

Fixers is a growing movement of young people tackling the issues they care about in order to make a difference to others. It works locally with young people aged 16-25. Participation is based on a simple idea you can do anything you want to, providing you make a difference to at least one other person’. There is no selection or application process. To date, more than 11,000 Fixers in 82% of local authority areas around the UK have started (and continue) over 1,300 unique social action projects tackling issues including stereotyping of a range of minority groups, abuse, foster care, employability, gang culture, crime, health conditions, mental health and safety amongst others. Fixers provides tailored support for projects identified and led by young people. We work with young people in their own settings and in their own time. It starts with an individual’s personal experience and empathy for the issue. This motivates them to take action and they go on to encourage and inspire collective action within a community.  They create their Fix, and we give them practical help. We use media platforms, including television news, to talk about the issues they are working on. In their campaigns, they work with media professionals creating unique, first-hand content about their experiences to share with other people. Through this content (e.g. films, songs, music videos, websites and events) they raise awareness and engage local audiences in conversations so that others learn from their experience. Our experience over five years shows communities directly benefitting from Fixers:  they recruit new volunteers to community work and projects, they use resources created through the Fix; they form and build new relationships; they change attitudes and behaviours.

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Fixers Evaluation Report

Size of Fixers 4,170 Fixers were recruited between August 2012 and September 2013, averaging 294 new Fixers per month. These Fixers have worked on 497 projects, averaging 36 new projects per month and 8.4 Fixers per project. The rate of new

recruitment has been constant during this period. However, this cannot be used to forecast future recruitment because Fixers has only recently reached its full capacity in terms of staffing, as shown in Figure 2.

Figure 1: Fixers and projects started in phase 2 of Fixers

Figure 2: Fixers staffing and funding

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Fixers Evaluation Report

Project subject matter Fixers choose the topic of their own project. PSBT’s data shows that Fixers projects address a wide range of themes, which are categorised as follows:

Safety > Road safety > Human trafficking

Prejudice > Stereotypes of young people > Homophobia

Mind > Eating disorders > Self-harm

Work and play > Unemployment > Staying in education

Home > Homelessness > Young carers

Abuse > Bullying > Domestic violence

Relating > Young parenthood > Bereavement

Eco > Recycling > Use of local green space

Crime > Knife crime > Having a criminal record

Body > Fitness > Sexually transmitted infections

Drugs > Legal highs > Addiction

Alcohol > Binge-drinking > Addiction

Many projects fall into more than one of these themes. This diversity of issues addressed was also reflected in the experiences of Fixers and stakeholders that took part in the evaluation. Analysis of project themes across demographic groups shows that male Fixers are more likely to address crime, while female Fixers are more likely to address abuse. It also highlighted that BME Fixers are much more likely than other Fixers to address crime and gay or bisexual Fixers are more likely to address prejudice.

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Fixers Evaluation Report

Demographics This section provides a snapshot of the age, sex and ethnicity of Fixers, compared to the general population of 16 – 24 year-olds in England. Fixers does not have demographic targets or discriminate in terms of entry, and this data does not represent progress against targets. Age and sex Fixers have a mean age of 18 years and 7 months at registration, with 16 being the most common age for new Fixers. 54% of Fixers are female, compared to 51% of 16 – 24 year-olds in England.

Figure 3: Age of Fixers at registration

Ethnicity The proportion of minority ethnic groups among Fixers is similar to 16 – 24 year-olds in England (24%). Compared to the general population, black young people are overrepresented in Fixers and Asian young people are underrepresented.

Figure 4: Proportion of Fixers from minority ethnic groups

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Fixers Evaluation Report


Fixers Evaluation Report

IMPACT FRAMEWORK

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he framework introduced in this section is based on the impacts described by Fixers and project stakeholders that took part in the evaluation. It is designed to reflect the journeys that Fixers go through and the types of impact they create. In contrast to many youth work and volunteering programmes, the framework is based on the motivations and experiences of participants, rather than seeking to design a scheme around a pre-defined model. This section outlines the framework and provides examples of common ways the framework applies to Fixers’ experiences.

3. direct outcomes (which can be observed during or immediately after the Fix). 4. longer term outcomes (which Fixers or stakeholders usually expect to observe in the future). Within each stage, experiences and impacts have been summarised into a small number of categories. Fixers take different journeys through this framework. It allows the diversity of impacts to be described, as well as the common experiences that Fixers report. Common journeys Based on all of the evidence collected for this evaluation, we have developed three illustrative Fixer journeys. These journeys are fictitious, and are not based on any individual Fixer and each includes elements from several Fixers. The routes through the framework represent the most important elements of each journey, and those that may be explicitly highlighted by the Fixer or a stakeholder, rather than covering every part of their journey. For many Fixers, every part of the framework will form a part of the journey.

Impact framework Fixers have a wide variety of experiences. There are also commonalities in their motivations, the activities they undertake during their Fix and the immediate and longer-term impacts the Fixes create. The range of experiences can be summarised in four stages: 1. the Fixers’ motivations for their involvement. 2. the Fix itself (which includes activities conducted during the Fix and the tangible outputs of the Fix).

