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© Anna Prytkova, New York, 2012

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FIX #3 /2013

Editor's column

It has been almost a year since we presented the second issue of the “Fix” magazine. We have reconsidered, learnt and changed a lot since then, have had conversations with fascinating people and have received constructive feedback. We have heard a lot of various suggestions, however, the one we remember best was “to hear the music of the magazine”. I am not going to state anything about the music, but in this issue we have certainly decided to experiment a bit. Don’t worry if at some moment you will lose the understanding of what you’re looking through: a photo album or a poetry book, series of American photographers’ works or somebody’s notebook. Our searchings have led us to this issue which we have named “The American Dream”. It is also long-wished for, somewhat unattainable and possessing its unique melody. Why the United States of America? The answer is going to be egotistical. Because this country has played a significant part in my life. Because it’s completely different from how we imagine it. “Limitless freedom, justice for all, luxury and the right to be yourself”. After a few months of observing the people of this country, after continuous discussions and arguments with American acquaintances the USA makes an impression of a teenager. Rebellious, exhilirated, unpredictable and dangerous. Big toys, huge consequences. Why a dream? Because everybody has one. The question is about the choice of the way and sufficient amount of patience and assertion. The motive of a dream and the choice of the way goes through the whole issue, and I really hope you will be able to find something useful and inspirational for you. Perhaps it can assist someone to put an end to tantalizing issues of creativity and self-identification. As America assisted me once in finding my own ways. Anna Prytkova, Editor-in-Chief of the “Fix” magazine.

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INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS

INTERVIEW ROSANNA BACH

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SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN

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SERIES RAFAL MALKO

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INTERVIEW PATRIK ANDERSSON

CATALOGUE

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SERIES DANIEL KUKLA

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INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS I saw Mike Peter’s works on Flickr. His pictures amazed me with a soft combination of street and portrait photography, outranking many studio portraits due to high detail and depth. We met in a cafe not far from Brooklyn bridge. Mike was in the company of his Hasselblad camera and a Russian friend Gena. Whom, as turned out later, Mike had discouraged to shoot street from a car using 200 mm lens. Then he explained patiently that the most important thing was to become a part of a street life scenario. The talk unwound quickly. Mike was reflecting on the situation in the country, on his genuine interest in people and his works. And we, with bated breath, were listening. He was amazingly honest in his speech, quite critical towards himself and his works, and contemplative at times. When we thanked him for that fascinating conversation, he laughed and waved his hand, adding: “By the way, I’m sure everything I said has no sense at all!” Gena replied promptly: “It could be lost in translation, don’t worry about that!” Everyone laughed, of course. But we surely knew that Mike’s words had a lot of sense after all.

INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS                                                                   FIX #3 /2013    9


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FIX: I saw few books you made on blurb. Can you tell me a bit about the books. ​ ike Peters: The book is my attempt to collect the M work into a certain final form. The first, that I did was called “Street stories” and I had been photographing people on the streets. When I started I really didn’t have anything in mind. Just wondering and reacting on what was behind of me. I photographed one picture, then next picture and another. I didn’t have the plan, I was just exploring. It’s an active discovery for me. So, after shooting on the streets for a couple years I decided, that I would just collect work into the book form. It was the first attempt to wrap my mind around what I was doing for a long time. I came up with the “Street stories”, cause I felt like you could read stories into the surroundings. Into the context where they were, with their faces, with their body language. At that point I wasn’t really sure who I was shooting as, a street photographer or a portrait photographer, who photographs on the streets. Sort of the mix of both. Later, in summer 2007, I started photographing on Coney Island. I was very focused on this place, because there were a lot of talking in press they are going to change it. There were a lot of things on the boardwalk which was going to be demolished and new things would be putting. Why it was happening? Well, one park “Astroland” was for sale. The woman who owned it wanted to sell it and she did it,

but a couple of years later. It was the fear, that Coney Island is going to change dramatically and I wanted to spend a lot of time there, to document what I was seeing and feeling. It was my attempt to concentrate on the particular area and put it close to the project. One thing I descovered over that time I was photographing on the streets between 2002 and 2011 was how the aftereffects of 9/11 have really affected people. I felt that something was fundamentally shifted since 9/11. In the minds of the people? Exactly. I felt that America, especially this part, has become much more difficult place to be economically. One of the reasons is the way our government reacted on 9/11. Seems like the government had sort of taking advantage of that situation and try to use that as an excuse to send army to Iraq, where we started the war. It means new extra taxes. I think we have created our own downfall. It was a terrible thing. And also the proditory economic situation started back in the 90s, when big banks could make a lot of money, but the working class people were very negatively affected by what was going on. All that stuff I saw and felt, and things were getting more and more difficult. That ten-year period from 9/11 to 2011 was my opportunity to explore all that changes. I collected that into the body of work called “The Dream”. Tell us more about your “The Dream”. You know, in that journey of discovery, I was drawn to photograph in certain places. I photographed in my hometown called Karney, in Ridgefield Park, where I

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INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

went for many years to photograph the July Parade. Which is a very patriotic celebration day. As I started going to all that places, along with Coney Island and Manhattan. I began to think that this country has fundamentally changed and “The American Dream” is not that it’s used to be. How do you feel the difference? It’s much harder for people to achieve the American Dream, if it is even achievable anymore. And was it achievable before? You know, back in the middle part of 20th century, after The World War II, the American Dream was achievable for everyone. The working class people could have a nice life: they could buy a house, a car, send their kids to college, go to vacation. People didn’t have to struggle economically. If you work hard, you know that you are able to have a head into having independent life, that was a great pleasure. We had a lot of freedom and security. Of course there were a lot of negative things back in those days, like racism for example, but nevertheless. In general Americans formulated this idea of the American Dream, it was a time ago. In late 40s, 50s, 60s, and to the 70s, maybe little bit into the 80s. But since that I think it took a dramatic change after 9/11. Society is less secure than used to be. What do you mean by secure exactly? It’s harder to be secure economically now. If you had a job, you were able to keep that job for a long

time, if you choose that. Now it’s changed. We were all encouraged to buy homes, borrow money and things like that. Seems to be less of the guarantee anymore, that your life is gonna work out as anticipated. The American Dream was sort of phantasm, as if it was a real possibility. And now it becomes sort of that cruel fantasy. Do you think government can manipulate people somehow playing with the idea of American Dream? No, I don’t think the government does. I think we are all manipulated by the corporations and institutions on that we work for. We have to change what The Dream is, but I don’t think that anybody is really going to do that. That is what I see when I’m photographing people on the streets. I see people who are lost in the moment. It could be what I feel about my society where I’m living, and you know I look for that. When I photographed in Coney Island I called that actually “pursuit of happiness”. In “The Dream” I contain life liberty in pursuit of happiness. Pursuit of happiness is like Coney Island was for Harlem working class people. Anybody could go to the Coney Island in 40s for a day. Swim in the water, have a good time, but even that is changing. Because much of Coney Island is going to be redeveloped or already was, it became more expensive. But it’s still free, still playground for the working class, that is nice. It hasn’t changed so much yet, but economic forces have changed the face of it too. “The Dream” is my kind of exploration of how things are changed. And my question is: “What has happened to the dream? Is it different and how

INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS                                                                   FIX #3 /2013    11


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© Mike Peters, works from the series “Coney Island”

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we redefine it?” Now I’m actually in the proccess of editing the book. I will use Blurb when a book will be coming and try to sell it to the publishers. That’s my Dream. (laughing) Can you tell me about your moving from Karney and your attitude to NYC? Karney is about 5 or 6 miles from NYC. Since I was a kid, I was always fascinated by NYC. I was just drawn to that glittering city on the horizon, wonderful and crazy place. To me it was the place of huge possibilities and fascinating. Full of interesting people and great buildings. It was very different from the place where I grew up–very quite, very urban. NYC is like explosion of everything, just everything! When I was 9 or 10 years old they started building the World Trade Center. Karney is actually on the hill. Every afternoon I was going back from school and then I was walk my dog. From the top of that hill I could look straight across on how that buildings are going up floor by floor. I was always so fascinated, that as soon as I started taking photographs I started photographing the WTC. You know, the thing I like to do when I’m photographing the event: I don’t photograph the event, I photograph people on the edges. When I went to the 9/11 Memorials and started this book with those memorials, I was more interested in the people who show up and just watch, who were just standing in there. To me it’s much more interesting than what is going on inside the event. And I felt like melting part of different type of people.

Seems that you was always looking for different people, different characters. How did it happen? Why portraits? Since I was a child, I was always interested in other people. I was very insecure about who I was and thought that anybody else is more interesting than I was. I was looking at another people and wondered what made them who they were, what their life were all about. I was just fascinated by people, it’s really simple as that. When I was growing up, I always was surrounded by working class people, because Karney is a very much of working class town. And I was sort of fascinated and more interested in people like that, than someone who lives on Park ave. I don’t really understand what is that like. Park Ave is the place where some “corporation” people live? Yeah, and very rich people. Regularly I find poor people less guarded about who they are then upper class or upper-middle class people. They usually attend to be very guarded, very attentive to what they are showing, to their fasade. About how they look like or something else? How do they look like, how do they present themselves. It’s like they have curtain haircut, curtain clothes, designers t-shirt, expensive watch. Because it’s all part of agressive attempt of showing people who I am. Like I’m special, I’m a big shot.

INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS                                                                   FIX #3 /2013    13


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© Mike Peters, works from the series “The Dream”

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INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

In my childhood people were just who they are, they didn’t care about anybody’s thought. It was more like: “Yeah, this is me, like it? That’s great. Not? I don’t care!” I like people like that. I feel like most of working class people don’t really pays attention to somebody. By the way, the media is not really paying to them much attention, too. And I’m worrying this kind of people nobody else is interested in. It’s a way of acknowledging their existance. What is your shooting process? Are you going through the streets just wondering around? How people react when you photograph them? For the most part I look through and just wait for someone, who will be close to me and maybe won’t notice me. I put myself to the position where I like the background and like where they are. And where I am in the relationship to where they are in the relationship to the background. Wait till the right moment, point my camera, compose, focus and take the photorgaph. I try to become the part of the scenario. Often if they are not looking at me, I’ll wait them to turn and to make an eye contact. That is the moment when I like to make a photograph. Because exactly in this moment what I’m doing is not registered yet on their faces, but I still get the eye contact. They are engaged, but they are not reacting. Just one split second, when it happens and than it’s over. When they notice they just look away. Or they may smile, what is even worse! When they smile it’s totally over! For me smile is very affective mask. People smile, cause they think they have to. I want a different look on their face,

more natural. You know, one that not to put on, that’s all what I’m strive for. In the project I was working on throught the past few years I’ve been photographing at night with the flash. In that situation I’ve taking a different approach, where I do stop people and do ask them. Because it was at night, we had a flash and all is quite spectacle. That was a different challenge for me to be able to communicate with people, but also to change the situation, when I have to ask first. But I’m still trying to get that sort of unguarded moment, when it’s still something else going on. It has to be much harder to get that moment with asking It is harder. I specifically ask people not to smile. And actually it makes them think, like “why?” It engages them into thought process and people look more interesting when they are thinking. The wheel was turning, like: “Why somebody doesn’t have to smile?” They are trying NOT to smile. Some people can just drop into that and for some people it’s a struggle. To me it is a very interesting process by itself to watch them struggling. It engages them into the moment in a different way. How did you start to make photographs? I studied photography when I was in high school. I discovered it by the accident. I was trying to play american football, and I was very bad at it, veery bad. Also I had no self-confidence. And it’s very hard to play any sport when you don’t have any self-confidence.

INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS                                                                   FIX #3 /2013    15


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So I ended breaking my wrist. That was the best thing that ever have happened to me. Because I would still go to the football games. One day the photographer came to the field to take photographs of the football game. I was always interested in sort of gadgets and mechanical stuff, and when I saw the camera I was fascinated. I could look through the camera, he put it down to my eye, turned the zoom ring and I was like “wow”. That is how I became interested in cameras. So I decided that I wanted to be a photographer. But it took me a long time to become more interested in photographs than cameras. I went to the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) for two-year course. Then I started working as a photographer in “Tiffany’s”, it’s about jewellery. I didn’t really like it too much and left it soon.The kind of photography I really became interested in those years was more documentary, photojournalism type of work. Like Eugene Smith’s works, Henri CartientBresson, “LIFE” magazine photography of the 40s, 50s and 60s. Back in the mid 80s I started to be working on newspapers, cause I thought that make me photograph everyday. I was still very shy around people, so it was difficult for me to take camera to people’s faces. I didn’t do much street photography of people those days, I was mostly afraid to do that. Did you feel uncomfortable about their reaction? Yes, I was afraid they gonna yell at me. (laughing) Haha, honest at least!

