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STUDY ABROAD FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY Department of Architecture

coordinator + editor: Jason Chandler

London_Berlin

Instructors: Claudia Busch Eric Peterson Jaime Canaves Marilys Nepomechie

Paris_Milan

summer 2014

Instructors: David Rifkind Malik Benjamin Nik Nedev Shahin Vassigh

Tokyo

Instructors: Alfredo Andia Camilo Rosales Eric Goldemberg Thomas Spiegelhalter


Contemporary Japanese Architecture

Anabel Mendt Ksenia Kosykh


thank you

To all who were involved in the study abroad programs, and who made this experience available to all students.


summer 2014

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY

London_Berlin

ARC 5340_5077_6356_ Architecture, Technology and the City Studio ARC 5935_ Film and the Depiction of Urban Public Space ARC 5933_ Projective Visualization: Analysis and Graphics

Paris_Milan

ARC 0000_Building Modern Europe: France and Italy, 1850 – Present ARC 0000_Skyscraper Design ARC 0000_Windows, Doors, Stairs, Ramps

Tokyo

ARC 5340_5077_6356_Japanese Design Studio ARC 5933_Environment Sustainability Strategies for Tokyo ARC 5935_Contemporary Japanese Architecture

Instructors

Claudia Busch Eric Peterson Jaime Canaves Marilys Nepomechie David Rifkind Malik Benjamin Nik Nedev Shahin Vassigh

coordinator

coordinator + editor: Jason Chandler

book design

Cynthia Parada Elisa Leal Miguel Pio Richard Gomez Ksenia Kosykh Eileen Nunes

Alfredo Andia Camilo Rosales Eric Goldemberg Thomas Spegielhalter


contents

London_Berlin

Architecture, Technology and the City Studio Film and the Depiction of Urban Public Space Projective Visualization: Analysis and Graphics

Paris_Milan

Building Modern Europe: France and Italy, 1850 – Present Skyscraper Design Windows, Doors, Stairs, Ramps

Tokyo

Japanese Design Studio Environment Sustainability Strategies for Tokyo Contemporary Japanese Architecture

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0


tokyo

japan


students

albert elias

hector ceballos

anabel mendt

italo perez

andrea mayor

ksenia kosykh

anica lompre

leonardo nediani

carlos aramburo

nicholas pendas

casey lamrouex

tatiane almeida

cynthia parada

veronica hiegemann


travel itinerary

May 12

Check-in to the hotel Orientation at the hotel

May 13

Edo-Tokyo Museum Takeshita Street Omotesando District Todds Store Shibuya Intersection

May 14

Tsutaya Bookstore Masaru Suzuki Umbrella Exhibit Aoyama District Prada Store Sunny Hills

May 19

Tokyo International Forum Ginza District Mikimoto Building Swatch Flagship Store Louis Vutton Ginza Namiki Dori Renzo Piano Hermes Store Renzo Piano Dior Store Nakagin Capsule Tower

May 20

21_21 Design Sight Museum O+H Architects Firm Visit

May 21

Odaiba Artificial Island The National Art Center Photography Exhibit Tokyo Apartments

Imperial Palace East Gardens National Museum of Western Art Ueno Park Tokyo National Museum Gallery of Horyuji Treasures Asakusa Cultural Center Senso-Ji Temple Toyko Skytree

May 16

May 22

May 15

NA House Za-Koenji Public Theater Musashino Art Univeristy Sou Fujimoto Library

May 17 Free Day

May 18

Yokohama Pier Takeshi Hosaka Firm Visit Sanaa Okurayama Apartments Sanaa Moriyama House

Free Day

May 23

Mist House Visit

May 24

Depart to USA


In Japan architecture is interpreted in a different way than our typical western architecture is. It is not about form or about what a building looks like. It is instead about the experience and the feelings evoked from being inside of this structure. Through design you can tell a story and have that story be the process and concept of your design. This studio allows students to view design and it’s process in a way that is never taught within our Western Culture and that may even be frowned upon. It is an exploration of how the process and reasoning behind the design can focus on one individual’s experience rather than on the overall form and function of the building. In this design studio students will fabricate diagrams, sketches, and models as a means to explore this type of architecture.