MOTIVATIONS THE FIX (activities) THE FIX (outputs) DIRECT OUTCOMES LONG-TERM OUTCOMES

Empathy with Someone Else’s Experience

A Personal Experience

Work with Peers + Collaborators

Plan Fix

Resource

Skills + Confidence

Improved Life Chances for the Fixer

Work with Communities

Media Coverage

Resolution of personal issue

Voice (individual + collective)

Increased Social Capital

Reflect + Plan Next Steps

Audience Dialogue

Awareness of Groups at Risk

More People seek Help or Take Action

Awareness of Wider Groups

Benefits for Partner Organisations

Changed Social Attitudes 9


Fixers Evaluation Report

Kate’s Journey I have just left college and live with my family in a small, rural town. I used to self-harm. It was difficult to explain to the people around me what was happening. They found it hard to talk to me about it. There is a lot of stigma about self-harming. I started blogging and was then approached by Fixers. They helped me develop a website which tells young people where they can go for support. It also talks about self-harm in a way that helps others to understand it better. I know that people are visiting the site and hope the information is getting through. They will know that there is support there and that they are not the only people facing this. Our local radio station found out about the website and asked me to do an interview about my Fix. Feeling that I have made a difference now makes me want to do more things to make life better for people. I already have a few ideas about what I want to do next. For now, I can talk to my friends about my Fix, which helps them understand what I was going through. I know that young people round here are talking about self-harm. Doing the blog and website has been a cathartic for me and I am more confident now.

MOTIVATIONS THE FIX (activities) THE FIX (outputs) DIRECT OUTCOMES LONG-TERM OUTCOMES 10

Empathy with Someone Else’s Experience

A Personal Experience

Work with Peers + Collaborators

Plan Fix

Resource

Skills + Confidence

Improved Life Chances for the Fixer

Figure 6: Kate’s intended journey is indicated by the coloured-in boxes. Boxes with dashed outlines represent unexpected outcomes for Kate. In general we see all the direct outcomes and outcomes being achieved over time.

Work with Communities

Media Coverage

Resolution of personal issue

Increased Social Capital

Voice (individual + collective)

Reflect + Plan Next Steps

Audience Dialogue

Awareness of Groups at Risk

More People seek Help or Take Action

Awareness of Wider Groups

Changed Social Attitudes

Benefits for Partner Organisations


Fixers Evaluation Report

Luke’s Journey I live in an areas where it is all “me, me, me.” But there are homeless people in our area who have very little and get a lot of abuse from people round here. My Fix was to make a short film about life as a homeless person and to share it with local children in schools. I hadn’t really made anything creative like that before so Fixers really helped there. Lots of people got involved: some homeless guys, teachers and the council. We showed it at three schools. I could tell the children were really excited by it and had lots of questions to ask. I think it has helped them see homeless people differently. We are now trying to find a way of showing the film to some older people where we live. Through the project a charity for homeless young people got in touch with me. I showed them the film and they asked if they could share it with other people who work at the charity. They have now offered me a part time job there while I finish my studies.

MOTIVATIONS THE FIX (activities) THE FIX (outputs) DIRECT OUTCOMES LONG-TERM OUTCOMES

Figure 7: Luke’s intended journey is indicated by coloured-in boxes. Boxes with dashed outlines represent impacts that the Fixer did not plan. Non-coloured boxes in activities and outputs happened but are not a focus for the Fixer. Other non-coloured boxes represent a Fixer’s perception of where they ‘had arrived’ during this study.

Empathy with Someone Else’s Experience

A Personal Experience

Work with Peers + Collaborators

Plan Fix

Resource

Skills + Confidence

Improved Life Chances for the Fixer

Work with Communities

Media Coverage

Resolution of personal issue

Voice (individual + collective)

Increased Social Capital

Reflect + Plan Next Steps

Audience Dialogue

Awareness of Groups at Risk

More People seek Help or Take Action

Awareness of Wider Groups

Benefits for Partner Organisations

Changed Social Attitudes 11


Fixers Evaluation Report

Alisha’s Journey Last year I lost one of my best friends in a road accident. He was in a car with another young driver. It has been a very difficult time for his family and for his friends too. We really struggled as a group to deal with it. We didn’t know what to say to each other. It felt like our group of friends was falling apart. Teenagers need to know the risks when they first start driving. They need to be aware of what they can do to try to keep themselves and others safe. Through the Fix we produced a short animation to make people aware of the risks of being a young driver. We have been schools and youth clubs all round where live to show it to young people and have spent a lot of time talking to people and answering their questions. The local newspaper were also interested in our project and they published a story. Last month we met with the police. They are worried about young drivers and think that our project can help get the message across to them. We have another meeting with them in a couple of months. Nothing makes losing a friend better. We still miss him all the time. But we hope that because of what we are doing other people will think more carefully about the dangers on the road, about their responsibilities. And for us, it has helped us to come back together as a group of friends. Working on the Fix has helped us start talking to each other again.

MOTIVATIONS THE FIX (activities) THE FIX (outputs) DIRECT OUTCOMES LONG-TERM OUTCOMES 12

Figure 8: Alisha’s intended journey is indicated by coloured-in boxes. Boxes with dashed outlines represent impacts that the Fixer did not plan. Non-coloured boxes in activities and outputs happened but are not a focus for the Fixer. Other non-coloured boxes represent a Fixer’s perception of where they ‘had arrived’ during this study.