No, really. I was afraid they gonna yell or even punch me! So, I photographed buildings, city, but never people. And I felt that newspaper job would really make me sort of confront that. And it did, I became a better photographer. Technically I got better because I was shooting everyday. Also it helped me to figure out more about myself. About what I was comfortable with, what was interesting to me and what wasn’t. Soon I felt I had enough experience and portfolio for shooting magazine work. That type of photograpy you had to shoot for magazines wasn’t documentary, right? Yeah, it have to be well produced. Back in those days it was much more produced, because they wanted me to shoot color. I was shooting the slide film Kodachrome and it was very slow. Anytime I had to do anything indoors I had to light it. So, no, it wasn’t documentary at all. You said it was hard for you to shoot people on the streets and there you had to produce something. Was it difficult for you? I wasn’t always comfortable with moving people around and telling people what to do, but I had to become comfortable and even more become good at it. So again it forced me into situation where I had to get better at it. That time I was also working a lot with my documentary personal work. In the late 70s I started to work with a view camera. I was walking through the streets with the 4x5 camera, with tripod on my shoulder. That was

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INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

© Mike Peters, works from the series “Coney Island”

INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS                                                                   FIX #3 /2013    17


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© Mike Peters, works from the series “9/11/11 NYC”

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INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

my street photography. The reason why I chose the view camera was I liked it. Also it’s sort of broader characteristic of people when you photograph them, because you really needed to engage them into the proccess. And the other thing was, that a view camera was much more a conversation piece. When I was walking around with the camera on my shoulder, people were always fascinated by it. It was the way to meet people. I can say: “Hey, I want to make a photograph of you”. And people weren’t much concentrated on me, but on the camera. It allowed me to get over being so shy. Very effective ice-breacker! When you make photography just to make money, you do what you don’t really like to do. What is your attitude for that? I’ve made peace with that. It is what it is, in terms of purpose. That time I was trying to combine everything. Try to do more personal work for my clients, but that does not really work very well. I satisfied with what I wanted to do and the clients were like: “Hmm, what’s this?” You really can either serve your clients or you can serve yourself, but you can’t do both. Its very difficult. All in all, even if I may hate doing that, it’s still photography.

So, you try not to pay so much attention for that difference in works and just do what you do? Yeah, you don’t think so much about that. You know, it’s easy for me to switch “keys”. Nice thing is when I work for clients I’m allways shooting

rectangles, but when I look through this (Mike points to his Hasselblad)–it’s the square. So I can switch over very easy, I save rectangles for clients and squares for myself, that helps me to differentiate. (everyone is laughting) I very consciously chose the square to shoot for myself, because I like this format. I think that is really challenge to compose square. And it’s perfect just the way it is. You don’t need to go horizontal or vertical. I really want to simplify the way I do my personal work. So it’s a square, just a square. Also I like the way how square looks on a book page. Just there, like Diane Arbus’s work. When I was a kid, Diane Arbus was the main influence on me and she shot all square. I feel like I’m gonna shoot square for the rest of my life. As long as I can find films anyway. For you analogue photography plays some special role in the process? Yeah, I like the very fundamentals of photography. I like a simple camera with no meter, no auto focus, nothing, just simple. I like having that simple things at work, that is certain feedback. There are a lot of limitations to this, I can’t expand the ISO up to 6400. It is what it is and it forces you to work with that limitations. And there is a lot of freedom just to be creative. Digital is filled with distractions, it’s infinite way you can do it, but … I don’t know, something is missing there. For myself I like to have film roll in my hand. Then we have to process it and the image actually exists.

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© Mike Peters, works from the series “9/11/11 NYC”

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INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

It’s a real tangible peace of something, you know, just real. I scan it, but I still have very real piece of film. Digital is not real, it doesn’t exist outside the computer, unless you make a print. But it is just the string of 1 and 0s. I want something different for myself, that’s all. Just different. What do you think about criticism? Do you criticise work of other people and how do they react on that? Before criticising anybody’s work, I want to know where all that is coming from. I try to get people to sort of come up with their internal understanding as what they are interested in. Why are they photographing that? I don’t want to come up with something blanket, like: “your pics suck”. I want to be able to say something constructive. But I can’t do that unless I will understand who they are, what they are all about. Back in late 1980s, I made an appointment to see John Loengard, the editor of “LIFE” magazine and brought to him my works. He said, that my work is really boring. In retrospective it was, but that time I wasn’t ready to hear such kind of thing and was really upset.

What does he mean by that? What was behind that “its boring”? It was just blind. But you know, that time I was boring, shallow, not interesting kind of person. Don’t remeber a lot of interests, I was mostly operated with fears. I was afraid of going into interesting situations,

I was very timid. So my work was dull, because it was reflective who I was. Completely consumed of photography, it was not much else in my life beyond photography. I was stuck in the feedback-loop, I wasn’t very interesting and complex person and that’s why my work was boring, too. What does it mean “boring” in your opinion? I had no passion. I liked taking photographs, but I had no passion for anything. I didn’t understand and still was not sure who I was in that point in my life. I was really unformed as a human being, didn’t grow up with a strong sense of myself. So, it took me a long time to accept who I was, to understand where I came from and what I was all about. I was always trying to be someone else, I was trying to be like this or that person. Shoot like that or this person, but I had no sense of my own personal identity. I had no visual style, I was all over the place. What helps you to find it, to find yourself? I had to learn to become honest with myself. Also few years later I had my first son, it was my first child. Being the parent really tell me more about who I was. It made me confront to good, to bad and to ugly about myself. I learn more about myself through my kids. When I became a parent I started thinking a lot about my own childhood, my own parents. It made me confront a lot about how I was grown up, made me really questionable about my thoughts, values and motivations. I was just very self-centered, shallow kind of person until then. Being a parent

INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS                                                                   FIX #3 /2013    21


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS

made me a better person, and I think it made me better photographer. By having lived a life, by having experienced relationships, love and loss. Even now I have two sons, and I get as much from them as they get from me. I see myself in them, but they are different. Parenting is two-way street, which is really wonderful experience. So it also made me more passionate about the things I choosed to do. Truelly passionate. About people, politics, about everything. I had no opinions when I was young and now I’m full of them. I accept that, its ok. When I was young I didn’t know anything, I had nothing to based my opinions on. What part of your work is the closest to you now? I don’t know, it’s hard to say. Its like to pick up the favorite child. (laughing) I feel sort of engaged in with the “Meatpacking” photos, but now I sort of stopped working on that, because of the winter. I usually shoot in summer. Why do you usually shoot in summer? Cause its warm and people are just more open, more relaxing maybe. When everybody is wearing coat, everybody is covered up and wearing black. So, I like the “Meatpacking” stuff in the summer. I’m trying to figure out what the next project is gonna be. I’m working on the project for probably 4 or 5 years now, shooting in the corner of 42nd street and 8th ave. It’s right by the Port Authority. I stand on that one corner and photograph people as they are waiting

across the light for the bus. When I stand there I sort of get what people are feeling. I understand that sense of exhaustion or anticipation. I see it in people’s faces, as they are standing and waiting while the light will change on the border. What they are doing every single day. I try to photograph what I know. I feel comfortable photographing it and having the point of view about that. I feel like I can do that with the sense of authenticity and integrity, as supposed to. So I feel like I don’t want just to be snorky. I need to connect on some level with something I want to photographing. That’s really important to me. Do you feel when the project is over? Or maybe all your projects are ongoing for you? Hmm, I don’t know yet. I feel like The Dream was finished at the end of 2011, because that was the decade of 9/11. So, I feel like what I photographed up to that point confiding the Dream, and everything after was something different, I’m not sure what yet. I tend to photograph concrete form, based on sort of geographic areas. “Meatpacking” project is one area, “42nd street“ project is another area. But the main heroes are people? People, its always people. In the “42nd street“ project it’s all Working people, going home at the end of the day. But in the Meatpacking project it’s mostly tourists, from all over the world, who come to

22    FIX #3 /2013                                                                   INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS


INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

© Mike Peters, works from the series “9/11/11 NYC”

INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS                                                                   FIX #3 /2013    23


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS

that area to have a good time. When I was younger, I was coming from NJ to the clubs of NYC to have a good time. That is sort of anticipation and almost a desperation to have a good time. That is so much wider to being there, how you dressed, how you pose yourself. And you, like: “Yeah, that is gonna be great, that is gonna be great!” But you don’t really know what is gonna be great at the end of the night. Does the experience live up to the expectation, what I get from there? People working really hard to have a good time, but are they really? And that is the fascinating thing of the whole project.

people who are just intellectual and dispassionate. They are more about puzzles and thoughts and less about what’s there. For me photography is all about discovery. I discover when I go out to photograph, I discover the world and myself. Maybe other people are interested in discovering their own ideas and that is great. Just different from what I do. Can’t say that one is more or less valuable, just different.

What is you attitude to the contemporary photography? I think a lot of contemporary photography is driven by the concepts, you know, abstract. And a lot of photographers they will explore those concepts to the photography. That idea is about their heads and photographing things is sort of make sense with those ideas. And there are people like myself, who are all about the world, the real world. So, my inspiration comes from what I see, what I encounter. For other people, inspiration comes from inside of their head. So, there are all kinds of people in the world, and some people are more intern with abstract concepts and ideas. They are not interested in 3-dimensional world. Everybody is different, there is a room for everybody. So, it depends ... It depends on who you are. I guess I’m more emotional and passionate. And there are other

Mike's photos on flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mikepeters/

24    FIX #3 /2013                                                                   INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS


INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

© Mike Peters, works from the series “9/11/11 NYC”

INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS                                                                   FIX #3 /2013    25


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS

© Mike Peters, works from the series “Meatpacking district”

26    FIX #3 /2013                                                                   INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS


INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

© Mike Peters, works from the series “Meatpacking district”

INTERVIEW MIKE PETERS                                                                   FIX #3 /2013    27


SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN                                                                     FIX #3 /2013

SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN Robert Weingarten’s photographs of Amish communities are riveting testaments to the enduring virtues of this religious group’s spiritual and bucolic lifestyle. His black-and-white images of the pastoral landscape are in perfect accord with the Amish’s profoundly simple faith. In the broad spectrum of photographic grays that exists between the darkest black and the brightest white, this California photographer has eloquently evoked the rich and subtle harmonies of a people who shy from everything modern and worldly while cherishing the traditional, the spiritual, and the teachings of the Bible. Like the Pilgrims and Puritans, the Amish migrated to America in search of religious freedom; but unlike other denominations, most Amish have retained the plain black dress, the horse-drawn carriages, the manual tools, and the vernacular architecture of their ancestors. They stress personal humility, honor family and community values, and maintain a fairly strict isolation from contemporary society. Amish culture has been primarily based in agriculture, and the larger of their settlements are found in rural areas of Pennsylvania, New York, Ohio, Indiana, Tennessee, Illinois, and Iowa. Largely due to their own proscription against making graven images, the Amish remain unique and unfamiliar, hidden in plain view to our modern world. Robert Weingarten grew up in Brooklyn where he developed a superb sense of visual design as well as an abiding passion for the art of photography. For three years, he has traveled to various Amish communities in search of photographing both picturesque scenery and a rich, unchanging culture. His images are romantic, certainly, but they also respectfully bear witness to a very special way of life – farm houses quietly shrouded in early morning mist, graphic arrays of empty carriages, rustic textures of weathered barns and silos, uniformed young girls attending school, and gravely thoughtful adults at country auctions are just some of the subjects he shares with us. And we are that much richer because of him. Robert Weingarten’s Website: http://robertweingarten.com/

SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN                                                                FIX #3 /2013    29


FIX #3 /2013                                                                     SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN

© Robert Weingarten. Holmes County, OH, 2002

30    FIX #3 /2013                                                                SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN


SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN                                                                     FIX #3 /2013

© Robert Weingarten. Elkhart County, IN, 2002

© Robert Weingarten. Holmes County, OH, 2002

SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN                                                                FIX #3 /2013    31


FIX #3 /2013                                                                     SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN

© Robert Weingarten. Holmes County, OH, 2002

© Robert Weingarten. Lancaster County, PA, 2001

32    FIX #3 /2013                                                                SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN


SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN                                                                     FIX #3 /2013

© Robert Weingarten. Lancaster County, PA, 2001

© Robert Weingarten. Lancaster County, PA, 2001

SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN                                                                FIX #3 /2013    33


FIX #3 /2013                                                                     SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN

© Robert Weingarten. Holmes County, OH, 2002

© Robert Weingarten. Holmes County, OH, 2002

34    FIX #3 /2013                                                                SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN


SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN                                                                     FIX #3 /2013

© Robert Weingarten. Elkhart County , IN, 2002

© Robert Weingarten. Lancaster County, PA, 2001

SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN                                                                FIX #3 /2013    35


FIX #3 /2013                                                                     SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN

© Robert Weingarten. Bedford County, TN, 2003

36    FIX #3 /2013                                                                SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN


SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN                                                                     FIX #3 /2013

© Robert Weingarten. Holmes County, OH, 2002

SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN                                                                FIX #3 /2013    37


FIX #3 /2013                                                                     SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN

© Robert Weingarten. Monroe County, WI, 2003

38    FIX #3 /2013                                                                SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN


SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN                                                                     FIX #3 /2013

SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN                                                                FIX #3 /2013    39


FIX #3 /2013                                                                     SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN

© Robert Weingarten. Elkhart County , IN, 2002

© Robert Weingarten. Monroe County, WI, 2003

40    FIX #3 /2013                                                                SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN


SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN                                                                     FIX #3 /2013

© Robert Weingarten. Elkhart County , IN, 2002

SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN                                                                FIX #3 /2013    41


FIX #3 /2013                                                                     SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN

© Robert Weingarten. Bedford County, TN, 2003

42    FIX #3 /2013                                                                SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN


SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN                                                                     FIX #3 /2013

© Robert Weingarten. Elkhart County , IN, 2002

SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN                                                                FIX #3 /2013    43


FIX #3 /2013                                                                     SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN

© Robert Weingarten. Lancaster County, PA, 2001

44    FIX #3 /2013                                                                SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN


SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN                                                                     FIX #3 /2013

SERIES ROBERT WEINGARTEN                                                                FIX #3 /2013    45


Charleston

Charleston After Ocean Vuong and this is how we danced: our bodies became ripples, words from bronte passages we left for drowned under the kitchen faucet. feet like leaves slipped into different tongues of wind, out of step, out of rhythm, the way we fell together and the instructor picked us up, twisting us free of each others’ roots, still januaryed, a cautious stiff. and this is the way we loved: a quarter handle of tequila, spider webs rising from pockets of the empty attic, the lonely film reel spilling a default blue projection against our bed.

Poem by Peter LaBerge

More info about Peter: http://www.peterlaberge.co.nr


Illustration by Nastya Aniskova


FIX #3 /2013                                                                        ARTICLE MIKHAIL BUSHKOV

48    FIX #3 /2013                                                                   ARTICLE MIKHAIL BUSHKOV


ARTICLE MIKHAIL BUSHKOV                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

ARTICLE MIKHAIL BUSHKOV Once I had a girlfriend. Now I also have a girlfriend, but different one and I call her a wife. Then it used to be just a girlfriend and I used to call her a girlfriend. My girlfriend and I used to lie on the pebbled beach lit by the sun, dreaming. Those were pre-hipster days, when girls chose sneakers not for the fashion but for their cheapness. But there was no use of them on the beach so they were piled aside. And we were looking at the sky, with our face crinkled, and dreaming. And the object of our dreams was America. We were calculating. How much money do we need to travel by car from the East Coast to the West Coast? From Boston to San Francisco. First we need to get to the USA, which is two thousand dollars per each. Lufthansa plane tickets plus car rental for a month. To buy an old junk worth 300 dollars or to rent a new Linkoln? The girlfriend was in favour of a junk and I was for a Linkoln. I’ve never been into junk cars. But a Linkoln for a month will cost another thousand. Then there are motels. It is necessary to spend nights at the motels. These are L-shape motels, where you can park your car by the entrance and the owner is a paunchy Mexican. Perhaps it’ll cost about 20 dollars per night. Then we add 600 dollars on housing. And what about petrol? Petrol in the USA must be cheap , but it will be hardly less than 500. Food is 10 dollars per day. We can save on food. We can buy cup noodles in the supermarkets and gorge them for breakfast, lunch and dinner. We’ll live through a month. So, if we take a junk car, gorge cup noodles and live in motels with bedbugs, then it’ll come out 2000 *2 + 300 + 500 + 20*30 + 20*30 = 6000 dollars. Six thousand… Six thousand dollars… Six thousand dollars wasn’t just a lot. That was incredibly a lot. We sincerely believed that our young kidneys ( altogether) cost less. And who’ll buy them? We were walking home in silence. Burnt back itched as well as worried kidneys. That summer we rented a crummy flat in the old block of flats in 15 minutes walking distance from the sea. There was a kitchen and a room with a bed in the flat. There was a faded Slade poster with pale azure musicians holding big guitars. We were lying on the bed looking at the poster on the ceiling and wanted to go the USA. I have no idea why. We just wanted it. Irrationally and vigorously. When a few years later I got to the USA, on the very first day I bought a 1 dollar Coca-Cola can in the street stand and paid by the credit card. It was an unforgettable feeling to stand on the wide American pavement,

ARTICLE MIKHAIL BUSHKOV                                                                   FIX #3 /2013    49


FIX #3 /2013                                                                        ARTICLE MIKHAIL BUSHKOV

drinking real American coke and watching passing by real Americans, real American cars and breathing in such American air. And you feel as if you were in a movie, because taxies are as yellow and jeans are as blue as they are there and notices are all in English The euphoria, however, does not last and gets replaced by realization of a simple fact: the USA are extremely big and versatile. Absolutely not like we have imagined it. This is an issue. If an American comes to Russia, will he be able to make up an impression about the country, having visited Moscow and Saint-Petersburg? No, that is going to be the impression of Moscow and Saint-Petersburg, that’s it. Something greater takes time the tourists rarely possess. In case of the US tourists limit themselves to a range of hipster rituals: get a shot in a bar on Manhattan, gamble away a hundred bucks in Vegas, cross the Valley of Death, etc. Their photos, due to technological progress, pile up not in family albums, but on the Web. Thanks to Instagram and other useful services, stereotypical impression of the USA is growing even more stereotypical. I wish Robert Frank could do something about it... Does everybody know who Robert Frank is? Swiss by origin, he travelled several years around the States in the mid-1950s and wrote a revolutionary, symbolic book–“The Americans”. Elliot Erwitt (everybody knows who’s Elliot Erwitt?) commented on Frank’s work: “Quality is not deep black and some hue range. This is but a semblance of quality. Frank’s photography may seem unskilled – wrong hue range and so on– but in terms of quality they are way better Ansel Adams’ photos, because Ansel Adams’ photos, I may note, are of postcard quality. Robert Frank’s quality refers to what he does, to what is in his head. It’s not about balancing the skyline with the sand and so on. It’s about his intentions.” For the last 50 years most of things Robert Frank did in “The Americans” have become normal. Although nowadays everybody (well, almost everybody) knows that “The Americans” is a great book, not everybody knows why. I remember taking it from a library. The awe quickly turned to bewilderment. I’m holding the book which revolutionized the photography world in the XX century, and don’t feel anything special. Where’s the promised insight? “The Americans” is a great book. Especially when you don’t regard it as an “I’m-holding-a-masterpiecenow-something-great’s-gonna-happen” book. And yeah – in its time it really was revolutionary. But you have to admit that “revolutionize” and “revolutionary book” are notions tied to some distinct moment of time. In case of Frank’s book – to 1950s. For the passed 50-60 years most of things deemed surprising and innovative have become regular. Broken rules have turned to new trends in photography.

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ARTICLE MIKHAIL BUSHKOV                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

© Mikhail Bushkov

ARTICLE MIKHAIL BUSHKOV                                                                   FIX #3 /2013    51


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© Mikhail Bushkov

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ARTICLE MIKHAIL BUSHKOV                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

History likes playing pranks on masterpieces of art. For instance, has anybody seen “Battleship Potemkin” by Sergey Eisenstein? A remarkable film. Critics, though, say it’s not just a remarkable film, but one of the greatest films of the XX century. However, to understand that you need to go deep into critical literature on cinematography. Eisenstein’s work is the basis for most of the modern cinematography. That’s why we’re not going to see anything drastically innovative in the “Battleship Potemkin” itself. Everything that was new has long become normal for modern cinema. The same thing happened to Orson Welles’ “Citizen Kane”. Yes, an excellent film. Why is it considered one of the best movies ever shot? Several reasons for that. Innovative sound effects engaged, innovative camerawork, innovative narrative technique... You can go on with the list for a while. But now all these tools are in the toolset of modern cinematography. A present-day spectator may take their expoitation in “Citizen Kane” for granted and regard the film just as good. In1943 “Citizen Kane” would turn the spectators’ minds upside down and grant them a new perspective on the possibilities of cinematography. In 1959 Robert Frank turned a lot of people’s minds upside down. “It just seems that he points the camera where he wants and doesn’t bother about exposition, composition and other derails. If you like photos out of focus, converging verticals, lack of any decent composition, lower than average quality, than Rober Frank is for you. If not, you may reard The Americans as one of the most disappointing photobooks”. (James M. Zanutto, USA, “Popular Photography”, Vol. 46, №5) “Through the obstinant medium of photography Frank has succeeded to express his own tense vision, and you can’t blame him for it. But considering the nature of this vision I see that clarity often gives way to anger, bitterness and narrow-minded prejudices, as well as many photoprints in the book suffer from senseless distortion, grain, wobbly exposition, tipsy horizons and overall carelessness. As a photographer, Frank demonstrated his contempt towards any quality standards or technical discipline”. (Bruce Downes, USA, “Popular Photography”, Vol. 46, №5) “There is no love. There is no mercy in his pictures. These are illustrations of hatred, hopelessness, loneliness and obsession with death. These are illustrations of the USA seen through the eyes of a bitter man who hates the country that gave him shelter. Is he really a poet, as Kerouac, his friend, thinks? Perhaps. But he is a liar as well.” (Bruce Downes, USA, “Popular Photography”, Vol. 46, №5) “Contempt to any quality standards?” An extremely rare trait for a photographer. “Has succeeded to express his own tense vision?” This characteristic is worth a lot. So the reviews are not that devastating, more on

ARTICLE MIKHAIL BUSHKOV                                                                   FIX #3 /2013    53


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© Mikhail Bushkov

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ARTICLE MIKHAIL BUSHKOV                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

the contrary. The critics could disagree with Robert Frank’s vision and technique, but they couldn’t let go the following: “The Americans” express his, Robert Frank’s, opinion and his, Robert Frank’s, personal viewpoint. This book is about the USA and the citizens as much as it is about the photographer himself, what he thinks, feels and wants to say. I feel miserable about the fact that when I first came to the USA I was young and stupid. I had Nikon D40 and I had heard nothing about Robert Frank. Nothing. Nothing at all, even the name. Perhaps – not certainly, of course, but just perhaps if I had read his book, if I had thought it over properly, I would have made a couple of good shots. Because I would have shot something I think and feel, having come to the USA from Russia. And I would have not felt ashamed of those photos. Even if everybody else considered them bullshit. Next time I see my ex-girlfriend, if it is ever going to happen, I will definitely tell her about this idea. Maybe then she will stop taking pictures of skyscrapers, Central Park and Brooklin Bridge. Because it is not so interesting for me. But I’m interested in what’s on her mind, when she finally got to the place we had dreamt about on a beach covered with pebbles and sunshine. Oh, how I wish Robert Frank could do something about her...

Mikhail Bushkov’s website: http://www.mikhailbushkov.com

ARTICLE MIKHAIL BUSHKOV                                                                   FIX #3 /2013    55


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© Mikhail Bushkov

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ARTICLE MIKHAIL BUSHKOV                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

ARTICLE MIKHAIL BUSHKOV                                                                   FIX #3 /2013    57


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© Mikhail Bushkov

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ARTICLE MIKHAIL BUSHKOV                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

© Mikhail Bushkov

ARTICLE MIKHAIL BUSHKOV                                                                   FIX #3 /2013    59


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© Mikhail Bushkov

60    FIX #3 /2013                                                                   ARTICLE MIKHAIL BUSHKOV


ARTICLE MIKHAIL BUSHKOV                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

© Mikhail Bushkov

ARTICLE MIKHAIL BUSHKOV                                                                   FIX #3 /2013    61


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NTERVIEW ROSANNA BACH                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

INTERVIEW ROSANNA BACH Rosanna was one of the first authors we met in New York. Rosanna Bach is a young Swiss photographer, at that moment she was Documentary and Photojournalism at the New York International Center of Photography. Looking through ICP students’ works, I stumbled upon Rosanna’s project “Fears”. And it seemed like just the right thing! It had something special in it: combination of photography and texts, supplementing the stories of the photo characters. We met in the evening, at a small cafe named “The chocolate room”, buzzing with the usual evening youngster talks. We got ourselves a couple of coffees and talked about life in New York, about readiness to change, about completed and future projects. The talk was a bit hectic, but with a unique mood. As well as a book “House of Creatives”, which Rosanna compiled thanks to the reckless decision to indulge to the opportunity to spend the summer with a group of musicians, photographers and artists in one house. Without trying to get something particular at the end, just trying herself, her abilities. This independence, readiness to risk and change at any moment was very well sensed in Rosanna. At some moment I wanted to grab her arm in case she disappeared before the end of the interview. You never know, actually.

