Page 1

No. 2

Yesterday Today

2017-8

Chair’s Message Prof. Victor Uribe S

Contents 1

Chair’s Message

2

Faculty Profile

3

Faculty Books

4

Featured Events

6

Undergraduate Program

8

History at Work

9

Graduate Program

11

Alumni News

16

Giving

cont’d p 15


Faculty Profile: Prof. Jessica Adler A few months before I moved

from Boston to Miami to begin work as an Assistant Professor of U.S. History in 2014, I received my teaching schedule. And I was a bit surprised. I would be teaching American Civilization, it seemed, in a parking garage. “PG5,” the schedule said. “Parking Garage 5.” I tried to figure out what to make of that. I understood that South Florida was known as a place where people relied pretty heavily on cars to get from one place to another. But I had no idea that students learned about the Civil War and civil rights in parking lots. Soon after I arrived in Miami, I made my way to campus and sought out PG5. From the outside, it looked like nothing more than, well, a parking garage. But when I entered the ground floor level, I heard the blare of pop music and found students seated at food court tables. One of them directed me to the room listed on my teaching schedule. My class, it turned out, would not take place in a parking lot; it would be inside of a well-appointed lecture hall, with movable seats and plenty of technological bells and whistles. It was my first realization that FIU’s massive infrastructure is comprised of small, productive parts and communities, which may be hardly visible from a distance. The History Department is one such community – made up of scholars who are at once productive in research and committed to teaching, and students who have diverse interests and talents. During the past three-plus years, I have had the opportunity to mentor students and teach courses in U.S. History, many of which focus on health care, medicine, and health policy. I have worked with undergraduate Biology majors destined for medical school, who want to learn about policies surrounding organ donation, and History majors en route to law school, who partake in discussions about the relevance of a midwife’s diary dating back to the 1700s. I have learned about graduate students’ projects focused on material 2

culture of the early republic, civilian defense efforts in Great Britain during World War I, and the migration of Cuban doctors to South Florida at the height of the Cold War. In the classroom and beyond, these students have pushed me to think more creatively about how to lead discussions and lectures, and about how to design assignments. Like most of my colleagues, teaching informs my research. My first book, Burdens of War (see Faculty Research) is about how publicly sponsored medical care for military veterans became a pillar of American social and health policy. In the book, I argue that the World War I-era establishment of the veterans’ health system marked a reimagining of modern veterans’ benefits and signaled a pathbreaking acceptance of the validity and power of professionalized institutional medical care. I also maintain that it indicated an uneasy recognition – in a country with a long tradition of skepticism of federal intervention in the health and welfare of individual citizens – that the government could fund and administer a selective and conditional entitlement program. In Burdens of War, I blend social, political, and health history to cont’d 15 Yesterday Today n. 2


Faculty research-

supported by prestigious national grants and fellowships - appears in our fields’ top journals, and our faculty often win prizes for these pieces. We also regularly lend our expertise in popular media, including the New York Times and the Washington Post. Keep up with these works on our website: fiu.history.edu.

Faculty Books

Jessica Adler, Burdens of War: Creating the United States Veterans Health System (Johns Hopkins, 2017).

Aurora Morcillo Gómez and Paula de la Cruz Fernández (PhD), The Modern Spain Sourcebook: A Cultural History from 1600 to the Present (Bloomsbury, 2017).

Bianca Premo The Enlightenment on Trial: Ordinary Litigants and Colonialism in the Spanish Empire (Oxford, 2017.)

Chantalle Verna. Haiti and the Uses of America: Post-Occupation US Promises (Rutgers, 2017).

3

Yesterday Today n. 2


Featured Events

Celebrating Retiring Colleagues In recent years, several beloved professors and colleagues retired: Profs. Howard Rock, Brian Peterson, Joyce Peterson, and Darden Pyron. Judging from the Alumni News, these professors have made a lasting intellectual and personal impact on many of us. Influence never “retires.” Last year, we celebrated the retirement of David Cook with two special celebrations taking place, fittingly, in Lima and Miami. At the beginning of the 2017 Latin American Studies Association Congress in Lima, FIU's History Department highlighted our longstanding connection to Peru. Our department has deep ties especially to the Pontifícia Universidad Católica del Perú, mainly fostered by Prof. Cook. The event, organized by Dr. Miguel Costa (PhD 2005), the Coordinador de la Especialidad de Historia at PUCP, highlighted David’s monumental contributions to Peruvian history, as well as our continued intellectual connection to the country. Organized in three parts, the first was a discussion of Prof. Bianca Premo's new book, The Enlightenment on Trial, with excellent commentary from PUCP student Luis Leyva and Dr. Judith Mansilla (FIU PhD in 2016), who has recently joined our faculty as Instructor and Undergraduate Advisor. Next, we boasted about how PUCP has sent several of their brilliant students to our doctoral program, including Profs. Costa and Mansilla, as well as Renzo Honores (PhD 2007). Finally, with tears, laughter and even a short movie, we offered a tribute to David, whose dedication to Peru is only matched by his dedication to his colleagues and students here at FIU. The party continued 6 months later in Miami to celebrate David and fellow historian and his wife, Sasha Cook! Photo: Drs. Renzo Honores, Miguel Costa, Bianca Premo, David Cook, and Judith Mansilla