Empathy with Someone Else’s Experience

A Personal Experience

Work with Peers + Collaborators

Plan Fix

Resource

Skills + Confidence

Improved Life Chances for the Fixer

Work with Communities

Media Coverage

Resolution of personal issue

Increased Social Capital

Voice (individual + collective)

Reflect + Plan Next Steps

Audience Dialogue

Awareness of Groups at Risk

More People seek Help or Take Action

Awareness of Wider Groups

Changed Social Attitudes

Benefits for Partner Organisations


Fixers Evaluation Report

MOTIVATIONS

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ixers’ motivations were tested through in-depth discussions in the focus groups. We used these discussions to design a question about motivations in the quantitative survey. Both methods demonstrate that Fixers’ main motivation is to help others (for example by raising awareness of an issue relevant to them). Motivations relating to personal development, such as learning skills or improving employment opportunities, are not strong drivers. Focus group results Fixers’ primary reasons for getting involved with Fixers stem from an ambition to improve things for others, through providing support for those at risk, addressing a problem or gap in their community, or to challenge stereotypes and

stigmatisation. Personal outcomes such as a desire to acquire skills or gain experience were not spontaneously mentioned by any of the young people in the focus groups. Many indicate that the personal benefits only became apparent to them as they develop their Fixes and it is clear that achieving their initial aims remains their key focus at all stages of the projects. Quantitative results In the quantitative survey, participants were asked to select which motivators apply to them from a list of prompts. Even here, where participants could select as many prompts as felt relevant to them, the most frequently cited motivators are wanting to improve something for others or in their community. This is shown in the chart below.

Figure 9: Proportion of Fixers feeling that each motivation applies to them (n = 94)

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Fixers Evaluation Report

DIRECT OUTCOMES

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irect outcomes are considered to be those that could be observed during or immediately after a Fix. The overwhelming majority of Fixers who engaged with the evaluation through the focus groups and survey, and all the stakeholders interviewed, are clear that Fixes generate a range of immediate outcomes. Many describe the key outcome as giving young people who engage with Fixers ‘a voice’ and they discuss how this contributes to how young people develop skills and confidence.

Direct Outcomes: a summary of the quantitative data Figure 10 shows the extent to which a broader sample of Fixers perceives direct personal benefits. It tracks the kinds of immediate impact respondents have experienced and indicates where they feel they might see impact in the future. It is striking that 97% feel that their project produced at least one of the four impacts listed. It is important to note that those that did not perceive an impact may not have felt the impact was relevant to them.

Other direct outcomes frequently cited by participants include: > Resolution of a personal issue. > Raising awareness of issues for groups at risk. > Raising awareness of issues among wider groups. > Benefits for partner organisations.

Figure 10: Proportion of Fixers that report that their experience has resulted in a direct impact on them (n = 94)

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Fixers Evaluation Report

Fixer’s Personal Growth: confidence, voice and skills Confidence Many of those taking part in the discussion groups and 82% of respondents from the quantitative survey cite increased confidence as a personal benefit. All the stakeholders interviewed describe seeing the confidence of the Fixers they have engaged increase through their respective projects. Discussions with young people and stakeholders provide insight into how Fixers develop confidence. An important factor is that Fixers act on issues they identify as important to them and are supported to have a ‘voice’. The support offered to them by YPCs is particularly mentioned in this context, with several Fixers saying they draw confidence from knowing there is someone there to support their ideas. ‘Voice’ is explored further below. The aspects of Fixers that young people and stakeholders describe as contributing to an increased sense of confidence are: Taking responsibility for a project: > Being enabled to take ownership and lead a project. > Managing a process and seeing its results. > Opportunity to play a role in finding solutions to problems that belong to them. Gaining recognition and ‘voice’: > Feeling that someone has placed confidence in them. > Becoming a recognised role model for others in their community. > External interest in their Fix (for example others in their community, other local organisations, local media). Having new experiences: > Encountering new situations (such as returning to a former school to address a class of pupils, being filmed for a broadcast piece or attending a meeting with a local councillor). > Exposure to a diverse range of individuals and groups.

Sarah (25) Plymouth: Support for people with alcohol addiction

Some young people started the process with low self-confidence, and felt that Fixers was the primary driver of an increase in their confidence. One young person from Scotland who reported low self-confidence prior to engaging with Fixers, and had self-harmed for several years said “It has made a huge difference to my confidence, in every respect”. A stakeholder observes:

Seven or eight [Fixers] came in the first time to see me and they seemed quite intimidated and only one or two were confident to speak to me. But the last time they came in, which was the third time, we could have chatted to them all day. I couldn’t get rid of them! So it brings them out of themselves… and that is important. Stakeholder, Police Other Fixers built on an already strong base of confidence by organising their own project and learning what they can achieve when they channel their confidence and determination. One of the stakeholders interviewed reports:

The people who organised [The Fix] were definitely gaining in confidence. I think you have to have a certain level of confidence to be able to approach someone and say we aim to do this, we are doing this and that. I think though that their confidence was built with the experience they gained and the guidance. Stakeholder, voluntary sector 15


