Issuu on Google+


Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Published by: FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Office of Student Affairs Sanford Markham, MD, Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs

Editors: Robert Dollinger, MD, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Jody Lehman, JD, Deputy General Counsel, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Elizabeth Marston, JD, Associate General Counsel, FIU Office of the General Counsel Sandra Allen, Director of Accreditation, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Rona Bellamy, Publications Specialist, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine All rights reserved. June 2012.

v.062912


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine — Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Contents

Section I: Overview Welcome to Florida International University .......................................................................................I-1 Preamble ...............................................................................................................................................I-2 Message from the Dean ........................................................................................................................I-3 Acronyms and Definitions....................................................................................................................I-4 HWCOM Mission and Goals ...............................................................................................................I-5 Diversity ...............................................................................................................................................I-5 Accreditation Statement .......................................................................................................................I-7 Facilities and Guidelines for Use .........................................................................................................I-8 Dedicated Medical Student Study Space .......................................................................................I-8 Lounge and Relaxation Areas ........................................................................................................I-8 Guidelines for Use of HWCOM Facilities .....................................................................................I-9

Section II: Office of Student Affairs Welcome from the Office of Student Affairs .................................................................................... II-1 General Services ................................................................................................................................. II-2 Vision and Values .............................................................................................................................. II-2 Professional Staff ............................................................................................................................... II-3 Admission to Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine ....................................................................... II-4 Counseling Services ........................................................................................................................... II-4 Personal Counseling – The Counseling and Wellness Center ..................................................... II-4 Financial Counseling and Financial Aid ...................................................................................... II-7 Career Counseling........................................................................................................................ II-8 HWCOM Ombuds Office................................................................................................................. II-11

Section III: Academic Affairs and Clinical Affairs Overview of the Doctor of Medicine (MD) Curriculum ................................................................... III-1 Strands ........................................................................................................................................ III-1 Educational Program Objectives................................................................................................. III-1 Periods of Study .......................................................................................................................... III-2 Green Family Foundation NeighborhoodHELP™ ................................................................... III-5 Graduation Requirements ........................................................................................................... III-5 Academic Departments ..................................................................................................................... III-6 Affiliate Clinical Sites ....................................................................................................................... III-6 Academic Advising ........................................................................................................................... III-7 Tutoring ............................................................................................................................................. III-7

Contents

i


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine — Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Section IV: Policies and Regulations A. Matriculation Policies ................................................................................................................. IV-1 1. Medical History and Physical Examination .................................................................. IV-1 2. Immunization Policy ...................................................................................................... IV-2 3. Health Insurance ............................................................................................................ IV-5 4. Disability Insurance ....................................................................................................... IV-6 5. Criminal Background Checks ........................................................................................ IV-6 B. Medical Student Assessment Process Summary ......................................................................... IV-7 1. Professionalism .............................................................................................................. IV-7  Professional Dress Guidelines ................................................................................. IV-7  Attributes of Professionalism .................................................................................. IV-9 2. Medical Student Standards of Conduct........................................................................ IV-10 3. AMA Principles of Medical Ethics .............................................................................. IV-10 4. Honor Code, the Honor Council, and Due Process Policies ....................................... IV-11  Policy Statement .................................................................................................... IV-11  Application of the Honor Code ............................................................................. IV-11  Student Participation ............................................................................................. IV-13  Composition and Selection of the Honor Council ................................................. IV-13  Complaint Procedures ........................................................................................... IV-15  Formal Resolution ................................................................................................. IV-17  Administrative Disposition.................................................................................... IV-17  Notice of Honor Council Hearing Notice and Access to Records ........................ IV-18  Honor Council Hearing Procedure ........................................................................ IV-18  Patient Confidentiality........................................................................................... IV-20 5. Medical Student Evaluation and Promotion Process for Evaluation of Academic Performance and Professionalism............................................................... IV-21  Medical Student Evaluation and Promotion Committee ....................................... IV-21  Hearing Process for MSEPC ................................................................................. IV-24 6. Appeals Process ........................................................................................................... IV-26  Appeals Committee ............................................................................................... IV-26  Grounds for Appeal ............................................................................................... IV-26  Procedure to Request an Appeal ........................................................................... IV-26  Appeals Committee Responsibilities and Actions ................................................ IV-27  Notification of Dean’s Determination ................................................................... IV-27  Grounds to Appeal the Determination of the Appeals Committee to the Provost ................................................................................. IV-27 7. Grievances and Grievance Procedure .......................................................................... IV-28  Medical Student Grievance Committee................................................................ IV-28  Informal Grievance Procedure .............................................................................. IV-29  Formal Grievance Hearing Process ....................................................................... IV-29  Selection of Committee Members ......................................................................... IV-29  Grievance Hearing Procedure ............................................................................... IV-30  Appeals of the Grievance Committee Report ........................................................ IV-31 C. Academic Policies .................................................................................................................... IV-33 1. Compact Between Teachers and Learners of Medicine............................................... IV-33 2. Grades and Evaluation of Academic/Professional Performance ................................ IV-35  Academic Evaluation ............................................................................................ IV-35  Remediation of Unsatisfactory Performance......................................................... IV-36

ii

Contents


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine — Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

D.

E.

F.

G. H.

I. J. K.

 Standing During Remediation ............................................................................... IV-37  Provisional Promotion ........................................................................................... IV-37  Period Performance Evaluation ............................................................................. IV-37  Transcript and Grade Average .............................................................................. IV-37  Formative Assessments ......................................................................................... IV-38  Policy on United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE) ............................... IV-38 3. Attendance and Excused Absence Policies ................................................................. IV-38  Tardiness ............................................................................................................... IV-38  Emergencies Affecting Attendance ....................................................................... IV-39  Planned Absences .................................................................................................. IV-39  Absence from Clinical Clerkships and Rotations .................................................. IV-39  Religious Observance ............................................................................................ IV-40 4. Leave of Absence Policies ........................................................................................... IV-40  Voluntary Leaves of Absence ............................................................................... IV-41  Initiating the Leave of Absence Process ............................................................... IV-41  Special Requirements when Requesting a Medical Leave of Absence ................ IV-42 5. Tuition Refund and Accommodation Policy ............................................................... IV-43  Standard of Academic Performance Policy for Financial Aid Eligibility ............ IV-43  Quantitative Measure of Progress ........................................................................ IV-43 Student Educational Records ................................................................................................... IV-44  Educational Records and Personally Identifiable Information .............................. IV-44  Directory Information............................................................................................ IV-45  Fees for Copies of Student Records ...................................................................... IV-45  Waiver of Right of Access .................................................................................... IV-45  Requests for Information in Connection with Research........................................ IV-45 Health Policies .......................................................................................................................... IV-48 1. Alcohol Policy ............................................................................................................. IV-48 2. Tobacco and Smoke-Free Campus Policy ................................................................... IV-48 3. Drug-free School and Workplace Policy ..................................................................... IV-48 4. Communicable Diseases Policy ................................................................................... IV-49 5. HIV/AIDS: Information and University Policy ........................................................... IV-50 6. Biosafety, Bloodborne Pathogens, and Needlestick Injury Policies ............................ IV-51 7. Workers’ Compensation .............................................................................................. IV-53 Technology Policies .................................................................................................................. IV-54 1. E-mail Policy ............................................................................................................... IV-55 2. Social Media Policy ..................................................................................................... IV-56 Medical Library Policies ........................................................................................................... IV-59 FIU Emergency Policies ........................................................................................................... IV-63 In Case of Emergency ........................................................................................................ IV-64 General Safety Guidelines .................................................................................................. IV-65 Technical Standards .................................................................................................................. IV-67 Students with Disabilities ......................................................................................................... IV-67 Miscellaneous Policies .............................................................................................................. IV-69 1. Sexual Battery and Harassment Policies...................................................................... IV-69 2. Non-Discrimination Policy .......................................................................................... IV-69 3. Medical Student Employment...................................................................................... IV-72 4. Jury Duty...................................................................................................................... IV-72 5. Media Requests for Student Interviews ....................................................................... IV-73 6. Lost and Found ............................................................................................................ IV-73

Contents

iii


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine — Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Section V: HWCOM Student Activities and FIU Student Services Panther Communities ......................................................................................................................... V-1 Medical Student Organizations .......................................................................................................... V-3 Funding for Student Activities ........................................................................................................... V-4 FIU Student Services .......................................................................................................................... V-7

Section VI: Appendices Academic Calendars ........................................................................................................................... A-1 Assessment of HWCOM Educational Program Objectives and General Competencies ................... A-4 FIU Campus Maps Modesto A. Maidique Campus .................................................................................................... A-5 Biscayne Bay Campus ................................................................................................................. A-6 Map of Affiliate Hospitals .................................................................................................................. A-7 Access to Health Services ................................................................................................................. A-8 Excused Absence Form ...................................................................................................................... A-9 Leave of Absence Form.................................................................................................................... A-10 Biosafety Plan................................................................................................................................... A-11 Counseling Services ......................................................................................................................... A-12 Faculty Directors .............................................................................................................................. A-13 Meningitis and Hepatitis B Information ........................................................................................... A-14 Consent Agreement Form................................................................................................................. A-16 FIU Alma Mater / FIU Fight Song ................................................................................................... A-17

iv

Contents


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine — Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Section I: Overview

Welcome to Florida International University State universities in Florida have been charged with the responsibility of providing students an educational experience that prepares them to participate in a rapidly changing world and to do so with a commitment to the highest moral and ethical standards. The Florida International University Standards of Student Conduct address three major areas of moral integrity: academic honesty, respect for the law, and respect for people. The latter, respect for people, is somewhat intangible in nature, and yet the most important, because it governs one’s response to the first two. As a student at FIU, you should take responsibility to serve as a leader in promoting compassion for others and challenging prejudice against all individuals and groups, whether due to race, gender, age, marital status, religion, nationality, political persuasion, sexual orientation, or disability. FIU encourages honesty and integrity in academic achievement, personal growth, and development through the publication of standards and statements of desired values and attitudes. The full text of the university Standards of Student Conduct and several related statements of policies and procedures appear in the FIU Student Handbook (http://globaldatebooksonline.com/flipbooks/flo2011). We encourage you to read these statements and integrate them into your daily life. Being part of the university community provides many opportunities to exercise individual rights, but also requires the assumption of responsibilities. Enjoy your university and medical school experience and maintain it at a level of personal integrity and caring that will reflect well upon you and the university you have elected to attend. We wish you the very best of success.

— The Faculty and Staff of Florida International University

Section I: Overview

I-1


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine — Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Preamble This Medical Student Handbook is maintained by the Florida International University (FIU) Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine (HWCOM) Office of Student Affairs, with collaborative input from faculty, administrators, and staff from HWCOM and FIU. The policies and procedures herein apply to all medical students and should serve as a guide throughout your academic, clinical, and extracurricular life as a member of the FIU community and specifically as a medical student. Certain policies and procedures also apply to faculty and staff members who are employed by or provide volunteer services to FIU HWCOM. Whenever participating in university and HWCOM-sponsored programs on campus and at offcampus sites, medical students must abide by the policies and guidelines in this Medical Student Handbook and the policies of the FIU Student Handbook published annually by the Student Government Association under the Department of Campus Life in the Division of Student Affairs. The basic premise for these student guidelines is the understanding that individual rights also are accompanied by responsibilities. By enrolling as a medical student at HWCOM, you also become a member of the larger FIU community and, thus, acquire rights in, as well as responsibilities to, the entire university community. Medical students are required to abide by all university regulations as well as the policies in the FIU Student Handbook. All policies and procedures described in this Medical Student Handbook and the FIU Student Handbook are subject to revision at any time and without notice. Such revisions are applicable to all medical students. The policies and information contained herein were last updated June 2012. Students will be informed of significant changes and updates via e-mail and class announcements at the time such revisions are made and posted online. Updates are expected periodically throughout the academic year and all students are urged to review the most recent information on the HWCOM website at http://medicine.fiu.edu/education/md/student-support-services/handbook/index.html as soon as updates are announced. Questions regarding the content of this Medical Student Handbook should be directed to the Office of Student Affairs at 305.348.0644.

I-2

Section I: Overview


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine — Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Message from the Dean Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine has seized the opportunity afforded to us in building an undergraduate medical education program from scratch to design a curriculum that is infused with opportunities to learn and to help. Our innovative Green Family Foundation NeighborhoodHELP™ (Health Education Learning Program), which runs through the entire 4 years of medical school, places medical students in teams with students of other disciplines. They will work together to address real medical, social, and ethical issues experienced by disadvantaged families in South Florida. This program –indeed the entire college– is as much about learning as it is about giving back to the community, of which FIU is such an integral part. It is my hope that our medical students help save lives and make important contributions to the improvement of the quality of life throughout South Florida, especially the region’s poorest areas. Further, through our partnerships with Baptist Health South Florida, Broward Health, Citrus Health, Cleveland Clinic Florida, Jackson Health System, Leon Medical Centers, Mercy Hospital, Memorial Healthcare System, Miami Children’s Hospital, Mount Sinai Medical Center, South Florida Evaluation and Treatment Center, the Florida Department of Health, and other community-based health providers, FIU medical students will be in contact with our community on a daily basis. The HWCOM leadership team and the leadership of FIU are working together to create a model that will contribute to the improvement of the quality of—and access to— health care in South Florida and ultimately throughout the nation. To make this vision a reality, the college is dedicated to providing its students an innovative and challenging curriculum taught by some of the best clinical and research faculty in the community and the nation. John Rock, MD Founding Dean and Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Section I: Overview

I-3


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine — Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Acronyms and Definitions AAMC ACGME CDC College DRC EAD ERAS

Faculty FAFSA FERPA Grievance Committee HWCOM HIPAA HIV LCME Medical Student

Association of American Medical Colleges Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Centers for Disease Control and Prevention FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Disability Resource Center Executive Associate Dean Electronic Residency Application Service, which is an AAMC service that transmits residency applications, personal statements, letters of recommendation, Medical Student Performance Evaluations, medical school transcripts, board exam scores, and other supporting credentials from applicants and medical schools to the fellowship and residency programs the prospective student selects using the Internet Members of the faculty of the Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Free Application for Federal Student Aid Family Education Rights and Privacy Act as amended from time to time HWCOM Student Grievance Committee Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 as amended from time to time Human immunodeficiency virus Liaison Committee on Medical Education Registered medical student at FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine M1 = First year medical student M2 = Second year medical student M3 = Third year medical student M4 = Fourth year medical student

Member of university community MSEPC Notice

Student, faculty member, official, or any other person employed by the university. Medical Student Evaluation and Promotion Committee. Notification in writing by hand-delivery or other means providing evidence of receipt. OSA Office of Student Affairs. OSHA Occupational Safety and Health Administration. UHS FIU University Health Services. University or FIU Florida International University, including all of its branch campuses and sites. USMLE United States Medical Licensing Examination.

I-4

Section I: Overview


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine — Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Mission and Goals HWCOM Mission: The mission of FIU HWCOM is to lead the next generation of medical education and continually improve the quality of health care available to the South Florida community. HWCOM will accomplish its mission by:   

Training physicians to serve South Florida’s diverse population through a patient-centered curriculum instilling cultural competence, Providing Florida students greater access to medical education, and Fostering research to discover and advance medically relevant knowledge.

HWCOM Goals: 1. Leverage the existence of our medical school to enhance the overall quality of and access to health care in South Florida. 2. Graduate culturally competent medical students who will be able to provide exemplary care to the diverse populations in Florida and the nation. 3. Utilize the presence of medical students working in interdisciplinary teams of health care professionals to improve health awareness and health care indices in the communities served. 4. Assist area hospitals in developing residency positions to ameliorate South Florida’s current and anticipated physician shortages. 5. Initiate and pursue international research and academic collaboration that will contribute to the economic development of the community, region, state, and nation. 6. Engage the local community through mutually beneficial outreach and partnership programs.

Diversity HWCOM considers diversity an integral part of the entire academic enterprise. Blending of different life and cultural experiences is of prime importance in the selection of faculty and staff and in the selection of medical students and education of future physicians. Diversity enhances the educational environment and enriches the experience of medical students, faculty and staff, and patients. HWCOM aims to create a culture in which everyone feels valued and included. This culture of inclusion fully appreciates differences in perspective, not only in composition, but of thought, expression, desires, and goals. HWCOM values all dimensions of diversity among medical students, faculty, and staff, including but not limited to age, race/ethnicity, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, physical ability, and geographic diversity. To enhance diversity among students, HWCOM’s admissions criteria go beyond grade point averages and MCAT scores, giving value to personal attributes (e.g., motivation for medicine and for FIU, leadership, compassion, languages spoken, economic/educational disadvantaged status), and personal experiences (e.g., community service, clinical experiences, overcoming hardships). In addition, available scholarship funds are awarded to qualified applicants who lack financial means to pay for medical school.

Section I: Overview

I-5


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine — Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

I-6

Section I: Overview


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine — Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 A primary goal of Florida International University, as stated in its Worlds Ahead 20102015 Strategic Plan is to educate “students who understand their culture and the cultures of others and appreciate the complexities and diversity of our global society.” Read FIU’s diversity policy online at http://policies.fiu.edu/record_profile.php?id=584. HWCOM supports this university goal. FIU HWCOM Diversity Policy Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine considers diversity an integral part of the entire academic enterprise. Blending of different life and cultural experiences is of prime importance in the selection of faculty and staff and in the selection of medical students and the education of future physicians. HWCOM seeks to foster a broad and diverse community of faculty, staff, and students to enrich the educational environment and expand the knowledge base for our students. This policy is parallel to the diversity policy of Florida International University. The value of this diversity emphasis for HWCOM educational programs and staffing will be realized by the production of culturally competent physicians who can serve South Florida’s diverse population.

Accreditation Statement The Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) is the accrediting body for medical schools in the United States and solely determines the accreditation status of every medical program leading to the Doctor of Medicine degree. To be accredited, a medical program must meet comprehensive standards that answer to the quality, integrity, and educational objectives required by LCME. The academic program is structured to provide students an education that meets the faculty’s expected standards for the attainment of the Doctor of Medicine degree. Accreditation for a new medical school is a five-step process. The last two steps of the LCME guidelines intentionally coincide with the progress of the inaugural class of students though their program of study. Currently, HWCOM has reached the fourth step in the accreditation process, called Provisional Accreditation, and it was awarded to HWCOM in 2011. The fifth and final step in accreditation is called Full Accreditation. HWCOM is on track to attain full accreditation prior to graduating its first class in May 2013. According to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), a student who completes the graduation requirements for the MD degree from a medical school in the process of completing full accreditation by the LCME is eligible for complete consideration in applying for accredited residency training programs. Additional information regarding accreditation can be found in the “Overview and Accreditation Procedures” sections of the LCME site located at www.lcme.org. Florida International University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) to award associate, baccalaureate, master’s, and doctoral degrees, including the HWCOM Doctor of Medicine degree.

Section I: Overview

I-7


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine — Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Facilities and Guidelines for Use Medical students have dedicated places within the FIU HWCOM facility to study, relax, and socialize while on campus − space that is truly a medical student’s “home away from home.”

Dedicated Medical Student Study Space Aware that students prefer different study approaches and have different learning needs, HWCOM has made space available for both individual and group study in environments conducive to learning. Medical students have access to dedicated lecture halls that are used for formal curricular presentations during day hours Mondays through Fridays, and for quiet, personal self-study after hours and weekends, as follows:   

AHC2 Lecture Room 170 can accommodate a maximum of 145 people. AHC2 Lecture Room 160 can accommodate a maximum of 80 people. AHC2 Lecture Room 655 can accommodate a maximum 45 people.

Students may reserve these rooms in advance to conduct group meetings (e.g., student interest groups and medical student organizations) and social activities. Dedicated medical student study space is available 7 days a week and includes 10 small-group study rooms on the sixth floor in the Academic Health Center 2 (AHC2) building and a dedicated Medical Library located on the third floor of the main university library. Small-group study rooms are frequently utilized during day, evening, and weekend hours. Nine of the ten study rooms on the sixth floor of AHC2 comfortably accommodate eight to 10 students each; the tenth accommodates up to 15 students. These rooms, which feature a wall-mounted HDTV and wireless Internet access, also can be reserved for meetings and group study during normal working hours and are available 24/7 via students’ magnetic ID card swipe. Eight “Objective Structured Clinical Exam” (OSCE) rooms in the Clinical Simulation Center on the fourth floor of AHC2 serve as the major on-campus location for students to practice their clinical skills. These dual-purpose facilities have exam rooms with patient training mannequins and adjacent conference areas featuring closed circuit TV for live observation and video recording. These rooms also may be reserved for individual and group study after hours. Wet and dry anatomy labs on the first floor of AHC2 are accessible to students via magnetic ID card swipe for after-hours study based on availability (when not being used to teach anatomy). HWCOM has a dedicated space on the third floor of the Steven and Dorothea Green Library reserved only for medical students. The Medical Library consists of approximately 7,000 square feet of dedicated space, and houses all of the library services for HWCOM, including access to electronic information systems, physical publications and materials, printing and copying equipment, a small group room, a lounge space with chairs and sofas, and private study carrels. The FIU Science Classroom building (AHC4), with expected occupancy in Spring 2013, will feature a classroom designed to accommodate 145 people as well as 12 new study rooms dedicated exclusively for medical students 24/7 in a state-of-the-art environment conducive to individual and group study.

Lounge and Relaxation Areas Medical students enjoy exclusive use of several lounge and relaxation areas located on the third floor of AHC2. Four distinct student areas, called Panther Community lounges, are equipped with sofas, chairs, tables, cable TV, computer, kitchen area with refrigerator and microwave, an individual mailbox and a personal locker. Medical students may access their Panther Community suite by swiping the magnetic strip on their FIU photo ID card. The lounges within the Panther Community provide a comfortable

I-8

Section I: Overview


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine — Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 setting for students to relax. Each Panther Community lounge is equipped with chairs, tables, wireless Internet access, HDTV with cable, and a convenient kitchen area with a refrigerator, microwave, sink, and counter and cabinet space for additional small appliances and cooking supplies. Each student has a personal locker to store valuables. A 960-square-foot recreational lounge on the third floor and adjacent to the Panther Communities provides students additional relaxation space featuring games, cable TV and Internet connectivity. Students have 24/7 access to all medical student lounge areas by using their magnetic stripe ID cards. The Medical Library also has a small lounge area complete with refrigerator, microwave, hot/cold water dispenser, and unassigned lockers. In addition, medical students have access to personal lockers and medical staff lounge areas during their clerkship rotations at the affiliated hospital sites. The Graham Center (GC), located in close proximity to HWCOM facilities, serves as the main student center for the university. The GC, referred to as the FIU “living room,” has more than 8,000 square feet of student lounge space and more than 4,000 square feet of recreational space offering unique services and amenities to all students. The GC is a place for students to relax, meet friends, and enjoy a variety of indoor games, including billiards and table tennis, board games (chess, backgammon, checkers, dominoes), and video games. GC also is home to a full-service cafeteria and multiple dining options, including national brands such as Einstein Bros Bagels, Pollo Tropical, Subway, Bustello Café, Jamba Juice, Java City, Sushi Maki, Burger King, and Chili’s Too restaurant. A café is located on the second floor of the university Barnes and Noble bookstore, and Starbucks is located in the lobby of the Green Library. The first floor of the PG5 Market Station, located north of the AHC buildings, features a dining hub with indoor and outdoor seating. Some of the vendors include Chick-fil-A, Moe’s, Papa John’s, Dunkin’ Donuts and Salad Creations. The facility also has a Cyber Café and televisions. The FIU Recreation Center is located west of the University Health Services Complex and is within easy walking distance from any location on campus. The 50,000-square-foot Recreation Center features more than 2,300 square feet of lounge areas; a two-court gym for intramural and recreational basketball, volleyball, and badminton; a 12,500-square-foot fitness area equipped with free weights, resistance machines, and cardio equipment; two multipurpose rooms for group fitness classes; large men’s and women’s locker rooms (each with more than 200 lockers); and a sidewalk café. The Recreation Center offers a diverse schedule of more than 30 fitness classes each week, Body Composition Assessments, and a Pro Shop that offers towel and laundry service, equipment checkout, and retail sales of energy drinks/bars, fitness accessories, and locker room sundries. A swimming pool located on the west side of campus is available to all FIU students.

Guidelines for Use of HWCOM Facilities To ensure that everyone’s personal, social, and safety needs are met in a fair manner, the following guidelines have been established: 

Lounge guests: A medical student is permitted to invite no more than two guests at a time to visit and utilize the amenities of the lounge; all guests must be accompanied by an FIU medical student unless prior permission is obtained from the OSA.

Lockers: Personal lockers located in the Panther Community lounges provide storage space for students’ laptops, medical equipment, white coats, and other items. Students are required to purchase their own locks to appropriately secure their valuables and periodically clean out the locker. Lockers must be cleaned out on or before the last day of classes. Any items left in lockers

Section I: Overview

I-9


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine — Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 after the last day of classes will be discarded. In addition, all inpatient clinical sites are equipped with lockers for HWCOM use. 

Mail and Student Mailboxes: Students are assigned a mailbox and are required to periodically check and clear out their mailboxes to ensure timely receipt of college and university-related mail. Any items left in mailboxes after the last day of classes in each period will be discarded.

Common Amenities: The use of television, microwave, furniture, games, videos, books, journals, photocopier, phone/fax machine, vending machines, and other community amenities will be mutually decided on a first-come, first-served basis. When conflicts arise, it is expected that the competing interests communicate and come up with a compromise or consensus. If an agreement still cannot be reached, this issue should be taken to the Office of Student Affairs.

Refrigerators: Refrigerators are provided for short-term storage of perishable foods. Nonperishable foods should not be stored in the refrigerators. To ensure sufficient space for all medical students, a student may store food of a quantity sufficient only for a 2 day period of time; this includes frozen food. All food must be removed weekly; all food remaining in the refrigerators after 6:00 p.m. on Fridays may be discarded.

Safety and Security: FIU is committed to providing a safe and secure environment for the entire university community. The University Police Department provides a full range of police services to the university community, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. All university police officers are certified by the State of Florida after completing the standardized training required by Florida state statute. General services provided by the Police Department include vehicle patrol, foot and bicycle patrol, criminal investigation of misdemeanors and felonies, traffic enforcement, traffic crash investigation, special events management, and crime prevention programs. Information about these services is available online at http://police.fiu.edu. In order to promote safety and awareness to the FIU community, the University Police Department instituted the Community Oriented Policing Service (COPS), a policing philosophy of the U.S. Department of Justice that advances the practice of community policing in America’s state and local law enforcement agencies. Detailed information on COPS is available online at http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/ Default.asp?Item=36.

Legal Matters: The University Police Department enforces all state and local laws and ordinances, including Florida State Statutes 790.06(12) and 790.115, which forbid any person to carry a firearm on a university campus. In addition, the unlawful sale, purchase, distribution, possession or use of any controlled substance or the unlawful possession and use of alcohol is prohibited in or on FIU -owned or -controlled property, or within a 200-foot perimeter of FIU property. Violation of these policies above may be cause for disciplinary action and criminal prosecution. The FIU Police Department is committed and required by state statutes to notify the university community when a registered sexual predator or sexual offender is enrolled, employed, or carrying on a vocation at FIU. The University Police Department publishes a Daily Police Crime Log that is available upon request.

Secure Access: HWCOM facilities are properly secured each evening to safeguard property. Only faculty, staff, and students with proper identification are admitted after hours. Faculty, staff, and students are issued a University One Card, which contains his/her photograph, name, ID number, signature, bar code for library use, and a magnetic strip for electronic identification and access. The University One Cards facilitate access to HWCOM facilities (offices, study rooms,

I-10

Section I: Overview


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine — Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 etc.) via a magnetic key-card system as authorized by HWCOM. In addition to the University One Cards, HWCOM faculty and staff have badges identifying them as HWCOM employees. 

Routine Patrols: Two public service technicians serve as security guards for HWCOM facilities weekdays, covering shifts from 8:00 a.m. to 1:30 a.m. Back-up is provided by FIU patrol officers across campus. The public service technicians’ primary responsibility is to ensure the safety of the students, faculty, and staff by conducting regular patrols of the buildings and by becoming familiar with the routines and activities of the medical students while on campus. Reporting jointly to the FIU Police Department and the HWCOM Director of Facilities, they carry out assignments and initiate their own surveillance and patrol techniques to monitor activities occurring in the buildings. Security cameras throughout the buildings are monitored by the onduty security guard at the University Police Department. University Police also conduct routine patrols of university buildings and parking areas 24 hours per day, including several patrols throughout HWCOM space during non-business hours. The Police Department and Parking and Transportation staff are available to escort students and faculty after hours.

Section I: Overview

I-11


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine — Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

I-12

Section I: Overview


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Section II: Office of Student Affairs

Welcome from the Office of Student Affairs The Office of Student Affairs at HWCOM is designed to be supportive of the needs of medical students throughout their medical education program. This support involves many of the day-to-day events and activities of HWCOM, including Panther Community operations, development and support of student organizations and interest groups, personal counseling, career planning, residency selection, residency application, and elective rotations at other medical institutions and facilities both in the United States and overseas. The Office of Student Affairs also offers specific counseling services provided by trained professionals in areas of financial support, psychology, career selection, and mentorship. The faculty and staff of the Office of Student Affairs have been carefully selected, with appointments given to professionals with a strong interest in medical student advocacy. Our offices generally are open and available to medical students from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. weekdays throughout each academic period. Additionally, a Dean or Director is on call 24/7 to address individual problems or requests of an urgent or emergent nature. Our combined goal is to make each medical student’s experience at FIU productive and rewarding by helping each student achieve to his or her maximum ability and potential. Additionally, it is our goal to help each student select the area of medicine in which he or she has the greatest interest and potential, and to guide each student through preparation and selection for residency training in the area of choice. On behalf of the entire faculty and staff of the Office of Student Affairs, I would like to welcome you to FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine and to the beginning of a new chapter in your life. We welcome your visits and are here to help you succeed. Sanford M. Markham, MD Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Section II: Student Affairs

II-1


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

General Services The Office of Student Affairs provides programs and services for all medical students at FIU from the time of recruitment to the time of commencement, and beyond. Activities of the Office of Student Affairs include: recruitment of students; the admissions process; mentorship of students; personal, academic, and financial counseling; medical student communities providing educational and extracurricular activities, organizations, and student leadership opportunities. The Office of Student Affairs has experienced faculty and staff who are dedicated to the overall well-being of medical students. The Office of Student Affairs provides learning opportunities outside of the formal classroom and clinical settings that are designed to complement and enhance the overall educational experience. Hours: 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Monday through Friday except on university holidays. On-call: The deans and directors in Office of Student Affairs also are available on a rotational basis for urgent student issues or situations at times when the office is closed. For urgent matters, students should call the after-hours emergency phone line 305.348.0696 for assistance. Most activities in the Office of Student Affairs function in an “open-door” manner so students may visit the office for help and support by the faculty and staff without making appointments. Because Office of Student Affairs is committed to medical student support and many individual counseling and advising services are confidential, it is strongly recommended that students make appointments in advance to ensure the availability of the specific dean or director and to ensure sufficient time is allocated to appropriately discuss the issue(s) to the student’s satisfaction. The Office of Student Affairs strives to recruit, admit, educate, counsel, advise, and professionally transform a diverse group of students into culturally competent, empathic, and ethical physicians. The OSA works in concert with the academic mission of HWCOM by fostering medical students’ intellectual, physical, emotional, spiritual, and social growth. We promote student-centered educational and leadership opportunities to enhance communication, critical thinking, ethical judgment, problem-solving, and professional skills. The OSA facilitates altruism, mentoring, volunteerism, and community service outreach while providing developmental programs and counseling services designed to promote optimal learning. In addition to academic support, the OSA will strive to enhance students’ personal awareness and wellness while preparing them to become outstanding medical professionals who provide patientcentered health care that is responsive to the medical, social, and cultural needs of the community.