4

Yesterday Today n. 2


Featured Events

Post-Docs and Professionalization Prof. Micah Oelze (PhD, History 2016) The Writing in History program is our department’s central academic support system for students taking history courses. Prof. Judith Mansilla and I have spent the last two academic years as the Postdoctoral Fellows heading up this program. Its tutoring program offers free coaching in writing Monday-Friday, 9am5pm, for all students enrolled in a history course. Our committed tutors offer online sessions, allowing our students to meet with our tutors without having to brave the Miami traffic to come to campus. Increasingly, students are asking for help that goes beyond the challenges of writing for their coursework. All students who take advantage of our tutoring, and especially the majors in our classes, are asking for direction and counsel as they prepare for the job market. This makes sense. Our graduates are entering increasingly competitive markets. Yet many must translate their historical and humanities research skills into terms that capture the attention of potential employers. So Dr. Mansilla, alongside our incoming postdoctoral colleague Dr. Grace Solís, and I have added a professionalization component to the Writing in History program. This first means that we have been writing letters of recommendation for many of our majors and working one-on-one with them in preparation for job interviews. we are incorporating lessons on professionalization into our writing workshops. The response has been enormous. Where two years ago, we struggled to get ten students to a workshop, our attendance is now regularly several dozen! We packed GL220 for “Cooking Up the Research Paper,” which holds 40, and will soon need to find a larger room! Cont’d p. 15

5

Yesterday Today n. 2


1

Undergraduate Program

History Majors Take On Law Schools Alessandra Siblesz, David Nabors & Sophia Gonzalez The common wisdom is wrong. History majors do not struggle for jobs. Data from various sources, including the American Historical Association, demonstrate that grads with a BA in History are more employable than students in many popular disciplines, including Psychology, and they are happier and often make more money. Also key: History majors dominate compared to other majors in competing for entry into post-bachelor’s programs, especially law schools. Just look at FIU’s 2017-8 graduating class. We had several History majors enter top national law programs, including students entering the University of Michigan, Harvard University, and the University of Florida, as well as FIU’s Law School. Alessandra Siblesz, now at the University of Florida Levin Law School, was one of those students. She reports that she entered college knowing she’d want to go to law school, and chose History because she knew the program would help her gain a “contextualized awareness when approaching certain topics, particularly Constitutional Law.” David Nabors, who is at Harvard Law, emphasized the way the discipline requires distilling the complexity of the human experience in organized, argumentative writing. He said he was especially certain that he’d made the right choice when he got into upperdivision History courses.

6

Yesterday Today n. 2


Undergrad Program con’td

History Majors in Law School cont’d

Sophia Gonzalez, presently at the University of Michigan Law School, agrees. She comments that she was a major because she was “specifically drawn to the aspect of historical thinking of structuring arguments in writing.” She credits her History major in helping her succeed in getting to law school because it helped “develop my research and writing skills as well as my ability to advocate on behalf of a particular position through writing.” Case closed.

Images: Previous page History BA David Nabors at the doors to Harvard Law; this page, Alessandra Siblesz, now at UF Levin Law, graduating from FIU.