Fixers Evaluation Report

Peebles: Want young people not to obsess about their looks

Several Fixers highlighted that it is not just their own confidence that grows, but also other young people involved with creating resources for a Fix. One Fixer explains:

The young people [ex-offenders] who were involved in making the Fix were inspired and became more confident to speak out about how they feel and how other people see them. Doing something positive has motivated them to carry on doing something more meaningful. Fixer, London This Fixer, herself an ex-offender, went on to talk about the pride she feels from having enabled young people she works with to have this experience. Another Fixer who had worked with a group of homeless people through his Fix notes:

I think it has given the homeless people more confidence, and shown them they can hold their heads high. Fixer, North England 16

Caitlin (17) Inverness : Don’t judge young people in care


Fixers Evaluation Report

Belfast: Talking about suicide

Voice The young people in the focus groups and survey saw ‘being given a voice’ or ‘realising they have a voice’ as a key outcome of their Fix. Fixers provided them with a platform to communicate the issues they care about. Stakeholders interviewed for the evaluation also regularly refer to this outcome and describe it as a factor that sets Fixers aside from other organisations working with young people. One stakeholder from the voluntary sector explains:

I have seen a real change in [The Fixer]. I would probably say that that is what it was that changed her. The focus of it, being given a voice, being heard, given support I don’t think it was anything I did as a support worker. She went off and did it. She got a voice…and just being heard made such a difference. Stakeholder, voluntary sector Another stakeholder observed:

Two young people were selected to make the broadcast piece. It’s had a very positive impact on them, they’ve had local press get in touch with them, they’ve had to do quite a few interviews. It’s helped them step up to the challenge of raising awareness around young carers. They’ve taken the bull by the horns and they’re really getting their voice heard. You can see two young people who’ve seen they can really make a difference and people will listen to them. Stakeholder, voluntary sector

The Fix has given me confidence and a vision to try and change the lives of others. In a very selfish ‘me me me’ society it has enabled me to be a voice that challenges people’s ideas and perspectives about life... and their attitudes into thinking about other people. Fixer, North England. Young people and stakeholders also felt that their projects show how other young people can use their voice to effect change. This is seen as an important outcome for young people and one that can change their outlook on their role in a community, and in turn impact on choices they make. One of the stakeholders interviewed explains:

I don’t think the Fixers [I have met] are a certain type’ of young person. But I think by being given the opportunity to do a Fix, and going through the process, maybe they become a certain type of person. They become more socially minded, more of a youth activist, more of a community leader. Stakeholder, voluntary sector The experience of gaining a voice, and learning how to use supports the development of other skills which young people and stakeholders feel Fixers acquire through working on their Fixes. These are described in the next section of the report.

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Fixers Evaluation Report

Skills Discussions with Fixers and stakeholders show that skills development is a common outcome of Fixers, even though it is not a primary motivation for Fixers. 80% of Fixers in the telephone survey reported that they have already gained new skills. The nature of the skills acquired varies and is linked to the activity the Fixer undertakes and their previous life experience. However, some areas, including communication and planning, are referenced by a wide range of participants. In terms of communication, Fixers report learning how to communicate to new audiences to effect change. They report learning lessons through evaluating the success of their work and identifying how to address less successful aspects of their work in future situations. Participants in the evaluation describe how all those involved in developing and delivering a Fix are exposed to situations that help develop project planning skills. They describe learning to prioritise and focus their thinking at project conception stage; a skill some envisage will inform how they approach tasks in the future. Fixers also talk about the experience of learning how to manage different stages of a project, planning and meeting deadlines. Other skills cited by individual participants in the evaluation include creative skills, media skills and networking.

Dwyanne(20) Cwmbran: Teaching people to understand autism

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Jade (16) Poole: Don’t take cannabis

Resolution of a personal issue Several of the Fixers taking part in the discussions have experienced significant personal difficulties in their lives. The range of issues experienced by even the small sample of people taking part in the evaluation is extensive and includes bullying, isolation, depression, mental health, suicide and bereavement. Among those questioned in the quantitative survey, 49% of Fixers report their Fix helped them with a difficult personal issue. This number is significant given that Fixers engages with a diverse range of young people, many of who have experienced major personal challenges. Fixers felt that they had an opportunity to process these issues. Several refer to Fixers as ‘cathartic.’ One participant who had previously experienced major difficulties as a result of bullying explains:

It has made a difference to me personally, I’m much more eager to talk about it, I used to find that very difficult...Through Fixers I have talked to other people in my situation...You can think it is just yourself going through these issues but now I know what they have been through too...so it has kind of given me some closure on it. Fixer, South England


Fixers Evaluation Report

By creating resources that address these issues, Fixers hope help others in similar situations. This process gives them the feeling they are responding in a meaningful way to the difficult personal issues they have experienced. It is also important to note the challenges inherent to this aspect of Fixers’ experience. One participant describes the difficulty of making a broadcast in which she talked openly about her experiences, but emphasises that, though challenging, this has helped her in the long term. Another participant, in the quantitative survey, explains that someone leading a Fix after experiencing personal difficulties “would have to be a strong person as I felt very drained.” In this instance the Fixer indicates that, with hindsight, they would have preferred to watch someone else’s Fix, rather than create a project centred on something so personal to them.