INTERVIEW ROSANNA BACH                                                                  FIX #3 /2013    63


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FIX: Nice place, do you always come here? Rosanna Bach: No, my friend was just around the corner. I was just hanging out. But she told me to come here. Ok, let’s get back to photography. Tell me one thing, why —photography? Good question. I tried other artistic disciplines, albelt I do draw sometimes, for example. But I just was never good enough and never put the work into it. I never really wanted it to pull in my time. By the way, I was enjoying writing a lot. And I did actually a book last year. One girl, she is musician and she kind of starts a collective. Her label paid her to move into a house in Pennsylvania for 2 month to record the album, work on it. And she thought: “Just me and my boyfriend in this big house, so let’s make something out of it!” So she found me on the internet and invited to participate, invited friends and other people. Do a little collaboration, make music mainly, but then they also do some photo shoots, like spot videos and stuff. Somehow it all just found me, I’ve got good signs. I mean, it’s not like one day I decided: “I’m gonna be a photographer!” I was studying something totally different. I was doing a class called design management. It’s actually like a business program, more branding based, which is quite usefull. Also I was taking a lot of pictures of my friends outside the school. I’ve got myself a real camera and started to make some little stories, like memories of my friends and things like that. Then I’ve decided, that I need to

learn the technique behind this, if I want to take it seriously. So, I moved in New York in 2008 and now I’m in ICP. Tell me about your life before NYC. Ok, it will take a long time. (laughing) Well I’m Swiss. My father is Swiss, my mother is British, but I grew up in Switzerland. So, until I was 18 I lived there basically, then I’ve moved here. But, I went to boarding school when I was 12, I haven’t been home for a long time. That’s why I’ve never really been a home-sick person. And I always loved meeting people, making new friends, it wasn’t that hard for me. I always knew there is something out there. That’s the summary. How do you find NYC? What is it for you? I like it. The first time I came here with the friend. I was 15 and she was from here, I met her at school. Her parents gave her so much freedom! You know, it was like in a big city just two 15 years old kids, running rounds. OMG, that was great! So, from that point it was freedom for me. I thought: “I need to come back here one day!” And I’ve moved here 3-4 years later and things were different. It’s absolutely different, when you visit a place and when you live in a place. You actually have to establish some sort of a structure, a life. And it’s very time-consuming, energy-consuming. But I felt once you find group of good people, reliable, actual real friends, then you can do anything. Just like your chosen family, you know. Now I have them and I’m really lucky.

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NTERVIEW ROSANNA BACH                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

© Rosanna Bach

INTERVIEW ROSANNA BACH                                                                  FIX #3 /2013    65


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© Rosanna Bach, works from the book “The House of Creatives”

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Tell me more about that period. Was it difficult?

life? I’m not saying it’s easy, but it’s definitely more interesting, I think.

It was difficult and I was very young. First you just go out all the time, and you constantly startled by everything. After awhile you have to kind of make something for you. Yeah, I mean, I think it’s difficult to start a new life anywhere. I had another friend, who I knew for 6 years, moved here at the same time with me. So I wasn’t completely alone. But when I’ve moved here I realized, that we are two absolutely different people. Switzerland is very small and you have a lot of the same friends and interest. And then when you have a whole another world, you realize that difference is very shown, kind of go apart a little bit. I was just trying to find my own life, my own way of doing things, my own friends. Yeah, it was hard but worth waiting.

How it was for you to quit your design management field and move to ICP? And was it difficult to come in ICP?

Seems there is a huge difference with the place you was living before, more opportunities and everything. What do you think about that? I come here from a little town in Alps, so obviously there is a lot more opportunities. There are a lot more things to photograph, there is a lot more anything. I’d say one of the most exciting city in Switzerland is Zürich. At the same time Zurich is smaller, so if you work really hard, you can probably get wherever you want faster. Here it’s nothing for sure, that’s why I love it here! Everything is up-down, extreme. It really flips you around, but it’s good. I think when you’re near 20s, you need to experience that! You feel alive that way. Who wants live a monoton

Oh, I don’t know, I was accepted. So I can’t say it was such a big transition. Because on other hand it wasn’t just a purely business. For example, for my thesis I did that project in Pennsylvania, made a book out of it and that was fine to submit it. I was lucky. If you knew what you want you are ok there, because you could use it to your advantage. I was always around taking pictures and it was kind of natural, I guess. I just needed to learn the technical things, and other things to know to grow up. What was the procedure for entering ICP? It was pretty simple. You’d sent portfolio, 15-20 images. Then you have to write, I think, 500 words and that’s it. I’ve brought a little book, I mixed my writing and my photos. Because I had all these photos but I’ve never actually done a sort of project, apart from a book. It was too many photos, so I couldn’t submit it. So I chose some of my favorite photos and made a story out of it, put a writing, yeah. How did you come to this method of mixing writings and photos? How it comes to you? Yeah, it’s funny, because when I did that project

INTERVIEW ROSANNA BACH                                                                  FIX #3 /2013    67


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       INTERVIEW ROSANNA BACH

in Pennsylvania, I had a professor. He wasn’t teaching my class, he was teaching another class, but I knew he was a photographer. So, I asked him for the advice and he spent a lot of hours and helped me. He said: “You have to write for this”. I said: “What do you mean, write? But I don’t know how”. After that I started write everything and it turns out. I’m really enjoying writing and I’m not a bad writer either. I may have a lot to work on, but I’ve realised there is an option. And I feel it gives a lot more depth too. It could be literal, but sometimes it can really add to the project, I think. Guess, there are a lot of people studing in ICP. Do you feel some special aspects about it? Well, it’s nice, because there is a good mix of people. It’s not like everyone has the same goal. Super competitive or not yet at least, the year has only begun, you know. Each person has their own thing, their own style. When you have a girl that is 20 years old, then you have another one who’s doing finance and she decided: “Fuck this, I wanna change my life”. She must be around her early 30s and she is doing a program. So you have like a good good mix, that is very interesting. Is it common to criticize works of your classmates, or? I wouldn’t call it criticize. I mean, they like critics. In any arts school you have that. You put up your works on the wall and people comment. And it’s not always positive. That’s how you learn it, right? If everyone says: “Ah, the work is great, the work is

great!” Then you probably shouldn’t be there. It’s just important not to take it too personally, take it as an advice, instead of a negative thing. You always have things to learn from different people. What is your plan for the future? Logically speaking, not in june, right? (laughing) One thing I’ve learnt at school, the teachers repeat, is: “You gonna have to do the job you don’t like, to do the projects you do like”. So, I’ll probably end up doing a few weddings, they pay very well. But my main plan is to find an assistant job to a photographer, someone I like, hopefully, that pays, hopefully.(laughing) Because, I just wanna learn, you know. I’m 22, I don’t have that much experience, I just wanna learn, and then let’s see. I have few ideas I want to do after school, but at first I just have to understand how all is going to pass. I think assistant job and then do you own project on the side, it doesn’t sound too bad. You still have to do what you love. You can have the best job in the world but there is certain part of it that you don’t love. Don’t get me wrong, I would love to do still pictures of my life and travel all day long, but seems it’s not very possible.(laughing) Also I love music, so I wouldn’t mind doing some music photography at all. Would you like some day start making video or filming? I don’t think I’m ready for this, because it’s really the whole another world. But you have multimedia. Which you can do with still photos and voice recording. That one I’m actually going to learn. I think

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NTERVIEW ROSANNA BACH                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

that would be great, because I feel it can be more powerful. It makes your story a lot fuller, you know? So, I’m excited to learn that. Which photographers are inspiring you? I really like Sophie Calle, she is a French photographer. I’ve just got a book of hers, which is about blind people. It’s amazing. She asked them what their concept of beauty was. And photos of the things that they say were included to the book. Also they have a page of braille as well. So, the whole book was made very smart. Beautiful! What about some kind of inspiration? What keeps you going? Well, I’m still a student. Ask me that question in 3 years, when I really need to keep me going. I suppose, it’s my way of getting to know the world better and people. Push myself to do things I’m maybe scared of doing. It takes me out of my comfort zone, that’s what I like. I’m always pushing myself. All after all, you meet some great people. That’s my selfish reason for doing it. But hopefully I’ll be able to make people do the same or dream or somehow make them think about certain things. And you still believe that this world could be changed? Probably not directly the world, but it all starts from one person, right? So if you can change one person’s way of thinking, then it becomes collective, then something happens. Little by little. I’ve got really

overwhelmed and I was thinking: “How can I change everything?” I was about to give up photography. And my boyfriend told me: “Listen, you can’t change the world in a day. Start small, then you can take it over. “ And he is right though. Don’t you afraid of being lost in all this world of art? Noo. I haven’t lived at home for like 10 years, so I’m pretty good at surrounding myself with good people. So, not really. I think people can be very egoistic, if they start to do well, they start to think more about themselves. And it’s really easy to get absorbed into that. Especially in New York, where you feel like that’s the only thing that is. When you leave it’s like: “Oh shit, there is the whole other world outside!” So easy to forget that. You get so consumed in it. It’s heavy, but you just need to keep some perspective in there, to stay sane and then you’ll be ok. (laughing) What is your fear? Oh no! You can’t do that! My fear... I guess... Is it bad I’m thinking so long and I’ve been asking everyone about what their fear is! (laughing) I guess failure, losing people I love, losing a man. Because people are very unpredictable, you know? You can be in love one day and then next week he might meet someone who changes his life and he is like: “Chao!” You never know. Seems you’re the person who likes all these moving, like you really need them, but still you have some few points of ...

m72

INTERVIEW ROSANNA BACH                                                                  FIX #3 /2013    69


«The gift the city gave to her was the music of the night, we danced the dance of truths while they laid in the bed of their lies, sounds lucidly drip through the unstarry sky, twisted in hope and fury, we all estranged strangers roam among one another, seeking to still our thirsty hearts.»

© Rosanna Bach


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       INTERVIEW ROSANNA BACH

… stability. I think you need that. Humans, we are creatures of habits, right? So we like to stick to what we know. I’m trying not to do that. At the same time you need some sort of stability. You’re always changing, always trying to find ourselves. But on the time we found ourselves, the world already changed. I know, it’s just a crazy topic, yeah. But you need that. My friends, the people around me are my stability, not the place. I don’t care about the place! The place can change as long as I have good people, then I’m ok.

MARIANO, BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA. "I fear that they won’t like me as I am."

k

SALVADOR, TAQUILE, PERU. "I want to learn English, I can’t speak it."

j

ARIAL, BUENOS AIRES. "I fear…ending up alone, not knowing what I like, not ever understanding myself."

i

m75 CARMELO, BUENOS AIRES. "Scared of the bad people k in the street. Life is bad in the street."

GRISELDA, BUENOS AIRES. "Scared of failing at work." SELINA GOMES, BUENOS AIRES. "I fear that they will get you."

72    FIX #3 /2013                                                                  INTERVIEW ROSANNA BACH

k

j k

Rosanna Bach’s website: http://www.rosannabach.com

ADOLFO, BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA. "Listen kid, no one is really dead until they’re forgotten."


NTERVIEW ROSANNA BACH                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

© Rosanna Bach, works from the series “The Fear Builds Walls”

INTERVIEW ROSANNA BACH                                                                  FIX #3 /2013    73


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       INTERVIEW ROSANNA BACH

74    FIX #3 /2013                                                                  INTERVIEW ROSANNA BACH


NTERVIEW ROSANNA BACH                                                                        FIX #3 /2013

© Rosanna Bach, works from the series “The Fear Builds Walls”

INTERVIEW ROSANNA BACH                                                                  FIX #3 /2013    75


SERIES RAFAL MALKO                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

Series RAFAL MALKO Rafal Malko is our friend and photographer from Poland. He is a photo-reporter and a studiophotographer, a winner of prestigious photography awards. He has been working for Gazeta Wyborcza since 2003 and is also a co-founder of the ArmadaPixels. This is his photo series named “American Dream”. All photos were made in Poland, his motherland.