Japanese Design

Instructors_Alfredo Andia_Camilo Rosales_ Eric Goldemberg_Thomas Spiegelhalter


Japanese Design

Sembikiya Luxury Fruit Parlour

climbing the forrest tasting the fruit descending to the roots store and checkout exiting

section

1st floor plan

Anabel Mendt

elevation

2nd floor plan

customer flow


Japanese Design

final model

study model

Anabel Mendt


Japanese Design

Ksenia Kosykh

Omotesando Forest Project

1st floor plan

3rd floor plan

4th floor plan


CIRCULATION DIAGRAMS

Japanese Design

stairs

stairs stands stands counters mixed use

mixed use counters 9

final model

Ksenia Kosykh


Japanese Design

Urban Temple Morphosis

section

Albert Elias

loud/ open to outside less loud/ partially closed quiet/ almost closed silent/ completely closed

level 1

level -2

site

level -1

level -3


Japanese Design

final model

section

Albert Elias


Japanese Design

Floating Capsules

1st floor plan

Cynthia Parada

2nd floor plan

3rd floor plan


Japanese Design

public private

final model

Cynthia Parada


Japanese Design

Akihabara Garden

4th floor plan

green arms

louvers

platforms

3rd floor plan

2nd floor plan

Casey Lamrouex

1st floor plan


Japanese Design

final model

final model

Casey Lamrouex


Japanese Design

Veronica Hiegemann

Habitable Illusion

1st floor plan

2nd floor plan

3rd floor plan

4th floor plan

5th floor plan

6th floor plan


Japanese Design

final model

Veronica Hiegemann


Japanese Design

Kamakura Mountain Residence

1st floor plan

2nd floor plan

east elevation

Leonardo Nediani

3rd floor plan

south elevation


This course is intended to aid students into gaining direct contact with extraordinary examples of contemporary Japanese Architecture. The lectures examine the work of a large number of Ateliers that have spurred into the Japanese Architectural scene in the past 15 years. These relatively small firms have spurred a workable movement that has produced a large number of build projects. The course traces the evolution of Japanese architecture and how the contemporary work relates to a more aboriginal spatial experiences found in Japanese aesthetics through time. The class consists of lectures, research, diagrams, and analytical models and the development of an individual case study.

Contemporary Japanese Architecture

Instructor_Alfredo Andia


Contemporary Japanese Architecture

Acrylic House Architects: Takeshi Hosaka Architects Location: Fujikawaguchiko, Japan Usage: Residential The surroundings of the Acrylic House are beautiful, with open views of the mountains through the clean air. However, a scenic road runs past the neighborhood, making large areas of glazing a privacy concern. The architect’s solution, created by sketching on photographs with whiteout, is to play with the relationship of the house’s inside and outside, as well as its transparency. This is accomplished by making the house both extremely transparent and solid at the same time. Both floors have continuous fused acylic panels instead of walls, giving uninterrupted views and a feeling of connection to the outside garden. However, beyond the garden are walls that rise to just below eye level, allowing a view of the surroundings but blocking most views from the outside in.

Carlos Aramburo Casey Lamrouex


Contemporary Japanese Architecture

Outside-In House Architects: Takeshi Hosaka Architects Location: Yamanashi, Japan Usage: Single family house Designer’s statement: “The project was launched when I was commissioned to enlarge a house for a couple in their 30’s and their three daughters living in Yamanashi Prefecture. On my first visit there, I found the houses of one story and two stories both stand close together but that there remain some empty lots, farming fields, wooded areas and unpaved roads. I remember that the bounty and generosity of the place inspired me. I looked for how the residents here could live in harmony with nature and climate even in a crowded residential area. In the beginning I destroyed half of the main house, and then designed and built a new, one-storied structure with a continuous gradation from the wooded area located on the south side of the house to the inside area — that is, it is a boundary structure built in space between nature and human beings.”

Italo Perez Andrea Mayor


Contemporary Japanese Architecture

House in Saka Architects: Suppose Design Office Location: AkiWard,Hiroshima Usage: Residential The raised corner of this house in Hiroshima by Japanese architects Suppose Design Office allows light to creep into the interior. A cantilevered staircase leads down to the sunken main entrance. The ceiling of the entrance thrusts outward over a small courtyard. The external structure wraps around three courtyards, shielding them from the street outside while allowing light to enter through the gaps underneath. Trees planted at ground level can be seen from windows in the upstairs bedrooms and bath- room. The angular interior spaces are dictated by the building’s restricted footprint.

