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     The  Continuum  

   

The Continuum

C

Issue  #6,  March  2011  

Picture  of  FIU’s  Patricia  and  Phillip  Frost  Art  Museum    

FL  Gun  Law  

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Victoria  Lafferty,  GA   Campus  Life,  shares  how     the  State  and  University   are  reacting  to  the  new   Gun  Legislation.    

The  Dog  Days  of  SAGA  Days  

BSGU  Visit  

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The  tradition  of  BGSU/FIU   Exchange  continued  this   year.    

Alumni  Chat  

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We  catch  up  with  Murillo   Soranso  and  learn  how  his   experiences  at  FIU  have   benefited  him  professional.    

over  the  U.S.  Participants  came  from  as   far  as  Washington  State.  Some  other   states  include:  Georgia,  South  Carolina,     By  Roderick  Wilson   is  completely  a  student-­‐organized  project.   Kentucky,  California,  and  Virginia.  As   Two  co-­‐chairs  chair  the  committee.  They   always,  the  program  attracted  current  FIU   Candidates  travel  far  as   work  along  side  an  advisor  to  plan  the   students.  This  is  a  great  testimony  for  the   Washington  State  to  compete  for   entire  event.  The  program  is  offering   work  and  relationship  building  the   graduate  assistantships.   exciting  graduate  assistantship  openings   graduates  and  professional  staff  do  at  the   for  the  2011-­‐2012  academic  year.   university.  There  is  no  end  in  sight  of  the   SAGA  Days  was  held  on  March  20-­‐22  this   Graduate  assistantships  create   program  slowing  down  in  growth.  So   year.  The  Higher  Education  Program  at   opportunities  for  students  to  experience   SAGA  Days  will  continue  to  be  an   Florida  International  University  (FIU)  has   numerous  programs,  events,  and  overall   important  part  of  recruiting  individuals  to   been  on  a  steady  growth  since  the  start   experiences  in  Student  and  Academic   the  program.  It  can  only  get  bigger  and   of  the  program  in  2005.  SAGA  Days  has   Affairs.  Graduate  assistantships  offers   better  from  here.     been  at  the  core  of  the  program,  and  it   benefits  such  as  a  stipend,  75%  health   adds  new  life  and  perspectives  to  the   “SAGA  Days  is  an   insurance  coverage,  and  a  tuition  waiver   FIU  community.  It  provide  opportunities   unique  student  run   for  the  academic  year.    Students  are   opportunity  that  allows   for  candidates  to  meet  current   encouraged  to  apply  for  a  GA  to  enhance   us  to  showcase  the   graduates,  faculty  and  staff,  and  also   their  experience.  The  process  is   program,  our  Division,   interact  with  other  candidates  who  are   competitive  but  is  a  great  example  of  how   and  FIU.”  –Tyler  Groll,   interested  in  the  program.     job  placement  will  be  at  the  end  of  there   SAGA  President     second   y ear.   2010-­‐2011   The  Student  Affairs  Graduate   Association  or  SAGA  puts  on  the  event.  It   This  year  SAGA  hosted  candidates  from  all  


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  The   Continuum  

Issue  #  6,  March  2011  

Spotlight  Grad:     Jessica  Greenwood   Jessica  currently  works  in  Campus  Life/Orientation  at  the   (Beautiful)  Biscayne  Bay  Campus  as  the  graduate  assistant  in   Orientation.  She  is  originally  from  Baraboo,  Wisconsin.    She   did  her  undergrad  at  the  University  of  Wisconsin-­‐  Whitewater   and  received  her  BA  in  Liberal  Studies.  One  of  her  favorite   quotes  is  from  the  movie  Love  Actually.  Its  says,  ”Whenever  I   get  gloomy  with  the  state  of  the  world,  I  think  about  the   arrivals  gate  at  Heathrow  Airport.  General  opinion's  starting   to  make  out  that  we  live  in  a  world  of  hatred  and  greed,  but  I   don't see  that.  It  seems  to  me  that  love  is  everywhere.  Often,   it's  not  particularly dignified  or  newsworthy,  but  it's  always   there  -­‐  fathers  and  sons,  mothers  and  daughters,  husbands   and  wives,  boyfriends,  girlfriends,  old  friends.  When  the   planes  hit  the  Twin  Towers,  as  far  as  I  know,  none  of  the   phone  calls  from  the  people  on  board  were  messages  of  hate   or  revenge  -­‐  they  were  all  messages  of  love.  If  you  look  for  it,   I've  got  a  sneaking  suspicion...  love  actually  is  all  around."