Rafal Mako’s website: http://www.rafalmalko.com

SERIES RAFAL MALKO                                                                     FIX #3 /2013    77


FIX #3 /2013                                                                         SERIES RAFAL MALKO

© Rafal Mako, works from the series “United States of Poland”

78    FIX #3 /2013                                                                    SERIES RAFAL MALKO


SERIES RAFAL MALKO                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

SERIES RAFAL MALKO                                                                     FIX #3 /2013    79


FIX #3 /2013                                                                         SERIES RAFAL MALKO

© Rafal Mako, works from the series “United States of Poland”

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SERIES RAFAL MALKO                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

© Rafal Mako, works from the series “United States of Poland”

SERIES RAFAL MALKO                                                                     FIX #3 /2013    81


FIX #3 /2013                                                                         SERIES RAFAL MALKO

© Rafal Mako, works from the series “United States of Poland”

82    FIX #3 /2013                                                                    SERIES RAFAL MALKO


SERIES RAFAL MALKO                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

© Rafal Mako, works from the series “United States of Poland”

SERIES RAFAL MALKO                                                                     FIX #3 /2013    83


© Rafal Mako, works from the series “United States of Poland”


FIX #3 /2013                                                                         SERIES RAFAL MALKO

© Rafal Mako, works from the series “United States of Poland”

86    FIX #3 /2013                                                                    SERIES RAFAL MALKO


SERIES RAFAL MALKO                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

© Rafal Mako, works from the series “United States of Poland”

SERIES RAFAL MALKO                                                                     FIX #3 /2013    87


Illustration by Nastya Aniskova


Engines

My brother enlisted in December. I remember because tears froze on my mother’s cheeks, and the windshield fogged when she turned on the heat to melt them. I was twelvealmost-thirteen. We got out of the car. My brother ruffled my hair, clamped a camouflaged arm around me, flew away. He told me, Dad would be proud of us, that I was the man of the house now. That year, I pitched for the sixth-grade Cardinals and the coach said I was almost as good. I smoked my first cigarette, found it naked and inviting like a woman on my brother’s bedside table. His letters ceased, and my mother daydreamed. Each Sunday, I went to eight o’clock Mass, burrowed my hands in holy water, folded them, and walked down the aisle to receive Communion. Last Sunday, my mother found her Bible, and my brother’s last letter. She put them in the passenger seat of his car. Then, she made the engine dance until every tool hanging in the garage shook. Poem by Peter LaBerge

More info about Peter: http://www.peterlaberge.co.nr


ARTICLE ADOLFO DORING                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

ARTICLE ADOLFO DORING Beyond the intent of the name, which is worth pointing out because it intends and implies a certain supra order to the series, the photographs are full of this same irony. The works capture moments, most of them impossible to recapture. They are moments and observations that vector in time and space to reveal hidden compositions and imminent truths, with humor and social commentary. Doring’s training as a sociologist imbues the work with a perspective that supersedes the aesthetics expected of photography, while remaining aesthetic beyond reproach. It is easy to observe that there are many dimensions to Adolfo Doring’s photographic works, but there is no series that best represents the totality of his approach as American Burger. The title itself reflects a certain irony in his thought process. Why not call it American Hamburger? Why use the diminutive vernacular “burger?” When asked this same question by Evelyne Garcia-Jousset the renowned French photographer and arts journalist, Doring replied that he knew “America” had to be part of the title for these photographs and that “burger” came to him after a meditation with regards to the nature of the word “cowboy.” “You ask ‘Why burger, why not hamburger?’ I say ‘Why Cowboy? Why not Cowman?” Photographs like Humans and White Collar at first glance send our minds to immediate assumptions; graphically they reach for perfection, we can assume that they were created for a purpose, a print ad for IBM or Apple computers perhaps, but given a minute of observation the images will become rich in irony and will beg the questions: Why was the camera there at that precise place, at that precise moment? Who was there to press the shutter? William R. Dixon Ph.D

Adolfo Doring’s website: http://www.adolfodoring.com

ARTICLE ADOLFO DORING                                                                    FIX #3 /2013    91


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       ARTICLE ADOLFO DORING

© Adolfo Doring, works from the series “American Burger”

92    FIX #3 /2013                                                                    ARTICLE ADOLFO DORING


ARTICLE ADOLFO DORING                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

© Adolfo Doring, works from the series “American Burger”

ARTICLE ADOLFO DORING                                                                    FIX #3 /2013    93


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       ARTICLE ADOLFO DORING

© Adolfo Doring, works from the series “American Burger”

94    FIX #3 /2013                                                                    ARTICLE ADOLFO DORING


ARTICLE ADOLFO DORING                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

© Adolfo Doring, works from the series “American Burger”

ARTICLE ADOLFO DORING                                                                    FIX #3 /2013    95


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       ARTICLE ADOLFO DORING

© Adolfo Doring, works from the series “American Burger”

96    FIX #3 /2013                                                                    ARTICLE ADOLFO DORING


ARTICLE ADOLFO DORING                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

© Adolfo Doring, works from the series “American Burger”

ARTICLE ADOLFO DORING                                                                    FIX #3 /2013    97


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       ARTICLE ADOLFO DORING

© Adolfo Doring, works from the series “American Burger”

98    FIX #3 /2013                                                                    ARTICLE ADOLFO DORING


ARTICLE ADOLFO DORING                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

"Oppression, alienation, consumerism... solitude."

ARTICLE ADOLFO DORING                                                                    FIX #3 /2013    99


FIX #3 /2013

100    FIX #3 /2013


FIX #3 /2013

iNTERVIEW PATRIK ANDERSSON We met with Patrik accidentally on a lecture in Center Alternative Photography in New York. Exchanged contacts, arranged a meeting. Having browsed through Patrik’s works on his site, amidst commercial shots, celebrities and presidents I stopped my eye on a somewhat weird, outstanding of the rest “61 project”. The decision was made. We met in a small cosy cafe “Shervin’s” in East Village, filled with the relaxed, a bit sluggish atmosphere of the morning town. Patrik Andersson is a Swedish photographer and director, living and working in New York now. Ironic, with clingy and thoughtful eyes, kind of a “good fella” in every company who sees right through you. At once Patrik suggested us to look through a collection of his works for the last 30 years, the “Kaleidoscope”. The name is completely illustrative of the impression from the book, where every spread changed unpredictably and amazingly. The author himself produces an impression of ever-ready for metamorphosis and discovery of new truths, as pictures in a kaleidoscope. While we were talking, almost every patron of the cafe seemed to come up to Patrik and give him a friendly pat on his back and a couple of words. Patrik would, as if unintentionally, suggest to express the person’s opinion on his latest book. And in a moment, as though he just remembered that he was giving an interview to some guys from a new Russian magazine, would ask: “Ok, what have we stopped at?”

    FIX #3 /2013    101


FIX #3 /2013                                                                    INTERVIEW PATRIK ANDERSSON

FIX: Are these the works from some period of time? Patrik Andersson: Yes, it’s about 30 years. Whoa... This was the reason to do Kaleidoskope. Design is like this, because... First, I sent everything I did to the art director. And he sorted it first. And then it kind of... didn’t work the way my mind worked. So I went there and moved the pictures around and he was like: “Oh, you are thinking chaotic, you always look for a new way of looking at things”. As always with photography, it evolved and changed. I do different. I spend time, couple of years, on one thing. And then I go to the next one, but it keeps overlapping. So I was looking for this kind of chaotic way, more like how memories work, how fantasy or imagination work. So when I took a break from the discussions and came back, the art director was like: “You’re like a little kid looking through a kaleidoskope”. I was like: “Yeah, that fascination is really true to how I storyboard”.

I guess that really helped... They allowed their workers to borrow cameras, so I would use all of it, everything, when I was 10-12 years old. I knew everything about this equipment. I had a darkroom in a bathroom. And then later photography became your main occupation... and you moved to NY... I was born in Gothenburg and then I moved to Stockholm, and from Stockholm to New York. As a swedish person I remember I had this dream to live in New York. What was really beautiful about photography is that, you know, if you are a young guy, you don’t have to learn English perfectly, you move abroad and bring your camera with you. The language of images is universal. How old were you when you moved to NYC? I was 25. Yeah, 1990. And very quickly I moved in a place across the street from here. And then you did what? Did you have any training or education in photography?

I wanted the book to have a kind of adventure, to trick the mind. I wanted the designer to have fun designing the book, and the book itself to be an interesting experience. And use my photography as a basis to create something else.

Well, I went to school for a little bit. But that was when I was 17 to 19. It was a little professional photography school. And then...

Look, this picture I took it when I was 12 years old. My mom worked at the Hasselblad factory, so I could borrow the camera.

I don’t know if it just happened. I was lucky but at the same time I was very focused.

It just happened?

102    FIX #3 /2013                                                                INTERVIEW PATRIK ANDERSSON


INTERVIEW PATRIK ANDERSSON                                                                    FIX #3 /2013

With regards to photography, what was your main goal of moving to NYC? In the beginning it was just an ambition. Right when I came, I was fascinated by the portrait and fashion style of photography, so the magazines were good for that. Two first jobs that I had when I came to NY were Italian “Vogue” and the first issue of “Allure”. The first fashion story in the first issue of “Allure”. It was really incredible me being 25 years old. And then this (Patrik shows a picture from his “61 Project”), you know... When I did this much later... These I was taking with a 28-24 inch color negatives on a fiber-based paper. It wasn’t done for anybody, it wasn’t done for magazine, it wasn’t even done for the art world. It was done because I wanted to experience my own photography world and see what happens. Yes, “61 Project”, I saw it on your website. It was one frame per day for two months when I drove from Los Angeles to Alaska, from Alaska to Maine, from Maine to Florida, from Florida back. So I spent 2 months on the road, just driving. I had so much equipment... It was Eric who lent me the camera, because he had this color process, that nobody has been using. Color negative, contact sheets on fiber-based paper. That never existed before. It was so expensive to take each picture, so I just made one frame per day. It matched my interest in meditation, in Zen, in a single moment, “what this day is about?”. So each day I was only allowed myself to do one exposure, and that’s what that is.

It’s not the same, but have you heard about 365 project that is very popular on Flickr? People make one picture per day, every day for a year. And then you have your year in pictures. It’s a bit similar, but not the same... What was interesting for me... In the beginning I thought: “Maybe I should use a digital camera, to make it very easy and then just choose something”. But that wasn’t the experience I wanted. I wanted the one where you have, you know, a really big camera. It takes a lot of effort to set up the camera. And the camera leaked light, so I had to build a tent around it that covered me when I was taking the plate in or out of the camera. It was a sort of a bit of insanity but I wanted to explore what that was about. It was also like going out into the American wilderness and being by yourself. It’s is sort of like you and... you know... and the world out there. I didn’t want to have pictures from my life right here. When did you do “61 Project”? 1999, It was right when digital pictures started happening, and it was right when I had said: “Ok, from now on I wanna focus on making movies”. So at that point I knew I was stopping being a photographer and starting being a movie maker. It was a transitional period. And then I saw that, wow, very shortly I’ll be using only digital cameras. It was 1999 and I had shot with a digital camera once. It was the 35 mm chip put on the back of a RZ67, the Mamiya 67. So it was retarded in how it

INTERVIEW PATRIK ANDERSSON                                                               FIX #3 /2013    103


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was. And the cable was only from here to there and connected to the computer. But I knew... The camera had to be connected to computer to be able to make the pictures, but I was like: this is gonna be amazing. And I also knew that movie cameras are gonna be digital. So, it kind of flashed back... Analogue photography, like film, it’s gonna be gone. It’s not gonna exist anymore. My lifestyle is gonna be completely different. At that moment I was filled with gratitude because I suddenly looked at my whoooooole life up to 1999... How old was I? ...I was 36 years old, and I was like–wow! I’ve met people, I’ve traveled, I’ve lived in different places, and I’ve learnt so much, lived and loved, worked and it’s been kind of amazingamazing... So I was looking to make a project that dealt with gratitude. I was shooting for the “Blair Witch Project”. I was camping with them and I came to New York and I had just couple of rolls of 120 film I gave to Eric. I said: “Look! I’m...” And he said: “I have a new camera, 20 by 24 and color negative”. And I knew that was the answer to this gratitude because it was crazy-analogue-conventional-film adventure. That would be like: ok, I’m gonna say “thank you” to classic photography, and then I will turn around and explore what digital cameras can do. And how do you find digital technology? Oh, it’s incredibly free. It’s so inexpensive. You can make projects for nothing, you know, the cameras are amazing,... and I like it. I did some pictures that are

very low light... and the distortions from it, from the new digital are super interesting too. So like here (Patrik shows a picture), here it is so dark, but look at kind of weird grain it has... This is 25$ lens, you know? It’s combining super sharp digital and making it fuzzy with weird lenses. It seems like you pick up that thing, you have this camera, that camera, this camera and your life changes... In which direction does it change? Is it becoming faster or easier? I think it’s not: “It is becoming this”. It’s much more like: “I’m here right now and I wanna explore this direction, or I wanna explore that direction”. If I wanted my life to go slower I could pick that kind of camera and those kinds of things, talk to that kind of people. If I wanted my life to be more like this... I’m, myself, I’m curious about whether storytelling is gonna function for me, you know. I’ve started exploring making movies and what that is, and I’m looking for funding, for scripts. My direction, it looks like this right now (Patrik shows script with notes). It’s a scriptwriting with notes. This is what photography has become. For you? For me. It is now a document first. I never rolled a document before taking pictures. Now I’m writing a document before I gonna go and make... How many pictures is it in a movie, 24 per second, 48 per second?