Raising awareness among groups at risk A priority for many of the Fixers is to communicate about issues that have affected them to others at risk of experiencing similar difficulties. They repeatedly talk about the importance of demonstrating to other young people that ‘they are not alone’ in dealing with these issues. The evaluation indicates that many Fixes have raised awareness in this way. In the quantitative survey, 72% of Fixers feel their project has increased awareness among young people with a further 22% feeling this may be achieved in the future. While measureable evidence of the scale of this impact is limited, Fixers described methods that they used to reach their target audiences. Several Fixers and stakeholders in the qualitative research attended workshops and events where the Fixers communicated their messages to other young people. Others have had feedback that confirms they are successfully raising awareness. Some are using digital and traditional media to disseminate information and encourage others to engage with materials One Fixer explains:

I have made a Facebook account and Twitter account. And I’ve now got sufferers actually messaging me saying ‘this is great’ and ‘can you help me?’ When you get comments like that you think yeah, I’ve done something really good.’ Otherwise it is difficult to measure what you are achieving. And I was lucky enough to have [a famous figure] tweet about it and he has 85 0000 or so followers, which means people now know about it and are talking about it. Fixer, West England

Maddy (18) Southampton: Get out of abusive relationships 19

Several are promoting their work though organisations that have direct and established relationships with those at risk, including GPs and Youth Offending teams, to ensure their work reaches target groups. 19


Fixers Evaluation Report

Raising awareness among wider groups Many Fixers aim to raise awareness of issues among wider groups. The evaluation provides insight into different ways in which this is happening. Some of this awareness raising takes place at community level, through events and workshops linked to Fixes. There are many examples of Fixers going into schools to discuss Fixes, as one Fixer explains: >

We haven’t really started it yet, got our teeth into it. But we have been into schools and spoken to people in colleges to make them aware of our project. So in that way Fixers have got through to a whole new audience...But at this stage it would be naive to say we’ve managed more than that. Fixer, Wales Several refer to local community events including launches and fund-raising activities and regard these as playing an important role in bringing issues important to Fixers ‘out in the open’ for a wider audiences, as one explains:

Fixers make sure that people’s views are heard, and aren’t swept under the rug. Fixer, South West England Many Fixers are reaching audiences outside their community through disseminating their resources. We have heard examples of Fixers sharing their resources (publications, websites, films) with professionals working with young people to enhance their understanding of their client groups. The evaluation also highlights a number of examples of teachers using Fixers materials to illustrate issues they are covering in their lessons and assemblies. Many of the Fixers taking part in the evaluation have also been in contact with local or national policy makers to raise awareness of the issues they wish to address. This ranges from discussions about cycle safety with senior Government officials to working with local government representatives to encourage them to adopt more child centred fostering processes.

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In the sample of young people we met with for the evaluation, we also encountered Fixers whose primary aim is to raise awareness of issues among adults so that they can understand and, in turn, support young people. One example of this is a website designed to enhance understanding about self-harm. Another is a project to sensitise teachers to how children perceive bullying. Benefits for partner organisations When asked about the social impact of Fixers, stakeholders from partner organisations initially discuss the impact on young people. However, further discussion revealed several ways in which Fixers brings positive change to the partner organisations working with Fixers. Partner organisations include schools and youth work organisations. The benefits include: > Learning from young people about the needs of target groups, and adapting working practices. > Accessing an additional platform from which to communicate to a wider audience. > Media coverage that raises the profile of their work/organisation. > Experience of working with and learning from a national partner. > Being able to draw on their experiences with Fixers when reporting to funders and drafting proposals for further work. > Having access to Fixers’ materials, which they can signpost clients to. > Fixers speaking at events and providing content for the their communications. > Learning from YPC’s approach to working with young people and adopting aspects of this approach in their own work.

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Fixers Evaluation Report

LONGER-TERM OUTCOMES

L

onger term outcomes are considered to be those that usually become apparent after the Fix is completed. Many Fixers who engaged with the evaluation are clear that Fixes contribute to a range of such outcomes. We also engaged with some who anticipate their Fixes will create long term change but do not yet have evidence of this happening, or are still in the early phases of their project. The most frequently cited long term outcomes fall into the following areas: > Increased help-seeking among relevant ‘at-risk’ groups. > Changed social attitudes and reduced stigma. > Increased social capital and connections between different community groups. > Improved life chances for the Fixer, including employment and learning opportunities, and health outcomes.

Direct outcomes: a summary of the quantitative data Participants in the quantitative survey were then asked whether they had observed longer-term outcomes. As highlighted in this the chart below, a significant number of these young people are already seeing these changes take place. Others anticipate that this change may happen at some point in the future. This is also reflected in the qualitative discussions where several provide examples of such changes already taking place. Other respondents say they do not yet feel in a position to gauge whether their Fixes have generated any of these outcomes: they may not yet have completed their Fix, be awaiting feedback following a launch or may have delivered a project which cannot produce measureable results.