Nicholas Pendas


Contemporary Japanese Architecture

Double Helix House Architects: Onishimaki + Hyakudayuki Location: Tokyo, Japan Usage: Residential Double Helix House is a small house in Yanaka area in Tokyo. The site is fully surrounded by other houses but there are two narrow allies from the road to the site. It seems very enclosed but at the same time very continuous because of the allies. Commencing from the narrow alleyway, a corridor winds up and around a white core. The white core contains spaces for daily living, while the winding, tube-like corridor performs as a lively “alleyway”, offering the residents connections with their neighborhood. The combination of core and corridor produce a simple contrast of spaces. Inside the corridor, the user passes through light, dark, narrow, and wide spaces, experiencing the space at a rate that depends on the corridor’s pitch. Consecutive windows provide a sequence of town views. As a house, the building offers a unique experience through complex, maze-like spaces.

Cynthia Parada Anica Lompre


Contemporary Japanese Architecture

Weekend House in Sengataki Architects: Onishimaki + Hyakudayuki Location: Karuizawa, Nagano, Japan Usage: Weekend House This is a small weekend house project in the woods. The design process began with a vision of a solitary roof drifting mystically above the trees like a watchful animal in the forest. The roof was conceived as an alien object in the environment, one that has its own spirit, as if it were a living creature. The first floor slightly slopes along the ground. The second floor is a big attic full of sunlight through many windows. Sunlight is gently led to the first floor through an opening on the floor. The roof is made of 4 steel plates. Each plate is naturally warped by gravity, and all 4 plates support each other to become strong enough as a structure. This idea came from the rule of gravity, and it also fits the idea of their design that they wish to make it a natural form in the forest. The roof is covered by thinly sliced wood. As time passes, there will be moss and small flowers on the roof and the house will slowly age.

Anabel Mendt Ksenia Kosykh


Contemporary Japanese Architecture

House N Architects: Sou Fujimoto Architects Location: Oita, Japan Usage: Residential The house itself is comprised of three shells of progressive size nested inside one another. The outermost shell covers the entire premises, creating a covered, semi-indoor garden. Second shell encloses a limited space inside the covered outdoor space. Third shell creates a smaller interior space. Residents build their life inside this gradation of domain. That is why life in this house resembles to living among the clouds. A distinct boundary i nowhere to be found, except for a gradual change in the domain. One might say that an ideal architecture is an outdoor space that feels like the indoors and an indoor space that feels like the outdoors. In a nested structure, the inside is invariably the outside, and vice versa.

Tatiane Almeida Leonardo Nediani


Contemporary Japanese Architecture

Zushi House Architects: TAKESHI HOSAKA Location: Yokohama, Japan Usage: Residential A house with a basement and two floors above ground was planned in a residential area in Yokohama, which is characterized by rolling hills. The 60-square meter site is sandwiched by existing houses to the south and the north. On the first floor, the rising floor blocks view from the street and ensures privacy, while also inviting light and wind from outside. An acryl was used for the toilet’s ceiling, located in the core furniture of the first floor, allowing natural light to enter even though it is placed at the center of the floor. The second floor gradually slopes to provide a comfortable space as if to replicate the hills outside. The roof slab is also slightly bent. This was done to prevent the rainwater that collects on the parapet-less roof from flowing to the windows. The water that is collected at the center travels to the ground through the slit on the southern wall.

Albert Elias Veronica Hiegemann


Contemporary Japanese Architecture

Aluminum Tower Architects: Onishimaki + Hyakudyuki Location: Tokyo, Japan Usage: Weekend Hut Aluminum tower project is a small weekend hut which is made of aluminum. The hut is very small and there is only tiny kitchen , dining table, a day bed, and a bathroom for enjoying weekends. Its feels more like owning a camper than a house. The hut is made of combination of tube-like aluminum pillars. It is possible to make a lot of variations of space by changing the combination.