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Is it difficult to find funding to make movies? What I discovered is... When I was 15, I said I wanna be a photographer and people said: “No”. In the beginning my family was: “No, it’s too difficult, everybody wants to be a photographer”. And I was like: “No, that’s what I wanna do”. And instead of going to technical school, I started working at photography store. And then: “Ok, now, I want to open my studio”. And people might be: “Oh, it’s too difficult”. And I might be: “I gonna have to figure it out then. I gonna move to NY. Or I gonna move to Stockholm and then I gonna move to NY”. “It’s too difficult!” At times it appears too difficult, right? Like learning how to build the story, how that functions–is difficult. The first story that I wrote, The Swedish Film Institute said: “Ok, we gonna produce your movie”. But when I wrote this story I’ve discovered that it was too difficult. Like I hadn’t done it. So what did I do? I moved to LA and I was hanging with screenwriters for 5 years and then, you know, I’ve started writing and I’ve been writing for about 10 years now. Not every day, because it’s difficult. And then I’ve discovered that my stamina as a writer is not good. I’ve discovered that if I’d talk it’s easier for me so I’ve started working together with writers talking the story and then it makes it ok. So then, you know, when it comes to fundraising, it’s the same thing there. Everybody say this is superdifficult. And I don’t have big money right now, right? And I don’t know if I ever will. But I know that people have done it before, right, so there is a way that this

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thing happens, right? So these things, that people know... Perhaps, I’ll be able to figured them out: what those elements are. What stands in between me and putting the stuff together to make a movie is time and doing things, putting things together, showing up and asking questions, asking for help, finding people that know how to do it and talking about it... Did you read the “Story” by Robert McKee? You know, the whole thing with getting your script liked–is a lot like taking a picture of the coffee cup on the Instagram. Which is like... if you want everybody to like your script you have to make a script that everybody likes, right? Finding your own voice, doing what you wanna do, and getting funding to do it or going to Kickstarter and doing it–I’m in a process of discovering what that’s about. I can’t give you the answer to what that is, but I can totally see that it’s not fitting your script into parameters of what Robert McKee needs it to be or what Joseph Campbell needs it to be. If you compare it to people who really bend the rules... It’s the same as... Sometimes I was really doing traditional photography with the black and white images and a grey wall, with a famous person. You know, pictures that Avedon and Penn, and Steven Klein, Michael Thompson, and everybody has done... And everybody liked them?


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© Patrik Andersson, works from the series “61 Project”

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Magazines loved them! They like them as covers and you might think that it’s better photography... Like if you take Instagram, for instance. You post something and people like it, right? So what is that gonna do? You gonna know: if I take a picture of a cup of coffee and I will put it on my page, anybody who wants a cup of coffee, they want this picture, because they like my cup of coffee. And what does it mean? It means that a lot of people like coffee. For instance, nobody has stopped at this and liked this picture, right? Or this picture, or that picture (Patrik goes through the Kaleidoskope book). Nobody has said anything, nobody liked, right? Nobody liked this. So, what–they’re no good then? Nobody liked, this, this... Or... everybody likes this, everybody likes this, everybody likes that (Patrik goes through the book showing pictures of beautiful women). “Oh I love this picture!”, “Oh this picture is so beautiful!”, “Oh, you’re really amazing!”, “Can I be your facebook friend?”, “Do you know her?”, “Oh my god, what was she like?”, “Oh she is so beautiful!”, “Oh, my god, did you have sex with her?”, “Oh my god! This is your daughter, she’s so beautiful!” You know, about a year or two ago I ran around with a little camera looking for a picture that meant nothing. I was looking for a picture that would give no emotional reaction whatsoever, a totally pointless picture, that’s what I was focused on.

But you liked the picture you took? No! I wanted to make a picture that I do not react to at all. Like a perfectly neutral picture. A nothingimage. What does photography mean for you... I mean... Of course, I understand that you are doing what are you doing and you can stop doing it at any moment. But is it important for you to somehow stay in history? Or, you know... Looks like you wanna ask the big question, right? (Patrik’s friend Eric just entered the bar) Eric, this is a Russian photo magazine. Can you answer, what’s the main object of photography? - (Eric) The main object of photography? - (Patrik) Yeah, the reason for it to exist? You’re being recorded. - (Eric): Alright... Ah... I don’t know... (laughs) I love to use photography to storyboard. But I’m a bad photographer. He uses my camera a lot, though (points to Patrik). - (Patrik) When you first pick up the camera, you may be like: I want to take picture of my brother, of my mom and then... For me it happened, I was seeing that I can make pictures that look special, you know... And then maybe you make one to be liked by the critics. So that may be your ambition, that may be your reason for a while. And then maybe your reason becomes to discover something about yourself, to

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figure what you want. Or maybe the reason is to make money, or to get some place. Maybe the reason is to make something more beautiful or awkward, or tell a story, or... I think you can pick any driving force that drives the human being and you can just install the camera into that, and that’ll be the reason. So, there is no absolute answer. So, when you ask: “What’s the main objective of photography?”, you can just sort of say: “Well, why are we here?” The camera is simply a tool and it’s so versatile and it’s so flexible, and it comes in so many different shapes that it’s impossible to give a one-line answer to that question. But the beauty of it is that because it’s so flexible it can become very useful for peoples lives. There’s a beautiful-beautiful, a beautiful relationship to it. But as a person evolves or as I evolve or you evolve you use it in different way. At this moment you seem to be on a kind of a quest of getting to understand something. Or choose what I really want... You are putting together magazines or work with a magazine to be able to discover something. You are on a path of looking for a kind of an understanding. So at the moment you are using the camera as a selfdiscovery tool. And it functions perfectly like that. You said that you would like to focus on filmmaking instead of photography. Does it mean that if you have to choose between filmmaking and some other job, you choose filmmaking?

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For a while I thought that you have to choose either-or. But making a movie can take such a long time that people ask me to take a picture, people ask me, you know... Over Christmas I gonna be editing a movie that I’ve already shot, which is an advertising for a 17’000$ watch.

Do you like it? I mean... Yeah, it’s a beautiful watch! Yeah! I’m not talking about the watch! Yeah, it’s a super... I get to explore and, you know, learn the tool. Each time that somebody places a project in my lab, I’m gonna look for an idea and use it like a boxer will use a sparring partner. It becomes like, you know: “How do I now evolve?” You put this job in me, I have to do this job and the client needs something, but within that framework I’m gonna sit with this project for amount of time, I’m gonna learn something. And then you can either focus your learning or you can make it randomly. I choose to focus on something. I open up software and take one aspect of a filter, or something, apply that and see what that is. Do you make some kind of workshops? For teaching? No, I haven’t... You are not interested in that? I just haven’t really thought about it.


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© Patrik Andersson, works from the series “61 Project”

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© Patrik Andersson, works from the series “61 Project”


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It’s an interesting question for me. What is education? Is it needed? Because it seems like if person is really full of ideas and talented, then education is not important. You can just shoot, shoot and something will turn up. But maybe not. There are different stories of different people, right? I think you don’t know... nobody really knows what education is? Or when you gonna get hit with this spark that will influence you. I was always fascinated by the master. So, like when I was young I saw the master in my hometown. Then I always tried to talk to the master. And then you have to, not you have to, but your relationship to the master changes because you can go into what they have discovered and then you can go beyond it, right? So, there is certain classic ways of doing photography, for instance. Then you go to that and you exist in that, and then you may wanna be like a teenager and rebel against the classic. And then you may wanna come back to the classic when you’re older, you know. But it’s also the same with... philosophy, right? I was swedish and then I was drawn to asian philosophy. And then maybe you like no philosophy at all, and then maybe you pick it up again, or... So, for me, storytelling is a way of going beyond what photography-the-master was able to give me. The photography-the-master became something that I have to go beyond, to keep going, because now I need the masters of movie making. And then... yeah,

I now need to study the people that have mastered at that and see what they are about, to be able to go beyond what this life gave me or what I’m able to give. I really wanna emphasize evolution because if it wasn’t about evolution you would have to, sort of, choose at what point do you start, where do you, sort of, say: “Ok, I wanna stay within this format now and then I wanna master just this”. Which is, you know, you can stop at whatever place you want, you can stop in classic photography, or had I stopped year earlier I could stop drawing animated cartoons and making super-8 movie with them. Had I stopped earlier I would have done... before photography I was doing model trains with my brother. Really? Yeah, you build little train sets. But if you move through, then you see what else is there, what else is there... By the way, isn’t this your brother on this page? Yes, he was the boss when I grew up... Nice company... He was the boss, when I grew up, and this was the boss when I took this picture. But it’s also the first time ever when I decided to make a portrait. So this is my very first attempt at a portrait. I used this super-8 little projection screen, so I put that up and then the light is windows in my

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bedroom. And then you can see... that... 35 years later I did the same exact thing, but I’ve created it now. I had to use like 7 HMIs, and a white backdrop, same color, so it’s exactly exactly the same look. This is like two assistants and huge backs and all kinds of gear. But the look of it is the same. Even though things changed, some aspects are like, you know... It’s like this light is... the most pleasant way of looking at a face, in a kind of neutral way. I feel this is like home base for lightning. Anything else you do–it’s something that you’ve done. But this is kind of not doing...

The funny thing is, this is your first portrait and then there’s a lot of this kind of framing... I think also, it’s because of how this guy chose to present the pictures in the book. He chose to frame the pictures this way, because he saw a lot of what I do is just “grab a face”. How does it feel to decide to become a moviemaker after all those years in photography? I was talking to Erik and he was saying like... how come that since I did this I’m not doing it any more? If I was good at that how come I’m not doing that now? But once you are good at something, the adventure in doing it is not there. So the adventure is in the discovery, you know? Adventure is in learning something. For me, what I’ve discovered is maybe that I’m not so much a photographer, but it is the adventure or the playful game of discovering.

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I was playing Backgammon with the friend of mine for years and then after a while we kind of psss, zoned out of playing Backgammon, it’s because we had both knew each others strengths and weaknesses perfectly. And then at one point we’ve decided we should be talking about the Back, I don’t know if you know Backgammon, but there is a “Back Game” part of the Backgammon where you start tricking each other one more level. And we started playing from that and then it became interesting again. Backgammon was exciting for 5 years and then 2-3 years we barely did it because there was nothing new to discover and then we applied this new kind of way of doing it, and it became interesting again. So it’s like–who knows where is that adventure or stimulation or new discovery is gonna happen? I could take just a simple portrait and you can explore that, you know... You don’t have to change, you can apply new things and make that interesting and create new things, you know, and become hugely famous or rich or whatever it is, that you are looking to do. People do this kind of things with... There is a guy around who only photographs stars, and you know, it creates a lot of fame by staying on one thing. If you only photograph water towers, people will see it. If you only photograph your dogs and people will see it. If you do different things and change all the time it’s not as good for people to identify what you’re about. But it depends on what you care about. Because if that is the most important thing! For me– having an interesting journey has... you know... I may change, but so far...


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It’s funny, because there is an opinion that photographer has to find some kind of his own style and, you know, to understand what he needs and ... Yes, that’s what the guy was saying. When we were listening to the guy that photographed those landscapes, he was saying that he found that taking 8 by 10 pictures from the high vantage point in a certain light with the certain film was him. So, he runs around the world under the impression that photograph in a certain way is his personality. That’s kind of limiting.

No. But it’s gonna be the only thing I do from now. And I only gonna do it with this technique. Different interviewers, but they have to capture the voice on Olympus recorder... Because otherwise the quality will be a little bit different, that’s not gonna be my style.