Vision and Values The vision of FIU HWCOM is to be South Florida's leader in providing clinically competent physicians to the local communities and discovering innovations in the science and delivery of medical care. The Office of Student Affairs values:       

II-2

Integrity and honesty Human dignity, compassion, and respect for all without discrimination or harassment based on race, color, religion, age, disability, sex, national origin, marital status, sexual orientation and veteran status Provision of culturally competent and multidisciplinary services that complement the academic mission of the university Professionalism that respects the rights, abilities, beliefs, and confidentiality of students and patients Scholarship, wisdom, creativity, and innovation that foster best practices and “outside the box” thinking Quality and continual improvement based on student feedback Responsible, responsive, fair, honorable, and ethical decisions by students and faculty/staff

Section II: Student Affairs


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013   

Student-focused education Advocacy for disease prevention Lifelong learning and the scholarly advancement of the honorable profession of medicine

Professional Staff Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs: Responsible for student enrollment, including recruitment, admissions, and records, as well as the areas of student support encompassing orientation, personal counseling, financial counseling, career counseling, student code of conduct, the Honor Code, as well as the Panther Communities and medical student organizations. Associate Dean for Student Affairs: Primarily responsible for medical student career counseling and preparation of students for residency, the Match, and taking USMLE exams. Provides oversight for the Registrar, student records, grades and transcripts. Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, Admissions: Responsible for the direction and oversight of medical student enrollment including recruitment, the application process, interviews, admissions, and the student records system. Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, Counseling and Communities: Responsible for the following student support services: personal and psychological counseling and wellness activities, financial aid, career counseling and mentorship. The Assistant Dean also provides oversight of the student learning communities and medical student organizations, which offer students a variety of extracurricular opportunities to enhance leadership and professionalism through educational, altruistic, spiritual, and social experiences both at the university and in the community. Director of Counseling and Wellness: Responsible for providing confidential psychological evaluations and consultations for students in individual and group sessions; provides psycho-educational and wellness programs on a variety of mental health topics, including stress management, time management, depression, personality profiles, identifying cognitive strengths, anger management, relationships, maintaining academic and social balance; study skills, test-taking skills, enhancing self-esteem, leadership, and seminars alerting HWCOM community to the early-warning signs, recognition and follow-up of disruptive or troubled students; and providing neuropsychological evaluations designed to enhance academic performance and retention. Director of Records and College of Medicine Registrar: Responsible for maintenance of grades and transcripts, as well as records and statistics pertaining to all medical students. Director of Financial Aid: Responsible for the administration and coordination of all financial aid programs, including financial aid and debt management counseling and student assistance in obtaining financial aid resources. Associate Director for Admissions: Responsible for collaborating with the Director of Admissions and Records to coordinate the medical student recruitment, interview and admissions process and the medical student record system. Assists in the maintenance of all records and statistics related to applicants and matriculates. Assistant Director for Administrative Operations: Primarily responsible for the daily administrative operation of the OSA and making arrangements for travel and registration to major medical school conferences and other professional activities.

Section II: Student Affairs

II-3


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 Faculty Director of a Panther Community: Primary care physician responsible for the supervision of the service learning, educational, social, and cultural activities for one of the four Panther Communities; serves as a student mentor and advisor, as well as the liaison between students and the various academic and support services available at HWCOM, the university, and outside organizations. Assistant Director for Panther Communities: Responsible for providing administrative support for the student learning communities as well as student organizations and activities. Provide financial guidance for fundraising and expenditure of various types of student funds.

Admission to Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine As part of HWCOM Office of Student Affairs, the Office of Admissions recruits, facilitates interviews with, and determines acceptance of, a diverse student body capable of pursuing a full range of opportunities available to physicians through medical practice, service, education, and research. The Office of the Registrar enrolls and registers students and maintains student records and transcripts.

Counseling Services The HWCOM Office of Student Affairs provides all medical students professional and comprehensive counseling services. The counselors are college faculty and staff dedicated to providing professional and confidential personal, psychological, financial, and career counseling services to support students’ academic and professional success. Students may be self-referred or may be referred by family, friends, professors, staff, peers, or other caring individuals.

Personal Counseling – The Counseling and Wellness Center The Counseling and Wellness Center, under the auspices of OSA, provides free, professional, and confidential personal counseling services exclusively for HWCOM medical students. The center provides a full range of psychological and mental health services designed to support medical student success through professional diagnosis, counseling, and life-skills coaching. Services are designed to foster the academic potential of students by enhancing their personal development as well as their psychosocial and emotional health. The treatment philosophy of the Counseling and Wellness Center is strength focused, embracing the values of individualism, empowerment, positivity, dignity and respect. The personal counseling services offered by the Counseling and Wellness Center are professional and strictly confidential. The Director of Counseling and Wellness is a licensed psychologist with board certification in neuropsychopharmacology and specialized expertise in neuropsychology and the diagnosis and therapy of a variety of student mental health concerns that could affect a medical student’s educational success. The director has extensive leadership, teaching, administrative, and supervisory experience in providing personal and group therapy at university counseling centers. Faculty and staff members may consult with the director on psychological or systemic issues that may be affecting student success and learning ability. All clinical services provided to the medical students maintain the highest standards with regard to ethical, competent, and confidential care. The Counseling and Wellness Center also has dedicated licensed psychologists with expertise in health psychology, biofeedback training, personality theory, mindfulness, and therapeutic assessment. Some of the common complaints medical students typically address include: stress, relationship problems, anxiety disorders, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, attention deficit disorder, eating disorders, adjustment difficulties, perfectionism, substance abuse, victimization, and simply dealing with being a medical student. Professional services include group workshops designed to promote mental

II-4

Section II: Student Affairs


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 health and enhance personal skills and resiliency. Consultations and group workshops address the following topics: stress management, burn-out, time management, depression and anxiety screening, relationships, developing personal strengths, team building, communication skills, personality assessment, student development, and wellness programs specifically designed to promote medical student personal health and academic success. The Counseling and Wellness Center also offers preventive and complementary health strategies designed to enhance students’ academic performance. The “wellness” component of the Center further enhances medical students’ sense of privacy, as it is unclear to others whether any student who is at the Center is there to receive psychotherapy or one of the many other health and wellness services offered at the Counseling and Wellness Center. Modes of intervention include individual, group, and couples counseling as well as individual psychological and neuropsychological testing. Enrolled students may receive short-term and solutionfocused outpatient counseling and therapy during all phases of their professional education and training. Counseling services and consultations are provided free of charge to students. By law, all patients must sign a written consent to release confidential information. Unless a student signs a “release of information”, information about the student, including whether or not they seek or participate in therapy, is not released to anyone except in accordance with the law. If a student is referred for counseling as part of a remediation or disciplinary action, the student must consent to release information to faculty with a “need to know” to fulfill the terms of the agreement. In addition to the student support services provided by the Counseling and Wellness Center, students may utilize the services provided by the FIU Counseling and Psychological Services Center located in the University Health Services Complex on the Modesto A. Maidique campus, a short walk from HWCOM. In cases of emergency after normal working hours, students are urged to contact the Office of Student Affairs via the after-hours emergency phone line, 305.348.0696, for further instructions on where to receive emergency medical care and crisis intervention. In the case of emergency or imminent danger, students immediately should go to the closest emergency room or call 911. A dedicated medical student counseling center is an innovative and highly valued private student service. The Counseling and Wellness Center at HWCOM provides services that are very much appreciated by the students as evidenced by the results of anonymous client satisfaction surveys and the LCME student survey. The psychologists of the Counseling and Wellness Center have no involvement in the academic evaluation or promotion of students. The psychologists in this office are available to work with individuals and small groups of students with concerns related to academic improvement and personal issues. Students wishing to enhance their current academic performance as well as those experiencing academic difficulty are eligible to consult with a psychologist to receive assistance in improving the quality and efficiency of study skills and time management as well as better ways to cope with test or performance anxiety. Students experiencing issues of a personal or psychological nature that might be interfering, or have the potential to interfere, with academic progress, are also able to consult with the psychologist for short-term mental health therapy to address issues related to anxiety, depression, family, or relationship issues; grief or anger issues; and crisis intervention. In situations where a student requires ongoing mental health care or needs diagnosis and/or treatment beyond the scope of services the Counseling and Wellness Center is able to provide, a referral will be made to an appropriate health professional, including a psychiatrist in the local community. Faculty, course and clerkship directors, mentors, and deans are additionally charged with providing counseling for students’ personal issues that do not require the services of a psychologist. HWCOM understands that many physical and psychological health issues confronting medical students may be of a sensitive nature and that a professional-patient relationship between FIU faculty and students would be

Section II: Student Affairs

II-5


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 inconsistent with a teacher-student relationship. FIU faculty members who provide health care services of a sensitive nature to any medical student have no involvement in the academic evaluation or promotion of students receiving care at the Center. Office Location: The Counseling and Wellness Center is located in a dedicated suite of offices in the Green Library (entrance room 340B) located near the Medical Library. The Counseling and Wellness Center features a dedicated office for confidential personal counseling staffed by the Director of Counseling and Wellness and a licensed board-certified psychologist, and an office designed for testing, stress-management, and performance enhancing-programs designed specifically to meet the needs of medical students. The emphasis of the Counseling and Wellness Center is to foster success through personal psychological intervention when necessary as well as general lifestyle enhancement through individualized counseling and wellness program. Principles of Confidentiality at the Counseling and Wellness Center What students say at the Counseling and Wellness Center stays there – with only certain exceptions. All personal counseling sessions are confidential. Receiving medical care and counseling are most effective if the patient or client can be direct and honest with a health care professional without fear that personal information will be divulged. No personal information is released outside the HWCOM Counseling and Wellness Center without written consent, except in situations such as those listed below. No notifications of counseling are made in the student’s official FIU or HWCOM records and the files of the Counseling and Wellness Center are maintained independently from those of the FIU University Health Services clinics and all other FIU and HWCOM departments. Client records are maintained under strict security measures that are consistent with professional practices. The laws of the State of Florida provide the following exceptions to the general policies of confidentiality:    

If the therapist has knowledge that a child, elder, or a person with disability has been abused by the client If the therapist has knowledge of intent to harm himself/herself or others If the therapist receives a court order to release information If the therapist consults with another clinical or counseling psychologist or mental health counselor who works within the center and who clinically has a reason to know about the case.

Medical students seeking personal counseling should first call the Counseling and Wellness Center at 305.348.1460 during normal business hours to make an appointment. Whenever possible, special appointments will be made to accommodate students’ schedules, as necessary. Urgent or crisis matters will be triaged immediately with on-campus psychological services or referral to services in the community. Medical students who experience an emergency during the evenings, weekends, and holidays should call 305.348.0696, the after-hours emergency phone number to speak to the “on-call” dean or director in the Office of Student Affairs. Students on campus who need emergency assistance should call the FIU Department of Public Safety at 305.348.5911. Students who need emergency services who are not currently on campus should call 911. Medical students also can contact the FIU Victim Advocacy Center 24-hour hotline at 305.348.3000 for free and confidential services if the student experiences actual or threatened violence. Policy on Provision of Psychological Counseling and Medical Care to Medical Students In compliance with the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) accreditation guidelines, it is imperative that all clinical faculty who provide psychological counseling and/or medical care to medical

II-6

Section II: Student Affairs


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 students have no role in the evaluation process of the students whom they see as patients or clients. Since many of the HWCOM clinical training programs take place under the supervision and care of clinical faculty who maintain practices at various outpatient and inpatient settings in the Miami-Dade County area, it is possible that a student may seek medical care and/or psychological counseling in a practice where a faculty member sees patients or clients. Health care professionals who provide psychiatric/psychological counseling or other sensitive health care services (e.g., sexually transmitted diseases, substance abuse, rape, etc.) to medical students shall not be involved in the evaluation or promotion of those students they treat. HWCOM faculty who already have an evaluative relationship with a student cannot provide psychological counseling or medical care to that student. A student who has received psychological counseling or medical care from a faculty member prior to entering an evaluative relationship may request reassignment from the Executive Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs. A faculty member who has provided psychological counseling or medical care to a student prior to entering an evaluative relationship will request and receive reassignment of the student to another faculty member. The faculty member will inform the student of this policy and will request a release to make the referral or transfer.

Financial Counseling and Financial Aid The HWCOM Financial Aid Office is located in the Office of Student Affairs. The Director of Financial Aid is dedicated to assisting students with the financial aid application process and provides one-on-one counseling regarding the availability of federal, private, and institutional funds. Students can meet with the Director of Financial Aid from Monday through Friday. Extended office hours are available upon request. There are several financial aid and scholarship options available to medical students, such as the FIU Graduate (Need) Grant, institutional and private scholarships, and federal and private student loans. The main types of aid available are listed below. For additional information and applicable forms, please visit http://finaid.fiu.edu. Types of aid:   

 

FIU Graduate (Need) Grant: Award, based on financial need, does not have to be repaid. Scholarships: Non-repayable awards, which may be based on merit, financial need, and other considerations. Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan: A student does not have to demonstrate financial need to receive this loan. Interest payments on this loan are not subsidized by the government. The student can make arrangements with the lender to pay the interest while he or she is in school or can allow the interest to capitalize, adding to the principal balance. Federal Direct Graduate Plus Loan: This loan is available to graduate students who are enrolled in an eligible program. Students must file a FAFSA form in order to apply for a Federal Graduate Plus Loan. This loan requires a credit check for eligibility. Private Student Loans: Private student loans can be obtained in addition to Federal Stafford Loans. Private student loans are based on credit and the interest rate is variable.

Financial aid funds are disbursed by the HWCOM Financial Aid Office in coordination with the FIU Financial Aid Office and in accordance with the requirements of the particular financial aid. For more information, visit the main FIU Financial Aid website (http://finaid.fiu.edu), HWCOM (website http://medicine.fiu.edu/education/md/student-support-services/fin-aid/index.html) or make an appointment with the HWCOM Director of Financial Aid.

Section II: Student Affairs

II-7


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 Debt Management and Loan Exit Counseling The Director of Financial Aid will meet with students to encourage smart and conscientious borrowing habits. Personal or group debt management sessions will be available throughout the program. All students who have received loans during medical school are required to attend a mandatory “Loan Exit Counseling” session. This is a federal requirement for graduation for any student who has received federal student loans for school. The HWCOM Director of Financial Aid holds group sessions on debt management, which are mandatory for all medical students during Period 1. During the first debt management session, students are provided a printed copy of their federal loan history and are informed about the National Student Loan Data System and how to retrieve their personal loan history. Debt management information and presentations are posted on the HWCOM “md2b” website, a portal of information for HWCOM medical students. The HWCOM Director of Financial Aid is also available for individual debt management counseling. In addition, students have access to the various financial aid resources provided by the AAMC, including the Financial Information, Resources, Services, and Tools (FIRST) online program at http://aamc.org/ programs/first/start.htm, which includes a tutorial titled Financial Literacy 101, podcasts, and many other resources. FIU participates in the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan program. To ensure students understand their responsibility to repay student loans, the federal government requires all student loan borrowers to undergo Exit Loan Counseling prior to graduating or leaving college and entering into repayment. HWCOM students have the opportunity to attend multiple mandatory and optional debt management sessions in person and online before they attend the mandatory exit interview in their fourth year. Scholarships Scholarships require students to maintain satisfactory academic progress. Students who have had a leave of absence approved by OSA may continue to receive the scholarships upon their return to HWCOM, provided that the leave of absence was not granted because of academic or professional deficiency. Students who fail to maintain satisfactory academic levels of progress will lose their eligibility for scholarship renewal. Tuition Refund and Accommodation Policies See Section IV: Policies and Regulations.

Career Counseling All HWCOM students receive career guidance from a variety of sources and programs during each year of their medical education. Careers in Medicine During Period 1, all HWCOM students create a personal profile at the Careers in Medicine (CiM) online program sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) at https://www.aamc.org/ students/medstudents/cim. The AAMC Careers in Medicine program is a four-phase career planning program that works in partnership with medical schools to help students select a medical specialty and apply to a residency program. In the first phase, students create a personal profile by taking an online selfassessment to help them identify their values, interests, skills, personality, and practice needs. This confidential personal information guides students during the second phase as they explore the variety of medical specialties and other career options available to them in the field of medicine. Later in their

II-8

Section II: Student Affairs


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 medical education experience, students complete phases three and four of the CiM process, which guides them in choosing a specialty and applying for and being accepted into a residency program. Faculty Mentors During Period 1, all students meet with the Faculty Director of their Panther Community and are given an opportunity to select a personal faculty member from a list of faculty members who have volunteered to serve as mentors to medical students. Students are encouraged but not required to select a mentor with whom they share personal and professional interests, as these mentors are typically the students’ first point of contact for issues concerning personal and professional development. Students are encouraged to meet with their mentor at mutually convenient times and locations, with first and subsequent contact to be initiated by either the student or the mentor. During the clinical years, the faculty mentor will be available to provide advice pertinent to the overall clinical clerkship experiences and help arrange for additional extracurricular clinical opportunities in specialties based on the preferences of the student. The faculty mentor also is expected to assist with the process of selecting a residency. Mentors may be changed, or additional mentors sought, as students solidify their career choices. Faculty mentors are not involved in formal HWCOM Academic Advising requirements. Academic Advisors Once the CiM profile is complete, students should meet with the academic advisor assigned to their Panther Community at least once a year to review their academic progress and career plans. More frequent meetings are held with students experiencing academic difficulty and advisors are available to meet at students’ request. At each annual meeting, student career plans and progress toward careers goals are discussed, and students are reminded both about resources such as CiM and about internal options such as mentoring and special interest groups. The NRMP Charting Outcomes in the Match is used to assist students in assessing their goals and planning their activities as they begin to define their interests. Panther Communities HWCOM Panther Communities host a variety of professional development seminars, inviting physicians of various specialties and subspecialties to conduct a series of formal workshops on medical career options, the residency and post-residency application process, and clinical and business aspects of their medical practice (e.g., personal and lifestyle issues). Students have opportunities to explore different specialties through the formal faculty mentorship program and through self-initiated conversations with physician specialists during required ambulatory clinic preceptorships, emergency department rotations, and professional conferences. Many professional programs sponsored by the Panther Communities and medical student organizations support the medical school curriculum by enhancing professionalism. The faculty directors of each of the four Panther Communities provide additional career advising. The Office of Student Affairs also sponsors annual career specialty workshops at which physicians make presentations to groups of students highlighting their specific specialty. An annual Residency Fair, offered in the spring, provides an opportunity for all medical students to speak with representatives from various residency programs throughout Florida and from the southeastern United States. During the various specialty workshops and the Residency Fair, students are able to learn the criteria used by programs to evaluate applicants, and are able to hear about specific programs from the directors. Career Exploration Sessions During Periods 1, 2, and 3, the Associate Dean for Student Affairs or designee will facilitate a variety of group and individual sessions designed to explore a variety of career options, including information on writing resumes, CVs, mock interviews, and other career development topics.

Section II: Student Affairs

II-9


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 Mandatory individual advising meetings occur during Period 3 and focus on choosing the fourth-year schedule. Each student meets with the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs (or designee) and also separately with his or her Academic Advisor to help select Period 4 activities based on specialty interest. Students receive assistance in developing a portfolio for residency application and identifying faculty to write appropriate letters of recommendation. Clerkship Directors serve as a resource for students seeking counsel about pursuing a career in a specific discipline and advise students on selection of electives to help them prepare for future career opportunities. Faculty at all HWCOM affiliated clinical sites are expected to serve as role models in their specialty areas and to provide objective career counseling to HWCOM students, including referrals to colleagues, as appropriate in response to student interests. During Period 4, the Office of Student Affairs assists students to register with the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) and provides personal and group counseling sessions on preparing residency applications (CV, letters of recommendation, personal statements) and registration for the National Residency Matching Program (NRMP). A Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE) and transcript are sent to the director of each program to which the student applies. During Period 4 rotations, HWCOM faculty preceptors help each student identify appropriate specialists who have personal experience in the student’s areas of interest and can guide the student in making appropriate choices. Preparation for Residency Application, Match, and Interviews Mandatory meetings for the entire class that are organized by the OSA to prepare the third-year class for residency application include:  

The Guide to the Match: the overall process of transitioning from medical school to residency training. USMLE Survival Guide: registering and preparing to take the USMLE Step exams.

During periods 3 and 4, OSA assists students in the process of transitioning from medical school to residency training. Students are required to meet with the Associate Dean for Student Affairs in December or January of Period 3. This meeting provides an opportunity for the Associate Dean for Student Affairs to discuss where the student is in the informed decision-making process. If the student has not yet identified a specialty of choice, the process of identifying a choice is discussed consistent with the process outlined in CiM . If the student has identified a specialty, the Associate Dean for Student Affairs discusses the student’s academic progress and competitiveness for their selected specialty. The Associate Dean for Student Affairs identifies strengths and weaknesses in the student’s application and provides advice on how to improve their competitiveness. The fourth year schedule is reviewed, including externship options. The Associate Dean for Student Affairs also reviews with the student the ways in which program directors evaluate applicants for the match and gives advice on writing a curriculum vitae and personal statement, preparing for interviews, and other topics germane to the process of transitioning to residency training. During the summer of Period 4, the Office of Student Affairs assists students with all processes related to the National Resident Matching Program “Electronic Residency Application Service” and other early-match programs (i.e., San Francisco, American Urological Association, Military). In January of Period 4, a town meeting is held to guide students through the process of ranking residency programs, completing the rank order list, graduation requirements, match week, Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program, and the process of moving to residency training. During this meeting, students will be encouraged to complete the AAMC Graduation Questionnaire prior to graduation week.

II-10

Section II: Student Affairs


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 In March of Period 4, the school will assist students who haven’t matched through the Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program process. Students who choose not to participate in the Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program will be provided information regarding non-residency options following graduation, including research, educational opportunities, and alternate career options.

HWCOM Ombuds Office The HWCOM Ombuds Office provides medical students a highly confidential, independent and informal forum in which to help them to clarify their concerns, identify their goals, and consider all of their options in managing or resolving conflicts. Information provided to the HWCOM Ombudsperson will be held in strict confidentiality. The only exceptions to this commitment of confidentiality are potential risk of serious harm to any person or requirements of university policy or applicable law. The HWCOM Ombudsperson serves medical students only. The HWCOM Ombudsperson is an advocate for fairness in all processes affecting medical students but will not serve as an advocate for any party to a dispute. The Ombuds Office has no formal decision-making authority. Typical concerns brought to the HWCOM Ombuds Office include issues related to the work/ learning environment and performance, fear of retaliation, and professional misconduct. Any issue may be brought to the Ombudsperson. The HWCOM Ombuds Office seeks to enhance the ability of all students to deal more effectively with challenging situations on their own. If assistance is needed beyond individual coaching, further information can be gathered on behalf of the student, and referrals can be made to those with expertise in a specific area or proper authorities at the school. When appropriate, the HWCOM Ombudsperson can provide shuttle diplomacy or mediation services to help find a satisfactory solution. The medical student seeking assistance decides which course of action, if any, is taken and that action is tailored to fit the situation presented. The Ombuds Office will not participate in existing academic processes or formal grievance processes. The Ombudsperson helps students resolve issues before formal action is pursued. The Ombudsperson:    

provides a neutral, safe, and confidential environment in which to talk, listens to concerns and complaints, and discusses appropriate options, mediates conflicts and engages in unbiased diplomacy, and provides information and refers students to appropriate resources.

Notice to the university: The HWCOM Ombuds Office may assist in the informal resolution of concerns regarding a variety of issues. Talking to the HWCOM Ombudsperson does not constitute notice to the university, since the purpose of the HWCOM Ombuds Office is to provide medical students a confidential forum where different options may be considered. The HWCOM Ombudsperson can provide a medical student information about how a complaint may be made to the university. Ombudsperson contact information: Sheldon H. Cherry, MD Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Phone number: 305.348.4370 E-mail: shcherry@fiu.edu.

Section II: Student Affairs

II-11


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

II-12

Section II: Student Affairs


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Section III: Academic Affairs and Clinical Affairs

Overview of the Doctor of Medicine (MD) Curriculum The 4-year course of study leading to the Doctor of Medicine (MD) degree at FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine (HWCOM) is based on development of general competencies in medical knowledge, patient-centered care, communication skills, professionalism, system-based medical practice, practicebased learning and quality improvement skills, and socially responsible practices. The educational program is broad and general, preparing students for postgraduate study in their chosen field of medical specialization, licensure, and medical practice. The curriculum is entirely course-based: all educational objectives are addressed in formal courses.

Strands The curriculum is built upon study in five major strands: 1. Human Biology; 2. Disease, Illness, and Injury; 3. Clinical Medicine; 4. Professional Development; 5. Medicine and Society

Educational Program Objectives The HWCOM educational program objectives encompass the knowledge, skills, behaviors, and attitudes students are expected to exhibit as evidence of their achieving competencies necessary for graduation and receipt of the Doctor of Medicine degree. The HWCOM Curriculum Committee uses these educational program objectives to guide decisions regarding specific course content (see Appendix for Assessment of HWCOM Educational Program Objectives and General Competencies):     

Identify the major mechanisms of biochemistry, genetics, cellular biology, and physiology regulating normal function of organ systems. Describe the endogenous response to external and internal insults, including genetic and metabolic alterations, developmental disorders, environmental toxins, autoimmune diseases, and infections. Explain how the body integrates and adjusts the function of cells and organ systems to maintain homeostasis, and how dysregulation of these mechanisms leads to disease. Apply the principles of embryology, anatomy, cellular biology, biochemistry, genetics, physiology, immunology, and pharmacology to determine etiology, pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of critical human disorders. Communicate effectively with patients, families, and health service providers, including situations involving language barriers and effective use of professional interpreters.

Section III: Academic Affairs and Clinical Affairs

III-1


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013                  

Conduct and document complete medical history and physical examination using the requisite fundamental skills, including recognition and evaluation of confounding factors of age, gender, ethnicity, cultural background, socioeconomic status, family history, and emotional state Identify and propose initial therapy for acute life-threatening situations. Identify and propose a management plan for chronic disease. Develop differential diagnoses based on knowledge of common clinical, physical, and biochemical manifestations and imaging findings of common diseases, illnesses, and injuries. Correctly perform basic procedural skills with attention to patient comfort. Obtain and manage patient information from the medical record. Use evidence-based medicine to provide quality health care to individuals and populations. Apply quality scientific research methods. Discuss the core financial, legal, structural, policy, and regulatory aspects of the US health care system and their impact on the delivery of healthcare. Identify the personal skills and systems-level processes that support continuous quality improvement and patient safety, and use standard precautions in the healthcare setting. Apply knowledge of complementary and integrative medicine to patient care. Identify end-of-life care issues from the physician’s and patient’s perspectives. Apply professional behavior attitudes, humanism, self-awareness, emotions, values, and identity for the care of patients, self, and others. Integrate epidemiologic, socio-economic, behavioral, cultural, and community factors into patient care. Advocate toward improved health outcomes at the community level through analysis of sociocultural determinants of health, engagement, and reflection. Provide appropriate patient-centered counseling techniques to improve rational utilization of health care resources, prevention, and patient satisfaction. Interact effectively with other professionals to address health care needs of patients. Anticipate ethical issues encountered in clinical care and research, explain ethically justifiable options and consequences from multiple perspectives, and manage ethical challenges.

Periods of Study The curriculum is divided into four periods of study. Basic medical science, clinical medical science and clinical skills are integrated throughout all four periods. Course work is multidisciplinary and features a case format in which basic science is learned in a clinical context. Clinical experiences in primary care and emergency settings begin in the first period of study as coordinated opportunities for practical application basic knowledge, skills and reasoning. Students are engaged with families, households, and communities in a longitudinal service-learning program in collaboration with FIU students from other health professions. Clinical training begins with basic medical conditions in outpatient settings and advances progressively with more complex cases and conditions in hospital settings, culminating in subinternship experiences. Independent scholarship and broad elective opportunities in the third and fourth periods encourage students to explore personal interests and build individualized competencies in preparation for advanced postgraduate study and practice in a specialty area. Student learning is guided by objectives for every course, defined core clinical case experiences, competency standards in specific clinical skills, and standards of professional behavior. Students log all clinical experiences and are monitored for progressive development of essential skills and general competencies. Period 1 provides the foundations of medicine in core basic, clinical, and social sciences. Core basic medical sciences include medical genetics, cell biology, anatomy, physiology, pharmacology, microbiology and infections, and pathology. An introduction to clinical skills focuses on doctor–patient communication, general physical exam skills, foundations of evidence-based medicine and quantitative

III-2

Section III: Academic Affairs and Clinical Affairs


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 measurements, and medical research. Studies also include medical ethics, regional cultures in relation to medicine, self-reflection, and professionalism in doctor–patient relationships. At the beginning of the period, students become certified in basic life support (BLS) in preparation for half-day primary care clinics and weekend emergency department shifts throughout the period. Medical simulations, standard patient experiences, and virtual case studies complement classroom study and prepare students for patient-centered clinical experience learning. Period 2 is organized around in-depth study of human biology, disease, illness, and injury in an organsystem approach. Pathology, physiology, anatomy, pharmacology, and human behavior are emphasized in case-based study of the major systems: hematopoietic and lymphoreticular, endocrine, reproductive, musculoskeletal, skin, gastrointestinal, renal/urinary, cardiovascular, respiratory, and nervous. Students develop clinical skills in conducting physical exams, forming differential diagnoses, and understanding how to interpret and use laboratory medicine data and imaging technologies. Clinical skills are taught as integrated and coordinated components of the organ systems. Simultaneously, courses in the strands of Professional Development and Medicine and Society continue, with study of health care systems and policy, interprofessional health care, community health, medical jurisprudence, and end-of-life care. Students begin their service-learning study with households in the community and begin clerkship format learning in geriatrics. They continue monthly emergency room clinical experiences. Period 3 involves seven core clerkships: internal medicine, surgery, neurology, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, psychiatry, and family medicine. Also included in the Period 3 curriculum are experiences in geriatrics and radiology and a case-based self-directed learning course. Study is predominantly preceptor-guided, student–patient experiences with increasingly complex medical conditions in outpatient and hospital settings. Students are guided through progressively greater responsibility as they gain experience managing care of patients. Students learn how to apply skills learned in the simulation laboratory and demonstrate competency in core procedural skills. Learning is enhanced by simulation and virtual cases. Elective opportunities in internal medicine and surgery clerkships allow students to explore specialty areas. Community and household projects continue during Period 3, and weekly conferences provide opportunities for students to work together on comprehensive, in-depth study of major medical conditions. Students are expected to pass Step 1 of the USMLE medical licensure exam at the end of the period and to demonstrate general competency in clinical skills, diagnosis of disease, and case management. Period 4 is devoted to advanced medicine, including scholarship and exploration of specialty areas to facilitate choice of postgraduate study. Students select individualized schedules that best serve their longterm career goals. Six of the 12 required 4-week rotations are targeted selectives: one subinternship, two surgical, two medical, and one hospital-based specialty. Two rotations are dedicated to research scholarship (individual research projects), two rotations are electives, and one rotation is community medicine. The final year concludes with a 4-week Capstone experience that includes the culmination of the Green Family Foundation NeighborhoodHELP™ program, professional development workshops on career management, and a clinical medicine residency boot camp to hone clinical skills and preparation for internship life on July 1. During Period 4, HWCOM students may apply for extramural electives as described below: 

AAMC-Accredited Host Schools in the United States or Canada. HWCOM students may apply for electives at any Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC)-accredited school. Suitable electives can be identified through the Visiting Student Application Service (VSAS) of the AAMC. If interested in applying for any of these external electives, the student is required to complete paperwork required by the host school as well as an HWCOM external elective approval form.