 

Protection  or  A  Public  Nightmare     By  Victoria  Lafferty  

The  Florida  Gun  Legislation  Law  and  its  effects   on  the  Florida  University  System     Recently,  Florida  Governor  Rick  Scott   endorsed  a  bill  that  would  allow   students  on  all  of  Florida’s  campuses  to   carry  guns  on  campus  with  a  concealed   carry  license.  However,  last  week,   Florida  State  Senator  Paula  Dockery   offered  an  amendment  at  the   committee's  Wednesday  meeting  that   maintained  the  current  Florida  state   law  prohibiting  guns  on  all  school   grounds,  including  colleges  and   universities,  and  there  was  no   objection.  The  Lakeland  Republican   later  said  public  sentiment  against  guns   on  campus  persuaded  her  to  make  the   change.  All  the  police  at  Florida’s  11   public  institutions  had  come  out  against   the  bill,  as  well  as  all  of  Florida’s   student  governments.  

House  of  Representatives  on  Wednesday   approved  a  measure  allowing  guns  (in   plain  sight  or  concealed)  on  public   university  and  college  campuses.  A  bill   approved  this  week  by  the  Arizona  Senate   would  allow  weapons  along  walkways  and   other  areas  of  college  and  university   campuses,  and  similar  legislation  is  under   consideration  in  Texas.  

The  guns-­‐on-­‐campus  issue  gained  national   attention  in  the  wake  of  the  2007  Virginia   Tech  shooting.  Some  gun-­‐rights  advocates   have  argued  that  the  lesson  of  that   tragedy  is  that  more  students  should  carry   firearms  for  self-­‐defense.  Supporters  of   the  legislation  argue  that  gun  violence  on   campus’s  best  defense  is  students  who   can  shoot  back.  The  survivors  of  the  1966   This  issue  is  currently  a  very  much   discussed  topic  within  higher  education   University  of  Texas  shooting  and  Virginia   Tech  survivors  however,  have  come  out   and  multiple  states  across  the  country   are  debating  this  issue  now.  The  Idaho   against  the  legislation.    

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Image  from  Google  Images  

  ColinGoddard  was  a  student  at  Virginia  Tech   when  he  was  shot  four  times  in  his  French   class,  and  he  dismisses  the  idea  that  another   student  with  a  gun  could  have  stopped  the   killer.  "People  tell  me  that  if  they  would   have  been  there,  they  would  have  shot  that   guy.  That  offends  me,"  Goddard  said.   "People  want  to  be  the  hero,  I  understand   that.  They  play  video  games  and  they  think   they  understand  the  reality.  It's  nothing  like   that."  Opponents  of  concealed  on  carry  say   students  and  faculty  would  live  in  fear,  not   knowing  who  might  pull  a  gun  over  a  poor   grade,  a  broken  romance  or  a  drunken   fraternity  argument.  What  do  you  think?  Is   concealed  carry  on  campus  a  way  to  make   our  universities  safer?    


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  The   Continuum  

Issue  #6,  March  2011  

A  Exchange  of  Experiences:   Tradition  Continues      

By   Roderick  Wilson  

On  the  week  of  March  6-­‐12th,  The  Higher   Education  program  upheld  a  long  rich   tradition  by  hosting  seven  students  from   Bowling  Green  State  University.     Every  year,  the  Higher  Education  Administration  program  at   Florida  International  University  and  the  College  Student   Personnel  program  at  Bowling  Green  State  University  embark  on   an  exchange  program,  the  BGSU  and  FIU  Exchange.    The   exchange  is  a  week  along  event  that  provides  the  visiting   students  the  opportunity  to  participate  in  a  mini  practicum  in  a   department  of  their  choice.  The  exchange  is  a  creation  and   testimony  of  two  higher  education  professional  and  longtime   friends,  Dr.  Karen  Palmer  and  Dr.  Helen  Ellison.     This  year  FIU  hosted  10  BGSU  visitors,  seven  students  and  three   faculty/staff  members.  The  week  included  a  numerous  of   activities,  events,  and  networking  opportunity.  Both  universities   participants  enjoyed  a  BBQ  Welcome  Celebration  to  kick-­‐off  the   week,  which  included  a  greeting  and  a  history  of  the  exchange  

 

from  two  Nova  Southeastern  staff  members  Jonathon  May  and   Neudy  Nunez.  May  and  Nunez  both  participate  in  the  exchange   when  they  were  graduates.  Nunez  is  a  graduate  of  the  Higher   Education  Administration  program  at  FIU  and  May  is  a  graduate   of  College  Student  Personnel  program  at  BGSU.  Both  May  and   Nunez  found  it  interesting  that  years  later  they  are  working   together  and  remind  friends  after  their  Exchange  experiences.     May  sat  on  the  hiring  committee  that  interviewed  Nunez  when   she  interview  for  her  current  position  at  Nova  Southeastern.  Also   this  year  both  BGSU/FIU  grads  were  able  to  visit  and  network   with  staff  members  at  the  University  of  Miami.   John  Gradel,  a  graduate  at  BGSU,  held  a  practicum  experience  in   the  Office  of  International  Student  Support  Services.  Gradel   reflected  on  his  experience.  “I  think  BGSU  was  very  impressed   with  the  university,  facilities,  and  most  importantly  the   hospitality  shown  by  every  member  of  the  program  as  well  as   staff  and  faculty.  The  experiences  we  learned  through  our  one-­‐ week  practicum  were  invaluable.  As  future  colleagues,  we  were   able  to  network  and  explore  different  universities  in  the  area   such  as  the  University  of  Miami,”  said  Gradel.  FIU  grads  are   excited  and  already  planning  there  trip  to  BSGU  next  year.    