On Generations and Majors Jason Fontana, President Phi Alpha Theta Returning to school after a considerable span of time can cause a very real sense of trepidation. Especially in an age where most students have enjoyed the benefits of advanced technology since birth. However, the tasks and outcomes associated with this technology are easily recognized by those of us categorized as generation X and earlier. For example, we all have a need for faster communication and unmitigated access to comprehensive sources of information. These necessities have not diminished over time, but they have moved beyond punch-button handsets and the Encyclopedia Britannica. This realization can help students of any age come to understand how their history prepares them for an inevitable changing future. Even millennials and the members of Generation Z have now been clearly defined, meaning a new generation is already set to play catch up. For history majors, experiencing this phenomenon is a great way to view the past with a fresh perspective. After all, every new history class is like returning to school after a considerable span of time. We still ask the traditional questions; Who? What? When? Where? And why? But we need to demand more from what we already know. For instance, most of us have friends and family that have played a fundamental role in our existence, just like the billions of souls that walked the earth before us had. But where are their stories archived? Where are the unique voices of everyday people that lost the battles, suffered in the margins, and were forgotten for their differences? These are the questions that need answering, and this is where contemporary experiences can change how the past is viewed in the future. 7

Yesterday Today n. 2


History at Work

Hands-On History Prof. Dan Royles

“Training in public history helps our students to be more curious, thoughtful, and engaged in their local communities”

- Prof. Royles, Public History Coordinator

Our history majors and graduate students don’t just study the past—they preserve and create it as well. Through our public history internship program, students work with community partners to document and interpret history for audiences outside the walls of the university. These partners include the City of Miami Beach, the Virginia Key Beach Park Trust, and the Black Archives and Historic Lyric Theater, and our interns do everything from digitizing historical photographs to installing exhibitions to designing web sites that interpret collections. At the same time, students can take a variety of courses that explore the ways in which historians engage with the public. Here we examine questions of historical memory: not only what happened, but how we make meaning around past events through the stories we tell, the things we buy, and the policies we support. Students can also learn about how we document the past in our courses on oral history, in which students learn about interviewing methods while working together on projects that examine the history of Miami Beach, student veterans, or the Black freedom struggle in South Florida. We are also working to develop the department’s offerings in the field of digital history, which pairs historical methods with computing power to tell new stories about the past. In partnership with FIU Green Library’s Digital Scholar Studio and GIS Center, students have created projects that use mapping software, digital archives, and media-rich storytelling to connect a global audience to historical research in innovative ways. Cont’d p. 15

8

Yesterday Today n. 2


Graduate Program

Grad Students and History beyond Borders Prof. Okezi Otovo, Graduate Program Director For nearly two decades, the Department of History Graduate Student Association (DOHGSA) has sponsored an annual scholarly meeting on diverse historical topics. The DOHGSA Conference is one of the highlights of our academic year and brings together FIU graduate students with colleagues from across the country to share their research-in-progress. This year, the program includes new research on the Spanish Atlantic and the InterAmerican Cold War and a keynote address on “(E)migration and Empire in the Spanish Empire” from Dr. Sarah Chambers of the University of Minnesota. Transnational history is a cornerstone of our graduate program, emphasized not only in the DOHGSA Conference but also in the curriculum as well as in our yearly Atlantic History Colloquium Series. The Atlantic History Colloquium brings to campus a distinguished group of visiting speakers. These speakers expose our graduate students to the latest trends in the field, and they also take part in conversations geared toward the practical points of graduate training. Our 2017-18 Atlantic History Colloquium included a very special guest speaker. History Department Alumnus Dr. Julio Capó, Jr.—Assistant Professor of History at the University of Massachusetts Amherst—shared from his recently published book, Welcome to Fairyland: Queer Miami before 1940 (University of North Carolina Press, 2017), a transnational queer history of a city just “south of the U.S. South.” We are pleased to report that Welcome to Fairyland was recognized in the Florida Book Awards nonfiction category as among the best in Florida literature for 2017, sponsored by the Florida State University Libraries, and nominated for a Lambda Literary Award. Our graduate program continues to prepare students to produce innovative and rigorous scholarship and to become leading experts in their fields.

9

Yesterday Today n. 2


Grad Program cont’d

Featured Graduate Student Darwin Rodriguez, MA in Public History, PAMM Intern I initially sought a graduate degree after teaching social studies for three years. As I researched programs that aligned with my goals, I decided that the FIU Masters in History was the program that best fit my needs. Moreover, it was the novelty of the Public History track that attracted me the most because of my experience in the classroom. Year after year, students told me that they never cared much for history, or did not see the point of studying it, until my class. I found these comments disheartening because the point of studying history is to contextualize our very selves. I was drawn to the field of Public History. I found myself agreeing that history is indeed everywhere, and most of us are not even aware of the ways in which we consume it, nor do we question its vehicles of arrival or inherent biases.. I knew I wanted to combine historical analysis and the visual arts, so I looked to the Perez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) as the institution that could afford me the space to craft a singular experience. Interning at the PAMM while pursuing my Masters allowed me to make the most of the synergies between public history and museums as some of the preeminent public spaces where communities  learn and do history. Image: The Perez Art Museum in Downtown Miami.