Section III: Academic Affairs and Clinical Affairs

III-3


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 The student must submit a completed HWCOM External Elective Approval Form, completed application for the AAMC-accredited school, and any other required documentation (health forms, check) to the Office of Student Affairs before a “Good Standing Letter” will be issued to the visiting school. A Good Standing Letter serves as evidence that the student is in good standing at HWCOM and has health insurance and training in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) training in universal precautions and bloodborne pathogens. Before an extramural elective can be added to a student’s schedule, the student must obtain written confirmation from the institution (via letter or e-mail) identifying who will be responsible for evaluating the student during the elective. This documentation must be submitted to the Associate Dean for Student Affairs (or designee), who is responsible for ensuring receipt of student performance appraisal following the elective. 

HWCOM-Affiliated International Institutions. To provide HWCOM medical students opportunities to study abroad, HWCOM has established clinical rotations at nine host schools with which affiliation agreements have been codified. HWCOM faculty have fully vetted these international affiliates, ensuring the host institutions provide appropriate learning environments, patient experiences, and clinical supervision for HWCOM students. For the 2012–2013 academic year (first cycle of Period 4), these opportunities exist at: o o o o o o o o o

III-4

Instituto Henry Moor, Buenos Aires, Argentina Instituto Tecnologico de Santo Domingo, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogota, Colombia Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan Universidad de Ciencas Medica, San Jose, Costa Rica Universidad de Santander, Bucaramanga, Colombia Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia University of Rome, Rome, Italy

Other Opportunities Requiring Ad Hoc Approval. HWCOM students may request approval of other Period 4 extramural rotations provided they submit their request well in advance of the requested time, allowing sufficient time for HWCOM administrators to assess the safety and quality of the proposed experience. The student is responsible for submitting a proposal consistent with the HWCOM International Study Policy, which requires: o The proposed experience must be reviewed and approved by HWCOM. o A performance evaluation and a student evaluation of the learning experience by the student must be submitted at the end of the experience. o Prior to approving an experience, HWCOM will assess the potential risks to health and safety; HWCOM reserves the right to deny the experience if it is deemed the risk to health or safety outweighs the benefit of the experience. o The student must be appropriately supervised at all times in the clinical learning setting. o The activities undertaken by the student must be within the scope of practice of the supervising health professional.

Section III: Academic Affairs and Clinical Affairs


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Green Family Foundation NeighborhoodHELP™ The Green Family Foundation NeighborhoodHELP™ is a required longitudinal service-learning experience that provides medical students integrated, interprofessional hands-on learning experiences in both population-based medicine (with a focus on the social determinants of health) and culturally competent primary care, while simultaneously serving the needs of local communities. Students are assigned a family household in one of the targeted geographic neighborhoods in South. The program facilitates partnerships between interprofessional teams of FIU faculty and students and medically underserved households with the goal of improving health and quality of life for medically underserved households. Student teams consist of medical, nursing, and social work students, with law students consulting as needed. The Faculty Director of each Panther Community is a primary care physician who, along with other family medicine physicians, supervises students as they work with members of their assigned households to facilitate access to health care and social services. Additionally, FIU physicians and medical students are available to provide primary health care services at community-based health centers and through the FIU Mobile Clinic.

Graduation Requirements Prior to graduation and the receipt of the Doctor of Medicine (MD) degree from HWCOM, students must demonstrate proficiency in each of the following five areas: 1. Courses: Students must complete the required courses and the appropriate number of elective and selective courses earning a minimum of 200 credits. 2. Licensing exams: Students must pass the USMLE Step I examination (required for promotion to Period 4) and complete the USMLE Step II Clinical Knowledge and Clinical Skills examinations. 3. Competency assessments: Students must demonstrate competency in all of the seven general competencies and earn certification for Basic Life Support (BLS) and Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS). 4. Professional performance: Students must demonstrate professionalism consistently in all aspects of the educational program. 5. Review and approval of academic and professional record by the MSEPC prior to graduation: Students must receive the MSEPC’s recommendation for graduation and receipt of the MD degree; this recommendation must be approved by the HWCOM Dean.

Academic Departments Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine has twenty academic departments: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Anesthesiology Cellular Biology and Pharmacology Dermatology Human and Molecular Genetics Humanities, Health, and Society Immunology Medicine Molecular Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Neurology Neurosurgery

Section III: Academic Affairs and Clinical Affairs

11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20.

Obstetrics and Gynecology Ophthalmology Orthopedics Otolaryngology Pathology Pediatrics Psychiatry Radiology Surgery Urology

III-5


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Affiliate Clinical Sites Several major clinical care sites have become affiliated with the FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine to provide clinical education, clerkships, and other experiences for medical students throughout the 4-year curriculum. Medical students who receive clinical education or participate in a clinical clerkship at HWCOM affiliate clinical sites are required to abide by all of the rules and regulations of the particular site, including acquisition and use of institutional identification (badge). Prior to their first patient contact experience at each of these sites, medical students will receive an orientation to the major policies and procedures by their supervising faculty physician(s) for their educational experiences at the affiliate site. The office of the Dean and the Office of Student Affairs each maintain a manual from each of the affiliate hospitals which contain the policies and procedures that are most pertinent for medical students, including but not limited to the following:       

Medical record system Personal identification Professional dress code Bloodborne pathogen and needlestick injury Communicable diseases Safety and incident reporting Drug-free workplace

Students are required to complete drug testing and background checks annually, in compliance with institutional affiliation agreements. Students are responsible for understanding and following all of the rules and regulations. Failure to abide by these policies and procedures will be reported to the supervising faculty physician and could result in referral to the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine MSEPC for recommendation and action. Among the sites used for clinical instruction are:            

Baptist Health South Florida, http://www.baptisthealth.net Broward Health, http://www.browardhealth.org Citrus Health Network, http://www.citrushealth.org/citrushealth.htm Cleveland Clinic Florida, http://my.clevelandclinic.org/florida Jackson Health System (Public Health Trust), http://www.jhsmiami.org Leon Medical Centers, http://leonmedicalcenters.com Memorial Healthcare System http://www.mhs.net Mercy Hospital, http://www.mercymiami.com Michael S. Gordon Center for Research in Medical Education, http://www.gcrme.med.miami.edu Miami Children’s Hospital, http://www.mch.com Mount Sinai Medical Center, http://www.msmc.com South Florida Evaluation and Treatment Center, https://www.facebook.com/pages/South-FloridaEvaluation-and-Treatment-Center/117130165014138

Liability Coverage Students enrolled in HWCOM are covered by the FIU self-insurance program only when participating in approved activities of HWCOM. The State University System of Florida Board of Governors SelfInsurance website (http://www.flbog.sip.ufl.edu) features liability insurance information about the six allopathic academic medical centers in the state of FL: FIU, FAU, FSU, UCF, UF, and USF. The site also provides several free online continuing medical education (CME) programs designed to address current risk management issues facing health care providers today.

III-6

Section III: Academic Affairs and Clinical Affairs


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Academic Advising HWCOM is committed to helping students achieve their academic and personal goals through quality academic advising. HWCOM uses a holistic approach to the student’s development, providing students current information, guidance, and access to a network of resources to obtain maximum benefits from their educational experience. Advising occurs as part of the functions of the Office of Academic Affairs and the Office of Student Affairs, but there are differences in the roles of these two offices. The Office of Academic Affairs monitors the academic progress of all students. The Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, the Associate Dean for Curriculum and Medical Education, and students’ assigned Academic Advisors in this office have access to all information regarding academic performance. Beginning in Period 1, students are assigned to an Academic Advisor and must meet with that advisor at least once per academic period to review academic performance and progress toward academic goals. These meetings are mandatory for all students; students can request additional meetings at any time. The primary purpose for systematic academic advising is to guide students academic development and career development, particularly in selecting post-graduate opportunities. Academic Advisors also meet with students who are referred by a course director for poor performance in a course. Advisors subsequently monitor remediation and progress. Academic Advisors have in-depth knowledge of the curriculum and support services available to HWCOM students, such as tutoring and personal counseling, and are thus able to make appropriate referrals. In addition, advisors are primarily responsible for counseling about career choices in relation to academic performance and in assisting with students’ choice of subinternships, electives, and selective rotations for the fourth period. Academic Advisors also assist the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in preparing the Medical Student Performance Evaluations, or “dean’s letter,” which is the final summative letter of students’ medical school performance and which accompanies residency applications. This academic advising system is under the aegis of the Associate Dean for Academic Advising, who reports to the Associate Dean for Curriculum and Medical Education and the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs. The Office of Student Affairs offers advising by individuals who have no role in making promotion or evaluation decisions. The Executive Associate Dean, Associate Dean, Assistant Deans, and directors in the Office of Student Affairs are available to provide advice and advocacy for students. Mentors in a variety of medical specialties are available to interested students through a formal mentoring program run by the Office of Student Affairs. The HWCOM Counseling and Wellness Center, a department within Office of Student Affairs, offers professional counseling and support on academic, career, psychological, and health-related issues. The HWCOM Counseling and Wellness Center is located in an office suite on the third floor of the FIU Green Library, allowing medical students to seek counseling or wellness services in a professional setting that offers privacy and confidentiality.

Tutoring The Tutoring Program is designed to provide an additional level of academic support to students seeking academic assistance supplementing the classroom environment. Tutoring is provided by both faculty and advanced students (M2, M3, and M4), providing an opportunity for advanced medical students who have performed well in specific courses to serve as tutors for their peers. These students are afforded this opportunity as a way to reinforce their own knowledge and critical thinking skills while simultaneously helping their peers to succeed in the curriculum. Students may request tutoring assistance at any time and are encouraged to do so at the earliest indication of difficulty in a course. The primary goal of tutoring services is for all students to be successful in course work as they progress through the curriculum. Students experiencing academic difficulty based on poor

Section III: Academic Affairs and Clinical Affairs

III-7


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 course performance may be required to attend formal tutoring sessions as part of their remediation agreement. Students may be referred for tutoring by the Office of Academic Affairs, a Course Director, the Medical Student Evaluations and Promotion Committee (MSEPC), or their Academic Advisors. Students may also request tutoring services on their own. Tutoring assignments and schedules are arranged by the Tutoring Program Director. More advanced (M2, M3, or M4) students are eligible to be selected as tutors, and receive formal training and financial compensation. The tutor serves as a facilitator of the learning process, filling content gaps as needed, assessing and modifying the tutee’s reasoning and problem-solving skills. Tutors will create a personalized tutoring plan to specifically address an individual student’s needs. No charges are assessed to the student to receive tutoring by either students or faculty. Students may, on their own and independent of the Office of Student Affairs or Office of Medical Education, contact faculty, graduate students, and other medical students for informal tutoring services should they desire; however, the cost of such independent tutoring is at the student’s own expense.

III-8

Section III: Academic Affairs and Clinical Affairs


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

A. Matriculation Policies Once applicants accept the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine’s offer to enroll and matriculate, they will receive a welcome notification from the Office of Student Affairs accompanied by a packet of information, a “Pre-Orientation Checklist” and several types of forms that need to be submitted at least 4 weeks prior to the first day of Orientation. The information packet includes the following prematriculation health forms:    

Medical History and Physical Examination Form Immunization Documentation Form Health Insurance Verification Form Health and Safety Agreement

The Health Insurance Verification Form must be completed annually. All of the forms may be downloaded at http://medicine.fiu.edu/education/md/student-support-services/forms/index.html.

A-1. Medical History and Physical Examination As a prematriculation requirement, all admitted students to HWCOM are required to see a licensed physician of their choice for a medical history and physical examination prior to the first day of Orientation. In addition, they must receive all required immunizations and antibody titers (see the HWCOM Immunization Policy). Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine is working directly with American DataBank, a professional online screening service, to facilitate the process whereby our newly admitted students can download the required health forms and submit scanned documents to comply with the prematriculation requirements pertaining to immunizations, medical history and examination forms, health insurance documentation, and drug testing. Students access the American DataBank website at http://www.fiumedicinescreening.com to sign up for a personal account. Once established, students must then upload all of the prematriculation health forms, as instructed in the welcome notification. After processing, American DataBank will notify the Office of Student Affairs concerning the student’s compliance with the prematriculation requirements. Students who fail to complete and submit these forms prior to Orientation will receive a hold on their registration until all documents have been submitted and processed. Students who fail to document immunity as outlined in the Immunization Documentation Form or fail to have a recent physical examination and TB screening test will not be able to participate in clinical care activities until all forms are completed and cleared by American DataBank.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-1


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

A-2. Immunization Policy HWCOM is committed to protecting the health and well-being of all students, faculty, staff, patients, and the public. Pre-entrance and periodic health screening evaluations for all students enrolled at HWCOM are required in order to detect and prevent communicable diseases that may be a threat to others. All medical students are required to show written proof of appropriate immunity, either by receiving the appropriate vaccinations or by providing evidence of positive blood antibody titers. Students are informed about the immunization requirements several months prior to Orientation and are asked to see their personal physician to receive the vaccines or blood antibody titer tests prior to arrival at HWCOM. A completed Immunization Documentation Form must be submitted prior to enrollment. A physical examination, including tuberculosis (TB) skin testing, also must be performed by the student’s choice of physician within 1 year prior to starting classes. To assist students in this process, a Pre-Orientation Checklist outlining the necessary requirements and deadlines is sent to all admitted students, and sufficient time is provided for students to comply with all Orientation requirements. Immunizations must be maintained up-to-date throughout the 4-year educational program. Annual TB testing is required. HWCOM developed its policy and immunization guidelines based on the guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and regulations issued by the Florida State Board of Governors that apply to all undergraduate, graduate, and professional students attending any public university in the state of Florida. i.

Immunization Requirements

Measles, mumps, and rubella. State of Florida prematriculation immunization requirements include documentation of measles, mumps, and rubella immunity for all students prior to registration for classes. As a prerequisite to matriculation or registration, the State University System of Florida requires all students born after 1956 to present documented proof of immunity to measles and rubella. Consistent with Department of Health guidelines, acceptable proof of immunity constitutes:  

Documentation of immunization (month/day/year) with two doses of measles virus vaccine (the first dose given on or after the first birthday and in 1969 or later; the second dose must be given at least 28 days after the first dose). Copies of measles, mumps, and/or rubella blood antibody titers verifying immunity.

Tetanus/Diphtheria immunization. Based on the guidelines published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), matriculating students who have not had a tetanus booster within the past 2 years should receive the tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) vaccine, which protects against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (whooping cough).  

A single dose of Tdap must be given for adults aged 19 through 64 years who have not received a dose of Tdap previously. Afterwards, adults should receive a tetanus/diphtheria (Td) booster every 10 years.

Hepatitis B immunization series. Students must show documented proof of vaccination and immunity to Hepatitis B, as described below:   

IV-2

A total of three doses of hepatitis B vaccine and a positive hepatitis B serum surface antibody titer (IgG). Proof of receiving at least the first dose of hepatitis B vaccine is required prior to the first day of classes. A positive hepatitis B surface antibody titer is required (copy of the lab report that indicates immunity is required).

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013    

If the hepatitis B surface antibody titer is negative, a second series of hepatitis B vaccinations must be given and the antibody titer repeated. Immunizations can be received at the FIU University Health Services Center at a nominal cost to the student. Students also may receive immunizations at their private physician’s office or at an ambulatory care clinic. Proof of the completion of the hepatitis B immunization series is required prior to clearance for direct patient contact. Students who continue to have negative hepatitis B surface antibody titers will receive individual counseling on how best to protect themselves and prevent hepatitis B infection and special procedures to follow after a needlestick injury.

Chickenpox (varicella). Proof of positive (immune) varicella antibody titer or receipt of two doses of the varicella vaccine 4 to 8 weeks apart. In the absence of proof of either immunization or immunity, students can be immunized by FIU University Health Services at a nominal cost to the student. Influenza. Students are required to receive the seasonal flu vaccine annually. Purified Protein Derivative (PPD) Screening for Tuberculosis (TB). Students are required to receive an appropriate TB skin test (TST) within 2 months prior to Orientation; this can be part of their required physical examination. a. HWCOM follows CDC guidelines, which state “for baseline testing, a two-step procedure for persons without a PPD test in the past 12 months can be used to minimize the likelihood of confusing reactivity from an old infection (boosting) with reactivity from a recent infection (conversion).” Therefore, unless a student has proof of having a current two-step PPD test (defined as at least two intracutaneous Mantoux tests, given a minimum of 1 to 3 weeks apart, within the previous 12 months) or history of a positive PPD at the time of matriculation, he/she is required to have the two-step test completed prior to the first clinical experience. If the student has had at least one PPD in the past 12 months, one test prior to matriculation will be sufficient to meet the two-step test requirement. b. TB skin testing is required prior to Orientation and annually thereafter. c. TB skin testing guidelines include the following: o Positive PPD reactors are required to be assessed annually by a health care provider, have a chest x-ray that reveals no acute cardiopulmonary process, and/or complete a symptom screening form annually thereafter. o A chest x-ray is mandatory for new and previous positive reactors; if positive, the student must document proof of receiving appropriate treatment. o Students who received Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) more than 18 months ago are still required to have a TB skin test. Decisions will be made on an individual basis as to the ability of a student on active TB treatment to pursue coursework and/or clinical rotations, based on the recommendations. All immunization forms must carry the original signature of a physician or a licensed medical practitioner and the license number or office stamp with address. Medical students may be required to have additional vaccines, scheduled or random drug testing, and/or other medical tests prior to starting classes and/or clinical clerkships, as required by HWCOM and all affiliated clinical educational sites. Additional periodic evaluations or tests may be required as indicated, or if exposure to an infectious patient or pathogen occurs.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-3


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 ii.

Monitoring for Immunization Compliance

All students are required to register for a personal and confidential website from American DataBank (http://www.fiumedicinescreening.com). Students scan or upload their health history, physical examination, and immunization forms directly to their personal American DataBank website. The HWCOM Office of Student Affairs staff conducts regular meetings with the American DataBank staff to discuss specific requirements for each vaccine, titer, PPD, health insurance, health and safety agreements. American DataBank provides the initial screening and will notify the HWCOM Office of Student Affairs regarding medical questions and, ultimately, indicate student compliance or itemize any deficiencies prior to Orientation. Students are notified via e-mail by both the Offices of Student Affairs and American DataBank if they do not meet the minimum immunization and health compliance requirements. For students who still lack complete compliance at the time of Orientation, University Health Services will provide services such as vaccines, titers, TB screening, and/or physical examinations during Orientation week for a nominal fee. Students who fail to prove compliance with immunization requirements are not eligible to attend clinical rotations until all requirements are met. Exception to this policy may be granted in the event of valid medical contraindications, for religious reasons, or if the student is in the process of receiving the complete vaccine series (e.g., hepatitis B, varicella). In the event of a local measles or varicella epidemic, the exempted students are excluded from university group activities, including classes and patient care, until such time as specified by the Miami-Dade County Public Health Director. Staff members of the HWCOM Office of Student Affairs have regular meetings with American DataBank staff to discuss specific requirements for each vaccine, titer, PPD, health insurance, health and safety agreements. American DataBank provides the initial document screening by checking for completeness and compliance and notifies the dedicated nurse (“compliance nurse”) at the FIU Faculty Group Practice when a student’s medical reports (e.g., antibody titers, chest X-ray reports, etc.) need review. Students who are not in compliance by the established deadline date are sent e-mail reminders by American DataBank and/or the compliance nurse. Students who still lack complete prematriculation compliance at the time of Orientation will be required to receive any incomplete vaccines, titers, TB screening, and/or physical examinations during Orientation week, as medically appropriate, before they will be able to register for classes. Once all documents have been uploaded and medical documents have been ruled compliant by the compliance nurse, the information is sent to the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs (Counseling and Communities) who notifies the Associate Dean for Clinical Medical Education and writes the compliance attestation letters for each of the affiliate clinical sites. iii.

Unable to complete an immunization?

In the event that the student is unable to complete an immunization, series of immunizations, or screenings as required for any medical or non-medical reason, the student will be required to sign a formal declination acknowledging the risks and provide a physician’s note documenting the medical exemption. The signed formal declination also states that should a local outbreak occur of the infectious disease to which a student is not immune, the student will not be permitted to participate in any clinical care activity until the epidemic is cleared by the Miami-Dade Department of Health.

IV-4

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

A-3. Health Insurance HWCOM students are required to possess current and adequate medical insurance to cover emergencies and common medical problems that might occur during their educational training period and are outside of the scope of services provided on campus (e.g., specialty care, diagnostic testing, hospitalization). Health insurance is available through the group student health insurance plan endorsed by FIU. The current insurance broker for all student insurance policies at FIU is Collegiate Risk Management. They have negotiated with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida to provide a relatively low-premium group Preferred Provider Organization (PPO) policy that meets the minimum benefits requirements for FIU students. This policy covers most services offered by standard medical insurance policies, including prescription drugs, emergency room expenses, laboratory testing, and dental care with a deductible and copay. The policy also covers pre-existing conditions and provides coverage for the diagnosis and treatment of accidental exposure bloodborne pathogens (e.g., needlestick injury). The cost of medical insurance is borne by the student; fees vary according to the plan selected. Students may elect additional coverage for spouses and dependent children, as applicable. Information pertaining to the insurance plan may be obtained at http://www.collegiaterisk.com/Students/FIU/fiu.html. Students may enroll and pay premiums online annually or in two equal installments due with tuition payments in August and January. Annual coverage for all students begins on the first day of Orientation and ends 365 days later. Alternatively, students may satisfy the medical insurance requirement with documentation of a valid medical insurance plan already in effect that meets the basic minimal standards as described below. The determination of whether alternative insurance policies meet the minimum standards is made by the Office of Student Affairs in consultation with the FIU Faculty Group Practice. Medical Student Health Insurance: Basic Minimum Benefits Requirements Coverage Period: Coverage must include the entire academic year, including annual breaks, regardless of the student’s terms of enrollment. The policy must provide continuous coverage for the entire period the insured is enrolled as a medical student and must be renewable. The policy must provide in-network and out-of-network coverage for physician, hospital, diagnostic, and therapeutic coverage in local facilities for both emergency and nonemergency outpatient and inpatient services in the local South Florida area (Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, and/or Monroe counties). Policy must not unreasonably exclude coverage for perils inherent in the student’s program of study such as coverage for needle stick injuries and charges related to the post-exposure diagnosis and treatment of blood-borne pathogens. Policy must also cover outpatient and inpatient mental health care, prescription drugs, and ambulance services. Students traveling to foreign countries need to have evacuation and repatriation coverage.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-5


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

A-4. Disability Insurance All HWCOM students are required to enroll in a disability insurance plan to cover injuries that might result in chronic disability during their educational training period. Students are responsible for payment and are informed about this requirement and annual fee prior to Orientation. Disability premiums are collected during Orientation week by the Office of Student Affairs and submitted to the HWCOM Department of Finance for subsequent payment to the insurance broker on behalf of all covered medical students. Disability insurance must be renewed annually in August throughout a student’s medical school enrollment.

A-5. Criminal Background Checks Upon acceptance to HWCOM and before the first day of Orientation, all students must pass a criminal background check conducted by a service selected by the Association of American Medical Colleges. Findings in background checks may affect the student’s admission as well as a student’s ability to participate in clinical experiences and complete the program, and/or obtain a medical license. During the student’s tenure at HWCOM, if a student is arrested, charged or convicted of a felony or misdemeanor, he or she must disclose such an event to the Executive Associate Dean of Student Affairs. Background checks also are performed by the state on application for licensure. Failure to disclose this information can result in a required appearance before the Board of Medicine and a significant delay (or possible denial) of a medical license. Background checks are required prior to starting Period 3 clinical clerkships and Period 4 selectives and electives.

IV-6

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

B. Medical Student Assessment Process Summary Medical student performance is assessed based upon both grades awarded to medical students and demonstrated professionalism. Both are described in this Medical Student Handbook. The Medical Student Evaluation and Promotion Committee (MSEPC) is the committee tasked with evaluating both aspects of each medical student’s performance. This evaluation occurs in two ways. First, any time a student fails to pass one or more classes or violates standards of professionalism as set forth herein, MSEPC may evaluate such student’s performance regardless of when the event(s) triggering review occurs. Second, at the end of each period, MSEPC evaluates each medical student’s grades and professionalism and makes a recommendation regarding advancement to the next period or graduation, as applicable. MSEPC considers each medical student’s overall performance in the evaluation; including prior disciplinary actions and/or remediation. MSEPC is cognizant of the work of the Honor Council, which is charged specifically with evaluating first violations of the Honor Code as provided herein. MSEPC and the Honor Council are charged with providing students due process, as provided herein, prior to taking action that may be adverse to a student’s academic standing. An appeals process is established in this Medical Student Handbook to allow appeals from adverse recommendations when there are sufficient grounds as more specifically provided herein. Separate from the processes described above, medical students have the ability to bring grievances against faculty or staff members to the Grievance Committee as provided in this Medical Student Handbook. Petition to the Grievance Committee is not, however, available to students who are under review by the Honor Council or the MSEPC. This summary is not intended to fully describe the processes set forth below. In the event of a conflict between this summary and the specific provisions set forth herein, the specific provisions shall control.

B-1. Professionalism Medical students are required to abide by the Medical Student Honor Code, the Medical Student Standards of Conduct, the FIU Student Code of Standards and Conduct as described in the FIU Student Handbook, the applicable policies and procedures of FIU, including the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, and the policies and procedures of institutions with which HWCOM has affiliation agreements. A violation by a medical student of the Medical Student Honor Code or the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Student Standards of Conduct will be processed by the Honor Council and/or the MSEPC as provided in this Medical Student Handbook. A violation by a medical student of the FIU Student Code of Standards and Conduct will be processed by the Director for Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution in accordance with the procedures outlined in the FIU Student Handbook upon referral. The FIU Student Handbook can be found at http://www.fiu.edu/student.htm. The Honor Council is responsible for adjudicating most first time violations of the Honor Code. The MSEPC is responsible for evaluating each student’s academic performance and professionalism; all facets of a student’s performance will be considered when a student is evaluated by MSEPC. 1. Professional Dress Guidelines As representatives of the medical profession, all medical students at Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine are expected to convey a professional demeanor, not only in their behavior but also in their dress and appearance. A professional image conveys credibility, trust, respect, and confidence to one’s colleagues and patients. In all educational settings—classroom, laboratory, clinical environment— students are expected to be clean, well groomed, and dressed in a manner appropriate to their responsibilities. The following dress code outlines expectations concerning appropriate dress and personal appearance:

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-7


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 Classroom and laboratory settings:    

Students are permitted to wear casual clothing, including casual pants/shorts, jeans, scrubs, and T-shirts, provided they are clean, neat, in good repair, and do not contain any offensive language or pictures. Sandals are acceptable in FIU HWCOM classrooms, medical student lounges or study spaces, and the medical student library only; beach-type shoes (such as thongs or flip-flops) and bedroom slippers are not appropriate. Students must maintain an optimum level of personal hygiene. In laboratory settings, students should follow the general standards listed above, but are required to wear closed-toe shoes. Specific requirements are listed in course syllabi.

Clinical care settings:   

    

Recommended acceptable attire includes: collared shirts, ties, slacks, skirts, blouses, sweaters, and dresses. Clothing should be professionally styled and fit well (not excessively tight or loose). Shoes must be comfortable, clean, in good repair and appropriate to the job and duties (closed, hard-soled shoes with socks; no tennis shoes/sneakers, high heels, or sandals). A white coat with the FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine embroidered logo and a name badge are required. While wearing a white coat in the clinical setting, medical students also are expected to identify themselves as students at all times and must assume responsibility to clarify their role to patients. Scrubs are to be worn in compliance with the policies of the institution in which the medical student is assigned for patient care rotations. Scrubs may be worn in specific patient care areas as appropriate to the clinical activity and are especially practical for night call. Typically, they should not be worn in public places outside of the clinical care facility. If a scrub suit must be worn outside of the designated clinical areas, it should be covered with a white lab coat. Scrubs should not be taken home without prior written authorization from the providing institution. Hair covers, masks, shoe covers, and gowns should be removed before leaving the designated clinical areas and should not be worn while in the outpatient clinics or when making rounds on the inpatient services. Jewelry (e.g., necklaces, rings, earrings, bracelets) and other fashion accessories should not interfere with assigned duties nor pose risk to the wearer or patient. Students must maintain an optimum level of personal hygiene. Fragrances should be avoided. No artificial nails are permitted. Students should not chew gum. Specific clerkship guidelines may supersede the above general standards.

Home visits:  

IV-8

Students should comply with the dress code standards set for clinical care settings, except students should NOT wear white coats or badges when making home visits, as described in the course syllabus. In general, the dress should be casual professional attire that fits in with community standards and does not draw attention to the student.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 Inappropriate Attire: In environments that include contact with patients, the following are NOT appropriate for the workplace: 

  

   

Jeans, shorts, leggings, overalls, sweat pants and sweat shirts or other work-out wear, halter or tank tops, non-collared tee shirts, translucent tops, tops with plunging necklines, or tops that leave the midriff or back exposed, clothing that exposes undergarments, clothing not in good condition (e.g., have holes, ragged hems, or patches). Sandals or open-toe shoes, bedroom slippers, or flip-flops. Caps, hats, bandanas (unless worn for medical or religious reasons or for nature of specific duties such as outdoor work) Tattoos and body art with wording or images that may be perceived as offensive should be covered during the time of professional contact with patients and families. Examples of such offensive art or images include racial slurs, swear words, symbols of death, or inappropriate revealing of body parts in a way that could be perceived as inappropriate. Body or facial piercings other than ears and those required by a student’s religious or cultural beliefs. Shirts or other apparel with images, wording, or logos that may be perceived as offensive to patients, families, or others. Sunglasses when indoors. Any attire that could be perceived as sexually provocative.

2. Attributes of Professional Behavior HWCOM has created systematic formal evaluations of professional behavior that are used in courses. These serve as formative evaluations on a continuing basis for students, advisors, and faculty to guide development of professional behavior. In addition, the cumulative record of these assessments is used as a summative evaluation at promotional stages in the HWCOM Doctor of Medicine degree curriculum. The attributes expected of a student are:           

Accountability: Student demonstrates an obligation or willingness to accept responsibility. Altruism: Student demonstrates unselfish regard for the welfare of others. Boundaries: Student demonstrates appropriate boundaries in interactions with faculty, staff, patients, and peers. Communication: Student presents verbal information accurately; student’s written communication reflects appropriate spelling, grammar, punctuation, syntax, style. Compassion: Student demonstrates compassionate treatment of patients and respect for their privacy and dignity. Confidentiality: Student maintains appropriate privacy of patient information. Critical thinking: Student demonstrates the ability to exercise careful judgment. Cultural competence: Student demonstrates knowledge of cultural, social, gender, and economic factors in health. Duty: Student fulfills obligations. Empathy: Student demonstrates the capacity to share another being’s emotions and feelings. Ethics: Student demonstrates knowledge of the theories and principles that govern ethical decision making, and of the major ethical dilemmas in medicine, particularly those that arise at the beginning and end of life and those that arise from the rapid expansion of knowledge of genetics. Excellence: Student demonstrates a commitment to quality.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-9


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013      

Honesty and integrity: Student demonstrates honesty and integrity in all interactions with patients, families, colleagues, and others with whom physicians must interact in their professional lives. Inquisitive: Student demonstrates a desire to ask questions and investigate. Reflective: Student uses constructive feedback effectively and is able to reflect constructively. Respect: Student demonstrates proper regard toward faculty, staff, patients, and peers. Sensitivity: Student demonstrates a keen awareness of others’ needs. Teamwork/collaboration: Student works effectively with others.