Hector Ceballos


Contemporary Japanese Architecture

NE Apartment Architects: Yuji Nakae, Akiyoshi Takagi, Hirofumi Ohno Location: Tokyo, Japan Usage: Residential This 8-unit rental apartment house complex was designed to house motorcycle enthusiasts, with a built-in garage included in every unit.The building is located on a flag-shaped plot near the apex of a triangular block, with a certain degree of open space toward the main road to the south. The C-shaped design was a practical decision to allow the residents to access their apartments through a common alley that leads right to the center of the complex. The wall on the entrance side was curved to provide maximum space on the outside, while guaranteeing sufficient volume for each apartment unit and wall length to fit 8 entrance doors. The resulting little square avoids giving the impression of a narrow and dark dead end, and allows the residents to rotate their bikes easily. The building is a reinforced concrete structure composed of seven walls and a slab.

Hector Ceballos


This seminar uses environmental analysis as a tool to design more environmentally sustainable buildings. Research will be conducted on Tokyo’s weather, wind, sun patterns, and its susceptibility to earthquakes. This research will then be applied to the projects being formulated in the design studio.

Environment Sustainability Strategies for Tokyo

Instructor_Thomas Speigelhalter


Environment Sustainability Strategies for Tokyo

Ueno Park Bamboo Pavilion Bamboo is one of the fastest-growing plants on Earth, with reported growth rates of 250 cm (98 in) in 24 hours. Growth rate is dependent on local soil and climatic conditions, as well as species. Typical growth rate for many commonly cultivated bamboos in temperate climates is in the range of 3–10 centimetres (1.2–3.9 in) per day during the growing period. Some of the largest number bamboo can grow over 30 m tall, and be as large as 15–20 cm (5.9–7.9 in) in diameter. Bamboo Grains are aligned in the axial (vertical) direction. Bamboo is an anisometric material. Mechanical properties depend on the directional force. Compression in the axial direction result in a different compressive strength. Dry bamboo has higher mechanical property. Raw bamboo has a high moisture content. Smaller bamboo has a higher mechanical strength. Larger bamboo can withstand larger forces.

site plan

Hector Ceballos

Optimum Orientation

Prevailing Winds


Environment Sustainability Strategies for Tokyo

Sembikiya Luxury Fruit Parlour

different glass types for each facade

spring equinox

summer solstice

surfaces shall have a high thermal mass value to store winter daytime solar gain and summer nighttime coolness

steep pitch to shed snow and prevent ice dams

Solar Radiation Analysis winter solstice

spring and fall

winter solstice

summer solstice

8:00 AM

Sun Path winter solstice

south facade shall aloow sun to penetrate in winter to gain heat from radiation

12:00 PM

Site

Wind Tunnel Analysis

fall equinox

Anabel Mendt

winter solstice

spring equinox

summer solstice

fall equinox

30 ft high

10 ft high

Wind Rose

spring equinox

fall equinox


Akihabara Garden

Shading Analysis

Solar Radiation Analysis Sunlight is more intense, and illuminates the building through the south gap.

summer

Environment Sustainability Strategies for Tokyo

winter

Sunlight is intense, but lower angle reach farther the building.

Humidity

Psychrometric Chart

less the can into

While the top recieves the most light, most areas recieve at least 2200 Wh/m^2 per hour. Environmental Strategies

Temperature

Casey Lamrouex

According to ASHRAE adaptive comfort model, high temperatures fall within the comfort zone for 6 months of the year, and the mean temperatures only 3.

During the hours of 7 am - 8 pm, the site is only natuarlly comfortable 23.6% of the time; it will need some additional strategies to be fully comfortable.

Thermal Mass To raise the ambient temperature in cold months, glass panels will partially enclose the site.

Thermal Pool A pool at the bottom of the building helps regulate the above air temperature year-round.

Water Conservation Center waterfall system cycles and filters water between the pool at the bottom, and the plants above

Dehumidification A combination of rock salt and dessicant-effect plants naturally dries the air.


8:30 AM

4:30 PM

summer

summer

spring

winter

fall

Ksenia Kosykh

Latitude: 35.6642 Longitude: 139.7144

Wind Rose

winter

Wind Tunnel Analysis

winter

12:30 PM

8:30 AM 12:30 PM

12:30 PM 4:30 PM

Optimum Orientation

Shading Analysis summer

winter

4:30 PM

Omotesando Forest Project

Solar Radiation Analysis summer

8:30 AM

Environment Sustainability Strategies for Tokyo


Oranges by Anabel Mendt

Study Abroad: Japan 2014  
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