Figure 11: Proportion of Fixers that report their project has led to longer-term outcomes (n = 94)

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Fixers Evaluation Report

More people seek help Some of those interviewed for the evaluation already have evidence that more people are accessing help as a result of the Fixes they have been involved with. In the telephone survey, 57% of Fixers felt that their Fix has already resulted in other young people seeking help. In the qualitative discussions Fixers mention examples of services, workshops or events being set up set up in conjunction with a Fix, and where they see these services being used/attended by those in need of support. Examples include a mental health service set up in a community in Northern Ireland which is well attended by local young people and events linked to a campaign to make young people aware of their employment rights. One stakeholder felt that the Fixers’ work is likely to encourage young people to seek help:

It might help someone recognise themselves as a young carer - they might not have seen themselves in that way before, and maybe make them more likely to step forward. They might be a bit embarrassed about having a caring role, but if there’s a service and they can see other young people there, it might encourage them to step forward. Stakeholder, voluntary sector In some other cases Fixers cannot yet track whether their work is leading to more people seeking help and, as such, this is not something we can meaningfully quantify in this evaluation. Some of the Fixers taking part in the evaluation are still in the developmental stage of their Fix or waiting for their productions to be broadcast. There are also other cases where Fixers have developed online resources which they know are being used but where there is no mechanism for them to track whether those engaging with their resources online are then prompted to access support from other providers.

Has it made a difference? Yes! The information that was out there for me is now there for others and hopefully no-one will have to go through the trouble I went through. Fixer, South England 22

Changed social attitudes Fixers and stakeholders discuss changing social attitudes in terms of challenging stigma in relation to specific sub-groups, issues or activities, and in terms of attitudes towards young people in general. Challenging stigma Young people taking part in the evaluation refer to the fact that previously ‘taboo’ subjects such as mental health, isolation and homelessness are now discussed openly by people in their communities. Several of those taking part sought to tackle stigma or stereotyping associated with issues they feel passionate about. A good example of this is a project seeking to de-stigmatise a sport, as one Fixer explains:

I wanted to change people’s attitudes about [our sport]. I wanted to show it was something more structured. It is something that everyone can get involved in, all kinds of people. It isn’t just for teens or ASBOs...It is something that has loads of benefits. Fixer, East England Changing attitudes towards young people Several of the young people taking part in the discussions say their projects attracted community interest, and brought groups together around issues which are important to young people. As a result, older generations are seeing young people’s efforts to change negative aspects of their lives and communities, and thereby challenging perceptions of young people as lazy and apathetic.


Fixers Evaluation Report

There is also a sense that some Fixes foster greater understanding between younger and older generations. Young people learn that older generations do not have experience of some of their issues, and that without direction communication between generations they cannot be expected to understand each other’s needs and experiences. One Fixer recalls:

We did a bingo event that raised money [for our Fix] - with older people. Now they have a better understanding of what we are doing and how we are trying to change things. They said to us you are an inspiration to your communities, tell your families. Being from Northern Ireland you watch the news and it is all about there’s been a bomb scare. There’s never any positive news...Before it [their Fixers film] came up on the screen it said it is usually the young people who are doing all the bad things but this time it said that a group from [the Fixers’ home town] is doing the good things. Fixer, Northern Ireland Commenting on a similar theme, one stakeholder explains:

They show young people in a new light to our society. Stakeholder, voluntary sector For many of those taking part, the role they play in inspiring other young people through their Fix is one of the most important outcomes they identify. Participants describe this happening at a number of levels. Several have, for example, worked with younger children through their Fixes and feel that, in doing so, they are helping to challenge their thinking on important issues. At a more general level some have had feedback that through working with other young people, they are motivating a wider movement of people to get engaged with their community and to take responsibility for tackling issues which concern them through recognising that they have a voice and can use it.

Increased social capital The evaluation provides evidence of how Fixers increases social capital of young people, at different levels. Social capital is discussed in terms of ‘bonding’, ‘bridging’ and ‘linking’ social capital, as described in academic literature. ‘Bonding’ social capital This describes closer connections between people and is characterised by strong bonds, for example, among family members or among members of the same ethnic group. A number of young people in the discussion groups describe how their involvement with Fixers has led to closer relationship both with peers and family members. For some of the more vulnerable respondents this is an important outcome. Several explain that that through their Fixes they have taken on a role and/or produced resources that their parents have said they are proud of. This has been particularly important for those who have had difficult times within their families in the past and a couple say it has felt good to ‘repay’ or ‘give something back’ to those close to them after these difficulties. Several participants describe how their Fix has resulted in greater understanding from their peers. For some it is through producing materials on issues around which there was previously a lack of understanding (such as self-harm and depression) that they have been able to educate their friends which, in turn, has led to better and more open communications. One young woman explains:

It has made a difference because it has made my friends more open with me. Now they get what I’ve been through. Fixer, Scotland

Several participants also describe the importance of having real role models that young people can respect and learn from, and think that Fixers produces role models.

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Fixers Evaluation Report

working in other organisations through requests to present at meetings or conferences, or being contacted by local organisations who have expressed an interest in potential joint projects. One stakeholder felt that the Fix had improved relations between young and older people in the community:

Kerry (17) Cramlington: Seeing and supporting hidden carers.