B-2. Medical Student Standards of Conduct Medical students must adhere to the principles of conduct and ethics as established by the FIU Student Standards of Conduct as described in the FIU Student Handbook, in addition to the following principles from the American Medical Association’s Principles of Medical Ethics, which are described as “standards of conduct that define the essentials of honorable behavior for the physician.”

B-3. AMA Principles of Medical Ethics     

   

A physician shall be dedicated to providing competent medical care, with compassion and respect for human dignity and rights. A physician shall uphold the standards of professionalism, be honest in all professional interactions, and strive to report physicians deficient in character or competence, or engaging in fraud or deception, to appropriate entities. A physician shall respect the law and also recognize a responsibility to seek changes in those requirements which are contrary to the best interests of the patient. A physician shall respect the rights of patients, colleagues, and other health professionals, and shall safeguard patient confidences and privacy within the constraints of the law. A physician shall continue to study, apply, and advance scientific knowledge, maintain a commitment to medical education, make relevant information available to patients, colleagues, and the public, obtain consultation, and use the talents of other health professionals when indicated. A physician shall, in the provision of appropriate patient care, except in emergencies, be free to choose whom to serve, with whom to associate, and the environment in which to provide medical care. A physician shall recognize a responsibility to participate in activities contributing to the improvement of the community and the betterment of public health. A physician shall, while caring for a patient, regard responsibility to the patient as paramount. A physician shall support access to medical care for all people.

Adopted June 1957; revised June 1980; revised June 2001. The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Policies Governing Professionalism of medical students shall abide by both the HWCOM and FIU policies and standards of conduct, published in this Medical Student Handbook located at http://medicine.fiu.edu/education/md/student-support-services/handbook/index.html and the FIU Student Handbook at http://www.fiu.edu/student.htm.

IV-10

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

B-4. Honor Code, the Honor Council, and Due Process Policies 1. Policy Statement The health care professions require men and women of superb character who lead lives that exemplify high standards of ethical conduct. A shared commitment to maintaining those standards, embodied in an Honor Code, creates an atmosphere in which medical students can develop professional skills and strengthen ethical principles. The Honor Code requires that medical students live honestly, advance on individual merit, and demonstrate respect for others in the academic, clinical and research communities. The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine shall have exclusive jurisdiction over matters of academic misconduct and violations of the medical student Honor Code as described in this section. The central purpose of the Honor Code is to sustain and protect an environment of mutual respect and trust in which medical students have the freedom necessary to develop their intellectual and personal potential. To support the community of trust, students and faculty must accept individual responsibility and apply themselves to developing a collegial atmosphere. The intent of the Honor Code is not merely to prevent students from lying, cheating and stealing or to punish those who violate its principles. Rather, participation in the Honor Code assures the Florida International University community that the integrity of its members is unquestioned and accepted by those in the academic, clinical and research communities. Participation in the Honor Code confers upon students the responsibility to respect and protect the integrity of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine. The foundation of the Honor Code is the willingness of each individual to live up to the standards established by the student body and faculty. Violation of the Honor Code affronts us individually and collectively as the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine regards such violations as serious offenses. In addition, the Honor Code requires the absolute honesty of each individual. When meticulously observed, the Honor Code allows medical students to live with the freedom of knowing that:   

Their personal property and academic work are respected and free from theft Classroom, clinical and research environments for learning and evaluation are honorable The learning environment is designed to be safe and equitable regardless of the student’s gender, race, national origin, religion, disability, or sexual orientation.

Students and faculty together establish, maintain and protect trust in these beliefs. 2. Application of the Honor Code The Honor Code applies to all work submitted for academic credit. Violations of the Honor Code reflect on the professionalism of a student. Any infraction of the Honor Code confirmed by the Honor Council will be subsequently referred to the MSEPC i) for further action as provided in the provisions of this Medical Student Handbook; and ii) for the overall evaluation of a student’s professionalism in accordance with the provisions of this Medical Student Handbook. Infractions of the Honor Code include but are not limited to: a. Cheating A medical student who does not do his or her own work on an academic exercise or otherwise gains unfair advantage over his or her colleagues is guilty of cheating. Examples of cheating are:    

Copying from another student’s examination or other class work Allowing any student to copy from another student’s examination or other class work Unauthorized collaboration during an examination with any person Using unauthorized materials or technology during a test

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-11


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013  

Preparing notes to take into a closed-book examination, for example, writing on one’s hand or desk Presenting the work of another person as your own

b. Plagiarism The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine recognizes plagiarism as “the act of appropriating the literary composition of another, or parts or passages of his or her writings, or the ideas or language of the same, and passing them off as the product of one’s own mind.” (Webster’s New Collegiate Dictionary). There are two distinct categories of plagiarism: conscious and unintentional. Both are violations of the Honor Code. In unintentional plagiarism students do not understand the process of crediting sources consulted in the writing of a paper and may inadvertently find themselves subject to Honor Council investigation. To avoid such unintentional plagiarism, students must familiarize themselves with the appropriate documentation of resources. Students should also consult faculty for assistance should there be any doubt about what constitutes plagiarism. Any student helping another to plagiarize may be found to have violated the Honor Code. In intentional plagiarism the student is fully cognizant of his/her actions. c. Fabrication When a medical student consciously manufactures or manipulates information to support an academic exercise, he or she has fabricated evidence. Some examples are:     

Falsifying citations Manufacturing data to support research Taking an examination or writing a paper on behalf of another student Listing sources in the bibliography that were not used in the academic exercise Falsifying information in patients’ charts

d. False Accusations False accusations of another’s violation of the Honor Code made in bad faith may constitute Honor Code violations and subject the accuser to penalty. e. Misrepresentation Intentionally lying to a member of the faculty, staff, administration, or an outside agency to gain academic advantage for oneself or another, or to misrepresent or in other ways interfere with the investigation of a charge of academic misconduct. f.

Misuse of Computer Services

The unauthorized use of any computer, computer resource or computer project number, or the alteration or destruction of computerized information or files or unauthorized appropriation of another’s program(s). g. Bribery The offering of money or any item or service to a member of the faculty, staff, administration, or third party in order to commit academic misconduct. h. Conspiracy and Collusion The planning or acting with one or more fellow students, or any other person to commit any form of academic misconduct together.

IV-12

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 i.

Falsification of Records

The tampering with, or altering in any way any academic record used or maintained by the College or the University or by the student for presentation to any University faculty or staff. j.

Other Acts

Misrepresenting information to HWCOM officials (e.g., falsifying grades or forging HWCOM documents or records) violates the Honor Code. k. Failure to Report Observed Violations A medical student who observes one or more of the above violations must report such to the Honor Council. Failure to do so constitutes itself a violation of the Honor Code. l.

Unprofessional Conduct

Unprofessional behavior in the educational or professional environment that could not pose the threat of harm to self or others. 3. Student Participation The Honor Code is designed to protect students’ academic freedom and professional integrity. For this to happen, all students must support the code by fulfilling specific obligations. Students must:     

Not condone cheating on the part of others; Refuse to assist others in acts which may violate the Honor Code; Take steps to ensure that other students cannot cheat from one’s examination or paper; Ask the professor for clarification if the student does not understand how the Honor Code pertains to any given assignment; and Accept the obligation to speak to fellow students about violations of the Honor Code, and to report suspected violations to the Honor Council.

To provide assistance to students in this endeavor, faculty and administrators should:    

Explain how the Honor Code applies to coursework undertaken for each class; Discuss how the Honor Code applies to coursework and behavior during the clinical years; Include a statement about academic integrity in each course syllabus; and Contact the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs (see below) regarding suspected infractions of the Honor Code

4. Composition and Selection of the Honor Council Adoption of the Honor Code necessitates the creation of an Honor Council, a group empowered to hear allegations of suspected violations of the Honor Code and recommend an appropriate course of action to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. The Honor Council is authorized to evaluate first time infractions of the Honor Code in accordance with this policy. Administration of the Honor Code requires the individual and collective cooperation of the entire medical school community — students, faculty, staff, and administration. The Honor Council will facilitate the administration of the Honor Code and act as liaison among the members of the medical school community regarding Honor Code issues. The Honor Council will hear first time violations and recommend an appropriate course of action to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and MSEPC.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-13


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 a. Composition  

The Honor Council will comprise both Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine faculty and students. There shall be two faculty members on the Honor Council, while the number of medical students shall increase with each new class until 12 students are appointed: For the inaugural matriculated class and each of two classes thereafter, three students will be selected by the Dean of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine to become members of the Honor Council until the Honor Council has 12 student members. The Dean shall also select two faculty members to become members of the Honor Council. Honor Council members may not simultaneously be members of the MSEPC. After the first three matriculated classes, each of the four medical student classes will elect three student representatives. The first-year medical student class will elect three representatives in September to serve during the first year of the Honor Council. Honor Council elections for all classes will be held annually in September. To be eligible to serve on the Honor Council, the medical student members must: o Be enrolled in Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine o Have upheld the principles stated in Honor Code o Have a history of good academic and conduct standing, must currently be in good academic and conduct standing, and must remain in good academic and conduct standing. Beginning with the fourth matriculated class, the two faculty members shall be elected by the Honor Council in consultation with the Deans in the Office of Student Affairs. Nominations for these positions will be presented during the first Honor Council meeting of the academic year. Nominations can be made by any member of the student body or faculty. The election of the faculty members will take place at the subsequent Honor Council meeting. The Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs or designee will be an ex-officio member on the Honor Council, without vote, entitled to attend all proceedings.

b. Term of Honor Council Membership The term of office for members representing the first, second, and third year classes of medical students will be from October 1st of that year to September 30th of the next. The term of office for those medical students representing the fourth year medical school class will be from October 1st until graduation. The term of student members of the Honor Council shall be 1 year, but may be renewed by re-election. The term of appointment for each faculty member is 3 years. Faculty members may be reappointed to the Honor Council for two consecutive terms. A faculty member who serves two terms may be reappointed after one year interregnum. During the inaugural year of the College, one faculty member will serve a 2-year term and one faculty member will serve a 3-year term. The Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs will determine which of the two elected faculty members for the inaugural Honor Council will serve only a 2-year term. Mid-term vacancies will be filled by appointment by the Dean of HWCOM. c. Honor Council Chair At the first meeting of the Honor Council, the members of the Honor Council will elect a Chair. Thereafter, the Chair will be elected during the final meeting of each academic period to serve during the following academic period. It shall be the Chair’s responsibility to manage the operation of the Honor Council, preside at the Honor Council hearings (“Honor Council Hearings”), make determinations on procedural matters, and preserve the orderly and effective functioning of the Hearing. It will be the Chair’s decision whether the attendance of the individual filing the complaint (“Complainant”) is mandatory. At the Chair’s discretion, either the student being charged or the individual making the allegation may present his or her case in writing. The Chair will also ensure that members of the Council remain on their fact-finding task and that both parties and/or witnesses

IV-14

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 do not become unduly repetitious or wander from relevancy in their testimony. The Chair will vote only to break a tie. d. Challenges Either the charged student or the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs has the right to challenge the impartiality of any Honor Council member and to ask the Chair to exclude the member from participating, stating in writing to the Chair the reasons for the request. A maximum of three challenges may be exercised during the pendency of a proceeding. It will be the Chair’s decision as to the validity of the challenge and whether to recuse the allegedly impartial Honor Council member from the proceedings. In the event that the Chair of the Honor Council’s impartiality is challenged, the Dean shall make the decision as to the validity of the challenge and whether to recuse the Chair from the proceedings. If the Chair is recused, the Dean shall appoint a Chair for the proceedings from the membership of the Honor Council. e. Notifications for MSEPC, Honor Council and Student Grievance Procedures All notifications to be given under MSEPC, Honor Council, and Student Grievance processes will be made by electronic delivery to the student’s officially designated university e-mail address, by handdelivery or to the affected individual’s last known address by any means evidencing delivery. 5. Complaint Procedures a. Filing Complaints Any medical student, faculty member, or staff member who is aware of a potential Honor Code violation must notify the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs by providing him or her a written description of the potential violation, including the names of the persons involved. The form for filing a complaint is located on the HWCOM website at http://medicine.fiu.edu/_assets/docs/honor-code-violation.pdf. If a person who is not employed by the university observes a student allegedly committing a violation of the Honor Code, and wishes to report the violation, he or she must first inform a HWCOM faculty member, chair, or dean who will notify the Executive Associate Dean of Academic Affairs in writing. The notice will include the names of the persons involved and a brief description of the alleged facts. No anonymous accusations will be accepted. b. Charged Student’s Academic Status During Honor Council Proceedings If a charged student is not referred to MSEPC by the Executive Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, his or her academic status will remain unchanged pending the outcome of (i) an informal resolution, (ii) an Administrative Disposition, or (iii) the Honor Council Hearing. Such student will not be allowed to register in the future until the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee is assured that the student is satisfactorily responding to the charges. If the charged student is satisfactorily responding to the charges, he or she will be allowed to register and his or her current academic status will remain unchanged, pending the final decision of the Honor Council proceedings. c. Preliminary Determination and Informal Resolution The Honor Council has the authority to consider the first confirmed violation of the Honor Code for a given student. i.

Review Complaint for Sufficiency. When incidents of alleged Honor Code violations are brought, the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee will review the written complaint and make an initial determination regarding whether the allegations, if true, would constitute a violation of the Honor Code. The Executive Associate Dean for Academic

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-15


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 Affairs may speak with the individual submitting the complaint to make this initial determination. If the complaint does not allege a violation of the Honor Code or any standard of professionalism, the complaint will be dismissed. If the allegations are sufficient to constitute a potential violation of the Honor Code or standard of professionalism, the allegations will be considered in accordance with the process outlined in this Medical Student Handbook. ii.

First Violation. The Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee will determine whether there are prior complaints have been filed against the charged student and resulted in a finding that the Honor Code was violated. If the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee so concludes, the current allegation will be referred directly to MSEPC for resolution. If the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee determines that the student has never been found to have violated the Honor Code, the complaint may be considered in accordance with this Honor Council process as the student’s first potential confirmed violation.

iii.

Second Violation or Egregious Unprofessional Behavior. If the charged student has a previous confirmed violation of the Honor Code or if the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee has determined that the alleged unprofessional behavior is deemed to be egregious and not appropriate for Honor Council consideration, the matter will be referred to MSEPC for consideration in accordance with the MSEPC process as set forth in this Medical Student Handbook.

iv.

Fact Finding Meeting with Student and Complainant. The Executive Associate Dean or his or her designee (who may be the individual filing the complaint) will meet with the charged student(s) in order i) to inform him/her/them of the allegation(s); ii) to provide the charged student(s) with any evidence supporting the allegations; and iii) to allow the charged student(s) to respond before referral for informal resolution (as described below) or before proceeding to an Honor Council Hearing (as described below); or before being referred to the Medical Student Evaluation and Promotion Committee (“MSEPC”) (as described below). The Executive Associate Dean or designee will provide a copy of the complaint to the charged student at least 3 days prior to the initial fact finding meeting. The Executive Associate Dean or designee will determine whether to enter into the informal resolution process; to proceed to an Honor Council Hearing; or to refer the matter to the MSEPC. In the event that the matter will be handled through the Honor Council process, the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee may arrange additional informal meetings with the Complainant and the charged student prior to referral to the Honor Council for an Honor Council Hearing. The purpose of this meeting(s) is to understand facts and circumstances of the alleged academic misconduct and to determine whether an informal resolution process resulting in an agreement of remedial measures is possible without involvement of the Honor Council. A limit of 21 calendar days exists from the date of the initial fact finding meeting to completion of informal resolution. A charged student may be referred for Honor Council Hearing before the Honor Council at any time during this 21-day period.

v.

IV-16

Informal Resolution. Should the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee determine that the matter may be resolved informally; the Complainant and the charged student must do so within 21 days from the date of the initial meeting with the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee and the charged student. This

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 resolution must be acceptable to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. The time frame for informal resolution may be extended with the prior consent of the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, the Complainant and the charged student. o

If an informal resolution is reached, both the charged student and the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs or designee will sign a Consent Agreement Form, which will be promptly filed in the student’s record in OSA, as well as conveyed to MSEPC. This form will set forth the terms and conditions of the agreement, including any sanctions agreed upon by the parties.

o

If an informal resolution is not reached or is deemed inappropriate by the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee, the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee may i) refer the charged student to the Honor Council for Honor Council Hearing or to the MSEPC or take no further action. This determination must be made no more than 5 business days after the expiration of time for informal resolution.

6. Formal Resolution When formal procedures are initiated for adjudication by the Honor Council, the Chair of the Honor Council will send the charged student with a copy of the filed complaint form and accompanying documents, if any. The charged student must deliver to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs a written response no later than 5 business days after receipt of the notice, indicating whether he or she chooses 

Not to dispute the facts of the charge and hence, request an Administrative Disposition (described below)

To dispute the facts and have his or her case resolved by an Honor Council Hearing (described below). The Administration Disposition or an Honor Council Hearing will be held within 30 calendar days following receipt of the charged student’s written response.

7. Administrative Disposition If the charged student indicates in writing that he or she will not dispute the facts of the charge and accepts responsibility for the specific charges of academic misconduct or unprofessional behavior, an Administrative Disposition meeting will be held between the student and an official designated by the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. During the Administrative Disposition meeting, the charged student and the designated official will meet to discuss any mitigating circumstances as relevant to the possible sanctions to be imposed. The Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designated official may ask the Complainant to be present at the meeting. The recommendation will be made in writing by the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or the designated official. If made by the designated official, the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will approve or amend the resolution. The determination of the Executive Associate Dean shall be delivered to the Dean for his or her consideration and action. The Dean shall approve or amend the recommendation. The charged student shall be advised of the Dean’s decision within 45 calendar days of receipt of the charged student’s election to enter into an Administrative Disposition. Upon request by the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, the charged student may agree to extend the time to finalize the Administrative Disposition.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-17


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 8. Notice of Honor Council Hearing Notice and Access to Records All hearing notices will be made in accordance with the notification provision set forth in this Medical Student Handbook. The charged student will be provided a minimum of five business days’ prior written notice that the Honor Council will be meeting with the charged student to consider a matter within its jurisdiction. Notification will be made to the student in writing and will state:   

A description of the matter under consideration; The time, date and place of the hearing; and A list of witnesses, if any.

9. Honor Council Hearing Procedure a. Information Gathering In the event that a matter is referred to the Honor Council for evaluation and recommendation, the Honor Council has the authority to gather information concerning the incident in order to assist with its deliberation and evaluation of the matter. The Honor Council may convene meetings to assist with preparation for the Honor Council Hearing. A student requesting a hearing before the Honor Council will be entitled to review the records the Honor Council is relying upon in rendering its recommendation. b. Confidentiality of Proceedings All meetings will be conducted in private and absolute confidentiality. Members of the Honor Council shall not discuss an allegation of a violation of the Honor Code except during meetings formally called for that purpose. Violation of confidentiality is in itself an Honor Code offense. During the meeting, the charged student will be formally advised of the information that forms the basis of the complaint and will have an opportunity to respond to the information presented. The Honor Council will allow witnesses to the incident to present information about the incident. If the charged student requests, other person(s) may appear before the Honor Council to speak on his or her behalf. The charged student may have an advisor present; however, that advisor may only advise the student and may not address the Honor Council member(s) directly or examine or cross-examine witnesses. Neither the student nor the Complainant has the right to be represented by an attorney, and no attorney shall be permitted to attend the meeting on the student’s or Complainant’s behalf. Any person invited to the Honor Council proceedings, by virtue of his or her presence, is required to maintain the confidentiality of the proceeding as described herein. The Honor Council reserves the right to hear the case in the absence of the charged student if he or she fails to appear or disrupts the proceedings. If present, the Complainant may remain. The Chair has the authority to exclude witnesses who provide redundant or duplicative information. Character witnesses shall not be permitted to testify at the Honor Council Hearing. If witnesses make presentations at the Honor Council Hearing, the student shall be entitled to pose relevant questions to such witnesses. The Honor Council will consider the information gathered and any additional information provided by the charged student, when making written findings of fact and recommendations based upon its assessment of the information presented at the meeting. c. Quorum and Voting A quorum is constituted by at least five voting members of the Honor Council, two of whom must be faculty members. A recommendation is adopted when approved by a simple majority of the members present.

IV-18

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 d. Record of Hearing Findings and recommendations of the Honor Council will serve as the official records of Honor Council Hearings and will be sent to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs within 10 business days from the conclusion of the Honor Council’s deliberation. e. Honor Council Recommendations The Honor Council will recommend an appropriate course of action to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. The recommendation of the Honor Council may be any of the following:

f.

i.

Charge is not substantiated. Advise the charged student that the charge of violation was not substantiated by the Honor Council and that a recommendation will be made that no violation will appear on the student’s record.

ii.

Charge is substantiated and the charged student will receive a reprimand. Advise the charged student that the Honor Council finds the charge to be substantiated and recommends that the student be reprimanded and be advised that any repeat violation will be referred directly to the MSEPC.

iii.

Charge is substantiated and requires further consideration by the MSEPC. Advise the student that the Honor Council finds the charge of such a nature that it requires a recommendation for immediate referral to the MSEPC for consideration and action.

Role of Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Actions and Student’s Right to Appeal i.

Executive Associate Dean Review and Notice to the Student. The Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will review the Honor Council’s findings and recommendations and will issue a written report to the charged student. This report will include the Honor Council report and the Executive Associate Dean’s recommendations. This will occur no more than 5 business days from the date that he or she received the written record of the Honor Council’s findings and recommendations. The Executive Associate Dean may uphold or amend the recommendation of the Honor Council.

ii.

Right to Appeal. Any charged student who wishes to appeal the recommendation of the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs may do so by filing a written request for appeal with the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs within 10 business days of receipt of the Executive Associate Dean’s determination. The Executive Associate Dean will forward the request for appeal to the Appeals Committee Chair in accordance with terms of this Medical Student Handbook.

iii.

Action in Absence of Appeal. If a charged student does not appeal the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affair’s recommendation, it shall be forwarded to the Dean for final determination. The Dean’s determination constitutes final agency action unless the matter is referred to the Provost as provided herein. The Dean’s determination will be sent to the charged student within 10 days of receipt of the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs’ recommendation.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-19


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 g. Grounds for Appeal The sole grounds for appeal are as follows: i.

ii.

iii.

Material failure to provide a student his/her due process rights, as set forth in this Medical Student Handbook, this failure adversely affecting the outcome of the Honor Council Hearing. Appeals based on this ground will be limited solely to a review of the record of the Honor Council Hearing. New information, not available at the time of the Honor Council Hearing and therefore not available to be presented. In addition, the student must show that the new information could have substantially affected the outcome of the Honor Council Hearing. The nature of the information must be described in full in the appeal letter, including an explanation regarding the reason the information could not have been presented at the Honor Council Hearing. For MSEPC recommendations alone, the severity of the sanction is clearly excessive in light of the nature of the offense and the totality of the student’s academic performance including indicia of professionalism.

Individuals submitting a charge of Honor Code violations may not appeal Honor Council decisions. This report will not include individually identifiable information about students. Records of the case shall be kept in secured storage. The MSEPC and the charged student will have access to his or her records. Records will be kept in accordance with the State of Florida and federal laws, rules and regulations, including records retention policy. The student’s record will contain a note of the offense, any penalty, and will include the following annotation: “action taken as the result of determined violation of the Honor Code.” 10. Patient Confidentiality Medical students are expected to respect the rights of patients, including the rights to privacy and confidentiality, and shall maintain the privacy and security of all patient records and information in accordance with University and College policies, the policies of the affiliated clinical hospitals and facilities, and state and federal law. As a member of the patient care team, medical students will have access to health information which is protected from disclosure under state and federal law (“protected health information”) including patient medical and/or demographic information. The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine and each HWCOM affiliated hospitals and clinics are subject to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (“HIPAA”) and have developed health information HIPAA privacy and security policies to prevent unnecessary and inappropriate disclosures of health information (http://www.hhs.gov). Medical students are required to abide by these HIPAA privacy and security policies and will receive education and training to understand the requirements of policies and law. In general, protected health information may not be discussed or disclosed to anyone, verbally, in writing, or electronically, unless this disclosure is necessary to perform the student’s duties and responsibilities. In particular, medical students may not review medical records or access electronically stored patient information unless such review is required in the performance of assigned duties. Medical students are responsible for maintaining the confidence of patients by sharing confidential information only with others who need to know and by handling any documentation of information in a manner that will maintain its confidentiality. Medical students are required to submit a signed confidentiality statement during their orientation process and on an annual basis thereafter. Medical students should note that the HIPAA privacy and security policies apply to all student-patient interactions, in formal curricular, extracurricular, or volunteer contexts.

IV-20

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 Inappropriate disclosure of protected health information is a serious matter that reflects adversely on a medical student’s professionalism and fitness to become a physician. The following basic rules are considered to be fundamental requirements for medical students at all clinical sites:   

Under no circumstances should any protected health information be accessed (read or copied)in the absence of a requirement for performance of duties. Health information obtained while providing clinical care duties may not be discussed with others unless a) such individuals are also involved in the treatment of that patient or b) it is necessary to fulfill educational objectives required of the student. Once confidential information is on paper and in a medical student’s hands, he/she is responsible for appropriate disposition: a) distribute to authorized persons only, b) file securely, or c) destroy.

B-5. Medical Student Evaluation and Promotion Process for Evaluation of Academic Performance and Professionalism The following describes the processes employed to evaluate medical student academic performance and professionalism. 1. Medical Student Evaluation and Promotion Committee a. Statement of Purpose: The purpose of the MSEPC is: i.

ii.

iii.

To ensure that each student who graduates from Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine possesses the skills and knowledge necessary to assume the responsibilities of a medical doctor; To evaluate academic performance in the required curriculum, to assess advancement to the next period (as this term is defined in this Medical Student Handbook), and to recommend appropriate intervention in the event of unacceptable academic performance; and To evaluate personal qualities which bear on a student’s professionalism and fitness to become a physician and recommend appropriate intervention. The MSEPC relies upon the cooperation, advice and judgment of faculty, students and administration to perform these duties.

b. Functions The MSEPC has two functions: i.

ii.

Ongoing Academic and Professional Assessment for Advancement and Graduation. The MSEPC evaluates the academic and professional progress that a student has made during each academic Period and recommends whether the student should advance to the next period and/or graduate. This function mandates that the MSEPC considers each student’s performance and considers all the information available regarding both the student’s academic performance as well as fitness to become a physician including, without limitation, behavioral conduct. In addition, the MSEPC may evaluate a student’s performance at any time based upon poor academic performance or unprofessional conduct. In the event that a student has been required to remediate three courses or twelve or more credits in any period, the MSEPC will convene to determine i) if the student may be allowed to repeat all or a subset of the courses for the academic period for which the courses were remediated, or ii) whether involuntary withdrawal from HWCOM is indicated as provided above. Assessment for a Specific Determination of Professional Fitness. The second function is to evaluate each student’s professionalism including, without limitation, alleged violations of

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-21


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 university and HWCOM policies and the policies of affiliated institutions and to recommend sanctions and interventions, if any. Medical students are required to abide by the Medical Student Honor Code, the Medical Student Standards of Conduct, and the FIU Student Code of Standards and Conduct set forth in the FIU Student Handbook, the applicable policies and procedures of FIU and the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, and the policies and procedures of institutions with which the HWCOM has affiliation agreements.  Authority Decisions on Promotion and Retention. MSEPC has the authority to recommend that a student repeat a course or academic period of study or recommend a student’s suspension or expulsion based upon its assessment of the student’s academic performance and/or professional fitness in accordance with the provision set forth herein. The MSEPC has the authority to gather information relevant to any matter before it.  Student Hearing Before MSEPC. The MSEPC has authority to require a student to appear before its committee. In the event that a student is referred to the MSEPC for poor academic performance or unprofessional behavior, the student is entitled to a hearing in accordance with the MSEPC hearing procedure set forth herein.  Appeals. In the event that the MSEPC makes an adverse recommendation based upon a student’s academic performance or professional fitness, it will be forwarded to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs who will consider, confirm or modify the recommendation. The affected student is entitled to appeal the determination to the Appeals Committee as provided herein. c. Composition and Selection of the Medical Student Evaluation and Promotion Committee MSEPC comprises both HWCOM faculty and students to ensure representation of all stakeholders. The MSEPC shall have eleven voting members. There shall be nine faculty members, one of whom will be the Chair appointed by the Dean, and two medical student members. The Chair must be a faculty member. The term of appointment for each faculty member is 3 years; each student member will serve for 1 year. The faculty members will be appointed by the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, subject to approval of the Dean. Faculty members may be reappointed to the MSEPC for two consecutive terms. A faculty member who serves two terms may be reappointed after 1 year has expired. Faculty members on the MSEPC shall not participate in any process which involves the evaluation of the findings and recommendation of MSEPC such as the Appeals Committee. During the HWCOM inaugural year with respect to matriculated students and for the 3 years thereafter, the student members will be appointed by the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, subject to approval of the Dean. Thereafter, the students will nominate and elect the student members to the MSEPC. The student members will include one student in the first 2 academic years and one student in the last 2 academic years. Students who serve on this Committee must have a history of good academic and conduct standing, and must be in good academic and conduct standing. Any student member who is not in good standing must be replaced. d. Advancement and Graduation i.

IV-22

MSEPC Consideration and Recommendation. At the end of each academic period, MSEPC will review the academic, professionalism, and conduct records of all matriculated medical students to determine whether the student will be promoted to the next academic period. Promotion is dependent upon satisfactorily completing all scheduled courses and clerkships as defined by the course directors and upon maintaining the degree of professionalism necessary to become a physician as determined by a review of the medical student’s entire

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 record. MSEPC will forward its recommendation for advancement and/or graduation for each student to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for review and approval. Students whose professionalism, behavior or poor academic performance is under review by MSEPC, the Honor Council, or another FIU hearing body, will not be forwarded to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for consideration unless the review is immaterial to the advancement and/or graduation determination. ii.

MSEPC Adverse Recommendations. In the event that the MSEPC makes an adverse recommendation regarding a student’s progress toward graduation, the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will review, confirm or amend the MSEPC recommendation, and notify the affected student within 5 business days from receipt of a written report from MSEPC. The student is entitled to appeal the determination to the Appeals Committee as provided herein.

iii.

Graduation. MSEPC will review the academic accomplishments and professionalism of each Period 4 student to determine whether all requirements for graduation from Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine have been met. MSEPC will forward to the Dean of the College the names of students who have met all requirements for graduation. The names of those students whose professionalism or poor academic performance is under review by MSEPC or the Honor Council will not be forwarded, provided such review is material to the evaluation of the student.

iv.

Executive Associate Dean Consideration and Recommendation. The Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will forward the advancement and/or graduation recommendations to the Dean of Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine for review and approval.

v.

Appeal from Recommendation of Executive Associate Dean. A student who is not recommended for advancement (or graduation for Period 4 students) by the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs has the right to appeal the recommendation to the Appeals Committee in accordance with the procedures set forth in this Medical Student Handbook.

vi.

Dean’s Determination. The Dean’s decision, upon receipt of the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs recommendation, as applicable, shall be final unless the student timely files an appeal with the Appeals Committee or the Provost, as applicable, in accordance with the procedures set forth in this Medical Student Handbook. In such event, the Dean’s determination shall not become final until the appellate process has concluded.

e. Student Review of Academic Performance and Opportunity to Appeal All students will be given an opportunity to review their performance in academic courses and clerkships. In the event that a student believes that a course grade or evaluation is inaccurate or unfounded, he or she has the opportunity to appeal said grade or evaluation to the Course Director using the Student Grievance process set forth in this Medical Student Handbook. This process is not available to students under review by the Honor Council or the MSEPC for incidents related to professionalism.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-23


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 f.