10

Yesterday Today n. 2


2

Alumni Today

Featured Alumna: Cindy Ermus, PhD, (FIU BA 2005) Co-Founder and Executive Editor,AgeofRevolutions.com Assistant Professor, University of Lethbridge My experiences at FIU undoubtedly had an influence on my interests in revolutionary and disaster studies. Since my undergraduate education focused primarily on medieval and early modern Europe, it was there that I learned about, and was captivated by, such transformative events as the Black Death, the Protestant Reformation, and the Age of Revolutions. I then brought these interests with me to graduate school, where I focused primarily on the latter (especially the French Revolution), and the study of other historical crises and disasters in the eighteenth century. So when my friend and colleague, Bryan Banks, approached me with his idea to launch an academic blog that would focus on the study of revolutions – that sought to explore the term “revolution,” and to expand upon traditional understandings of the “Age of Revolution” – I knew that I had to accept. One of our objectives with AgeofRevolutions.com has been to provide a platform for scholars to get their fresh research out there – to start new conversations in the field, perhaps while undergoing the all-too-long process of publishing by the more traditional means of academic articles and monographs. Moreover, the site serves as a vehicle for getting this research out to the public in an accessible, aesthetically attractive, and engaging format. Bryan and I consider ourselves fortunate to be part of what has grown into a very large and dynamic community. We learn a great deal from both our contributors and our subscribers/followers. We feel as though we have a front-row seat for new scholarship in the field of revolutionary studies, and this in turn influences our teaching and scholarship in new and exciting ways. Follow Cindy on Twitter: @CindyErmus and follow AoR : @HistorioBLOG . 11

Yesterday Today n. 2


Maria S. Cano. Practicing criminal defense and immigration law since 1979, in Coral Gables at the same location since 1983. Was ecclesiastically married in Rome with Johanna van Rossum-Cano (formerly, an FIU psychology adjunct professor) on Oct. 13, 1999, on the 20th anniversary of our civil marriage by Fernando E. Heria, also an FIU History ('75) grad!!! And the band played on… canolawmiami@msn.com

Alumni News con’td

Jason Chohonis (MA 2014) works as an AP World History Teacher at Cutler Bay Senior High School, where he has worked for the past 2 years. This academic year (2017-2018) he was named as the teacher of the year for Cutler Bay High. He will spend this summer traveling through China to learn about their educational system as part of a 5 week Fulbright program through Towson University. Email: choho314@gmail.com Carlton Daley (MA, 1999) Currently serves as the Director of Student Support Services at Miami Dade College, North Campus and has since 2006. In addition, he serves as an Adjunct Professor in the Social Science Department and teaches American History and Social Environment at the College Serves as a Mentor for the 5000 Role Models of Excellence Program. Remains influenced by Dr. Brian Peterson work in improving public education in Miami Dade County. cdaley4456@yahoo.com Paula de la Cruz-Fernández (Ph.D., 2013,) works for the Digital Services unit of the University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries. She is the project manager and digital archivist of the Isabel Briggs Myers Papers digitization project. She is also the founder of Edita (more at Edita.us), a company that offers edition, translation, and transcription in Spanish and English. Paula teaches history courses at FIU and consults with organizations and archives as part of the Business History Group LLC. Her co-authored book The Modern Spain Sourcebook: A Cultural History from 1600 to the Present (Bloomsbury; see Faculty Books) just came out and she is currently working on the publication of her own book and on new work on Digital Humanities.

We want to know what you are up to! Send updates to fiuhistalum@fiu.edu

I can’t express how valuable

having some background in history and the humanities has been in terms of helping me to develop professionally. Almost all that lawyers do— particularly litigators—is parse text and write for the purpose of persuasion. -Joshua Daniels, BA

Joshua Dieguez (BA, 2013) Passed the Florida Bar Exam last year and now works at his family’s law firm, Dieguez & Associates, PLLC. He continues to be active in his hometown, Miami Lakes, FL, recently being elected to the Miami Lakes Bar Association’s Board of Directors and launching his campaign for Town Council. josh@dieguezlaw.com.