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The   Continuum  

Issue  #  6,  March  2011  

Pictures  of  the  Grad  Skellar.  The  event  was  host  by  our  very  own  SAGA.  It  provided  a  nice  break  and  a  great  meal  for  the  night  for  any   graduate  in  any  Masters  program.  There  were  graduates  from  both  BGSU  and  FIU  in  Higher  Education.  Also,  graduates  in  the  MBA,   Law,  and  other  FIU  Masters  programs.  

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  The   Continuum  

Issue  #6,  March  2011  

Learning  from  the  Past,  Now  and  For  the  Future     Alumni  Spotlight  –  Murillo  Soranso   by  Rich  Trocio    Sure  enough,  Murillo   caught  the  Panther   Pride.  The  program   was  new  and  had  no   more  than  10  people,   1  main  full-­‐time   faculty  member,  and   Dr.  Ellison  taught   classes.    Before  him,   there  was  no  SAGA   Days  and  individual   departments  did  their   own  searches.  His   cohort  started  SAGA.     As  the  year  is  about  to  end  and  we’re   setting  ourselves  up  for  the  summer,   we  often  take  a  look  at  where  we’ve   been,  where  we  are,  and  where  we   want  to  go.    To  many,  this  time  period   means  conferences,  phone  interviews,   campus  visits,  and  hopefully  landing   that  next  internship  or  job.    If  it  only   was  that  easy…   SAGA’s  past  advisor  and  an  alumnus  of   FIU’s  Higher  Ed  program,  Murillo   Soranso  gives  us  insight  from  his   experience.     Murillo  started  at  FIU  as  a  Grad   Assistant  in  Res  Life  during  the   summer  of  2003.  He  was  apart  of  FIU’s   first  official  cohort  in  Higher   Education.    He  credits  his  reasoning  to   go  to  FIU  was  the  people.  I  really   “connected  with  Dr.  Akens  (the   director  of  Res  Life  at  the  time),  the   Residence  Life  Coordinators,  and  Dr.   Ellison.   I  learned  about  the  program  from  my   (undergrad)  mentor  Dr.  Richard   Corenti  from  Ithaca  College,  who   helped  start  the  program  with  Dr.   Ellison.  (When  I  visited)  They  gave  me   an  individualized  personal  touch.”      

   

From  there,  Murillo  found  a  job  at  the   University  of  Illinois  in  Housing  and  Res   Life,  not  from  a  conference  but  from  an   ad  in  the  Chronicle.    He  worked  there  for   a  couple  years  and  returned  back  to  FIU  in   a  new  Res  Life  position  and  as  the  new   SAGA  advisor.  After  another  couple  years,   networking  helped  Murillo  get  another   job  at  Illinois  again  where  he  is  now.  After   my  conversation  with  him,  he  gives  three   pieces  of  advice…   1.  Network.  It’s  no  secret.    To  be   successful  in  any  job  especially  in  Higher   Ed,  you  need  to  network.  This  is  one  of   the  reasons  why  Murillo  decided  to  return   back  to  FIU  and  one  of  reasons  why  he   currently  returned  back  to  a  previous   institution,  the  University  of  Illinois.  From   his  past,  Murillo  stayed  connected—“E-­‐ mail  is  totally  acceptable.  Carry  your   business  cards.  Use  technology  too-­‐   Facebook,  LinkedIn,  etc.    Keep  in  mind   you  never  know  you’ll  need  these  people   for  your  reference!”    Also,  “know  how  you   meet  people  and  know  what  works  for   you.    Are  you  a  WOO  or  do  you  need   somebody  to  break  the  ice?”  So  utilize  the   people  around  you.    Lastly,  “Network  in   the  area  you  want  to  stick  with  but  still   network  widely”  and  “Practice  wherever   you  are.  What  type  of  person  you  are,  