Notifications for MSEPC, Honor Council and Student Grievance Procedures

All notifications to be given under the MSEPC, Honor Council, and Student Grievance processes will be made by electronic delivery to the student’s officially designated university email address, by hand-delivery or to the affected individual’s last known address by any means evidencing delivery. 2. Hearing Process for MSEPC a. Notice of Hearing All hearing notices will be made in accordance with the notification provision set forth in this Medical Student Handbook. Students will be provided a minimum of 5 business days’ prior written notice of the MSEPC meeting with the student to consider a matter within its jurisdiction. The notice will state:    

A description of the matter under consideration; The time, date and place of the hearing; That the student will have the opportunity to review the documents that MSEPC is relying upon; and A list of witnesses, if any.

b. Hearing Procedure i.

Information Gathering. In the event that a matter is referred to the MSEPC for evaluation and recommendation, the MSEPC has the authority to gather information concerning the matter to assist with its deliberation and evaluation of the matter in the context of the student’s academic performance and overall professionalism. The MSEPC may convene meetings for any purpose including assisting with preparation for the MSEPC Hearing.

ii.

Meeting with Student and Confidentiality. All student meetings will be conducted in private. During the meeting with the student, he or she will be advised of the information that forms the basis of the inquiry or allegation; the student will then have an opportunity to respond to the information presented. The student may have an advisor present; however, that advisor may only advise the student and may not address the MSEPC member(s) directly or examine or cross-examine witnesses. The student does not have the right to be represented by an attorney, and no attorney shall be permitted to attend the meeting on the student’s behalf or in any other capacity. The MSEPC will allow witnesses to the incident to present pertinent information at the meeting with the student. The Chair has the authority to exclude witnesses who provide redundant or duplicative information. Character witnesses shall not be permitted to testify at hearing. If witnesses make presentations at any hearing, the student shall be entitled to pose relevant questions to such witnesses. The MSEPC will consider the information it has gathered and any additional information provided by the student and make written findings of fact and recommendations based upon its assessment of the information presented. Such findings and recommendations shall be provided to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs within ten business days of the conclusion of the hearing.

c. Quorum and Voting A quorum consists of at least six voting members of the MSEPC. A recommendation is adopted when approved by a simple majority of the members present. A recommendation to expel a student from the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine must be approved by two-thirds of MSEPC.

IV-24

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 d. Record of Hearing Written decisions will serve as the official records of a hearing. e. Medical Student Evaluation and Promotion Committee Recommendations The MSEPC will make one or more of the following recommendations regarding the disposition of a matter of professional fitness considered by the Committee:         

Find that the matter does not warrant action; Issue a written reprimand or warning; Allow the student to repeat or otherwise remediate academic deficiencies; Allow the student to continue on a modified academic schedule; Refer the student for counseling or psychological evaluation; Place the student on probation with such conditions as deemed appropriate; Suspend the student or place the student on leave of absence for a specified time or until specific conditions are met; Suspend the student for a period of time; Expel the student.

MSEPC may recommend to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs removal of a student’s probation once the student has fulfilled the conditions of probation. f.

Executive Associate Dean of Academic Affairs’ Review

The Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will review MSEPC findings and recommendations, adopt them, or modify them. g. Notice of Recommendation to Student The findings and recommendations with modifications, if any, will be sent to the affected student within 5 business days of the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs’ receipt of the MSEPC’s written report. h. Student Request for Meeting with Executive Associate Dean of Academic Affairs A student may schedule an appointment with the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs to discuss the proceeding prior to the Executive Associate Dean’s final evaluation and recommendation. The appointment must be requested in writing and received by the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs no more than 3 business days after the student receives written notification of action by the MSEPC. If a meeting is requested, it will take place promptly. Within 5 days of the meeting between the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and the affected student or within 8 days of notice to the student if no meeting is requested, the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will finalize the written findings and recommendations and provide notice to the student of same. The student has the right to appeal the decision of the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs by submitting a request for appeal as provided in the Appeals Process. If the student does not appeal in timely fashion, the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will forward the written findings and recommendations to the Dean for his or her review. The Dean will review the findings and recommendations and affirm or amend the findings and recommendations. Once the Dean has affirmed or amended the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affair’s findings and recommendations, the Dean’s decision shall be final agency action and the affected student will be notified by the Executive Associate Dean Student Affairs.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-25


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

B-6. The Appeals Process 1. The Appeals Committee a. Statement of Purpose The Appeals Committee provides the forum for medical students to appeal decisions of the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs based upon findings and recommendations made by the MSEPC, the HWCOM Honor Council, and the Medical Student Grievance Committee that are adverse to the student. b. Composition and Selection of the Appeals Committee The Appeals Committee will comprise both College of Medicine faculty and students to ensure representation of all stakeholders. The Appeals Committee shall have seven voting members. There shall be five faculty members, one of whom will be the Chair appointed by the Dean of the College, and two medical student members. All members will be appointed by the Dean of the College. The term of appointment for each faculty member is 3 years and for each student 1 year. Students who serve on this Committee must have a history of good academic and conduct standing, and must be in good academic and conduct standing. Any person who has participated in MSEPC, the Honor Council, or the Medical Student Grievance Committee with respect to the matter under appeal or who has otherwise been involved in the evaluation of the incident that triggered an appeal is ineligible to serve on the Appeals Committee convened to consider the matter under appeal. c. Quorum and Voting A quorum is more than 50% of the voting members of the Committee. A recommendation is adopted when approved by a simple majority of the members present. 2. Grounds for Appeal The sole grounds for appeal are as follows: i.

Material failure to provide a student his or her due process rights as set forth in this Medical Student Handbook that affected the outcome of the hearing. Appeals based on this ground will be limited solely to a review of the record of the hearing.

ii.

New information, which was not available at the time of the hearing and therefore could not be presented. In addition, the student must show that the new information could have substantially affected the outcome of the hearing. The nature of the information must be described in full detail in the appeal letter including an explanation regarding the reason the information could not have been presented at the hearing.

iii.

For MSEPC recommendations alone, the severity of the sanction is clearly excessive in light of the nature of the offense and the totality of the student’s academic performance including indicia of professionalism.

3. Procedure to Request an Appeal When a student has a right to appeal a decision of the Honor Council, the MSEPC, or the Student Grievance Committee, he/she will use the process established in this section and must deliver a letter

IV-26

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 requesting appeal to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs within 10 business days of receiving notification of the decision triggering a right to appeal. 4. Appeals Committee Responsibilities and Actions The following procedures shall govern the appeals process: i.

Filing Request for Appeal. The student’s request for appeal must state the grounds (as provided above) upon which the appeal is based, the facts supporting the student’s assertion, and a request for specific relief from the determination being appealed. The burden of proof rests with the student to clearly demonstrate that an error occurred during the Honor Council, MSEPC or Grievance Committee hearing process. The appeals process is not a rehearing of the matter under appeal.

ii.

Appellate Review. The Chair of the Appeals Committee shall be designated as the appellate officer. He/she shall first review the appeal letter and documentation from the original hearing to determine if there is a basis for appeal. If the appellate officer determines there are no grounds for appeal, a written decision upholding the decision will be sent to the student stating the appeal is denied and the reason for the denial. If the appellate officer determines that there are grounds for appeal, the appellate officer shall convene a meeting of the Appeals Committee within 10 business days from the date that an appeal was properly requested. The Appeals Committee will provide its written recommendations to the Dean of the College, the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs, and the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs within 10 business days of the date of the meeting of the Appellate Committee.

iii.

The Dean will review the Appeals Committee’s recommendation and affirm, amend, and/or remand to the Appeals Committee for specific consideration of the reason(s) for the remand. Once the Dean has affirmed or amended the Appeals Committee’s recommendation, the Dean’s decision shall be final agency action unless the Provost issues a decision pursuant to Section F below. Except in the case of a summary suspension, the student’s status will remain unchanged and all sanctions placed on hold during the appeals process.

5. Notification of Dean’s Determination The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Office of Student Affairs will provide official notification to the student of the Dean’s decision within 3 business days of receiving the signed paperwork from the Dean. The Dean has the responsibility to ensure due process is followed in all disciplinary actions undertaken on behalf of medical students. This determination shall constitute final agency action unless the student appeals the determination of the Appeals Committee to the Provost in accordance with this policy. In the case of dismissal, the student will be removed from all courses or clerkships at that time. The official effective date of the dismissal will be the date of the decision of the Dean of the College. 6. Grounds to Appeal the Determination of the Appeals Committee to the Provost A student may appeal the determination of the Appeals Committee to the Provost within 5 business days of the issuance of the decision by the Appeals Committee or official in the event that there was a material failure to provide the student his or her due process rights as set forth in this Medical Student Handbook that affected the outcome of the hearing. Appeals to the Provost will be limited solely to a review of the record of the hearing. If the Provost finds that there are no grounds for an appeal, the Provost’s decision will constitute final agency action.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-27


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

B-7. Grievances and Grievance Procedure 1. Medical Student Grievance Committee a. Preamble Medical education is most effective in an environment of informality, mutual respect, cooperation, and open communication. Students in HWCOM must not only satisfy university standards but also the professional expectations of faculty members. Medical student grievances often grow out of misunderstandings or misperceptions about expectations of faculty members. Academic and clinical faculty members and advisors have an obligation to communicate those professional and academic standards applicable to medical students. Medical students have a concomitant obligation to pursue and satisfy these standards. They are bound to observe and respect the policies, rules and regulations of the University, and of HWCOM and its faculty. Most grievances should be settled through informal communications between medical students and faculty members. Occasionally, a conflict develops that cannot be resolved informally. When all means of informal resolution have been exhausted, the parties have a forum in which to seek review and resolution of an academic grievance against a faculty or staff member. Medical students have the right to bring grievances against a faculty or staff member concerning academic matters covered by this Grievance Procedure. b. Purpose The purpose of these policies and procedures is to provide a means for medical students to seek investigation and possible resolution of academic grievances, as defined below. c. Grounds The Grievances Policy and Procedures deal with any complaint or controversy alleging:    

Unprofessional conduct by a faculty or staff member that adversely affects either a student’s ability to achieve academic expectations commensurate with his or her ability to perform in classroom, lab, or clinical setting; Failure to respect the student’s right of privacy; Arbitrary and capricious grading for coursework, examination, clinical clerkship, or research project; or Arbitrary and capricious decision to deny promotion or dismissal from a course or program.

Medical students may not use the grievance process to appeal or otherwise contest determinations made by any other committee or council. d. Notifications for MSEPC, Honor Council and Student Grievance Procedures All notifications to be given under the MSEPC, Honor Council, and Student Grievance processes will be made by electronic delivery to the student’s or faculty member’s officially designated University email address, by hand-delivery or to the affected individual’s last known address by any means evidencing delivery. e. Filing a Grievance against FIU Faculty or Staff Any student, staff member or faculty member may file a grievance alleging that an HWCOM faculty or staff member has engaged in conduct constituting grounds for filing a grievance against such faculty member under this policy. If a grievance is filed by an individual other than an affected

IV-28

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 medical student(s), the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will meet with the medical student(s) affected by the alleged conduct to determine whether such individual(s) wish(es) to proceed with the grievance procedure. If so, the grievance procedure shall be followed including the opportunity for informal resolution of grievances. If not, the grievance shall not proceed and the matter will be referred to the faculty member’s or staff member’s supervisor for consideration. Regardless of whether a grievance is filed, staff members and faculty members are subject to FIU policies and Florida and federal law regarding their conduct, and FIU may take disciplinary action in accordance with its policies and applicable law regardless of whether a grievance is in process. 2. Informal Grievance Procedure Medical students must first attempt to resolve the academic grievance as soon as possible through an informal meeting with the faculty or staff member. The student must initiate such informal resolution by contacting the faculty or staff member in writing with a copy to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, no later than 10 business days after classes begin in the period following that in which the complaint arose, or the grievance will be deemed untimely. A mutually agreeable resolution shall be formalized through a notation in the student’s file/record, which is initialed by the student and the faculty or staff member. If the matter cannot be resolved, including if the faculty or staff member cannot be reached or does not respond, the student must meet with the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs to discuss the grievance before filing a petition for a hearing before the Grievance Committee (a “Grievance Hearing”). If an informal resolution cannot be reached within 21 business days after the initial informal contact with the faculty or staff member, the student then has the right to seek a formal resolution through the Grievance Procedure. 3. Formal Grievance Hearing Process The request for formal resolution, detailing the specifics of the complaint and attaching all previous correspondence generated during the informal resolution process, must be sent by the student to the offices of the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs and the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. The student must secure the signature of the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs on the request for a Grievance Hearing, to certify that the informal process has been unsuccessfully completed. Within 5 business days from receiving the complaint, the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee shall review the complaint for timeliness, jurisdiction, and to determine whether there is sufficient evidence to justify a Grievance Hearing. If the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee determines that the complaint to be within the jurisdiction of the Grievance Committee, that it is timely, and that there is sufficient evidence, he or she will order a hearing by Grievance Committee. 4. Selection of Committee Members When a complaint falls within the scope of this policy and there are disputed issues of material fact to be determined, the Dean of HWCOM will refer the matter to the Grievance Committee. The Grievance Committee will be appointed on an ad hoc basis for each grievance under consideration. It will be comprised of seven members, all appointed by the Dean. Two of the seven members will be medical students selected by the Dean of the College from a list of names supplied by the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs. The other five members will be faculty members who have not been involved in the grievance. After the first three years of the HWCOM’s existence, one student will be appointed from students in the first 2 years of study and one student from the last 2 years of study. Students who serve on this Committee must have a history of good academic and conduct standing and must be in good academic and conduct standing. The other five members of the Grievance Committee

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-29


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 shall be full-time faculty members who have experience with the medical student curriculum. They will be selected by the Dean from lists supplied by the Executive Associate Dean of Academic Affairs. The faculty members of the Committee will include at least two faculty members from academic or patient care units outside of the facility where the event giving rise to the grievance allegedly occurred and at least two faculty members from the academic or patient care unit of the facility where the event giving rise to the grievance allegedly occurred. The Chair of the Grievance Committee will be jointly selected by the Dean of the College and the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. In the event that a Committee member is unable to attend the Committee meeting, the Dean will appoint a substitute who must attend. 5. Grievance Hearing Procedure a. Filing Complaint The formal academic grievance procedure is initiated by filing a written complaint with the Dean. The complaint must be filed within ten business days of the date the informal resolution process ends, or within ten business days after classes begin in the period following that in which the complaint arose–whichever is later. After receipt, the Dean, in consultation with the Chair of the Grievance Committee, will review the complaint to determine whether it falls within the scope of this policy and whether a Grievance Hearing is warranted. When there are disputed issues of material fact that must be determined and the complaint falls within the jurisdiction of the Grievance Committee, a Grievance Hearing is warranted. b. Grievance Hearing Schedule and Notice of Hearing If a complaint is within the scope of this process, a Grievance Hearing shall be scheduled as soon as possible but no later than 45 business days after receipt of the written grievance. Students and affected faculty or staff members will be provided written notice at least 5 business days prior to the Grievance Hearing by the Chair of the Grievance Committee or his or her designee. The Dean of HWCOM will notify the student, faculty or staff member involved in the grievance of the Grievance Hearing. Notification will be made by electronic delivery to the student’s, faculty or staff member’s officially designated university e-mail address, by hand-delivery or to the affected individual’s last known address by any means evidencing delivery. The notice will state:   

a description of the matter under consideration; the time, date and place of the hearing; and a list of witnesses, if any.

c. Notification That Complaint is Not Within Purview of Grievance Committee If the complaint does not fall within the scope of this policy, then the student shall be so notified. d. Information Gathering The Grievance Committee has the authority to gather information concerning the incident to assist with its deliberation and evaluation of a matter. Faculty, staff and administrators must comply with all reasonable requests for relevant information that will assist the student in presenting his or her case and the Committee in reaching a recommendation. e. Meeting All Grievance Hearings and Committee meetings will be conducted in private. During the Grievance Hearing the student and the faculty and/or staff member against whom the grievance is made will be

IV-30

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 advised of the substance of the inquiry/allegation. The student will have the opportunity to present his or her complaint and may call witnesses to participate with the prior consent of the Chair of the Committee. The affected faculty and/or staff member(s) will have an opportunity to make a presentation and to call witnesses to participate with the prior consent of the Chair of the Committee. The student and affected faculty member must provide a list of witnesses at least three business days prior to the date of the Grievance Hearing. The student and affected faculty and/or staff member(s) will have an opportunity to respond to the information presented. The parties do not have the right to be represented by an attorney, and no attorney shall be permitted to attend the meeting on a party’s behalf in any capacity. At the Chair’s discretion, either party can present his or her case in writing. All relevant documents should be in the hands of the Committee Chair no later than five business days before the Committee meets to consider the case. Any documents received after this date may be excluded at the discretion of the Chair of the Committee. The Committee will consider the information presented at the meeting and make written findings of fact and recommendations based upon its assessment of such information. Its deliberations will take place outside the presence of the parties. f.

Quorum and Voting

A quorum is more than fifty percent (50%) of the voting members of the Committee. A recommendation is adopted when approved by a simple majority of the members present. g. Record of Hearing Written decisions will serve as the official records of the meeting and will be sent to the Dean of the HWCOM. h. Determination A written report including findings of facts, conclusions and recommendations shall be prepared and forwarded to the Dean within fifteen business days from the conclusion of the Grievance Committee’s deliberation. The Dean shall issue a written decision within fifteen business days of receipt of the Committee’s report. The affected student and the faculty and/or staff members will be sent copies of the Dean’s determination by electronic delivery to their officially designated University email address, by hand delivery or sent to their last recorded home address in a manner evidencing receipt. The Committee’s recommendations regarding the student’s evaluation will be binding on the faculty member. In addition, other recommendations regarding the faculty member will be considered by the Dean and further actions will be taken in accordance with the HWCOM faculty bylaws and applicable HWCOM and University policies and procedures. 6. Appeals of the Grievance Committee Report All appeals shall be taken to the Appeals Committee and shall follow the process set forth in the Medical Student Handbook. a. Support Services In addition to the Grievance Process, students are encouraged to make full use of the services available at the Student Counseling and Wellness Center and the Office of Student Affairs. These resources cover the full range of academic, personal, financial, health or marital difficulties and will be handled confidentially.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-31


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 b. Support Procedure to Address Misconduct Against Medical Students in Clinical or Professional Settings by Individuals who are not FIU Faculty Members or Staff Members Any medical student, staff member or faculty member may notify the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs that a medical student has been subject to misconduct in a clinical or other educational setting by a person who is not an FIU staff member or faculty member. The Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs shall promptly notify the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and the Affiliate Dean for the institution at which the alleged conduct occurred and request an immediate investigation in accordance with the institutions policies and applicable law. The Affiliate Dean will report the alleged misconduct to the institutions Chief Executive Officer or his or her designee for follow up and action.

IV-32

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

C. Academic Policies C-1. HWCOM Compact between Teachers and Learners of Medicine Adapted from the Association of American Medical Colleges: Preparation for a career in medicine requires the acquisition of a large fund of knowledge and a variety of professional skills inherent in the doctor/patient relationship. The following are the guiding principles of this contract: 1. Respect. Respect for all individuals is fundamental to the practice of medicine. Mutual respect between learners, as novice members of the medical profession, and their teachers, as experienced and esteemed professionals, is essential for nurturing respect. 2. Duty. Medical educators have a duty, not only to convey the knowledge and professional skills required for the delivery of the contemporary standard of care required of physicians, but also to inculcate the values and attitudes required for preserving the medical profession’s social contract across generations. 3. Integrity. The learning environments conducive to conveying professional values must foster integrity. Students learn enduring lessons of professionalism by observing and emulating role models who epitomize authentic professional values and attitudes. Guiding Principles of the Educational Compact HWCOM is committed to promoting academic and professional success for learners and teachers at all levels. The achievement of such success is dependent on an environment free of actions and behaviors that can undermine the important missions of our institution. An atmosphere of mutual respect, collegiality, fairness, and trust is essential. Although both teachers and learners bear significant responsibility in creating and maintaining this atmosphere, teachers also assume responsibility for evaluating student work and modeling appropriate professional behaviors. Teachers must be ever mindful of this responsibility in their interactions with their colleagues, patients, and the students whose education has been entrusted to them. HWCOM responsibilities of teachers: 1. To treat all learners with respect and fairness. 2. To treat all learners equally regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, disability, or sexual orientation. 3. To provide current materials in an effective format for learning. 4. To be on time for didactic, investigational, and clinical encounters. 5. To provide timely feedback with constructive suggestions and opportunities for improvement or remediation, when needed. 6. To grade/evaluate on factors related to performance, effort, or level of achievement. 7. To be available for contact and timely response through various means of communication, including official university e-mail, cellphone, and accurate home phone and mailing address. 8. To respond to official e-mail communications within 72 hours. 9. To maintain high professional standards in all interactions with learners, patients, colleagues, and staff. 10. To refrain from requesting learners to perform inappropriate personal errands unrelated to the didactic, investigational, or clinical situation at hand. 11. To nurture both the intellectual and personal development of learners. 12. To pursue confidential mental and physical support for any conditions that might compromise the learning environment and/or patient care. 13. To abide by the values of HWCOM.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-33


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 14. To adhere to all of the rules and responsibilities outlined in the Medical Student Handbook. HWCOM responsibilities of learners: 1. To treat all fellow learners and teachers with respect and fairness. 2. To treat all fellow learners and teachers equally regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, disability, or sexual orientation. 3. To commit the time and energy necessary to achieve the goals and objectives of each course. 4. To be on time for didactic, investigational, and clinical encounters. 5. To communicate concerns and suggestions about the curriculum, didactic methods, teachers, or the learning environment in a respectful and professional manner. 6. To maintain high professional standards in all interactions with fellow learners, teachers, and staff, consistent with HWCOM and FIU Student Standards of Conduct and the Honor Code. 7. To notify the appropriate faculty and staff members in a timely manner of any problems that adversely affect the learning environment. 8. To participate in the process of program evaluation, improvement, and development. 9. To respond to official e-mail communications within 72 hours. 10. To be available for contact and timely response through various means of communication, including official university e-mail, cellphone, and accurate home phone and mailing address. 11. To take time to nurture one’s own intellectual and personal development. 12. To pursue confidential mental and physical support for any conditions that might compromise achievement of one’s educational goals or patient care. 13. To abide by the values of HWCOM. 14. To adhere to all of the rules and responsibilities outlined in the Medical Student Handbook. Students, residents, faculty, and staff are informed about HWCOM policies regarding teacherlearner responsibilities, the Compact Between Teachers and Learners of Medicine, and the Standards of Conduct for Medical Students via the HWCOM website, Medical Student Handbook, and Faculty Bylaws. HWCOM sponsors the following training sessions to educate both students and faculty about these policies. Student Training:   

The HWCOM Compact Between Teachers and Learners of Medicine – Orientation Week and the Medical Student Handbook Sexual Harassment: one hour training program during Period 1 and the Medical Student Handbook Standards of Conduct: Orientation Week and the Medical Student Handbook Professionalism: Orientation Week and the strand on Professionalism in the curriculum

Faculty Training:   

The Compact Between Teachers and Learners of Medicine (required reading); Medical Student Handbook Sexual Harassment: periodic training sessions (required by FIU) Standards of Conduct (required reading); Medical Student Handbook Professionalism (required reading): HWCOM Faculty Handbook

The Doctor of Medicine degree program is designed for faculty to primarily teach students for the first 3 years and for residents to interact with students primarily during clinical rotations of the fourth year. Medical student complaints relating to violations of the Compact Between Teachers and Learners of Medicine are handled in a manner specific to the complaint. Grievances relating to academic issues are handled through the Grievance Procedure, which is documented in the Medical Student Handbook. Sexual Harassment complaints are handled through the Florida International University Board of Trustees regulation FIU-104. In addition, medical students may discuss issues of

IV-34

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 violations of the Compact Between Teachers and Learners of Medicine policy with any of the deans in the Office of Student Affairs.

C-2. Grades and Evaluation of Academic/Professional Performance 1. Academic Evaluation a. Courses The curriculum comprises independent courses arranged in longitudinal strands and divided into four study periods. Student performance is assessed in each course. Course numbers and credits are assigned to each course. Credits reflect the quantity of content and the quantity of effort expected of students in that course. Courses thus vary in number of credits, intensity of scheduled time and duration. Courses usually are organized to begin and end on common dates within periods and generally adhere to a uniform weekly schedule. To the extent possible, final exams for concurrent courses shall be scheduled in order not to compete with other learning activities. Students can access information about the curriculum on the HWCOM “md2b” website, a portal designed to provide medical students easy access to curricular information. Students are expected to check the website regularly for updates and changes. b. Course Syllabus and Teaching Learning Format The syllabus for each course contains the learning objectives, course schedule of activities, topics to be presented, faculty involved, listing of course materials, evaluation system and grading policies and all other course policies including attendance expectations. A variety of learning formats may be used, including lectures, discussion groups, individual and group projects, simulation and standard patient laboratories and clinical supervised patient care experiences. c. Conduct of Examinations A variety of assessment formats are used, including objective multiple-choice questions (MCQ), oral and written reports and exams, and essays. Objective style exams will be conducted using secure questions that have been created or selected by the faculty. Exam questions will not be available for study before or after exams. Course Directors will review exams with the class following administration. Students may not record the review sessions. All exams will be constructed by HWCOM faculty. Some exams may be administered in collaboration with the National Board of Medical Examiners as customized with faculty selecting questions from the NBME question pool to create these exams. NBME “shelf” exams will be administered in most clerkships. d. Exam Grades Students will have opportunities to raise concerns about exam questions during exams using a “challenge card.” Students will receive their own exam results individually. General class performance on individual exams will be provided to students in the results report. High score, low score, mean, median and the standard deviation will ordinarily be in the reports for objective exams.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-35


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 e. Course Grades Performance in courses will be graded either numerically or pass/fail. The option is selected by the course director and must be approved by the Curriculum Committee. The grading system for a given course will be clearly described in the course syllabus. For numerical grades, the highest grade will be “100” and the lowest passing grade will be “75.” A grade that is numerically unsatisfactory (below 75) will be designated by the letter “U.” All students will be given an opportunity to review their performance in academic courses and clerkships. In the event that a student believes that a course grade or evaluation is inaccurate or unfounded, students have the opportunity to appeal said grade or evaluation to the Course Director using the Student Grievance process set forth in this Medical Student Handbook. f.

Incomplete Work in a Course

If a student is unable to complete required work in a course, the student must contact the Course Director to request an incomplete “I” status for the course. If granted, the registrar will enter a grade of “I” on the record. g. Make up for Incomplete Course Work A plan to make up incomplete course work must be created by the course director and approved by both the student and the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs and the Associate Dean for Curriculum and Medical Education. The formal plan (“Plan for Completing Course Requirements”) will describe the activities, assessment and time period to complete the work. When completed, the course director will report the grade earned. The MSEPC will consider incomplete work as part of its evaluation of a student’s academic status. A student may be awarded “Provisional Promotion” to a subsequent period of study with an “ I “ and an approved plan for remediation. 2. Remediation of Unsatisfactory Performance Remediation of unsatisfactory performance is predicated on completion of a formal remediation plan established by the course director and the student. The plan will be formalized with a signed agreement entitled “Remediation Plan for Unsatisfactory Performance,” a standard document stipulating expectations for work to be performed, measures to be used to assess competency, and time period for the remediation. The student, course director, and the Associate Dean for Curriculum and Medical Education must all approve the coursework remediation plan and sign the agreement. Guiding and managing remediation for an unsatisfactory student performance is a responsibility of the course director with oversight by the ADCME. Remediation is to be designed to assure competency in the course work and must be scheduled in such a fashion to avoid time conflicts with ongoing study in the curriculum. Students with unsatisfactory grades in Period 1 are expected to remediate before the end of the Period. A student may be permitted by the MSEPC to continue into the first, (spring), segment of Period 2 without completed remediation; however, all Period 1 remediation must be successful before returning to classes in Period 2 following the summer break. The same policy applies to the first segment of Period 2, namely that remediation for unsatisfactory performance in these courses must be completed before resumption of classes following the subsequent summer break. Upon satisfactory performance per the remediation agreement, the course director will report the satisfactory achievement by submission of a signed “change in grade” form for the course. The grade of “75” will be awarded and appear as “U/75” on the student transcript for the course. The grade of 75 will be used with the course credits in calculating the grade average. Failure to complete a plan for remediation (i.e., work not completed or performed at an

IV-36

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 unsatisfactory level or on time) will be reported to the MSEPC. Regardless of the outcome of remediation, the MSEPC will review and evaluate each student’s academic performance for each period of study and award Period grades of H, NH, P or F. Given that time constraints unavoidably limit the number of courses that can be successfully remediated concurrently, the MSEPC must at the earliest time available, evaluate the academic performance of a student receiving unsatisfactory grades (F, U or U/75) in a total of three courses or a total of 12 or more credits in any period of study. In such event, the MSEPC will meet to confirm the unsatisfactory performance. If confirmed, the affected student has the right to enter into an informal or formal resolution with the MSEPC as provided herein. If the MSEPC confirms that a student has unsatisfactory grades in a total of 12 or more credits in a period, it must make one of the following recommendations: (i) require the student to repeat one or more academic periods; or (ii) require the affected student to withdraw involuntarily from HWCOM. In these cases the action of the MSEPC supersedes the responsibility of a course director to manage remediation. 3. Standing during Remediation A student required to remediate a course or period is not in good standing until he or she successfully remediates the course(s) or period, as applicable. If a student is required to repeat one or more periods, that student is not considered to be in good standing until the entire period(s) has been successfully remediated. A grade of “I” does not affect good standing. 4. Provisional Promotion MSEPC may confer “Provisional Promotion” to a subsequent period allowing remediation to be completed during continuing study. 5. Period Performance Evaluations Students will be awarded performance grades for Period 1 and Period 2. These grades are” H” Honors, “NH” Near Honors, “P” Pass or “U” Unsatisfactory. The grades will be awarded by the Medical Student Evaluation and Promotion Committee (MSEPC) based upon academic achievement in the period. These period grades will appear in the official transcript separately from course grades. In general, Honors represents performance in the top 10%, and Near Honors in the top 25% of the class. Students undergoing remediation will also receive period grades. 6. Transcript and Grade Average The official transcript will be organized by periods of study listing all courses in a period with the grades (numerical or P/F) earned for each course. The student grade transcript will also list the grade awarded by the MSEPC for the period (H, NH, P, F). The transcript will list credit hours for each course and the earned grade. The grade average for each period will be calculated based on all courses with numerical grades. Further, the grade average for each period will be on the transcript along with the cumulative grade average following the second period of study. Courses with Pass/Fail grades will not be used in determining period or cumulative grade averages.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-37


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 7. Formative Assessments Formative assessments are included in all courses and Periods. They are: a. Cognitive: Comprehensive Assessment and Preparation for USMLE Step 1 will be administered as a required exam following completion of Period 1. This exam is a customized NBME exam designed to cover the entire first period. Results will not impact student grades for either period or courses. The purpose of this exam is solely formative allowing the student to reflect on overall knowledge in relation to the USMLE Step 1 expectations. Comprehensive USMLE Step 1 basic science self-assessment BSSA exams will be administered three additional times: (1) at the end of Period 2, (2) at the mid-point in Period 3, and (3) at the end of Period 3. b. Noncognitive: Development of behaviors, values and attitudes appropriate for the practice of medicine are essential components of medical education. Behavior in a professional manner is expected throughout the study for the Doctor of Medicine degree. Professional, noncognitive behavior are evaluated in Periods 1 and 2 in courses in which students may be observed individually. Aggregate reports from noncognitive evaluations are intended to serve as the basis for guidance and reflection. Evaluation of professional, noncognitive behaviors is summative in Period 3, an integral part of each clerkship grade. 8. Policy on United States Medical Licensing Exams (USMLE) All students must pass the USMLE Step 1 before being promoted to the fourth period. Students must also take the USMLE Step 2 CK (Clinical Knowledge) and USMLE Step 2 CS (Clinical Skills) exams prior to graduation, although passing these exams is not a requirement for graduation. Students must be enrolled in the College in order to register for and take the USMLE Step1. All students are required to pass the USMLE Step 1 to be approved by the Medical Student Evaluation and Promotion Committee for promotion to Period 4. Students are required to take USMLE Step 1 before the start of Period 4. Passing USMLE Step 1 is a graduation requirement.