12

Yesterday Today n. 2


Joseph Holbrook (PhD ’13) After spending several years as an adjunct instructor, I am now the Director of Academic Programs for the Latin American and Caribbean Center. It has been a joy to return to LACC where I earned an interdisciplinary masters in 2006 with a case study comparing religious pluralism in Brazil and Colombia and its effects on Democracy. I continue to teach Introduction to Latin American Civilization (at BBC) and I also teach Introduction to Latin American Studies, and the capstone course, Contemporary Latin America and the Caribbean. I love students, and enjoy recruiting and advising them. jholbroo@fiu.edu

Alumni News cont’d

Antony W. Keane-Dawes (MA 2013) is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of South Carolina where he has spent the last 4 ½ years. Antony has spent the last year writing his dissertation with the support of a university writing fellowship and intends to have his dissertation defended at the end of the 2017-2018 academic year. He would like to thank his professors and friends who helped him to get to this point and continues to hold them all in high regard. antony@email.sc.edu Lindsey Maxwell (PhD, 2016). Lindsey currently works as a fulltime faculty member at Gulliver Schools in Miami, where she teaches Pre-Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate courses in World History. She also instructs courses in Early and Modern American History at FIU and MiamiDade College. In FIU’s Department of History she also serves as Dual Enrollment Coordinator and as a faculty mentor for Dual Enrollment teachers. Over the course of the past months she presented her research on evangelical homeschooling at the History of Education Annual Meeting and the American Academy of Religion Conference. In January she showcased her latest digital history project at the Annual Conference of the American Historical Association—her personal website www.lindseymaxwell.com offers a preview. Taking the first “real” break ever since wrapping the dissertation in spring of 2016, she will spend summer 2018 backpacking across Eastern Europe together with her sister. lindseymaxwellphd@gmail.com Sallie Middleton (Ph.D., 2001, Diss. Director Alex Lichtenstein) works for Palm Beach State College as Professor III, History, Department of Social Science, Lake Worth Campus. Dr. Middleton has served both students and community at PBSC for the past ten years. She also serves as faculty advisor of the History Club of Palm Beach State College, which she started, and loves her work with these interested students. Along with her husband of 42 years, Steve, she still lives in Jupiter Farms and volunteers at local non-profit Our Sister’s Place every Saturday. You may contact Dr. Middleton by email middlets@palmbeachstate.edu 13

Yesterday Today n. 2


Alumni News cont’d

Maria Laura Rodriguez (BA, 2016) works as an Administrative and Research Assistant for The Ackerman Group LLC in Fort Lauderdale, Florida since June 2017. Upon graduating from FIU, she joined the German Marshall Fund of the United States in Washington, D.C. as a Strategic Partnerships and Development intern and expects to return to D.C. to pursue a graduate degree in European and Eurasian Studies at the end of 2018. Having taken an interest on contemporary Spanish history from several courses with Dr. Aurora Morcillo, she hopes to focus her professional studies on the lessons learned from Spain’s transition to democracy and how they can or cannot be applied to different countries in Latin America—especially her home country of Venezuela. mrodr832@gmail.com Alexandra Pitigoi (BA, 2012) works for Cipher Security in Miami, where she spent recent years working with national CIO's and local enterprises to strengthen their cyber-security posture. After joining the technology sector in 2014, providing and managing Immerge sales teams for Fortune 100 telecommunications companies, she is excited to expand technology startup sector growth through awareness and opportunities for women in technology. She will continue to support local charities such as Miami Lighthouse and the ALS Association in her personal time, and engage young professionals for business networking. alexandrapitigoi@gmail.com Rodney Earl Walton (MA 2001, PhD 2009) published an article: "HISTORY IS HELL: Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman and His Biographers," The Journal of America's Military Past XLI, no. 3 (Fall 2016): 5-35. During the summer 2017 semester he taught a course on U.S. Military History at FIU. He recently attended the American Historical Association annual meeting in Washington, D.C. Colleen A. Vasconcellos (PhD 2004) is an associate professor of Atlantic history at the University of West Georgia. Her first book, a co-edited volume with Jennifer Hillman Helgren entitled Girlhood: A Global History was published by Rutgers University Press in 2010. Her most recent book, Slavery, Abolition, and Childhood in Jamaica, 1788-1838 was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2015 as part of their Early American Places series. Dr. Vasconcellos is currently working on a new project examining the intersecting lives of three enslaved girls living in Jamaica during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