There are also a couple of instances where a Fix has helped to rebuild relationships with peers following a shared crisis. One Fixer reports how her friendship group had been struggling to come to terms with the death of a friend, and that communications within the group were breaking down. Being involved in the Fix together has given them a shared focus and facilitated discussions around what remains a painful issue. The evaluation also points to examples of Fixers meeting people through Fixers who have become important to them in one case a partner, in another a flat mate. One stakeholder observed that Fixers had brought a new group together: ‘Bridging’ social capital This describes more distant connections between people and is characterised by weaker, but more crosscutting ties, for example, with business associates, acquaintances, friends from different ethnic groups, and friends of friends. We have heard evidence of Fixers developing relationships with members of their communities that they would otherwise not have come into contact with. This includes people they have met through fundraising and launch events or workshops linked to the Fix. There are also several examples, even within this small sample, of Fixers building relationships with individuals

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I think the [media coverage] helped to give the group some credence and helped take away the fear factor that older people might have had, they might have seen them as dangerous. The natural thing for older people when they see a number of young people about is the fear factor, even about walking past people. I was able to explain to the group about the issue for an older person if a young person with a hood runs up behind them. Stakeholder, public sector A number suggest that social media activity linked to Fixes can support this kind of networking. ‘Linking’ social capital This describes connections with people in positions of power and is characterised by relations between those within a hierarchy where there are differing levels of power; it is good for accessing support from formal institutions. A range of decision makers have expressed an interest in individual Fixers’ work, and in some cases this has led to face to face meetings between Fixers and senior figures. Among those taking part in the evaluation, we heard from young people who had met with local and national politicians, Government ministers and senior figures within organisations delivering services to young people (including social services, health and education).

This has made me realise that if I really want to do something I can. It has taught me that, it has fuelled me to me get on with stuff, I’m going to try to make things better for young people around me - be more proactive. I’m talking to my friends about things. They have ideas and we’re like - ‘let’s do that’. Fixer, Midlands, England


Fixers Evaluation Report

Aadam(16) Leytonstone: Coping with eczema

I’m thankful that working with Fixers opened a lot of doors for me and started conversations about breaking down the stigma around suicide. I’ve recently been asked to be on the board of directors of a charity, which deals with suicide and self-harm. Fixer, Quantitative survey Improved life chances for the Fixer Detailed discussions with Fixers and stakeholders indicate that Fixers ultimately contributes to improved life chances for young people in terms of future employment, learning opportunities and health outcomes. Participants mention a number of experiences stemming from their work with or as Fixers, which have already lead to or are likely lead to opportunities in the future. Examples include: > Developing contacts through their Fixes. Several have connected with new organisations through Fixers. > Finding work opportunities and, in a couple of instances, secured employment as a direct result of their Fix. > Using their skills and experiences to improve their CV and identify career paths. > Learning about other programmes and funding opportunities that they will consider contacting for future projects.

Others indicate that there are health outcomes from working with Fixers, which ultimately improve their life chances. As one Fixer explains:

I lost my apprenticeship when I was 18…I dug myself in a hole of depression that I couldn’t get out of. I’ve always wanted to get into the media industry and thought that was an untouchable dream...Then I had an opportunity from an employability programme... and it eventually led me to Fixers. Fixers helped me gain the extra confidence to get into college this year to do a foundation degree in media…I’ve eventually got on to it because I felt a lot better within myself so approached it with a more positive attitude...I have learned how I need to put myself across…Now I know how to start a project and finish it to meet a deadline and stuff...it has helped me grow up. Fixer, North England One of the stakeholders interviewed observes:

There were mini-outcomes too. Some [of the Fixers involved in a sport focused Fix] have got more interested in sport and signed up for other stuff. A couple are more interested now in their health and that sport is good for your health. The guy who was leading it wrote it on his CV so it was helpful for him to look for work because of all the skills he learnt through organising it. One even found a flat mate through it which is really nice. Stakeholder, voluntary sector

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Fixers Evaluation Report

AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT

F

eedback on Fixers, both in terms of its objectives and delivery, is overwhelmingly positive. It is clear that the organisation commands a strong base of support from the young people who have engaged with the Fixers, as well as organisations who have partnered with it on specific initiatives.

Building capacity Support for the work of YPCs is strong and both Fixers and partner agencies that have benefited from their help are keen for others to have access to this experience. In some cases they identify other projects that they would like Fixers to support. One stakeholder explains:

In the context of the evaluation discussions, some of these supporters suggest issues for Fixers to consider in its future planning, maximising the impact of its work. These are outlined in the section below. In each case the issues are raised by a small number of respondents. It should also be noted that we have not evaluated the extent to which PSBT is already addressing the issues raised in the context of these discussions, or how these issues related to the current stage of growth of Fixers.

If I have one negative thing to say about Fixers it is that they are so out-stretched now because they are doing such a good job that I would like to do more with them but they have other projects and other young people they are working with. I see they are so busy. It is partly my fault too. I’m busy too! Stakeholder, voluntary sector

Raising the profile of Fixers A number of those taking part in the discussion feel that developing a stronger national profile would further strengthen the impact of the projects Fixers support. Participants themselves say they had no or only low awareness of Fixers before getting involved and are keen so see more people engaging with Fixers resources and to benefit from the information and support they provide.