C-3. Attendance and Excused Absence Policies Professionalism is a major component of the HWCOM curriculum. Therefore, medical students as future professionals should conduct themselves appropriately in all curricular activities, including classroom work, laboratory work, and clinical experiences. The professionalism of a medical student includes arriving to educational activities on time, using laptop computers only for course work during the educational activity, and minimizing disruptions to the educational exercise. Students are accountable and personally responsible for attending all educational activities including large and small group sessions and lectures, labs, clinical experiences, examinations, etc. Faculty may establish specific attendance and punctuality requirements for certain courses and clerkships by notifying students of the requirements in the course syllabus or by an alternate means of written communication. Academically successful medical students are expected to attend all educational activities to best prepare them to meet the curricular goals leading to the M.D. degree. Attendance in all clinical activities with patients and for many active-learning exercises is mandatory. Mandatory classroom sessions will be indicated in the course syllabus. Tardiness Students are expected to attend all scheduled activities on time and ready to begin. It is important that students realize that their absence or tardiness negatively affects a number of other people. Students who expect to be late for a mandatory class, lab, or small group session for any reason (e.g., car trouble,

IV-38

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 accident, injury or similar unforeseen event) MUST contact the course director BEFORE the start of class. Faculty may deny entrance or participation to a tardy student. Unexcused absences demonstrate unprofessional behavior by the student. Attendance, including tardiness, is part of the evaluation for professionalism, and poor evaluations may result in decreased grades and, in severe cases, referral to the MSEPC. Emergencies Affecting Attendance If a student has an emergency that prevents him/her from attending a scheduled class, clerkship, clinical rotation, Emergency Department rotation, Green Family Foundation NeighborhoodHELP™ household visit, or any other required activity, he/she is to call and notify the Office of Student Affairs using the “after hours” emergency phone line 305.348.0696 and inform the course or clerkship director as well as supervising faculty member(s) for that activity. Examples of emergencies include emergency onset of illness, severe injury, death or serious illness of family member, and other serious incidents as determined on a case-by-case basis. If absences also interfere with attendance at the primary care preceptorships and/or household visits, students must also contact the appropriate Medicine and Society faculty. Students with emergencies affecting attendance at scheduled Emergency Department rotations must immediately contact the appropriate emergency room staff and subsequently, the Office of Medical Education as well. Planned Absences Students must schedule personal appointments and activities during times when no mandatory activities are scheduled. However, if such conflict is unavoidable, students must request to be excused in advance from such classes and clerkships as early as possible. Students must complete the Excused Absence Approval Form (see Appendix) and discuss a plan to complete all missed course work with the faculty course directors as pertinent, which is acknowledged by their signature(s) on this form. The form must be sent to the Office of Student Affairs for final approval by Executive Associate Dean for Students Affairs, or designee. Students must obtain approval prior to registering for conferences and making travel arrangements and thus, should allow sufficient time to provide advance notice to appropriate faculty and the OSA. Students with long-term illnesses must contact BOTH the Office of Student Affairs as well as the course and/or clerkship director. Students will need to provide OSA written documentation of the nature of the illness from his/her personal physician. Students may request permission to participate in professional activities off campus through a process in the Office of Student Affairs; 30 days advance notice is required. Absence from Clinical Clerkships and Rotations Students are expected to attend and actively participate to the end of each session of a clinical clerkship or rotation. Absences are subject to the approval of the Clerkship Director. Students are required to make up any time lost on the clerkship. The clerkship director will assist with scheduling the make-up. Immediate excused absences from a clinical clerkship must be approved by the Clerkship Director in writing and will generally be allowed for the following reasons:  

Death within the immediate family Illness requiring immediate attention or hospitalization

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-39


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 Planned excused absences must be approved by the Clerkship Director, in writing on this form, at least 2 weeks before the clerkship begins whenever medically possible. Planned absences may be approved ONLY for the following reasons:      

Prolonged illness or severe injury requiring complex treatment, rehabilitation and recovery (with note from student’s physician) Presentation at professional meeting Representation of FIU in an official capacity (e.g. Evaluations and Promotions committee meeting, Honor Council meeting, appearance request by Dean, etc.). Residency interviews Jury duty Religious observance

Students seeking excusal from a clerkship rotation for professional purposes must complete the Request For Excused Absence From Clinical Clerkship or Rotation Form (see Appendix) and have it signed by the Clerkship Director in advance of the absence. Religious Observance (Adapted from FIU Policy) HWCOM recognizes that students, faculty, and staff observe a variety of religious faiths and practices. HWCOM respects the religious beliefs and practices of its students and will work with students requesting accommodations to find reasonable and appropriate accommodations within the requirements of the HWCOM's curriculum and academic schedule which will not impose an undue hardship. HWCOM encourages students who anticipate the need for a reasonable accommodation to timely notify OSA and the supervising faculty, including course and clerkship directors), so that such request can be appropriately considered. Any student who believes that he or she has been unreasonably denied an educational benefit due to his or her religious belief may file a grievance using the HWCOM grievance procedure established in the HWCOM Student Handbook.

C-4. Leave of Absence Policies A leave of absence (LOA) is a temporary period of non-enrollment and may be either voluntary or involuntary. Students may request a voluntary LOA if they meet certain criteria; involuntary leave describes absence from academic activities that is mandated by the MSEPC or the Dean. The AAMC describes the following categories of LOA: 

  

IV-40

Medical: Students requesting a medical LOA must have recent written documentation from his/her personal physician that states such leave is considered necessary for the student’s emotional, mental, or physical health, and beneficial to their personal and professional well-being and progress. The recommendation must generally include a diagnosis and a suggested duration for the leave. Students requesting a medical leave or extension may be required to submit a medical assessment by a physician designated by the university before returning from leave. Academic: Academic LOA may be requested to pursue an advanced degree, research training, a medically related fellowship, extended USMLE preparation, or other education program as approved by the Office of Academic Affairs. Financial: Students may request a Financial LOA if he/she is unable to meet tuition and/or other educational financial obligations for all or part of an academic period. Personal: A Personal LOA should be taken if a student requires a significant amount of time to give primary attention and effort to circumstances or situations that most likely would inhibit or interfere with their academic performance and/or progress. A personal leave of absence usually may not exceed 12 months and a student may not request this type of leave more than once in an

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

academic period. A student must be in good academic standing at the time a personal LOA is requested. Administrative: The Dean has the option to place a student on an administrative leave of absence if it is believed that the student is incapable of continuing in the medical curriculum at that time. Return from administrative leave may carry stipulations such as proof of successful resolution of the circumstances necessitating the leave. Other Reasons: Students have a significant and documented need to spend time away from medical studies that is not classified under one of the above categories.

Medical students should be aware that taking a leave of absence may affect student loan deferment and repayment status, housing, health insurance coverage, or financial aid eligibility. Therefore, prior to applying for a leave of absence, students should investigate these implications as they pertain to their personal situations. Certain requirements include, but are not limited to the following provisions:    

If conditions have been set for a student’s eligibility to return from a leave, the student must demonstrate satisfaction of those conditions prior to the return date. Students must participate in an exit interview with the Office of Financial Aid before LOA can be approved. Students must demonstrate continuity of health insurance coverage during the leave. Students must complete all course requirements for awarding the M.D. degree within a 6- year period from the time of matriculation in order to graduate.

Voluntary Leaves of Absence Students may request a voluntary leave of absence for medical, academic, financial, personal, or administrative reasons as described above. Students requesting a voluntary leave of absence must prepare a written statement including the following information in his/her letter:     

Dates of the leave Reason for the absence Student’s plan to acquire missed information as well as make-up provisions for missed assignments and exams Arrangement for coverage of all clinical or course responsibilities Arrangement for notification of all faculty and other students affected by the absence

Initiating the Leave of Absence Process   

For Medical, Personal, and Financial LOA: The student will first need to meet with one of the Deans in OSA at which time he/she will be given the Leave of Absence/Change of Status Form (LOA Form) to complete (see Appendix). For Academic and Administrative LOA: The student will meet with his/her Academic Advisor and/or one of the deans in the Office of Academic Affairs, at which time he/she will be given the Leave of Absence/Change of Status Form to complete. All students, regardless of which office they meet with initially, must discuss the leave and obtain clearance by obtaining the appropriate signatures on the LOA Form from the following HWCOM representatives: Financial Aid, Medical Education, Student Affairs, and Information Technology (IT).

The maximum amount of time granted for a voluntary leave of absence from the MD program is 12 months. The Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs and the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, or designees, are responsible for granting or denying the request, with or without

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-41


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 special conditions, and affix their signatures on the form. The form is finally sent to the HWCOM Registrar to be maintained with the student’s records. Special Requirements when Requesting a Medical Leave of Absence In addition to completion of the LOA Form, students requesting a medical leave of absence must obtain a written statement from his/her personal physician that delineates the medical or psychological need for the absence, the diagnosis and prognosis of the illness, duration of treatment, and specific dates that student is required to miss classes. The request must be submitted to the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs or designee. The Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs or designee is responsible for granting (with or without restrictions) or denying the request. Reinstatement must be approved by the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs or designee after receiving written clearance from the physician that the student is again ready to handle the academic rigors of the HWCOM curriculum. While the physician’s statement of readiness may be sufficient, HWCOM reserves the right to require a second opinion regarding a medical student’s physical or psychological readiness to return to classes and clinical care service. This consultation will come from a physician approved by HWCOM, and any cost involved will be borne by HWCOM. The amount of leave time granted for leaves of absence due to pregnancy will be primarily dependent upon the recommendations of the student’s obstetrician. Students are required to submit a written request to the Office of Student Affairs and the Office of Academic Affairs as far in advance as possible. In addition, students must notify the following faculty members: course directors of all classes, clinical faculty supervisors for preceptorships and emergency department rotations, and the Clinical Affiliate Deans responsible for her current clerkship during Period 3 or Period 4, as applicable. As a general guideline, if the student is absent for a period of 10 weeks or less, all attempts will be made to provide tutoring to minimize the impact of her class absences; however, students must realize that this may not always be possible or appropriate depending on the type of course(s) missed. If the student is absent for a period of more than 10 weeks, the student should consult with his/her Academic Advisor to determine whether he/she should request a “Medical Leave of Absence”. All students must realize that all course work must be satisfactorily completed within 6 years from the date of matriculation in order to graduate from the HWCOM with the doctorate of Medicine (MD) degree. Students who do not pass the USMLE Step 1 examination may be placed on USMLE leave-of-absence by MSEPC. When the student is placed on a USMLE leave of absence, MSEPC will determine the length of leave based on the conditions, if any, for return. Students will be reinstated upon successful completion of the examination and any other restrictions that MSEPC has imposed. A leave of absence for the USMLE Step 1 examination cannot exceed 1 year unless approved by MSEPC. A student who determines that he/she is not returning at the time scheduled for a leave to end must consult with the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee as early as possible before the scheduled return date to allow sufficient time to learn whether an extension will be granted. The extension request may be presented to MSEPC at the discretion of the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. If the extension is not granted, the student will need to make other arrangements so that he/she will return by the end of the leave’s term; otherwise, the student will be deemed to have withdrawn HWCOM.

IV-42

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

C-5. Tuition Refund and Accommodation Policies In accordance with FIU policy, the university will refund the full tuition and fees if the student officially withdraws or is dismissed from HWCOM in writing before the first day of Orientation. Students may receive 25 percent of the tuition and fees if they officially withdraw or are dismissed from HWCOM before the first 4 weeks of classes. Repeating Several Academic Courses:     

A medical student enrolled in HWCOM may seek accommodation of tuition when that student has been reviewed by the MSEPC and offered an option of repeating specific courses in an academic period, rather than repeating all of the courses in the academic period. The pro-rated tuition will be calculated by the Associate Dean for Curriculum and Medical Education based on the number of credits awarded by the courses repeated when compared to the total number of credits awarded by all courses in the academic period. This pro-rated tuition will be payable twice a year similar to tuition payments by other FIU students. The student receiving this tuition accommodation must, however, pay the full HWCOM and FIU fees that apply to all enrolled students. The student receiving this tuition accommodation also must sign an agreement attesting to their understanding and agreement with the accommodation.

Standard of Academic Performance Policy for Financial Aid Eligibility Students must remain in “good academic standing” as defined by the Curriculum Committee to be eligible for financial aid. Quantitative Measure of Progress Completion Rate Requirement: Students must successfully complete 67 percent of attempted credits taken at HWCOM by the end of each financial aid awarding year. Maximum Time Frame: Students must follow the decision of the HWCOM MSEPC. A medical student will have a maximum of 6 years to complete the program.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-43


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

D. Student Educational Records HWCOM retains all student educational records in accordance with Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), federal and state requirements, and Florida International University Board of Trustees regulations. Educational Records and Personally Identifiable Information The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) defines educational records and governs students’ rights of privacy and access to their educational records. Any school record, either paper or electronic, that contains personally identifiable information directly related to the student is an educational record under FERPA. Such records may include:                 

Directory Information Clinical rotation schedules Narrative evaluations of clerkship/elective performance Letters of commendation and/or notifications of honors Information about leaves of absence Combined degree program enrollment information Scholarship award letters Special registrations Score reports from USMLE Step examinations Records of disciplinary actions Documentation of change in enrollment status Computer media Microfilm Video and audio recordings Photographs Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE) Course and clerkship grades

Personally identifiable information contained in student education records shall be released, or open for inspection, only to the student, or parents of dependent students as defined in Section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. “Personally identifiable” means that the data or information includes the name of a student, the student’s parent, or other family members, the address of the student, a personal identifier, such as the student’s Social Security number or a student number, a list of personal characteristics that would make the student’s identity easily traceable, or other information that would make the student’s identity easily traceable. The following are not considered educational records under FERPA:    

Private notes of individual staff or faculty that are in their sole possession Campus police records Medical records Statistical data compilations that contain no mention of personally identifiable information about any specific student.

The university and HWCOM does not release or permit access to education records and personally identifiable information kept on a student except as otherwise permitted by law and this regulation. Responsibility for custody of all student educational records belongs to the Dean of HWCOM, Vice President, or the university officials in charge of the area in which the records are maintained. Each Dean, Vice President or designated custodian shall ensure that the procedures required by federal and Florida

IV-44

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 law and this regulation are in place to control access to and disclosure of student education records and personally identifiable information contained therein. Directory Information The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (U.S. Public Law 93-579; FERPA) allows for the designation of certain academic record information as “directory.” In order to prevent access to or release of directory information, a student must so notify the designated custodian of record in writing within the time provided in the annual FIU Notice of Rights. Access to or release of directory information is withheld until further written instruction is received from the student. “Directory Information” includes:        

Student’s name, local and permanent address, and telephone number(s); Date and place of birth; Student classification and major and minor fields of study; Participation in officially recognized activities and sports; Weight and height of members of athletic teams; Dates of attendance, degrees and awards received; The most recent previous educational agency or institution attended by the student; and Photographic image

Fees for Copies of Student Records The university will charge the following fees for furnishing copies of student records and reports, or any material included therein:  

Copies of official transcripts – Ten dollars ($10.00). Copies of all other educational records – Fifteen cents ($.15) per page for copying, plus any administrative costs incurred for search, retrieval and mailing.

Waiver of Right of Access Students and parents of dependent students have the right to waive their right of access to confidential letters of recommendation and other documents that evaluate student academic performance. Such waivers shall be in writing and made a part of the official academic record. A waiver of right to access shall be effective only when the student is notified, upon request, of the names of all persons who are submitting confidential recommendations or evaluations and when the confidential letters of recommendation and other evaluative documents are used solely for the purpose intended. The university may not condition admission to the university, grants of financial aid, or receipt of any other service or benefit offered by the university, by another public educational institution in the State of Florida or by any other public agency upon being provided a waiver of the right to access by the student. Requests for Information in Connection with Research All requests for academic research dealing with data from student education records shall be referred to the university Registrar and to the Provost. Such requests must be in writing and must set forth specifically the type(s) of information to which access is requested and the intended scope of the research project. The applicable custodian of records and the Provost shall determine whether to grant the request, in whole or in part, and may condition access upon a guarantee that the researcher will appropriately safeguard the data; that no personally identifiable information about any individual will be published or made available to others; or, upon other reasonable conditions

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-45


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) Notice The university shall provide notification annually to students of their rights relating to education records, including the right to file complaints, the procedures to be followed in order to exercise such rights, the types of information entered in the education records maintained by the university, and the university’s policy to support the law. Notifications are published in the university catalog, the Student Handbook and the fall semester class schedule. HWCOM complies with the following rights of privacy and access to student education records: 

The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 30 days after the day HWCOM receives a request for access.

A student should submit to the registrar, Dean, head of the academic department, or other appropriate official, a written request that identifies the record(s) the student wishes to inspect. The custodian of the records shall require the student, or parents of the student when applicable, requesting access to or release of the records to present proper identification such as a valid driver’s license or passport. The request must be in writing and signed by the person seeking access or release. A copy of the request for access or release shall be retained in the student’s file. Requests are usually honored within 2 business days unless the custodian or designee is not available. The student may review his/her file under supervision. Supervision will be by a member of the staff to ensure that the record is not altered during the review process. FIU policy states that the custodian shall have up to 30 days in which to comply with a request. When the record includes information on more than one student, the custodian shall release, or permit access to only that part of the record that relates to the student who is the subject of the request. Students requesting the release to others of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records must provide the custodian of such records with a signed, written request specifying the information to be released, the purpose(s) for such release, and the person or organization to whom such information shall be released. A copy of all requests for access and release shall be retained by the custodian of the records and shall be available for inspection and review by the student or a parent. The university reserves the right to deny a request for copies of education records made by a student or a parent when there is a financial obligation to the university that has not been satisfied or when there is an unresolved disciplinary action pending against the student. 3. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights under FERPA. A student who wishes to ask the school to amend a record should write the school official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record the student wants changed, and specify why it should be changed. Students who challenge the accuracy of an education record shall file a written request for amendment with the custodian of the records. The student shall also present to the custodian of the records copies of all available evidence relating to the data or material being challenged. The custodian of the records shall consider the request and shall notify the student in writing within fifteen (15) school days whether the request will be granted or denied. During that time, any challenge may be settled informally between the student and the custodian of the records, in consultation with other appropriate HWCOM officials. If an agreement is reached, it shall be in writing and signed by all parties involved. Such agreement shall be maintained in the student’s records. If an agreement is not reached informally, or if the request for amendment is denied, the student shall be informed in writing of the denial and the right to a hearing on the matter. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

IV-46

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 4. The right to provide written consent before the university discloses personally identifiable information (PII) from the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. The school discloses education records without a student’s prior written consent under the FERPA exception for disclosure to university officials with legitimate educational interests. The following persons and organizations are considered “university officials” and may have access to personally identifiable information without the student’s prior consent: a. Faculty, administrators, staff and consultants employed by the university, the Florida International University Board of Trustees, or the Florida Board of Governors whose work involves:  Performance of administrative tasks which relate to students;  Performance of supervisory or instructional tasks which relate to students; or  Performance of services that benefit students. b. Other persons who are authorized by federal and state law and regulations to have access to or receive copies of such information. Upon request, HWCOM also discloses education records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll. HWCOM will make a reasonable attempt to notify each student of these disclosures. 

The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the HWCOM to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-47


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

E. Health Policies E-1. Alcohol Policy Florida International University is committed to the responsible use of alcohol by all members of the FIU community. Irresponsible, high-risk use of alcohol threatens the lives, health, safety, and performance of our students and employees. When one drinks irresponsibly, he or she is more likely to become injured, to make unwise choices regarding sex and relationships, to miss class, to perform poorly on tests and in clinical environments, possibly endangering patients. Excessive drinking also impacts others; these second-hand consequences of drinking include interrupted sleep, inability to concentrate and study, fights, property damage, assault, rape, and death. High-risk drinking undermines the academic mission of HWCOM and jeopardizes a medical student’s professional aspirations. This policy is created to respond to the very serious public health problem by acting proactively in a comprehensive effort to ensure the safety and well-being of the FIU community. To view FIU’s alcohol policy online, go to http://globaldatebooksonline.com/flipbooks/flo2011/#/34.

E-2. Tobacco and Smoke-Free Campus Policy Florida International University is a tobacco-free, smoke-free university. According to the National Toxicology Program, the U.S Environmental Protection Agency, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, second-hand smoke contains at least 250 chemicals known to be deleterious to the health of non-smokers who inhale it. The FIU policy regarding smoking is available online at http://bot.fiu.edu/files/Notice%20%20FIU%20113%20 Smoke%20and%20Tobacco-Free%20Campus%208-16-10.pdf.

E-3. Drug-Free School and Workplace Policy As a condition of receiving funds or any other financial assistance under any federal program, institutions of higher education shall certify that they have developed and implemented an Alcohol and Drug-Free Workplace and Campus Policy. To see the policy online, go to http://globaldatebooksonline.com/flipbooks/flo2011/#/34. Medical students who have a known or suspected abuse problem will be referred to seek professional care at the Counseling and Wellness Center, which will include mandatory education, counseling, and possible referral to agencies that specialize in substance abuse and alcohol treatment and rehabilitation. If the student fails to attend an evaluation consultation at the Student Counseling and Wellness Center, or if such abuse interferes with the medical student’s academic or performance in the clinical setting, a mandatory referral may be made to the Physician’s Recovery Network for evaluation and treatment, prior to return to the classroom or clinical setting. The matter will also be referred to the MSEPC. Students who refuse professional treatment and/or violate the provisions of the drug-abuse policy repeatedly will be subject to dismissal from the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine.

IV-48

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 Prevention, Treatment, and Assistance Resources for Medical Students The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Office of Student Affairs o o

Office of Student Affairs; ACH2 Room 660W2. Phone: 305.348.0644 Counseling and Wellness Center; Green Library, Room 340B. Phone: 305.348.1460

FIU University Health Services o o

General Medical Clinic Wellness Center

E-4. Communicable Diseases Policy All students, including visiting students, with communicable diseases or conditions will not be permitted to engage in patient contact until such conditions have been resolved as documented by a physician. This restriction is necessary to protect the health and safety of FIU patients and staff. Persons with the following medical conditions will not be allowed patient contact without prior medical clearance: 1) active chickenpox, measles, German measles, herpes zoster (shingles), acute hepatitis, and tuberculosis; 2) oral herpes with draining lesions; 3) group A streptococcal disease (i.e., strep throat) until 24 hours after treatment has been received; 4) draining or infected skin lesions (e.g., Methicillin Resistant Staphyloccocus aureus (MRSA); or 5) HIV/AIDS (also refer to the separate FIU AIDS Policy in the FIU Student Handbook). A student who has a communicable disease or is unsure whether he/she should participate in patient care should seek medical care by a private physician. All students with a communicable disease must receive written medical clearance by a physician prior to return to clinical care activities. A case-by-case evaluation of each infected student shall be done by his/her physician to determine his/her ability to perform the duties required of the clinical rotation. Based on the recommendations of his/her physician, it is the responsibility of each infected medical student to notify the Office of Student Affairs if unable to perform clinical work; appropriate documentation is required. See also Absence Policy. All such notifications will be kept strictly confidential. If an ill student is unsure whether he/she should participate in patient care, the student should contact his/her private physician or a physician on staff at the FIU University Health Services. All students with a communicable disease must receive written medical clearance by a physician prior to return to clinical care activities. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines suggest that medical students with hepatitis B or HIV (HBV/HIV) seropositivity can continue to attend classes and participate in clinical clerkships and preceptorships. Prior to the start of the clinical experience, infected students are required to seek medical consultation by a physician to determine his/her ability to perform the duties required of the clinical rotation. It is the responsibility of each HBV/HIV infected medical student to notify the Office of Student Affairs of his/her status. All such notifications will be kept strictly confidential. Students who are at high risk of infection because of their immune status, or any other reason, are encouraged to discuss their work responsibilities and educational activities with their personal health care provider. If the health care provider believes that there are certain assignments the individual should not accept due to personal health reasons, this should be discussed with the appropriate administrator or the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs. Accommodations may be available on a case-by-case basis. Medical students with HBV/HIV seropositivity shall have periodic physical examinations by their

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-49


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 private physician. Written health clearance will be provided to the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs who will notify the student’s Clerkship Director of his/her ability to return to practice direct patient care. All correspondence will be kept confidential and will not be used as a basis for discrimination. The greatest theoretical risk of medical student-to-patient transmission of HIV or HBV involves invasive procedures with manipulation of needles or other sharp objects not under direct visualization. Medical students who have HBV/HIV seropositivity may not perform invasive procedures unless such activity is approved in writing by the student’s personal physician, and submitted confidentially to the clinical clerkship director and the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee. Medical students are not obligated to answer patient questions related to their own HBV/ HIV status, nor shall they answer such questions related to other students, other health care personnel, or patients. Serologic testing of medical students for HBV/HIV antibody will not be performed routinely unless the person is seropositive (see above). Testing is recommended when there has been a documented needle or sharp instrument puncture or mucous membrane exposure to the blood or body fluids of patients, or when there has been a medical student-to-patient exposure. Refer to the “Biosafety and Needlestick Injury” policies and procedures in this Medical Student Handbook.

E-5. HIV/AIDS: University Policy HIV/AIDS continues to be a major public health concern, especially in South Florida. Therefore, the university strives to provide the FIU community programs and services that focus on support, education, and prevention of HIV/AIDS. Students and employees of FIU who may become infected with the HIV virus will not be excluded from enrollment or employment, or restricted in their access to university services or facilities, unless individual medical evaluation establishes that such exclusion or restrictions are necessary for the welfare of the individual and/or other members of the university community. Healthy University Task Force The FIU Healthy University Task Force meets regularly to address various health issues, including HIV/AIDS, that affect the FIU community. The taskforce makes policy recommendations and works with various departments within the university to enhance the overall health of the students, faculty, and staff. Screening, Education, and Prevention Services Members of the FIU community who may be at risk for HIV infection are encouraged to get tested. Free HIV counseling and testing is available at the University Health Services (UHS) Wellness Center on both campuses, along with free safer sex products, such as condoms and dental dams, which help prevent the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases such as HIV. In addition, the Wellness Center conducts workshops and outreach activities to educate students about healthy behaviors and assist students in making responsible decisions regarding alcohol, drugs, and sexual health. For more information concerning the services offered by UHS please visit http://studenthealth.fiu.edu.

IV-50

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

E-6. Biosafety, Bloodborne Pathogen, and Needlestick Injury Policies HWCOM follows the institutional policies of its parent university regarding exposure to infectious and environmental hazards on campus, and the institutional policies of its clinical affiliates regarding exposure to infectious and environmental hazards. The purpose of the FIU Policy on Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure on Campus is to protect students from the risks of being occupationally infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus or other bloodborne pathogens, and to implement the United States Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Standard 29 CFR Section 1910.1030 Bloodborne Pathogens. The FIU policy is published http://www2.fiu.edu/~ehs/guidance/USCG2005100.pdf. Educating Students about Methods of Prevention HWCOM is diligent in educating students about precautionary infection control measures for airborne and bloodborne pathogens prior to students’ first contact with patients and first contact with human tissue, blood products, and body fluids. Ultimately, each student is responsible for his/her health and safety in the clinical/educational setting; therefore, it is the goal of HWCOM that all students learn appropriate policies and procedures to follow in the event that they are injured or potentially exposed to bloodborne pathogens or other communicable diseases. All medical students, including visiting students, receive the Biosafety Plan during orientation. Additionally, medical students receive an orientation to the blood-borne pathogen policy of the affiliate hospital prior to commencing laboratory and/or patient care activities. The FIU sponsoring host faculty member is responsible for ensuring that all visiting students receive the appropriate training and orientation prior to starting laboratory or clinical work at FIU or one of its clinical affiliates. In addition, the sponsoring host faculty member is responsible for ensuring the proper procedures are followed in the event of potential exposure. During the application process, the visiting student is responsible for providing HWCOM with documentation of PPD screening, medical exam and clearance, health insurance, disability insurance, and written documentation of immunity to hepatitis B and other infectious diseases according to the policies of their home school and policies of FIU HWCOM, whichever is more stringent. HWCOM clerkships and preceptorships are conducted at various clinical sites throughout South Florida. Medical students receive site-specific policies prior to their work at each site and should follow the established protocols at that site for immediate care and treatment after exposure. Florida International University Department of Environmental Health and Safety and Risk Management Services manages cases of occupational exposure for students and staff. The FIU policies and procedures pertaining to exposure to biohazardous materials (e.g., a needlestick injury) in both laboratory and clinical care settings are available online at http://www.fiu.edu/~ehs/med_surv/medical_surv.htm. Procedures for Post-Exposure Care and Treatment, including Needlestick Injuries Students who become exposed to biohazardous materials must follow established protocols at HWCOM to receive timely diagnostic and therapeutic care. Students who experience needle-stick and other types of injuries at any location (i.e., on-campus, hospitals, ambulatory clinics, or neighborhood households) must immediately notify their supervisor and should receive immediate first aid and initial care at the site where the injury occurred. Immediately after all known exposures, medical students must first contact their clinical instructor or attending physician and report the name of the source patient and diagnosis. This information is necessary

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-51


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 to assist in determining the potential severity of the exposure. In addition, all exposures must also be reported to the OSA and the FIU Department of Environmental Health and Safety and Risk Management. Policies and procedures, including specific reporting forms and surveillance information, are located on the FIU Environmental Health and Safety and Risk Management Services website http://www2.fiu.edu/~ehs. All exposures to potentially biohazardous materials, including needlestick injuries, must be reported to the FIU Environmental Health and Safety and Risk Management Services. In addition to completing required incident report forms at the clinical sites, all injured students must complete and submit the FIU “Exposure Incident Investigation Form” within twenty-four hours, located at http://www2.fiu.edu/~ehs/Biosafety/ExposureIncidentForm2.pdf . This incident report form is also located on the HWCOM website (http://medicine.fiu.edu) under “Student Forms.” Students who become exposed to biohazardous materials while at a HWCOM-affiliated clinical site (or other institution) must follow established protocols at that site for immediate care and treatment after exposure. All affiliation agreements with clinical care sites contain provisions for the care of students who sustain needlestick injuries. The Affiliate Deans and Directors of Medical Education at all affiliate clinical sites are aware of the HWCOM needlestick policy and procedure, and ensure all students are aware of these policies while on rotation. Medical students may receive follow-up care and treatment for exposures that occur at off-campus clinical or household sites either at the affiliate site, the UHS clinic, or by their private physician. Students are responsible for the payment of fees associated with the diagnostic and therapeutic services associated with needle-stick and other types of injuries, including filing health insurance claims. The student assumes responsibility for all charges that are not covered by his/her health insurance plan. A student may request the assistance of HWCOM by discussing the situation with a dean in the Office of Student Affairs. Students infected with bloodborne or other pathogens shall not, solely because of such infection, be excluded from participation in any phase of medical school life, including educational opportunities, employment, and extracurricular activities, except as otherwise required by applicable federal, state, or local law, or unless their health condition presents a direct threat to the health and safety of themselves or others. Students infected with airborne pathogens are excluded from participation in such activities during the infectious stage of their disease. Students who know, or who have reasonable basis for believing, that they are infected with bloodborne or airborne pathogens are expected to seek medical care at the FIU UHS or from their private physician. In accordance with HWCOM policy, students will be excused from clinical activities in order to seek medical care. It is the student’s responsibility to discuss health concerns with his/her faculty supervisor. In some cases, students may be unable to participate fully in medical school life or meet the Technical Standards of HWCOM because of their illness. In these cases, students may seek assistance from the FIU Disability Resource Center to discuss the existence and nature of the disability and whether reasonable accommodations are available. The deans in the Office of Student Affairs facilitate referrals to assure student needs are met. If a student’s exposure results in the contraction of a disease or disability, the student will be allowed to continue in the education program with as little disruption as safely possible depending on the circumstances. The student’s specific medical circumstances will be evaluated confidentially on a caseby-case basis and nondiscriminatory recommendations regarding the student’s progress through medical school may be submitted to MSEPC for appropriate action, if necessary.