your  values,  and  how  you  carry  yourself.   Institutions  can  teach  you  skills  but  can’t   teach  your  attitude”   2.  Balance.  We  all  know  that  balance  is  a   challenge  when  you  work  in  Higher  Ed.     Murillo  takes  pride  in  his  success  in   navigating  his  work  life  and  personal  life.     He  plays  volleyball  consistently  and  has   many  friends  outside  of  work.  This  starts   in  the  present.   “You  can’t  neglect  it.  (If  you  do)  You’re   going  to  play  catch  up  (so)  begin  finding   it!”  Plan  vacations  and  think  of  things  that   are  important  to  you  that  can  be  a   constant  in  your  life.  (Then)  Look  for   places/institutions  that  allow  for  that.     Keep  finding  out  what  important  to  you   (now)  because  that  is  ultimately  going  to   lead  to  your  first  job.”  And  don’t  forget   about  others  around  you.    “Instill  balance   in  your  colleagues.  Don’t  let  them  neglect   it  too”   3.  Be  Yourself.  “Show  exactly  who  you  are   (by)  acknowledging  successes  and  areas  of   growth.”  Know  nobody  is  perfect.     Employers  are  looking  for  potential  and   people  that  are  trainable  and  a  good  fit   for  the  program.  So  there’s  no  point   putting  a  facade  or  something  you  are   not.”  Also,  “Look  for  something  you  like.     And  like  the  people,  your  work,  and  the   organization.    Ask  questions  about  your   supervisor  and  how  your  relationships  will   look  like  (because)  your  supervisor  is  a   one  of  the  best  ways  to  make  your   decision.  This  is  important  in  your   beginning  of  your  career  and   development”     “Leave  a  good  impression.  Be  professional   and  go  with  the  flow,”  even  if  you  conflict   with  the  employers.    Don’t  hurt   professional  personas.  Still  try  to  make   connections  as  they  will  be  used  for  the   rest  of  your  career.  

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The  Continuum  

Issue  #6,  March  2011  

Social  Media  the  Future  of  Interviewing:  Some  Tips  For   Interviewing  With  Skype      

Submitted  by  Dr.  Glenda  Musoba,  Assistant   Professor  Educational  Leadership  and   Professional  Studies  

With the difficult economic times, do not be surprised if a campus search committee wants to do an initial screening via telephone or Skype. Skype offers a more satisfying experience however with some extra technology so you can see your interviewers and maybe get a head nod or response to your answers. However, committees have not become sophisticated with this technology so you may still be answering voices of people you cannot see or can see the whole committee but at such a distance that you cannot see facial expressions. Here are a few pointers I learned from the Chronicle of Higher Education and the comments to the Chronicle article.

 

1. Know who will be interviewing you and search them on their institutional web sight before the interview so you know what are their areas of interest. This and other advice for telephone interviews applies. 2. Dress for the interview, wear your suit jacket. Know that solid colors work better than prints and a full white shirt tends to reflect light which makes the camera adjust leaving your face looking undefined or washed out. 3. Carefully select your lighting. Placing yourself in front of a window makes you look like the Phantom of the Opera on camera. Make sure there are not shadows on your face because of back lighting. Make sure you don’t look washed out. 4. Carefully select what else they see in the frame. Sitting in front of your book shelves will be taken more seriously than sitting in front of your Disney poster or dirty dishes. (The fact that it is a classic collectible poster will not be seen on screen). Also watch out for relationship photos, children’s toys, or other signals about your personal life that you are not ready to reveal. 5. Think about removing distracting noises. No roommates coming in or barking dogs and traffic off screen. Silence your cell phone, etc. 6. Practice with a friend or a family member your camera angle. When a camera is pointed upward it symbolized authority. Think how the President is always filmed from slightly below. Yet close-ups from below tend to widen the bottom of the face in proportion to the top. Check out your best angle. Raise or elevate the laptop/webcam accordingly. 7. An independent microphone (tie clip or headset) allows you to talk more normally (as long as the headset does not look too much like a receptionist’s). Independent microphones allow you to move your head yet keep the volume consistent. Using the microphone in the web camera will tend to pick up more background sounds including the delayed sound from your speakers back to them. 8. Focus the camera so your head and shoulders fill the frame. Being larger than life on their 52 inch screen is not a bad thing. You don’t want to be too far away (more common mistake) but you don’t want to be just a head either. 9. Close everything else on your computer and Internet connection. You want all the bandwidth so that Skype is sending and receiving at maximum speed. This includes others using the same connection when you can control them. 10. Add the institution to your Skype contacts list in advance. 11. Provide them with a telephone number where you will be as a backup in case there are problems with Skype. 12. Allow yourself extra time. If it takes a few extra minutes to establish the connection, you don’t want to be anxious about another appointment near the end of your interview. 13. Don’t move around too much. If the interviewers have a slow connection and it is constantly rebuilding the picture, it is less distracting when you move less. (But don’t become distractingly still either. For example, keep your animation in your facial expressions and hand gestures, but don’t spin your chair.) 14. Think about whether you want to be able to see yourself on your screen. Being able to see yourself allows you to adjust the camera if you bump the computer and check your hair, etc. however, it can be distracting and raise anxiety for some.


Continuum March Issue #6 2011