14

Yesterday Today n. 2


1 2

Chair’s Message cont’d These books show that humanities students are particularly prepared to push forward creative and successful new business ideas; to understand and propose solutions to complex issues faced by business, education, the military, and government; to give life to dynamic new companies; or, as two of the authors put it, to solve our “toughest business problems” (Christian Madsbjerg and Mikkel B. Rasmussen, The Moment of Clarity, Boston, 2014). Interestingly enough, the authors tend not to be historians or other liberal arts and humanities graduates intent on defending their professional worth. They have no particular investment in forcing STEM and other technical experts understand that humanists too amount to something. Instead, these fierce advocates of History and related fields are leading venture capitalists (Hartley), business professors (Stross), or founding partners of major international business consulting firms (Madjsberg). Many of the people they cite in support of their claims are CEOs of advanced technologies companies such as Lockheed Martin or corporations producing mass consumer goods such as Proctor & Gamble. These and similar private companies are starving for employees with conceptual, creative, argumentative writing, and critical thinking skills able to “digest, analyze, and synthesize information and articulate their findings” (Madjsberg, Sensemaking, p. xviii).

15

The public sector is in need of such employees. We historians have much to celebrate and be proud of. The set of skills we develop in college is not made up, after all, of “soft” and fleeting practices. Nothing more enduring than good writing, analytical reading, solid thinking, and the ability to understand complexity and uncertainty! Nothing more likely to land you a great job! Royles, cont’d These opportunities to practice public history in the classroom pay off after graduation. Thanks to the skills they developed at FIU, our students have gone on to work in archives, museums, and community development, sometimes for the very same institutions they worked with as students. But perhaps more importantly, training in public history helps our students to be more curious, thoughtful, and engaged in their local communities, and that’s something that benefits all of us. Image: Screen cap of a Senior Seminar Project, “The Waves of Mariel,” in Prof. Howe’s Fall 2017 course, preserved by the Digital Scholars Studio in Green Library Adler cont’d explain the advent of a unique entitlement program; in the process, I draw conclusions about how interest groups, public opinion, and historical circumstance shape American health policy. My two ongoing major research projects are also about federal involvement in health care. One focuses on health services in United States prisons, and the other on the post-Vietnam War advent of community-based mental health clinics, or Vet Centers, within the veterans’ health system. The prison project is about the years prior to

widely viewed as the case that set the precedent that prisoners had a right to state-sponsored medical care. My work on Vet Centers, too, focuses on expansions in federal entitlements – in this case, resulting from activism on the part of congressional representatives and Vietnam veterans who argued that services available in the VA system were inadequate given emerging standards for psychological care. Both the prison and Vet Center stories show how medicalization, grass-roots advocacy, politics, and legal action intertwined to produce precedent-setting and lasting health policy changes. Image: Prof. Adler signing copies of Burdens of War at a book launch at Books and Books

Post-Docs & Professionalization cont’d Professionalization is not the only reason that students are turning out in greater numbers. We recently included a session for junior and senior majors called “Cooking Up the Research Paper.” We conducted the workshop as if it were reality-TV cooking show. On this “show,” we taught the students how to make empanadas. We then used this exercise in experiential learning as a memorable analogy for writing history papers. Just as one should not fold up empanada dough without first making and inserting the filling, students should never write an introductory thesis or conclusion without first reading and analyzing the sources that will contribute to the “filling” of the essay. Students laughed, but walked away with a memorable guide to their own research. And eventually their jobs. Image: Dr. Oelze demonstrating the recipe for good writing.

Yesterday Today n. 2


1 2

FIU Department of History Florida International University Department of History 11200 SW 8 Street, DM 397 Miami, FL 33199 Â

History at Work

Please give to your History Department. Choose from one of our funds: History Advancement Project Fund Cook Fund Pyron Fund

https://ignite.fiu.edu

Your History Department has been working creatively to give its students as many opportunities to gain skills and find employment as possible. We know that History students do very well after they graduate. Many end up working in a wide variety of fields, from law, to business, to politics, to the military. And of course teaching history at the high school and university level. But we want to keep them competitive. So we are launching an initiativeHistory at Work- that will involve experiences to take them to

graduation. We are sponsoring internships  for them in museums, archives, libraries in city and state government, in the private sector. To do this we will need your help. Please consider a gift that can support our efforts in these areas. If you can help to sponsor our student in an internship, or know of opportunities that would be good for them, please let us know about those as well. In the coming months we will be starting up a major capital campaign for these and other Department Programs. So you will be hearing more about them. We want you to be one of our important supporters.

Yesterday Today 2017-8  

no. 2

Yesterday Today 2017-8  

no. 2

Advertisement