IV-52

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

E-7. Workers’ Compensation Students are not employees of HWCOM or its clinical affiliate sites; therefore, they are not eligible for Workers’ Compensation coverage. Therefore, treatment for illness or injuries incurred as a medical student will be the responsibility of the student via his/her private health insurance plan.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-53


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

F. Technology Policies HWCOM expects medical students to abide by the FIU policies on the use of information technology. Those policies are published online as outlined below:           

Overall policies: http://policies.fiu.edu/files/96.pdf FIU Code of Computing Practice: http://wordpress.fiu.edu/technology/2009/01/29/fiu-code-ofcomputing-practice/ Data Stewardship policy: http://policies.fiu.edu/record_profile.php?id=560 Digital Millennium Copyright Act policy: http://policies.fiu.edu/files/545.pdf Gramm-Leach-Billey Act: Safeguards to Protect Confidential Financial Information: http://policies.fiu.edu/files/129.pdf Information Technology Security: http://policies.fiu.edu/files/96.pdf IT Security Procedure: Sharing Access to IT Resources; Password Management: http://policies.fiu.edu/files/559.pdf IT Security Procedure: System and Application Management: http://policies.fiu.edu/record_profile.php?id=562 Access Sharing policy: http://policies.fiu.edu/record_profile.php?id=559 Digital Millennium Copyright Act policy: http://policies.fiu.edu/files/545.pdf IT Security Office policy in the FIU Student Handbook: www.fiu.edu/student.htm. HWCOM will provide tablet computers to medical students for educational purposes only. Students have no expectation of privacy with respect to information stored within or the use of these tablets. Students must take personal responsibility for the security of the portable computer and mobile device, software and data in their care. In the event that the tablet computer is misused and damaged, the medical student shall be responsible for the replacement cost of the computer. Medical students are expected to keep all health information confidential and not to disclose such information unless necessary and appropriate to fulfill educational and/or patient care needs. There are State of Florida and federal laws that govern the confidentiality, privacy, and security of health information and records. Consequently, students will become educated about and abide by laws, policies and procedures regarding the use, disclosure and dissemination of health information. In particular, health information that is accessed and retained electronically must be kept private and secure via encryption using SharePoint as the storage system of sensitive documents. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 and its amendments establish the minimum protections for health information. In addition, there are State of Florida and federal laws that require special consents for disclosure of sensitive health information such as HIV status and mental health records.

There will be education on the policies of HWCOM clinical affiliates and on policies adopted by HWCOM in preparation for the clinical experiences. HWCOM provides medical students access to network resources such as computers, printers, network peripherals, software, data storage, e-mail, and Internet access for academic purposes. Students must abide by the technology policies and regulations governing both the university as well as those that are specific to the Information Technology (IT) department of HWCOM. The policies contained in this document are to ensure that technological resources provided by HWCOM are utilized in a manner consistent with the educational goals of HWCOM and the university.

IV-54

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

F-1. E-mail Policy Only HWCOM faculty, staff, students, and other persons who have received permission from the HWCOM Information Technology office are authorized users of the FIU e-mail systems and resources. Use of e-mail is permitted and encouraged where such use supports the university’s academic goals and facilitates communication between faculty and students. However, if a student uses e-mail in an unacceptable manner, he or she is subject to sanctions, including but not limited to having his or her campus e-mail account deactivated. The student will receive an initial warning and reports of any subsequent violations will be referred to the Medical Student Evaluation and Promotion Committee for final recommendations and action. Unacceptable Use of E-mail Unacceptable uses of e-mail include but are not limited to:         

Distributing, disseminating or storing images, text or materials that might be considered discriminatory, offensive or abusive, in that the context is a personal attack, sexist or racist, or might be considered as harassment. Using e-mail systems for any purpose restricted or prohibited by laws or regulations. “Spoofing,” i.e., constructing an e-mail communication so it appears to be from someone else. “Snooping,” i.e., obtaining access to the files or e-mail of others for the purpose of satisfying idle curiosity, with no substantial academic purpose. Attempting unauthorized access to e-mail or attempting to breach any security measures on any email system, or attempting to intercept any e-mail transmissions without proper authorization. Sending chain mail that misuses or disrupts resources: E-mail sent repeatedly from user to user, with requests to send to others. Introducing any form of computer virus or malware into the network. Sending copies of documents in violation of copyright laws. Including the work of others into e-mail communications in violation of copyright laws Portable

Computers and Mobile Devices Policy Portable computer and mobile device users must take personal responsibility for the security of the equipment, software and data in their care. Students will be provided with a tablet) computer, which is the property of FIU and will be subject to random software scans and antivirus updates. The tablets will contain the necessary operating system and software to complete the 4 years of medical school. Students pay a technology fee to HWCOM, which includes extended warranty to cover 4 years. Since these are leased for academic purposes, students should understand that there is no reasonable expectation of privacy. Additional regulations pertaining to the use of HWCOM tablet computers and mobile device. Unauthorized or unlicensed software must not be loaded on tablet include, but are limited to, the following:    

Students must ensure that the tablet or mobile device is not used by unauthorized persons. Students must only access tablets, mobile device, or network resource with accounts authorized to them by HWCOM. Students must take all reasonable steps to ensure that the tablet or mobile device is not damaged through misuse. Students must not tamper with the tablet or mobile device in attempt to circumvent security measures on the tablet or mobile device.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-55


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 The IT department of HWCOM will house spare tablets in the event that the unit requires repair or maintenance. Since the tablet will have a “standardized” image, there will be little or no disruption in service to the student as the student’s data will be housed on the network drives and backed up daily. Students are personally responsible for backing up all data on the tablet before taking in tablet for IT service. Images on the tablets are standardized for all students. There will be no personal customization of the tablets. All students will have access to both “My Site” and the Sharepoint web portal and are encouraged to regularly save all data to the network drives and a central location (i.e., Sharepoint). HWCOM will not be responsible for any loss of data on the tablets themselves. Tablets or mobile devices should never be left unattended in public places (e.g., car, library, restaurant, restroom, etc.). Tablets or mobile devices in cars must be stored out of sight when the car is left unattended. Students must return the tablet or mobile device to the IT department at HWCOM for regular health checks or when requested by HWCOM. Students must immediately report any possible security breaches to the IT department of HWCOM (e.g., tablet stolen or misplaced); Public Safety may need to also be notified should it be discovered that the tablet was stolen. Students must not access porn sites using HWCOM tablet; this is also a violation of university policy. Students must abide by all of the IT policies of the university in addition to those specifically for HWCOM. This includes all HIPAA and FERPA regulations pertaining to security and privacy.

F-2. Social Media Policy Social media refers to a variety of internet-based programs that allow users the ability to create and publish online content (text and photos) about themselves or others. Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine (HWCOM) welcomes the responsible use of social media technologies to support and engage learning and for effective outreach to the global community. General Policy Statements Definition: The term “social media” includes the following:   

Communication via email, text messaging, or transfer of photographs of file documents using computers, smart phones, portable communication devices, and other technologies; The use of web-based applications such as, but not limited to, Facebook, MySpace, LinkedIn, YouTube, Flickr, blogs, wikis, and other outlets where comments are posted in network-based public settings’ and fuure technologies that permit Internet-based information sharing.

1. This policy applies to all types of social media participation at any time by HWCOM students. 2. Students must abide by the laws, rules, regulations, and policies governing the protection of sensitive information such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) governing the dissemination of health information and the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) governing the dissemination of education records. Failure to do so can result in serious consequences both academically and legally. Confidential information must be protected at all times and must never be shared on any social media site, including, but not limited, to the following: a. Health information about anyone other than the student posting the information. Please note that posting health information about yourself could be deemed unprofessional if it breaches written standards established by HWCOM.

IV-56

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 b. Personal information about FIU, students, employees, or alumni (e.g., private e-mail addresses, grades, health information, demographic information, information about interactions with patients, and photographs of patients or the care environment– some of which may be FERPA protected). c. Defamation of HWCOM and its affiliates, faculty, staff, and other students. 3. If FIU and/or HWCOM become aware of postings on any social media venue that have a negative or detrimental impact on the university or HWCOM, such information can be used in determining the appropriate sanction for failure to act in accordance with this policy, which may include dismissal. 4. Be proactive about your professionalism: a. Separate personal from professional. Identify your opinions as your own. b. Be professional and respectful. Text and photos on your social media site(s) should meet the standards of professionalism expected of HWCOM. Anything you post reflects not only your professionalism but also that of the institution. o Always think before you post, remembering that anything you share via social media is not private and can (and probably will) be shared, stored, and spread globally. o Never post anything when you are angry, stressed, or lack sufficient time to review carefully. You should only post information, photos, and comments online if you would feel comfortable seeing them on TV or on the front page of the newspaper. o Postings are permanent and can be retrieved even after being deleted by the user. o Be timely and accurate. Check facts, grammar, and spelling of all content before posting. o Use highest privacy settings available. Social media sites are often targeted by cybercriminals who use personal data for identity theft. o Use the official institution names. Use “Florida International University” and “Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine”; acronyms “FIU” and “HWCOM” may be used if defined earlier in the document. 5. Prohibited activities: these may represent violations of the law and/or University policy and may result in academic discipline and/or legal sanctions: a. Communicating with patients using social media, including “friending” a patient. b. Posting patient information, including protected health information or photos, on any social networking sites, blogs, instant messaging or text messaging services. c. Taking photos of patients and procedures. Photos of patients may only be taken when instructed by clinical faculty and proper protocols are followed and permissions obtained. d. Using cell phones, fax machines, or email to transmit confidential information. e. Posting personal information (e.g., home address, phone, password clues, social security number) or photos that show or appear to show you engaging in any offensive behavior, including, without limitation, promiscuity, intoxication, or substance abuse. f. Posting potentially inflammatory or unflattering material on another’s website or wall. g. Posting educational records or other student information protected by FERPA. h. Posting profane or disparaging information about students, faculty, courses, rotations, hospitals, or the medical school. i. Presenting yourself as an official representative or spokesperson for FIU or HWCOM on social media. j. Using FIU and HWCOM logos or personal Panther identification numbers in any social media postings. k. Creating personal social media sites using FIU email addresses or computer equipment.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-57


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 l.

Using smart phones, portable communication and/or other social media devices for personal or non-emergent reasons during encounters involving patients or patients’ families and friends, to include but not limited to, the following areas: o hospital patient rooms, exam and treatment areas, operating room, emergency room o outpatient clinics o physician or patient lounges, nurses stations, hallways, waiting rooms, elevators, etc. o during patient care rounds or didactic presentations that discuss specific patients o family home visits (i.e., Green Family Foundation NeighborhoodHELP™ visits)

Violations of Policy Students who violate this policy will be disciplined and verbally instructed to implement immediate corrective action. Depending on the type and severity of the infraction, immediate disciplinary and/or legal action may be warranted. All confirmed violations may result in referral to the Honor Council and/or the Medical Student Evaluation and Promotion Committee (MSEPC) for recommendation and action, which shall become a permanent part of the student’s personal record. Violations of this policy may result in dismissal from HWCOM by MSEPC. This policy does not replace other HWCOM and FIU policies governing disclosure of confidential information, including protected health information and education records. For specific policy guidelines for the appropriate use of Social Media and Social Networking in Medical Practice, go to: http://www.fsmb.org/pdf/pub-social-media-guidelines.pdf.

IV-58

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

G. Medical Library Policies The HWCOM Medical Library is located on the third floor of the Green Library (GL 380) on the Modesto A. Maidique Campus. The Medical Library follows the policies of the university. The Medical Library offers ample study spaces, computer workstations, wireless connection and a wide variety of library services. The latter includes copying, printing, interlibrary loans, reference service, and individual assistance in using databases and other virtual resources. The Medical Library is a member of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. Library Open Hours The Medical Library is normally open until 1:00 a.m. Sunday to Thursday, 10:00 p.m. on Friday, and 8:00 p.m. Saturday, except during June and July when hours are shortened. Because of its location in the Green Library, which follows a different academic calendar, and variations in the HWCOM curriculum, students should check the Medical Library website for up-to-date hours of operation and for instructions on access: http://medlib.fiu.edu/about-us/hours. Resources More than 4,000 journals and a large collection of books in biomedicine are available in electronic format. A broad variety of databases provides up-to-date knowledge on medical topics, and offers tools for drug reference, laboratory values, medical images, differential diagnoses, and more. Medical Library Lounge A small room at the back of the library is used as a “lounge.” It contains a microwave, refrigerator, and hot/cold water service. Lockers are available for securing personal items. The appliances are cleaned and maintained by the medical students. Study Spaces In addition to study carrels and tables, one room is available for small group collaboration. A projector, laptop and document camera may be checked out for use in the room. A selection of chairs and reading tables complete the Medical Library as a location for quiet study, collaborative learning, and relaxation. Access to the Medical Library Use of the Medical Library as a study center is limited to students and faculty of HWCOM. Panther ID cards must be swiped on the door’s automated access system to enter the library. Visitors may use the Medical Library upon request to the Help Desk staff. Book Check-Out Books may be checked out for 30 days with one renewal. Collection materials checked out from the Medical Library must be returned to it. Materials checked out from the Green Library must be returned only to that library (second floor). A Panther ID card is needed to check out materials. Reserve Materials Books and other materials that are ‘required’ or ‘recommended’ for courses are kept in the Course Reserve cabinet in the library. They may be checked out for a 2-hour period upon request at the Help Desk in the Medical Library.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-59


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 Computer and Internet Access Wireless access is available throughout the Medical Library and the Green Library. A number of computer workstations are available for use in the Medical Library. Students needing workstations for educational purposes have priority. Library computers are rebooted at the end of the night, so documents should not be saved to the desktop or hard drive. Documents may be saved to flash drives. The Medical Library follows the University Libraries’ policy regarding Internet use: http://library.fiu.edu. Printing and Scanning A copier/printer/scanner is available in the Medical Library. Others are located throughout the Green Library and in AHC2. Using it requires purchase of a copy card and incurs a per-page charge. See a Help Desk staff member in the Medical Library for more information. Personal Belongings Personal belongings should never be left unattended. The Medical Library is not responsible for lost or stolen items. Students should inquire at the Medical Library offices (GL 323) for lost items. Behavior Professional and respectful behavior and compliance with policies is expected at all times in the Medical Library. Violators will be asked to leave. Medical students who abuse library policies will be reported to the HWCOM Office of Student Affairs. Medical Library Help Desk The Help Desk in the Medical Library is staffed by library assistants who are knowledgeable on how to access and use the library’s digital resources, and in trouble-shooting library computer and printer problems. They are prepared to assist students on request. Reference/Research Assistance and Tutorials Dedicated and experienced medical librarians are available weekdays to assist students who have reference questions or need help with research. Librarians also provide hands-on database instructions to individuals and small groups. Supplemental tutorials are available at the Medical Library home page under “Services.” Librarians may be reached in the Medical Library Offices on the third floor of the Green Library (GL 323) or by request at the Help Desk in the Medical Library.

IV-60

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 Interlibrary Loan Service Students may obtain articles from journals that are not available online, as well as books that are not available locally, by requesting an Interlibrary Loan on the Medical Library’s home page. Problems, Issues, Concerns, and Compliments The Medical Library is an academic unit of HWCOM and is not a unit of the University (Green) Libraries. Problems or issues regarding services in the Medical Library should be brought to the attention of the medical librarians in GL 323 or to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in HWCOM. Medical Library Offices Medical Library administrative offices are located next to the elevators on the third floor of the Green Library (GL 323). Food and Drink Most snack food and drinks are permitted in the building including chips, nuts, and cookies, canned and bottled drinks. Pizza, fries, hamburgers, sub sandwiches, and foods with strong odors are not permitted. Food deliveries from vendors (pizzas, etc.) are prohibited and will be turned away at the entrance to the libraries. Patrons are requested to: (1) use containers that prevent spills; (2) deposit containers in waste receptacles; and (3) avoid bringing food with strong odors into the building. Disruptions Disruption to study and research is prohibited. Examples include but are not limited to:    

Creating excessive noise. Harassment of others. Odor constituting a nuisance or health and safety concern. Behavior that disturbs users or staff and interferes with use of the facility.

MP3 Electronic Equipment Players, I-Pods, CD Players, Cell Phones, Cameras, or Other Devices The use of any equipment that disrupts patrons is prohibited. Beepers and cellular phones should be placed on vibrating mode or turned off. The use of cellular phones in public areas of the library is prohibited. The use of video cameras requires the permission of the library administration. Destroying or Damaging Materials, Equipment, Software, or the Facility The following are examples of actions that are prohibited (this is not a comprehensive list):     

Destruction, mutilation or defacement of any materials Damaging of hardware or equipment Misuse of furniture or the facility Intentional introduction of viruses into any system Tampering with software or changing equipment settings

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-61


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 Children and Minors Individuals under the age of 16 must be accompanied by a parent or caregiver. Parents or caregivers who bring children into the facility are responsible for monitoring their activities and regulating their behavior. Disruption of patrons by children or minors is prohibited. Loitering, Soliciting, and Advertising Loitering and soliciting for donations or accosting patrons or staff for any purpose that disrupts their use of the facility is prohibited. Non-FIU advertising materials may not be displayed or distributed without permission from library administration. No materials may be affixed to library interior or exterior walls without permission from the library administration. Group Tours/Instruction Any persons wishing to bring groups of people into the library need to obtain prior permission from the appropriate department. Persons who are unwilling to abide by this policy will be asked to leave the facility. Refusal to do so may result in forced removal by Public Safety. Students could be liable for disciplinary action as established by FIU. Use of Video Cameras The use of video cameras requires the permission of the library administration. Presence in Library When Library is Not Open Patrons may not remain in the library when it is closed without prior permission from the library administration. Persons who are unwilling to abide by University Libraries’ policies will be asked to leave the facility. Those refusing will be subject to removal by Public Safety. Students could be liable for disciplinary action as established by FIU.

IV-62

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

H. FIU Emergency Policies When faced with any type of emergency or inclement weather, the health and safety of students are the paramount concerns of the FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine. As emergencies occur unexpectedly, HWCOM in conjunction with the FIU Department of Emergency Management (DEM) will ensure that all medical students will receive immediate notification of all emergency alerts provided to FIU students. By definition, an emergency at FIU can include all of the following:          

Fatal or critical accidents, injuries or illnesses occurring on university premises, involving employees, students or visitors University-related transportation accidents involving hazardous materials or major property damage Reports of acute illnesses involving persons or animals, arising from chemical or biological emissions or exposures on university premises Reports of acute illnesses or injuries arising from the consumption or use of any product purchased, sold or distributed by the university or on university premises Major spills or emission of hazardous materials inside buildings on university premises to the extent that the well-being of university community, the local community and/or the environment may be affected Natural disasters, including storms, floods, hurricanes, or tornadoes Fires, explosions, bomb threats and terrorist threats on and off campus Violence or rioting on or in close proximity to university premises Extended and/or widespread utility interruptions with particular emphasis on how they affect class schedules, research projects, university residential facilities, or the ability of the university to continue normal operations Unauthorized major work stoppages, boycotts or threatened boycotts of university-sponsored events.

In addition to the above, any incident that has the potential for adverse publicity involving campus resources, and/or instruments of the university, may be considered of sufficient gravity to activate the university’s emergency plan. During an emergency, there are several ways that students of HWCOM will receive alerts from the FIU Department of Emergency Management (DEM). First, emergency messages will be broadcast to emergency VoIP phones located in most classrooms, offices, and buildings, as well as to FIU e-mail accounts. Audio messages and sirens will be broadcast via outdoor speakers. Students and staff can receive emergency text messages to their personal cell phones by signing up for Panther Alert, the emergency text messaging system designed to alert FIU students and staff, as well as their friends and families. Panther Alert will provide automatic text message notification to medical students’ cell phones during an emergency that affects the university. All students are urged to visit the FIU homepage, http://fiu.edu for a link and instructions on how to sign up for Panther Alert. FIU’s Department of Emergency Management maintains a website (http://dem.fiu.edu) that provides immediate status updates throughout emergency situations. The DEM works to mitigate, plan and prepare for emergencies; educate the FIU community about preparedness; coordinate emergency response and recovery efforts and collect and disseminate critical information. Inherent in the DEM mission is the continued and safe operation of the university.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-63


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

In Case of Emergency Be prepared. All students should take a few minutes to visit the website of the FIU Department of Emergency Management: http://dem.fiu.edu to learn how to prepare for the following types of emergencies:      

Hurricanes Thunderstorms and lightning Tornadoes Floods Criminal threats Pandemics

The Department of Emergency Management works to mitigate, plan and prepare for emergencies; educate the FIU community about preparedness; coordinate emergency response and recovery efforts; and collect and disseminate critical information to the entire FIU community. FIU Classes and Clerkships All classes in the basic and clinical sciences that are scheduled on any FIU campus will follow the university’s temporary closure policy. Students who are assigned to clinical clerkships that take place outside of the FIU campuses at the time of a local or geographically widespread emergency should contact the Clinical Affiliate Dean of the specific site for specific instructions pertaining to students’ instructional responsibilities. As a general rule, clinical care responsibilities are expected to be fulfilled and students should follow the policies of the affiliate clinical site where they are currently rotating. Students on clinical rotations are generally expected to report to their hospital assignments unless severe weather conditions prohibit safe travel; each student should make a prudent judgment as to the possibility of safe travel. The student should contact his/her resident, the clerkship director, and the Office of Student Affairs. Throughout the emergency, students should tune in to local television and radio broadcasts to remain informed regarding emergencies affecting any of the FIU campuses. This is especially true regarding hurricanes, tropical storms, and other natural disasters. In addition, students can contact the FIU HELP line at 305.348.HELP for the latest updates, as well as one of two online sources: the FIU home page www.fiu.edu or the home page for the FIU Department of Emergency Management http://dem.fiu.edu. As soon as possible after an emergency, you should establish contact with your professors and/or clerkship coordinators. Please refer to the new informational poster as a reference when you make your preparations for the hurricane season. Please share it with your friends and family. Additional information and useful preparedness links can be found at the website for the FIU Department of Emergency Management: http://dem.fiu.edu. Emergency Response Communication System FIU plans for all types of emergencies that may affect the university community. An important part of that plan is an intentionally redundant communication system. Depending on the situation, some or all of these communication vehicles may be activated to alert the entire FIU community about impending emergency situations, as well as post-emergency plans for continuity of operations:

IV-64

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

FIU Media Alerts FIU Alerts*

Text messages

Informacast

Phones in classrooms/offices and outdoor speakers

FIU Department of Emergency Management

http://dem.fiu.edu

FIU web page

www.fiu.edu

FIU News

http://news.fiu.edu

Facebook

www.facebook.com/floridainternational

Twitter

http://twitter.com/FIU http://twitter.com/FIUnews

FIU Help Line

305.FIU.HELP (305.348.4357)

Local News Media

TV, Radio, Newspapers

*FIU Alerts notifies students, faculty, and staff of emergencies via text messages to their mobile phones. The HWCOM Office of Student Affairs registers students automatically for this service.

General Safety Guidelines There are inherent risks in any situation requiring contact with the public. Students must be aware of the need for personal safety and act accordingly to minimize risks. The safety and security of medical students are the first priority of HWCOM. Safety and security practices will be reviewed prior to community and clinical experiences. Examples of such educational training programs include:     

universal precautions needlestick prevention response to needlestick or bodily fluid exposure de-escalation techniques when dealing with angry patient emergency procedures involving medical care (e.g., CPR), natural disasters, terrorism, assault, illegal activities, and others.

While working in community settings, including hospitals, clinics, home visits, and other off-campus venues, medical students should take precautions and use common sense including but not limited to the following:      

Be aware of your surroundings. Don’t stand out (e.g., wearing flashy or expensive jewelry). Don’t carry excessive amounts of money. Don’t leave valuables in plain sight. Travel in pairs whenever possible. Keep car doors locked and windows closed.

While working or studying on campus, it is important to note that the Department of Public Safety has jurisdiction over the entire university, including HWCOM. Emergency phones have been installed at strategic locations around HWCOM and university, which connect directly to the Department of Public Safety. Students are urged to take notice of and become familiar with their locations. As members of the

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-65


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 FIU community, students can enhance their personal safety and help keep the campus safe by taking precautions, including but not limited to, the following:  

 

Use prudent precautions for personal safety including walking in pairs in isolated places or during the evening. Students should not hesitate to call Public Safety to request a student escort or other security services at night. Keep close watch on your personal property. Do not leave personal property such as books, audio or video players, cell phones, PDA’s, laptops, purses, wallets, jewelry, cameras, or other valuable objects unattended or out of your sight or in classrooms, the library, restrooms, clinic, campus dining areas, the bookstore, your vehicle, or in any public place. Report all on-campus thefts to the Department of Public Safety. o Non-emergency: 305.348.2626 Report any suspicious persons or activities to the Department of Public Safety. o Emergency, on-campus: 305.348.5911

While fulfilling HWCOM educational objectives, students must also be aware of the need for personal safety and act accordingly to minimize risks. The key message for students is to be cautious and use common sense. Always listen to your “gut” and follow your instincts. If an environment or situation feels unsafe, stay calm and leave immediately. Discuss with a faculty supervisor and/or call law enforcement. Additional guidelines will be provided prior to the start of the household visits. Emergency contact information:   

For all off-campus emergencies, call 911. For all on-campus emergencies and urgent scenarios involving safety, call FIU Public Safety at 305.348.5911 for the Modesto A. Maidique Campus or 305.919.5911 for the Biscayne Bay Campus. For non-urgent safety concerns or questions, contact: o University Police Non-Emergency UP: 305.348.2626 o University Police Non-Emergency BBC: 305.919.5559

Students may also contact HWCOM Office of Student Affairs to address these issues and seek guidance regarding non-urgent situations. Call 305.348.0644 Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and call 305.348.0696 for urgent matters during nights and weekends. Medical students who reside in the FIU residential housing should be familiar with the safety policies established by the Department of Housing and Residential Life (http://www.fiu.edu/life-at-fiu/housing).

IV-66

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

I. Technical Standards Candidates for the MD degree must be able to fully and promptly perform the essential functions in each of the following categories: Observation, Communication, Motor, Intellectual, and Behavioral/Social. However, it is recognized that degrees of ability vary widely among individuals. Individuals are encouraged to discuss their disabilities with the Director of Counseling and Wellness Center of HWCOM and the FIU Disability Resource Center to determine whether there is a reasonable accommodation available to train and function effectively as a physician. (Please also see the Students with Disabilities policy.) HWCOM is committed to enabling its students with disabilities a reasonable accommodation to complete the course of study leading to the medical degree.       

Communicate effectively and sensitively with patients, health professionals, teachers, staff, and peers in settings where communication is typically oral or written, or when the time span available for communication is limited. Accurately observe a patient from a distance and at close range, obtain a medical history directly from the patient, and directly observe a patient’s medical condition. Acquire, assimilate, interpret, integrate, and apply information from direct observation and oral communication, written messages, films, slides, microscope, imaging science, ECG reports, and other media. Perform diagnostic and emergency maneuvers and procedures, such as palpation, percussion, auscultation, airway management, cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, suturing, and assisting in surgery. Perform problem-solving tasks quickly and efficiently in an environment that may change rapidly, without warning, and/or in unpredictable ways. Comprehend three-dimensional and spatial relationships. Perform procedures involved in learning the sciences fundamental to medicine. This includes the ability to participate fully in curriculum requirements in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical settings.

J. Students with Disabilities HWCOM adopts the FIU policies and procedures regarding students with disabilities. Students with specific questions regarding the FIU policies governing students with disabilities may contact the university’s Disability Resource Center (DRC). Medical students with disabilities who wish to receive accommodations based on a disability must register with the FIU Disability Resource Center. An individual with a disability is one who −with or without reasonable modifications to the rules, policies, or practices, the removal of architectural, communication, or transportation barriers, or the provision of auxiliary aids and services− meets the essential eligibility requirements for the receipt of services or the participation in programs or activities provided by the university. Disabilities may be categorized as physical, psychological, and/or learning incapacities. Students with specific questions regarding the FIU policies governing students with disabilities may contact the university’s Disability Resource Center (DRC). Medical students with disabilities who wish to receive accommodations based on a disability must register with the FIU DRC. The Disability Resource Center collaborates with students, faculty, staff, and community members to create diverse learning environments that are usable, equitable, inclusive and sustainable. The DRC provides FIU students with disabilities the necessary support to successfully complete their education and participate in activities available to all students. Students who have a diagnosed disability and plan to utilize specific academic

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-67


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 accommodations should contact DRC at 305.348.3532 or go to the office located in the Graham Center (GC) Room 190. Procedure for Using the Disability Resource Center Step 1. Student contacts DRC to schedule a Welcome Appointment, which includes an intake process. In the DRC intake process, it will be determined whether the student is qualified under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADAAA) as amended in 2008 to be a person with a legal disability (e.g., one who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more of the major life activities). Major life activities include caring for oneself, performing manual tasks, walking, seeing, speaking, breathing, learning, and working. ADAAA includes thinking and concentrating as major life activities. Students with disabilities who self-identify and request accommodations are required to provide current written documentation that includes a professional assessment of their disability along with a formal request for specific accommodations. A notification memorandum will be provided by DRC to the HWCOM Assistant Dean for Student Affairs (Counseling and Communities) stating that the student is eligible for accommodations under the ADA as amended in 2008 (ADAAA). Step 2. DRC consultation with the student and HWCOM to determine whether the accommodations requested by the student with a disability are reasonable or unreasonable. Step 3. In consultation with the student, DRC submits a written request for accommodations to the HWCOM Assistant Dean for Student Affairs (Counseling and Communities). Step 4. The Accommodations Assessment Committee is appointed by the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs to review the accommodation request. The committee consists of three voting members, two faculty members and one ad hoc member, as well as a non-voting representative from OSA. In addition, an attorney from the HWCOM Office of the General Counsel will be appointed to serve an advisory role. The committee is charged to determine whether each requested accommodation is reasonable based on the following criteria:   

The accommodation does not require significant alteration to the essential elements of the medical education program. The accommodation does not result in the lowering or waiving of academic or technical standards. The accommodation does not cause HWCOM, FIU, or its educational partners to incur undue financial burden.

Step 5. Determination on how accommodations will be delivered (if an accommodation is deemed to be reasonable, and thus granted). The committee recommends the process for delivering the accommodation and the specific responsibilities of the student and members of the faculty and administration of HWCOM. The committee will provide a letter to the student that outlines how the accommodations will be delivered. Both HWCOM and the student reserve the right to request re-evaluation by DRC or the Accommodations Assessment Committee. This request for re-evaluation of the accommodations must be submitted formally in writing. Examples of such cases include, but are not limited to, the following: the student seeks a modification of the accommodation(s); the disability is temporary or has resolved; accommodations change when the student begins formal clinical training.