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Several Fixers who live in rural communities perceive their YPCs to be stretched, working with young people across a wide geographic area. They call for more YPCs to support a wider number of young people in these locations. Shortening time between production and dissemination / broadcasting Participants in two of the groups feel that Fixers should shorten the time between production and dissemination of outputs. A couple of young people say they worked hard at the outset of their Fix to get peers and communities engaged with the project but due to delays in broadcasting /dissemination, some had lost interest by the later stages of the project. The one Fixer taking part in the qualitative evaluation who felt his Fix had not achieved social impact had experienced a significant delay of this kind.


Fixers Evaluation Report

Fixers Evaluation Report

I worked hard to get everyone interested in the beginning…to get them motivated about it. But we still haven’t been able to find anywhere to show it [the film]…and I guess if I go back to people now they will have forgotten about it. Fixer, London

I would have liked to have had more say in the production of my creative resource. I was under impression I’d have more influence on the production and script which had a different slant to the message I’d envisaged. Fixer, Quantitative Survey

The planning part of the project was slow and we had to wait for a few months for the project to be approved, and then when it was, suddenly everything had to be done overnight and we had two weeks to do a script and get everything organised. Which was fine, but it was a bit unbalanced. Stakeholder, voluntary sector

While most participants describe how Fixers matched their expectations, such comments might point to a need for more consistent positioning of Fixers, management of expectations and explanation of media requirements and limitations at the outset of Fixes.

Remaining Fixer centred A priority for all participants is that Fixers remains centred around young people. They explain that this is what sets Fixers apart from other programmes and is responsible for the high level of change young people affect through their projects. In the context of these discussions a small number of participants in the evaluation expressed some disappointment at the level of input Fixers have at production stage as one participant in the quantitative survey explains:

Ensuring sustainability Several of the Fixers involved in the evaluation are already considering how they might develop their Fix, and welcome conversations they have had with YPCs about different options. One of the stakeholders interviewed asks whether Fixers could be going even further to ensure Fixers’ good work is sustained, suggesting regular 12-18 month post Fix reviews to assess outcomes and next steps.

Anthony Foruria (19), Becky Bellworthy (22), Sophie Lejeune (22), Yvonne Omini (25): Road safety

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Fixers Evaluation Report

DISCUSSION

T

his section draws out three themes that emerged from the evaluation research.

Participants: Fixers accommodates a wide range of young people, often with adverse life experiences The sample that took part in the focus groups and quantitative survey reported a wide range of life experiences. Many had experienced adversity, including mental illness, homelessness, abuse and other negative life events. As discussed in the motivations section of this report, these young people often got involved in Fixers to raise awareness about the issues they faced and help others in the same situation. Other Fixers were in less challenging personal situations, but their work in Fixers was still focused on social outcomes. They often wanted to improve something in their local area, such as the availability of sports activities for young people. Fixers is appropriate and attractive for this diverse range of people because the process is led by the Fixer, who chooses the subject matter of their work and the activities they undertake. Some of the Fixers that took part in this evaluation were comfortable with the process because it did not try to ‘put them in a box.’ Model: Fixers is flexible and based around the young person, which is considered unique Some of the young people and stakeholders that took part in this research have experience of a range of youth work programmes. They often reported that Fixers is unique because it allows the Fixer to define their own goals and work in a way that they choose. In comparison to other programmes, Fixers felt ownership over their work. Similarly, it was felt that Fixers does not prioritise young people or issues, while other programmes

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may focus on specific groups or outcomes. This approach was seen as inclusive and suitable for a wide range of young people. The support offered by Fixers was also seen as unique, in that the Young Person Co-ordinators (the project co-ordinators employed by PSBT) engaged with Fixers to understand what they are interested and want to achieve, rather than guiding them through a pre-existing pathway. One stakeholder observed:

They focus solely on the young people. Some organisations are target driven. Fixers are more about the young people. If young people are motivated, Fixers will have them achieve it. They start with the young people, while other organisations are more top-down, and more target focused. Stakeholder, public sector. Impact: Fixers’ experiences are positive and sometimes transformational This evaluation showed that Fixers have highly positive feedback about their experience. A small number in the study did not have a positive experience and there are lessons for Fixers to learn from these cases. However, these are exceptions. Some Fixers reported that their experience was transformational in terms of the confidence that they gained. In some cases, these young people joined Fixers during a challenging period of their life and reported that Fixers was an important part of understanding the experience and recovering from it. The engagement with Fixers that formed this evaluation was conducted when most of the Fixers were either still involved in their projects or had recently completed them. The longer-term impacts therefore have not been assessed.


Fixers Evaluation Report

This evaluation study was produced by Firetail. Firetail is a consulting firm that works around the world to help ambitious organisations achieve positive social change. We help our clients develop strategies, create insights and encourage learning so that they make better and smarter choices.

Fixers is a registered trademark of the Public Service Broadcasting Trust. T: 01961 810977 E: DianaCarpenter@psbt.co.uk www.fixers.org.uk | www.psbt.co.uk

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FixersUK

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Fixers Evaluation Report 2014  
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