Yes, but do you want these limits? It’s very... For him it’s been very useful, you know. And it’s really effective and a lot of people admire it. And I think you discover a lot from staying on one thing. Because, may be the way I’ve done it, is a kind of scatterbrain, you know. Maybe you spread yourself too thin maybe... But still, I think it can be you, your journey... the main thing for... So, now we define me as that. May be next week I will just do this. All I gonna do from now–is talk to Russian photo magazines, that’s gonna be my style! I hope not! I will always try to find new Russian magazines, to sit in this cafe and I gonna be the expert of it. Have you ever been interviewed by a Russian magazine before?

More works from this series watch on Patrik Andersson's website: http://www.patrikandersson.com

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SERIES DANIEL KUKLA Daniel Kukla, a native of Indianapolis, Indiana, currently resides in Brooklyn, New York where he works as a freelance and fine art photographer. He is a graduate of The International Center of Photography program in Documentary Photography and Photojournalism. Prior to his photographic education he attended The University of Toronto and received his B.Sc. in Evolutionary Ecology, Biology, and Evolutionary Human Anatomy. He works at the juncture of these disciplines, focusing in on capturing images that have the power to articulate our everchanging relationship with the natural world. Edge Effect Description In March of 2012, IN was awarded an artist’s residency by the United States National Park Service in southern California’s Joshua Tree National Park. While staying in the Park, I spent much of my time visiting the borderlands of the park and the areas where the low Sonoran desert meets the high Mojave desert. While hiking and driving, I caught glimpses of the border space created by the meeting of distinct ecosystems in juxtaposition, referred to as the Edge Effect in the ecological sciences. To document this unique confluence of terrains, I hiked out a large mirror and painter’s easel into the wilderness and captured opposing elements within the environment. Using a single visual plane, this series of images unifies the play of temporal phenomena, contrasts of color and texture, and natural interactions of the environment itself. «My artistic practice is informed by the joint intersection my work as a photographer, and my formal training in the biological and anthropological sciences. I work at the juncture of these disciplines, focusing in on capturing evidence as images that have the power to articulate our ever-changing relationship with the natural world. In both science and photography the act of collection is universal.  Whether specimen or subject, the collection process allows one to categorize, control, and critically describe ones findings, and contribute them to the collective work of others in the field.  I find that this process allows me to engage my audience with contemporary social and environmental themes, ranging from the commonplace to the esoteric.  As a calculated investigation, my projects document and bear witness to important social, political and ecological issues; through highlighting the beautiful and the bizarre, and retaining the experimentation of the scientific perspective, I offer a vantage point on these subjects that can destabilize, challenge and provoke.» More works from this series watch on Daniel Kukla's website: http://www.danielkukla.com

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© Daniel Kukla, works from the series “The Edge Effect”

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© Daniel Kukla, works from the series “The Edge Effect”

SERIES DANIEL KUKLA                                                                     FIX #3 /2013    119


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© Daniel Kukla, works from the series “The Edge Effect”

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© Daniel Kukla, works from the series “The Edge Effect”

SERIES DANIEL KUKLA                                                                     FIX #3 /2013    121


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© Daniel Kukla, works from the series “The Edge Effect”

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© Daniel Kukla, works from the series “The Edge Effect”

SERIES DANIEL KUKLA                                                                     FIX #3 /2013    123


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© Daniel Kukla, works from the series “The Edge Effect”

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© Daniel Kukla, works from the series “The Edge Effect”

SERIES DANIEL KUKLA                                                                     FIX #3 /2013    125


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA

126    FIX #3 /2013                                                                    ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA


ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA With all the gratitude and love to Adolfo Doring Recently I have been presented a book by Patti Smith «Just Kids», where the Godmother of Post Rock, as people call her, remembers her life in New-York and her relationships with scandalously known photographer Robert Mapplethorpe. I used to think that the most truthful information one can get from their memoirs, but not from any kind of press. Moreover, I heard a lot about that book, and when, eventually, I got it in my hands, I was on cloud nine. «Just Kids» is the essence of the memories of Patti about Robert and about the time when the most members of Club 27 were still alive. The more I read, the stronger was the feeling of déjà vu. Her recollections somehow feebly but got in touch with mine, as we were kids that summer there with the burning eyes, paying no attention to hunger and permanent lack of sleep, but full of boiling feeling of freedom and of being almighty. By the way it was a usual story for 20 year-olds who found themselves in the city of their dreams left on their own. At least once you must have heard about the student exchange programme “Work and Travel”. In reality it has nothing to do with exchange itself but it does work. “Work and Travel” is a programme that gives you an opportunity if being a student, to turn your luck around, to get lots of money and eventually get off to «conquer» the US. «Conquer» is what I really mean. We took part in that programme and witnessed very different conquests. There are still some questions: who was conquered by whom and what for? One of the key points of the programme is that the provider of the programme must find a hirer for the participant taking into account your work preferences. For example, what would you prefer more: washing the dishes, rescuing drowning people in the swimming pool, cleaning floors or taking orders in the diners of the seaside. Having that offer of employment, you go to the Embassy to get J-1 visa. During the interview at the Embassy you do your best to make the interviewer believe that the purpose of your 3-months visit to the US is to improve the level of your English and to get priceless experience and all that is surely to help you to shine later on, after coming back home. Of course, the most far-seeing find the ways to stay in the US and organize their own Saransk somewhere on the South Coast, in the places known for their blackjack and…you know. Far and by, we were in New York. What can I say? This city is dreamed of, many films are shot there, one

ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                    FIX #3 /2013    127


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA

can find history here round every corner. Just think of the hotel «Chelsea»! The phenomenon of the hot rod was raised here. It was the place where people mused, loved, died, wrote songs and created masterpieces: Charles Bukowski, Mark Twain, Frida Cahlo, Milos Forman,Andy Warhol, Jack Kerouac and Janis Joplin. That is what Patti writes about her first impressions of the city, where she came being a 20-year old girl, having a black turtleneck and an old gray coat on; where she came searching for freedom and having a desperate desire to become an artist: «The city was a real city, shifty and sexual». «No one expected me. Everything awaited me». «This open atmosphere was something I had not experienced, simple freedom that did not seem to be oppressive to anyone. I was beat and hungry, roaming with a few belongings wrapped in a cloth, hobo style, a sack without a stick-my suitcase stashed in Brooklyn». When I first walked out of the Port Authority and stepped on the New-York pavement I had the single trousers on, 2 T-shirts, a netbook and a camera in the backpack. I wanted to figure out what shall I do with my life, with my future, whether I shall turn to being a programmer or a photographer, it`s easy to see what variant I tended towards more. But I needed to prove it to myself, I needed signs. I was sitting on the stairs right in the heart of the city at the intersection of 42nd Street and Eighth Avenue, watching the salesman of the roasted nuts, bright posters of the coming soon Broadway shows and passing by the cabs. I was relishing the cigarettes, that I brought from Russia, wondering, where I should start my search for these very signs. At that moment I hadn`t known yet that a packet of cigarettes cost 15$. The outcome of my search turned out to be a small one-roomed flat on the second floor in Brooklyn in Stagg Street. There were 9 of us in the house that seemed to be made of cardboard somewhere in the industrial area of New-York full of hang out places popular among stylish young people (now you can see hipsters here as well) and second-hand shops. Nine Russian-speaking boys and girls who came to the US with Work and Travel. It was our little paradise for J-1 holders. Sometimes we didn`t have food in the fridge and our toothbrushes looked like sunflowers, we hung our towels as if they were coats left in the cloak-room at the premiere of a long awaited play. All of us came there to find something for himself: some wanted to earn money, some were eager to learn the language, some came to stay in the country and others just looked for new experience and adrenaline buzz. And everyone eventually found something for themselves: some got work, some met friends, some

128    FIX #3 /2013                                                                    ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA


ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

© Anna Prytkova, works from the series “Russian Flat”

ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                    FIX #3 /2013    129


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA

© Anna Prytkova, works from the series “Russian Flat”

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ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

faced cruelty, some realized how love they their Motherland. Some of us were really lucky and unbelievable things happened to them. But all of us without any exceptions experienced what it is like to live in the US, how it feels to be a foreigner in the city where one of the main values is money, and how it feels to work here or not to work, what is much harder. Here on the second floor of the light cardboard house we felt quite distinctly what it is like when your dream clashes with the true, acid reality. In that reality people sleep on the old futons from the jumble market, in that reality people avoid stepping on the permanently wet and malodorous bath-mat in the tiny bathroom, in that reality people eat what they can afford for the money earned for the day, friends can become enemies only because of the rental charges which weren`t paid and gathered on time, when relationship between people can change dramatically only because of the dirty plates left after a party. In that reality you are lucky if you manage to get an air-bed that is not popular among bed-bugs, and you are unlucky when looking at a soft, cozy, light sofa you dream of sweet hours (if you catch a break) or minutes of sleep, but you know your body will be covered with red, aching piercers; when you are unlucky if your working day ends at 4 a.m. and begins at 8 a.m. that day. And it lasted for months. Buy still we were happy. Truly happy. For the feeling of freedom was so strong, and our ambitious, childish, short-term plans were as distinct as never before. We were to survive and get for we came for. All those hours that were underslept, breakfasts that weren`t eaten, clothes that weren`t done the laundry, all that was worth a 7-days trip around the US in the rented car, which had a sunroof. Once when I was having beer and the most delicious sandwiches with my very good friend, he told me something that I try to repeat to myself time and again. We were intellectualizing about those things that really deserve sacrificing the comforts of life. He said then that the true happiness and satisfaction one can get on only having experienced the opposite. After an exhausting desert find yourself in the refreshing swimming pool. Having spent nights on the futons full of bed-bugs lay on clean, starched hotel bedsheets, on eating 1 dollar rubber-like pizza enjoy the best steak in the world. And that`s how it goes. We all have our own contrasts, something we live for. Maybe having a look at these reflections someone will think: «They are just kids». Well why not?

Anna's photos on flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dreuam_top

ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                    FIX #3 /2013    131


© Anna Prytkova, works from the series “Russian Flat”


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA

© Anna Prytkova, works from the series “Russian Flat”

Evgenii, 19 years old, Russia, Krasnoyarsk. First time in America.

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ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

© Anna Prytkova, works from the series “Russian Flat”

Vova, 21 years old, Russia, Kursk. First time in America.

ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                    FIX #3 /2013    135


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA

© Anna Prytkova, works from the series “Russian Flat”

Anastasia, 23 years old, Russia, Moscow, Otradnoe. First time in America

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ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

© Anna Prytkova, works from the series “Russian Flat”

Sasha, 23 years old, Russia, Vladimir. For a year lives in America

ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                    FIX #3 /2013    137


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA

© Anna Prytkova, works from the series “Russian Flat”

Olga (at left),21 years old, Russia, Krasnoyarsk. First time in America. Natasha (right), 21 years old, Belarus, Prujani. Second time in America.

138    FIX #3 /2013                                                                    ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA


ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

© Anna Prytkova, works from the series “Russian Flat”

Sasha, 23 years old, Russia, Rostov-on-Don. First time in America.

ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                    FIX #3 /2013    139


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA

© Anna Prytkova, works from the series “Russian Flat”

140    FIX #3 /2013                                                                    ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA


ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

© Anna Prytkova, works from the series “Russian Flat”

ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                    FIX #3 /2013    141


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA

© Anna Prytkova, works from the series “Russian Flat”

142    FIX #3 /2013                                                                    ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA


ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

© Anna Prytkova, works from the series “Russian Flat”

ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                    FIX #3 /2013    143


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA

© Anna Prytkova, works from the series “Russian Flat”

144    FIX #3 /2013                                                                    ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA


ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

© Anna Prytkova, works from the series “Russian Flat”

ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                    FIX #3 /2013    145


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA

© Anna Prytkova, works from the series “Russian Flat”

146    FIX #3 /2013                                                                    ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA


ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

© Anna Prytkova, works from the series “Russian Flat”

ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                    FIX #3 /2013    147


FIX #3 /2013                                                                       ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA

Evgenii, 19 years old, Russia, Krasnoyarsk. First time in America.

Vova, 21 years old, Russia, Kursk. First time in America.

- What university did you study in Russia? Aerospace State Siberian University n.a. M.F. Reshetnev.

- What university do you study in Russia? Technological Kursky State University, department of applied mathematics in economy and jurisprudence.

- Did you work in Russia? I don’t have constant job there. I have worked as a network engineer, customer manager, sales manager, wireman. What I just did not work. - What job did you have in US? I was unemployed for 1.5 month, 1 week I was a waiter on Wall street, 1 week I was a bus boy, and then for a long time I have worked with pedicab. - Are you going to come back in Russia? It’s very boring at home, you shouldn’t worry about anything. In Russia I’m studying at 2 universities and I can’t find a job. After I’ll come back, of course I’ll be looking for a job, maybe something like departmental assistant for 3 – 4 000 rubles per month. It’s easy to earn more money here, in America. In Russia for sure you can earn enough money, but make the same effort you can do it here better.

- What job do you have in Russia? For 2 years I have been working as customer manager in media agency. - What job do you have in US? For 3 month I have worked as a mover, my salary was $17 per hour. - Why did you decide to go to America? It was my dream for a long time. I wanted to see this country, to look at life in here, nature, culture, nation in general. - Would you like to stay here? No, because I don’t want to lose everything that I have in Russia. I don’t want to lose the time in which I will achieve in America what I already have achieved in Russia.

- What are you going to do after you will come back to Russia? I’ll continue my study. I need to obtain a diploma. I’m sure, it’s going to be very hard to study, I’ll have to force myself. It will be very hard to be in Russia after America, everyone told me this, maybe not so in Moscow, but in Krasnoyarsk.

- What do you see yourself in Russia? I don’t know what I wanted to be, what I want to do.

- First impression of America. I was absolutely quite, when I came here. I left the airport, stood smoked, caught a taxi, rode. But it was cool, going in the cab, saw all that huge road junctions, the sun, and I thought: “We’ve arrived!”

- The most bright impression of America? Grand Canyon.

- What for did you come in US? I was coming to earn money. I had a fake offer for a job, so at the same time I came, I started to find a job.

- What do you see yourself in America? Employee in a small business, like Google for example. (laught) I just like the corporate spirit!

- What have changed in you after your America? No, I don’t feel any changes in me. Maybe when I’ll come back to Russia I’ll find some changes.

- What have changed in you after America? My attitude to money and people. You shouldn’t trust people, especially when the deal is money. Usually, society doesn’t care about your problems. But there is no such a problem because of it you should be upset. There are no hopeless situations. It was happening thousand times: I’ve earned money, lost them, earned money again and again lost them. Who cares. 148    FIX #3 /2013                                                                    ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA


ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

Anastasia, 23 years old, Russia, Moscow, Otradnoe. First time in America

Sasha, 23 years old, Russia, Rostov-on-Don. First time in America.

- How it happened, that you came to America? My friend offer me come here to study in some university and don’t know why, but I agreed. By the way, he didn’t obtain a visa.

- What university do you study in Russia? Southern Federal University, faculty of mathematics, mechanics and computer science.

- Where did you study in Russia? I have master degree at department of Social economy at Moscow State Pedagogical University. But in fact, I’ll become a teacher of history at school.

- What job do you have in Russia? Engineer in Southern Federal University.

- Who do you work as in Russia? For a 2 years I’ve worked as a librarian in Public State Library of History. My salary was 7500 rubles per month, and I’ve worked from 8:30am to 5:00pm, 4 days a week.

- What job did you have in US? Flayer girl in café and hairsalon, hostess in Greek cafe, bike rental, cashier in fast-food, mover-assistant. My salary was $7-10 per hour.

- Your first impression of America? What’s going on? Area of Cypress Hills impressed me, Gungster-style cars, a huge number of Puerto-Rican and black people and no one speaks English.

- Why did you decide to go to America? Because I’m 23 years old and I never been abroad before. Once I understood that in that moment I have opportunity for this and unfortunately I will not live forever and I should do it now!

- What for did you come in America? I wanted to buy here 70-200mm, 2.8 lens. But it didn’t happen. I came here to make some photos. All at once went wrong: we didn’t come to Utah to get our offer job, cause the ticket was $300, so we stayed at NYС.

- Why America? Because, America–second big country after Russia and work&travel program is not so expensive and more interesting than to go there like tourist. I think that I saw “real” America, not “sign city tour”.Student, worker, citizen.

- Why did you decide to stay in America? I don’t know why. A lot of people told me that life here is much easier, I don’t know actually for whom, but still. - What are you leaving in Russia? My Family, home, my comfort zone stayed at Russia too.

- What you see yourself in America? Foreigner. - The first impression in America. Bed smell at Manhattan. (запах горелой каши) - The brightest impression of America. Death Valley.

- How you can imagine yourself in Russia in the future? I think, I would be an owner of some Photo Studio, rent it to other and earn money with help of this.

- What have changed in you after your America? Yep! A lot of things! I became more open-minded. I was leaving the US with a thought “I want to see more”, and to learn English also.

- How you can imagine yourself in America in the future? See myself like a usual Gastarbeiter, without a some certain future. I want to stay only because of my boyfriend. It turns out, that one person can be more important than comfort zone, friends, everything. All because of NY, romantic apple. Everything in here is full of atmosphere of relationship spirit between man and woman. Metropolis is a hard place to live, that’s why people are drawn to each other. Like a bedbugs.

- What do you think about bed bugs? Life with bedbugs is possible! - About flat. J1-students in America, we are all like a brothers there! And to live with thousands brothers is freaking awesome!

ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                    FIX #3 /2013    149


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Sasha, 23 years old, Russia, Vladimir. For a year lives in America.

- How did you get in America? I came with Work&Travel program in 2009. - Where did you study in Russia? I finished first college with honors. Then I studied in Vladimirsky State University, at department of Computer Science. I would become a specialist in the creation of processors, but the problem is in Russia no one create processors, so I thought I would not destiny there. In 2008 I was in America and decided to leave university. - What was your First impression of America? Here people know how to live. - What are you doing for living in America? I’m working here, I was studing, but I quit. It was language school called Spanish American. I’ve worked with pedicab, bikes, I worked as a taxi driver, messenger. - How do you see yourself in US? I’m going to start my own business. Actually, I’d like to live in California. - Why did you choose America? Cause in America you can be an emigrant, and not feel strange, because everyone is like that. - How do you think is here some freedom? Yes, sure. Everything is permeated with democracy. Allowed everything that is not prohibited. And it’s right, there are a lot of laws here, they can be funny, but people respect it.

I couldn’t find real job offer in US, military enlistment office started to search me. But anyway, when at least I got the Visa, I have been celebrating for 2 weeks! - What have changed in you in America? The most positive point – I’ve learned how to enjoy life! In Russia I always had a goal, long-term plans, and I lived with it. But life here, teach me to enjoy every single day! I repeat God Bless America almost every day. - Do you have a dream? For now the main dream is my official status here. I want to become a full member of society. Cause I can’t find normal job! Something like work in an office, but not pedicab or bikes, no more! Of course it would be great to start my own small business, but you still need documents for that. - What you can say about this apartment? I’m glad about everything. For this summer here were very different situations, good and bad, don’t want to remember some of them. But anyway, all should happen – already happened. We had more good moments! - What you can say about bed bugs? I hate them. They are like NY streets. It’s like celebrities and some homeless and fucked up people can go on the same street. Bedbugs can relate to everyone. Once, we bought the mattress in some trendy shop on Manhattan with a doorman, antique pieces, brought it home and of course found in there bedbugs.

- What for do you come here at your first time? Just to see this country, to travel, and especially to see New York. I didn’t want to stay here at my first time, it comes later. - What can you say about that time you left America at the first time? When I was leaving The US at the first time, I understood that I want to come back. I thought what for should I live in Russia, if I feel great in US, I’d like to live here. When I came to my university, saw all this nerds, I was thinking for a week and decided to come back to US. Then I left my university, and there were a lot of problems: my university could dismiss me too early,

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ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                         FIX #3 /2013

Olga (at left),21 years old, Russia, Krasnoyarsk. First time in America.

Natasha (right), 21 years old, Belarus, Prujani. Second time in America.

- Where do you study in Russia? Siberian Federal University. Institute for Education and Psychology and Sociology.

- Where did you study in Republic of Belarus? Minsk State Linguistic University, Faculty of English language, Department of Foreign Literature. I’m going to be a linguist, teacher of foreign languages.

- Do you work in Russia now? Now no, I don’t. - Where did you work in America? I’ve worked as a statue of liberty on the street.

- Where did you work in Belarus and in America? In Belarus I didn’t work. In America I was salesman in ice cream shop.

- Why did you choose America? There are a lot of friends, who was in the US before and they loved it. So, I thought that I’m already 4-year studen and it’s time!

- Why did you come to America? I just wanted to see it, to know how is everything in there.

- First impression? It was incredible at the beginning! Unless the first day in NY, when you wander around the subway. But at that same day, I was surprised because of African American who has stopped to help us, he understood our bad english and where we want to go. Then he rode with us landed and drove back to his business! I was shoсked! - Why come here, what did you want to find? Traveled to America itself just to see it from within, not only in the movies! Did not have a strong goal to earn money, just a little work, so that I did.

- What was your First impression of America?First impression was fear, because the first thing I saw in New York City was Port Authoruty and there were so many African American people. But the general impression is cool! I love it so much, that’s why I decided to come at the second time. - What you see yourself in America and in Belarus? Belarus I can be English teacher, and I will have this job in a month already, but actually I would like to be an interpreter. In America I don’t know who I would work as.

- How you can see yourself in the future in Russia and in America? To be honest, after my return from the US, I can’t imagine myself nowhere! Life so far away from home showed me new things. I was so confused, I didn’t know what I should do next, choose country, choose life. But I can’t imagine my future life in Russia! Russia is country of poverty .. I’ ve never been a patriot, and now even more anti-patriot!) In America, you can at least work as a waiter and live a normal life) - What has changed in you after America? For sure, something was changed, can’t say exactly. But I started think about my future, and forget about my past and now. About the changes, I probably omit ... what can we say when an entire month after the arrival of people do not go to school, is sitting at home ... and does not take up a camera ... and even afraid to watch photos from America so as not to cry.

ARTICLE ANNA PRYTKOVA                                                                    FIX #3 /2013    151


Illustration by Nastya Aniskova


After Katrina* Tonight, I think of everything halved: the husk of a Charlotte, North Carolina left haunted by evacuation, the whisper of August green in our garden flattened under lawn chairs and splintered swing set limbs. As we wait for the storm, the world is premature still: an x-ray with a smear of fog pooled at the bone— the center of it all. We wait: to break, admire the broken beauty, to recollect, for rebirth. The house now a shard of something bigger, the street now a mixed race of timber and asphalt, the street a misaligned vertebrae. Charlotte emptied like a woman at seven o’clock in the morning cooking breakfast for her husband. We crave an explanation of nature’s fine events. No, no emptying now. We wait: broken, broken beauty: splintered: whispered. *Hurricane Katrina; August, 2005.

Poem by Peter LaBerge

More info about Peter: http://www.peterlaberge.co.nr


Catalogue is a collection of photographs sent by our readers and authors all over the world via social networks. In each issue we are publishing the most interesting ones. Submit your photographs to the “FIX� photography magazine online: http://www.flickr.com/groups/fixmagazine https://www.facebook.com/fixmag http://vk.com/fixmagazine


Š Furik Nazar


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© Sergey Dubkov

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© Vladimir Averin

© Mikhail Palinchak

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© Vladimir Rudkovskii

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© Vladimir Rudkovskii

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© Irella Konof

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© Nikolay Rasuwaew

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© Anet Harutyunyan

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© Anet Harutyunyan

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© Konstantin Miro

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© Nikolay Rasuwaew

© Sergey Dubkov

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© Dina Belenko

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© Nikita Litvinenko

© Alexey Volkov

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© Sofia Tiyatyavyaynen

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© Mikhail Palinchak

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© Rita Tipunina

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© Alexey Volkov

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© Mikhail Tutoshny

© Mikhail Tutoshny

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© Andrey Karamushka

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© Anet Harutyunyan

© Lera Berk

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© Anastasia Bespalova

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© Aleksandra V

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© Denis Gaivoronskiy

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© Mikhail Palinchak

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© Nikita Litvinenko

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FIX #3 /2013

Editor-in-Chief: Anna Prytkova Assistant editor: Olga Bushkova Interviewers: Victor Petrenko Anna Prytkova Copy Editor: Michael Bushkov Design and Layout: Dmitry Chernishev Illustrators: Anastasia Aniskova Dmitry Chernishev Catalogue editors: Anastasia Aniskova Victor Batkovitch Michael Bushkov Milana Ceeva Translator: Anna Shaposhnikova Vera Vernigora Artem Kostryukov

The use of any materials from the photography magazine «Fix» only by agreement with the editorship. Address:344022 Rostov-on-Don, 80 Shaumyana street, 3rd floor, Art Photography School e-mail: info@fixmagazine.ru PHOTOGRAPHS FOR SUBMISSION: photo@fixmagazine.ru CONTACT US: fixmagazine.ru/ www.facebook.com/fixmag/ www.flickr.com/groups/fixmagazine/ Photograph on the cover by Patrik Andersson.

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American Dream - the third issue of Fix magazine: *interviews with photographers: Mike Peters, Rosanna Bach, Patrik Andersson; *Articles b...

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