IV-68

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

K. Miscellaneous Policies K-1. Sexual Battery and Harassment Policies HWCOM will adhere to the Florida International University Sexual Battery Policy contained in the FIU Student Handbook, which can be read online: http://globaldatebooksonline.com/flipbooks/flo2011/#/52 /. The Counseling and Wellness Center (CWC) is available for counseling assistance as are the FIU resources described in the Medical Student Handbook.

K-2. Non-Discrimination Policy By Federal Law and Florida Statute, the university is prohibited from giving differential consideration based on gender, sexual orientation, age, race, creed, or national origin. HWCOM adheres to this policy. FIU-103 Non-Discrimination Policy and Discrimination Complaint Procedures General Statement a. Florida International University affirms its commitment to ensure that each member of the university community shall be permitted to work or study in an environment free from any form of illegal discrimination, including race, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, marital status, and veteran status. The university recognizes its obligation to work towards a community in which diversity is valued and opportunity is equalized. This regulation establishes procedures for an applicant or a member of the university community to file a complaint of alleged discrimination or harassment. b. It shall be a violation of this regulation for any member of the university community, to discriminate against or harass, as hereinafter defined, any member of the university community or applicant. Discrimination and harassment are forms of conduct which shall result in disciplinary or other action as provided by the regulations/policies of the university. Definitions a. For the purpose of this regulation, discrimination or harassment is defined as treating any member of the university community differently than others are treated based upon race, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, marital status and/or veteran status. b. Conduct which falls into the definition of discrimination includes, but is not limited to: 1. Disparity of treatment in recruiting, hiring, training, promotion, transfer, reassignment, termination, salary and other economic benefits, and all other terms and conditions of employment on the basis of membership in one of the listed groups. 2. Disparity of treatment in educational programs and related support services on the basis of membership in one of the listed groups. 3. Limitation in access to housing, or participation in athletic, social, cultural or other activities of the university because of race, color, religion, age, sexual orientation, disability, national origin, marital status and/or veteran status. 4. Discrimination of the foregoing types on the basis of sex, unless based on bona fide requirements or distinctions, in housing, restrooms, athletics and other such areas. 5. Retaliation for filing complaints or protesting practices which are prohibited under this regulation.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-69


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 c. Conduct which falls into the definition of harassment includes, but is not limited to, harassment based on race, color, religion, age, disability, gender, sexual orientation, national origin, marital status or veteran status. (For harassment on the basis of sex, see FIU Sexual Harassment Regulation. Within the context of this regulation, harassment is defined as conduct which unreasonably interferes with an employee’s, student’s or applicant’s status or performance by creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or educational environment. It includes offensive or demeaning language or treatment of an individual, where such language or treatment is based typically on prejudicial stereotypes of a group to which an individual may belong. It includes, but is not limited to, objectionable epithets, threatened or actual physical harm or abuse, or other intimidating or insulting conduct directed against the individual. d. Scope of prohibitions: Activities covered under this regulation include, but are not limited to, all educational, athletic, cultural and social activities occurring on a campus of or sponsored by the university, housing supplied by the university, and employment practices between the university and its employees. e. When referred to in this regulation, “days” means calendar days unless otherwise noted. Procedures for Reporting Violations and Conducting Investigations and Complaints a. Administration and Consultation. The Office of Equal Opportunity Programs shall administer the policies and procedures outlined in this regulation. The Office of Equal Opportunity Programs shall answer inquiries regarding the procedures contained in this regulation and may provide informal advice regarding issues of discrimination. In cases where the potential complainant chooses not to file a formal complaint, action will be taken to inform the alleged offender of the concerns, suggesting that the individual monitor and modify (if necessary) his/her behavior. b. Complaints. i.

A complaint must be made in writing to the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs. The complaint shall contain the name of the complainant and state the nature of the act(s) complained of, including such details as the name of the alleged offender and the date(s) or approximate date(s) on which the offending act(s) occurred, the name(s) of any witnesses, and the desired resolution(s).

ii.

A complaint must be filed within 100 days of the alleged act(s) of discrimination, or in the case of a student complaint against a faculty member, within 14 days from the first day of classes for the following semester.

iii.

The Office of Equal Opportunity Programs shall investigate the formal complaint. This investigation may include, but shall not be limited to, interviewing the person complained about regarding the allegations, interview of other persons who may have information relevant to the allegations, preparation of witness statements for all persons interviewed, and review of any relevant documents. Upon completion of the investigation, a report shall be prepared which includes a summary of the complaint, a description of the investigation, the findings, and recommendations.

iv.

There may be instances in which a potential complainant is unable or unwilling to pursue a complaint of discrimination, but where the university administration is aware of the behavior. In such instances, the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs may choose to pursue an investigation of the alleged offense. The decision of whether or not to pursue an

IV-70

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 administrative complaint will be based on the egregiousness of the alleged offense, the basis for the aggrieved party’s decision not to pursue a complaint, and the apparent evidence supporting the allegations. The decision to pursue an administrative complaint shall be made by the director of the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs in consultation with the Vice President in charge of the aggrieved party’s unit and the Vice President in charge of the alleged offender’s unit, in the event that the two parties are in different units. An administrative complaint will follow the same procedures as formal complaints except that no complainant will be named. v.

In the event that a claim of discrimination is found to be frivolous or malicious, appropriate university sanctions shall be taken against the complainant, including disciplinary action where appropriate. Disciplinary action against students shall be taken in accordance with the university’s Code of Conduct for students.

c. Conciliation. The Office of Equal Opportunity Programs may attempt conciliation during the course of an investigation of a complaint. If conciliation is not achieved, then the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs shall continue to investigate the complaint, and shall issue a written finding concerning probable cause within a maximum of 100 days. If conciliation of the complaint was achieved between the parties in cooperation with the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs, and the alleged offender fails to abide by the agreement or retaliates against the complainant, the complainant or supervisor should notify the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs. The Vice President for Human Resources or a designee may then require the complaint to proceed as if conciliation had not been reached. d. Findings. The report of the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs shall be made known to the Vice President for Human Resources or designee, the complainant, the alleged offender, the immediate supervisor of the alleged offender, and the appropriate vice president. e. Review. i.

Either party may seek review of the finding of the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs to the Vice President for Human Resources or a designee by filing a request for a review (“appeal”) within twenty 20 days of receipt of the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs finding. It shall specify the basis of the appeal. The appeal shall be based on one or more of the following: relevant evidence was not reviewed and/or new evidence is available, or the factual evidence was insufficient to support the findings.

ii.

The appeal shall be in writing, and shall set forth the issues to be considered in the appeal. Copies of the appeal shall be provided to the opposing party and to the Director, Equal Opportunity Programs. 3. The opposing party and the Director, Equal Opportunity Programs, may file a response to the appeal to the Vice President for Human Resources or designee within 20 days of receipt of the appeal.

iii.

The Vice President for Human Resources or designee shall issue a written finding no more than 20days after receipt of the appeal, or of a response to the appeal, whichever is later.

f.

Resolution. Upon final acceptance by the Vice President for Human Resources or designee of a written finding on the complaint, the immediate supervisor of the alleged offender may provide a reasonable resolution to the complaint (e.g., that a student be allowed to change sections, that the employee report to a different supervisor) and may also recommend or take disciplinary action against the alleged offender. The proposed resolution shall be approved by the Office of Equal

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-71


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 Opportunity Programs. Disciplinary action shall be taken in accordance with the regulations and policies affecting the class of employee and the terms of any applicable collective bargaining agreement. g. Prohibition of Retaliation. No university employee shall retaliate against a complainant or any person involved in the process. Any attempt to penalize a complainant or anyone involved in the process through any form of retaliation shall be treated as a separate allegation of discrimination. Specific Authority Board of Governors’ Resolution dated January 7, 2003. History–New 7-6-97, Amended 11-3-02, 11-15-04, Formerly 6C8-1.009, Amended 9-12-08. The FIU HWCOM values diversity, as a diverse faculty and student body enhances the learning environment for all students.

K-3. Medical Student Employment Medical students enrolled at HWCOM should not undertake any type of employment outside of HWCOM. The rigorous demands of the medical school curricula in the basic sciences and the clinical clerkships require the full energy, attention and time of the student. However, on rare occasions, individual exceptions may be made due to documented financial hardship. Students who feel they need additional income and thus absolutely must work are required to provide a written request to the Executive Associate Dean of Student Affairs prior to starting work or during the first day of Orientation Week. The medical student will also be required to provide verified documentation of financial burden to the Office of Financial Aid and have a personal consultation with the Director of Financial Aid. The final decision regarding employment will be made by the Executive Associate Dean of Student Affairs or designee. These students will also be expected to attend classes and clinical rotations like any other medical student and maintain a satisfactory academic record throughout their medical school experience. Violations of this policy or a student’s inability to maintain satisfactory academic performance will be subject to review by MSEPC.

K-4. Jury Duty One of the Constitutional rights to all American citizens is the fundamental right to a trial by jury. As an American citizen, it is your privilege and duty to serve as a juror when called upon. Failure to comply with a jury summons can result in a large fine and/or contempt of court. However, it is very reasonable and acceptable to request a postponement from service on the dates indicated on your summons. Students who receive notices regarding “jury duty” service should apply to postpone the dates of service to a break or vacation period, to minimize the impact on courses and clinical responsibilities. There is no state of Florida exemption of jury duty responsibilities for students. To apply for postponement: If the date of jury service is inconvenient, students must write a short letter stating the reasons for postponement (e.g., mandatory attendance at medical school classes and clinical responsibilities). In addition, students are required to complete the “yes, no” questions on page 2 of the summons, including name, telephone number and signature, and mail the letter and summons to the address located above the juror badge. In this letter, you may request a specific Monday or Wednesday that falls between 4 and 12 weeks from the date you are scheduled to serve, or a random future date will be assigned to you. Requested dates are usually accommodated. Students must provide the date of their next school break. All requests must be in writing as telephone requests will not be accepted. For more information about jury duty service, students should review the information at the following URL’s:  

IV-72

Miami-Dade County: http://www.jud11.flcourts.org/jury_service/default.htm Broward County: http://www.clerk-17th-flcourts.org/ClerkWebsite/welcome2.aspx

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 

State of Florida: www.flcourts.org and follow the link to the website for the Miami- Dade County Courts or the Broward County Clerk of the Courts.

K-5. Media Requests for Student Interviews HWCOM follows the FIU Media Policy, which can be found at http://policies.fiu.edu. Students should contact HWCOM Office of Student Affairs (OSA) whenever approached by members of the media, including radio, television, newspaper, magazine, cable, Internet, etc. Media personnel are required to have permission from the FIU Office of Media Relations before approaching anyone on campus. The deans at OSA will make the appropriate contact with the Office of Media Relations. All students, faculty, and staff must be careful that the privacy of patients and colleagues, as well as the professional work of researchers must be respected. Thoughtless, incomplete, or casual answers to some media queries could have serious ethical or legal repercussions and could be a breach of HIPAA or FERPA regulation.

K-6. Lost and Found Articles that are found in classrooms or other public areas within HWCOM should be brought to the Office of Student Affairs (OSA). Students who have lost an item should first contact the OSA. If the missing item is not there, students should contact the Department of Public Safety at 305.348.2626.

Section IV: Policies and Regulations

IV-73


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

IV-74

Section IV: Policies and Regulations


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Section V: Student Activities and FIU Services

Panther Communities The Panther Communities provide an educational and social environment to promote a sense of community and unity within the medical school environment. The Panther Communities are designed to enable medical students to socialize and study with other students at all stages of the medical school experience, as well as to network informally with faculty, Office of Student Affairs staff, as well as physicians and other health care professionals in the local community at other medical schools. The overall goal of student learning communities is to facilitate the physical, emotional, social, intellectual, spiritual, and professional development of the medical students. Students who are connected and supported by the community structure learn more efficiently and effectively through shared peer-to-peer educational and social experiences. Developing long-lasting interpersonal relationships is invaluable for productive learning, creating a support network during the medical school years, and for fostering future professional success. In addition, enhanced student-staff interactions will allow for earlier and more effective interventions that could lead students to obtain prophylactic and/or therapeutic academic and/or counseling assistance earlier in the course of academic deficiency. HWCOM has four Panther Communities: Anderson, Hippocrates, Pasteur, and Semmelweis, each named after notable physicians and medical scientists. Each Panther Community consists of equal numbers of medical students from all classes. Each student remains in the same assigned Panther Community throughout the four-year medical school experience. Each year, the students of each Panther Community elect a mayor to serve as its administrative leader, as well as a vice mayor, secretary, treasurer, and historian. During the four-year medical school experience, FIU medical students are expected to develop the following skills necessary to become knowledgeable, empathic, culturally competent, and patient-centered physicians: 

  

Leadership skills: Student leaders not only contribute to the quality of the medical school environment but also gain valuable experience that will prepare them for leadership roles as physicians. Each class elects officers who represent the class in academic matters, plan activities, and organize social events. Interpersonal and communication skills: Students will learn the importance of developing strong interpersonal relationships as well as assertiveness, cultural competency, and conflict resolution skills. Academic skills: The Panther Communities provide opportunities for students to share their best practices with their peers in terms of tutoring, mentorship, as well as share their successful study, time management, and test-preparation skills. Professional skills: Professional skills development will be fostered in the Panther Communities through the following activities, including but not limited to: o Clinical skills, patient simulation o Suturing, blood drawing, and skin biopsy techniques o EKG reading workshops o Sessions devoted to preparation for residency applications, resume writing, and interview skills o Guest speakers representing a variety of medical specialties and non-medical disciplines

Section V: Student Activities and FIU Services

V-1


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 o

Community involvement through established contacts affiliated with the Green Family Foundation NeighborhoodHELP™ program, including public schools, religious organizations, and local government. o Collaboration with various allied health departments and groups at FIU to participate in health fairs and health theme events and presentations, the Healthy University Task Force initiatives, as well as participate with the College of Nursing and Health Sciences and the Stempel School of Public Health and Social Work. o Student participation in annual fundraising events such as Relay for Life, the American Heart Association Walk, and other altruistic endeavors. Social skills: The Panther Communities are truly a “home away from home” providing medical students with a sense of belonging to a smaller group and providing social support to help students with a variety of issues, including the following: personal health care (taking care of the care-giver); stress management; personal strengths; physical fitness; financial planning and debt management; parenting; relationships; housing; cultural entertainment; friendly athletic, talent, and academic competitions; and the establishment of new HWCOM traditions.

The Panther Communities provide students with informal opportunities to share various aspects of their medical student experiences with their peers. There will be opportunities for students to interact with faculty in a social setting outside of the classroom, laboratory, and clinical setting as well as informal opportunities for medical students to interact with students majoring in nursing, public health, and other allied health disciplines where discussions regarding professionalism, innovation, community service, leadership, and research could take place. In addition, medical students have opportunities to collaborate with the medical students at the University of Miami, Florida Atlantic University, Nova Southeastern University, and other universities, to provide community service in a variety of different programs and activities, such as health fairs and medical missions. Finally, extracurricular programs are developed as part of the Panther Community experience to introduce students to physicians of various specialties and ethnicities designed to enhance cultural competency and professionalism in ways that complement learning in the classroom and clinical settings.

Panther Communities  ANDERSON

HIPPOCRATES

PASTEUR

SEMMELWEIS

V-2

      

Named after physician Elizabeth G. Anderson who was the first female physician in Britain and the first female mayor in England. Community color: green Named after ancient Greek physician Hippocrates, regarded as the Western Father of Medicine Community color: silver Named after physician Louis Pasteur who confirmed the germ theory and is known as the one of the three main founders of microbiology. Community color: red Named after physician Ignaz Semmelweis who discovered that hand washing could reduce the spread of infections in obstetrical patients. Community color: blue

Section V: Student Activities and FIU Services


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Medical Student Organizations Students at HWCOM can form groups based on common beliefs and interests; they may express their views through these student organizations as permitted by their constitution. As of June 2012, FIU HWCOM sponsors chapters of the following national medical student organizations:     

American Medical Association (AMA) American Medical Student Association (AMSA) American Medical Women's Association (AMWA) Latin Medical Student Association (LMSA) Student National Medical Association (SNMA)

In addition, students may participate in any of the following specialty interest groups (as of June 2012):              

Dermatology Interest Group Emergency Medicine Interest Group Family Medicine Interest Group Internal Medicine Interest Group MedSWISH (Medical Students Working to Improve Society and Health, a student-run clinic) Military Medicine Interest Group Neurosciences Interest Group Non-profit, Global Health Interest Group Obstetrics and Gynecology Interest Group Ophthalmology Interest Group Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine Interest Group Pediatrics Interest Group Radiology Interest Group Surgery Interest Group

Students requesting to start a new medical student organization must complete the appropriate registration form and submit it to their Panther Community Coordinator. Prior to approval and inception, student organizers of all proposed new medical student organizations must select a faculty advisor approved by the Office of Student Affairs. Organizations desiring to use FIU HWCOM facilities for their activities and meetings must be recognized by the institution. The Deans in the Office of Student Affairs have the power to grant and to suspend recognition to student organizations. Students must agree that all meetings must be conducted with due regard to the laws governing defamation and comply with all policies and procedures at FIU and HWCOM. Libelous defamatory statements are not constitutionally protected and could subject a student group and its members to legal action. Students’ statements are not constitutionally protected, and could subject a student group or its members to legal action. Students are also advised that unauthorized use of copyrighted material may violate trademark or copyright laws. Students must ensure care that all publications are free of libelous statements and contain adequate citations to original sources. All major student publications (e.g., yearbook, humanities journal) must be reviewed and approved by the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs (Counseling and Communities) or designee.

Specialty Interest Groups and FIU Chapters of National Medical Student Organizations All HWCOM medical student organizations are student-initiated organizations under the auspices of the Office of Student Affairs. The elected student officers of the Medical Student Council, under the direction of the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs (Counseling and Communities), provide administrative oversight in terms of funding and legislation for all organizations sponsored by the Office of Student Affairs. Each group Section V: Student Activities and FIU Services

V-3


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 is led by an executive board of student-elected officers and selects a faculty advisor to provide oversight and guidance. Through their active participation, student members are exposed to more professional, scholarly, social, and cultural opportunities than afforded by the traditional curriculum and clinical clerkships. Some of the more popular endeavors include student-led clinical activities under the direction of faculty advisors, including community health fairs and educational programs, as well as shadowing experiences with established practicing specialists in the community that serve as role models and mentors. Medical student organizations and specialty interest groups provide students with opportunities to attend educational meetings and conferences sponsored by local, regional, national, and possibly even international professional associations of that specialty. Through their participation, medical students become knowledgeable about, and may even consider becoming an active medical student member of, one or more professional associations of that specialty. Medical Student Council The Medical Student Council (MSC) is the voice of the medical student body and has the administrative authority to pass resolutions on medical school policies and procedures by serving as the formal liaison between the faculty, administration, and the medical students. Officers are elected by the students in annual elections and consist of President, Vice President, Treasurer, Secretary, and FIU Student Government Representative. In addition, the Presidents of the four Class Councils comprise the MSC leadership. The MSC serves as the umbrella student organization for the management and allocation of funds to the other medical student organizations in a consistent and fair manner that contributes to the education of students. The Faculty Advisor is the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs (Counseling and Communities) and the MSC receives administrative guidance from the Assistant Director for Panther Communities. Parents and Family Association Parents, spouses, and domestic partners of medical students are eligible and encouraged to join the Parents and Family Association. For more information, visit http://medicine.fiu.edu/education/md/student-supportservices/student-orgs/parent-association/index.html.

V-4

Section V: Student Activities and FIU Services


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Funding for Student Activities One of the primary functions of the MSC is to responsibly allocate funds to the student body/student organizations. The following Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) has been established by the MSC to provide efficient and equitable distribution of funds to support students for professional development and extracurricular opportunities, working in concert with the mission of the OSA and the HWCOM. Fund Allocation Types: 

General Allocations: General Allocation Funding is defined as funding requested to support student programs and organizations. General Allocation Funding from MSC may only be requested by FIU HWCOM recognized organizations (Interest Groups, Panther Communities, Subcommittees, etc.). Faculty and staff may request funds only for purposes that will directly benefit the students. General allocation funding is awarded with a higher priority than Special Allocation Funding.

Special Allocations: Special Allocation Funding is defined as funding requested to support FIU HWCOM students or programs that do not qualify as General Allocations. Examples of Special Allocations include but are not limited to: individual student travel for conferences, special programs for the student body arranged by the MSC, and funding requests that exceed the general allocation funding limit.

Application forms and guidelines to request MSC funding are available on the MSC website. Funding for student activities and professional development, including travel to conferences and meetings, may be obtained from the following sources:      

Budgeted monies allocated through the OSA annual budget, Allocated FIU Graduate Student Funding (GSF) and Council of Student Organization (CSO) funds based on a specific program and/or activity, External funding – financial resources obtained by students or faculty in the form of sponsorships and/or purchases (e.g., hospital affiliates, other community organizations, Parents and Family Association, HWCOM Development Office, project grants, etc.), Earned monies from various projects of the Panther Communities and medical student organizations (e.g., bake sales, car washes, consultations, etc.), Funds provided by national, state, and local organizations directly to their FIU HWCOM chapters (e.g., AMA, AMSA, AMWA, FMIG, etc.), and Direct contributions from students.

All students must abide by the following procedure when requesting funds to support student activities, including participation at professional conferences.    

Students should first contact their Panther Community Coordinator to receive consultation regarding procedure and applicable forms to receive funding for approved activities sponsored by any of the four Panther communities and any recognized medical student organization. Students seeking funds for other types of student programs (e.g., professional conferences, travel, medical missions, purchase of equipment, etc.) should consult with the Assistant Director of Panther Communities to obtain necessary paperwork and procedures. Budgeted monies are subject to State of Florida and FIU rules of application and utilization. The same applies to GSF and CSO monies. Donated, earned, and contributed monies can be used in any way the organization chooses, provided it is not deposited in the Foundation (FIU) account. Once monies are deposited in the Foundation account, the same regulations apply as for OSA-budgeted, GSF, and CSO monies.

Section V: Student Activities and FIU Services

V-5


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013  

 

Once the available funds are totally used from an organizational account, no other disbursements can be made until the next financial year (July 1 to June 30). Request for funds disbursements and the subsequent utilization of funds requires student application to the sponsoring organization or unit (e.g., MSC, Panther Community, Specialty Interest Group, Medical Student Organization, etc.) prior to the event. Approval for funds disbursements is at the discretion of the sponsoring organization or unit based on their current financial and administrative procedures. MSC funding requires application before purchase of travel tickets or a lodging commitment. MSC cannot fund or pay for “non-travel related” costs. Students cannot receive reimbursements from FIU accounts.

Failure to follow the above procedures could result in denial of funding request or loss of any reimbursement for out-of-pocket expenses. Students should contact the Assistant Director of Panther Communities for specific questions pertaining to financial and administrative operations.

V-6

Section V: Student Activities and FIU Services


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

FIU Student Services Preventive and Therapeutic Health Services Medical and mental health services available to Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine (HWCOM) students include primary medical care and health education for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of routine illness and injury, as well as personal counseling. Students may receive medical services at a convenient ambulatory care center located on each FIU campus. Modesto A. Maidique campus, where HWCOM is located, houses the University Health Services Complex (UHSC), a 20,000-square-foot facility with a General Medical Clinic, Women’s Health Services, Wellness Center, pharmacy, immunization and laboratory services, Counseling and Psychological Services Center, and a Victim Advocacy Center. Clinic, lab, and pharmacy services are available Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Ultrasound diagnostic exams are available by appointment. Students who require diagnostic radiology services (X-rays, CT, MRI, nuclear medicine testing) are referred to community diagnostic centers that accept applicable insurance benefits plans. The health clinic on Biscayne Bay Campus, located approximately 28 miles from Modesto A. Maidique campus, is housed in a 2,200-square-foot facility with clinic and lab services available Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Clinical Care Services Services are offered to registered, health-fee-paying students through the University Health Services as described on the FIU website at http://studenthealth.fiu.edu. Appointments are not required, but are recommended. Nominal fees are charged for such ancillary services as vaccines, lab tests, medications, and office procedures; this fee is considerably lower than that charged by local urgent care centers and emergency rooms. Wellness Center Services Services at the FIU Wellness Center include one-on-one consultations, computerized fitness assessments, and anonymous human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing and counseling. Alternative therapies include massage therapy, aromatherapy, acupuncture, and chiropractic services. Appointments are required to access the Wellness Center services and for personal consultations. FIU Pharmacy The FIU pharmacy is a complete outpatient pharmacy staffed by a licensed pharmacist. The pharmacy fills prescriptions from FIU medical staff and outside physicians. Over-the-counter medications are available on site. Student Health Fee HWCOM students pay the total annual FIU Student Health Fee (currently $249.57) in two equal installments when tuition is due in August and January. Payment of the Student Health Fee entitles medical students to unlimited office visits to the doctor, nurse practitioner, or registered nurse, as well as the various clinical services, health education consultations, and health promotion programs. The Student Health Fee is not an insurance policy and covers only medical and mental health services rendered on campus at the health care center or the Counseling and Psychological Services Center. All medical students are required to purchase and maintain adequate health insurance coverage throughout their medical school experience to help pay for services that may be needed outside of the scope of services provided on campus (e.g., emergency room, specialty care, diagnostic testing, hospitalization).

Section V: Student Activities and FIU Services

V-7


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 Students who are on clinical rotations ordinarily receive routine medical care services at the FIU University Health Services General Medical Clinic and Women’s Health Services Clinic during normal business hours Monday through Friday. They also may see their private physician, if desired. Students who require medical care at a time when they are expected to be present at their clinical site should first contact their clerkship coordinator to obtain advance permission. Students requiring urgent or emergency care during a clinical rotation at a hospital affiliate or at any other location may receive care at that facility or the nearest facility that provides the required service. All medical students are required to maintain continuous health insurance coverage that meets basic minimum requirements, including medical coverage within Miami-Dade and Broward counties. Because students are required to have health insurance, access to medical care locally should not be limited. Students taking rotations at sites located outside of the South Florida area (Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, and Monroe Counties), including international programs, must meet the minimum requirements of the host institution. This may include receiving additional vaccinations and lab tests, drug screening, additional health insurance coverage, medical examinations, respirator mask fit testing, malpractice insurance, passport, and other tests and documents. Students are responsible for scheduling appointments and paying for additional tests and procedures.

Other FIU Student Services             

V-8

FIU Police Department and Public Safety, http://police.fiu.edu FIU Emergency Alerts – Department of Emergency Management, http://dem.fiu.edu/ FIU Student Handbook and Campus Life, http://campuslife.fiu.edu University Health Services, http://studenthealth.fiu.edu Victim Advocacy Center, http://advocacy.fiu.edu Graham University Center, http://guc.fiu.edu/default.aspx FIU Athletics, http://fiusports.com Recreation Services, http://www.recreation.fiu.edu Housing and Residential Life, http://www.fiu.edu/life-at-fiu/housing/index.html Transportation and Parking, http://www.fiu.edu/life-at-fiu/transportation-parking/index.html Patricia and Philip Frost Art Museum, http://thefrost.fiu.edu Wolfsonian-FIU, http://wolfsonian.fiu.edu Biscayne Bay Campus Resources, http://bbcclo.fiu.edu/resources.html

Section V: Student Activities and FIU Services


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Section VI: Appendices

1.

Academic Calendars ................................................................................................. A-2

2.

Assessment of HWCOM Educational Program Objectives and General Competencies .......................................................................................... A-4

3.

FIU Campus Maps Modesto A. Maidique Campus ............................................................... A-5 Biscayne Bay Campus ............................................................................ A-6

4.

Map of Affiliate Hospitals ........................................................................................ A-7

5.

Access to Health Services ....................................................................................... A-8

6.

Excused Absence Form ............................................................................................ A-9

7.

Leave of Absence Form ......................................................................................... A-10

8.

Biosafety Plan......................................................................................................... A-11

9.

Counseling Services ............................................................................................... A-12

10.

Faculty Directors .................................................................................................... A-13

11.

Health Information: Meningitis and Hepatitis B .................................................... A-14

12.

Consent Agreement Form ...................................................................................... A-16

13.

FIU Alma Mater / FIU Fight Song ......................................................................... A-17

Appendices

A-1


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Appendix 1. Academic Calendars 2012 Monday, March 26 Monday, April 2 Monday, April 9 Monday, May 14 Monday, May 28 Wednesday June 13 – Sunday, July 29 Wednesday, July 4 Monday, July 30 Monday, August 6 – Friday, August 10 Friday, August 10 Monday, August 13 Monday, September 3 Monday, November 12 Thursday, Nov. 22 – Sunday, Nov. 25 Saturday, December 22 – Tuesday, January 1

CLASSES BEGIN Orientation to Clerkship/Research Progress CLERKSHIP BEGINS ROTATION BEGINS Memorial Day Summer Break Independence Day CLASSES RESUME Orientation White Coat Ceremony CLASSES BEGIN Labor Day Veteran’s Day Thanksgiving Break Winter Break

Period 2 (class of 2015 Period 3 (class of 2014) Period 3 (class of 2014) Period 4 (class of 2013) Period 2,3,4 Period 2 (class of 2015) Period 2,3,4 Period 2 Period 1 (class of 2016) Period 1 (class of 2016) Period 1 (class of 2016) Period 1,2,3,4 Period 1,2,3,4 Period 1,2,3,4 Period 1,2

Martin Luther King Day CLASSES END Spring Break CLASSES END Spring Break ROTATION ENDS CLERKSHIP ENDS CLASSES BEGIN CAPSTONE BEGINS (subject to change) Orientation to Clerkship/Research Progress CLERKSHIP BEGINS USMLE Study Break GRADUATION ROTATION BEGINS

Period 1,2,3,4 Period 2 (class of 2015) Period 2 Period 1 (class of 2016) Period 1 (class of 2016) Period 4 Period 3 (class of 2014) Period 2 (class of 2016) Period 4 (class of 2013) Period 3 (class of 2015) Period 3 (class of 2015) Period 3 Period 3 (class of 2014) Period 4 Period 4 (class of 2014)

2013 Monday, January 21 Friday, March 15 Saturday, March 16 – Sunday, March 31 Friday, March 22 Saturday, March 23 – Sunday March 31 Friday, March 29 Friday, March 29 Monday, April 1 Monday, April 1 Monday, April 1 Monday, April 8 Monday, April 1 – Sunday, April 28 Monday, April 29 – Sunday May 12 Monday, April 29 Monday, May 13

Dates subject to change.

A-2

Appendices


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Class of 2013 (Period 4) Monday, May 14 ............................................................... ROTATION BEGINS Monday, May 28 .............................................................. Memorial Day Wednesday, July 4 ............................................................ Independence Day Monday, September 3 ....................................................... Labor Day Monday, November 12 ..................................................... Veteran's Day Thursday, November 22 – Sunday, November 25 ............ Thanksgiving Break Monday, December 24 – Sunday, January 6 .................... Winter Break Monday, January 21 .......................................................... Martin Luther King Day Friday, March 29............................................................... ROTATION ENDS Monday, April 1 ................................................................ Capstone (subject to change) Monday, April 29 .............................................................. GRADUATION

Class of 2014 (Period 3) Monday, April 2 ................................................................ Orientation to Clerkship/Research Progress Monday, April 9 ................................................................ CLERKSHIP BEGINS Monday, May 28 ............................................................... Memorial Day Wednesday, July 4 ............................................................ Independence Day Monday, September 3 ....................................................... Labor Day Monday, November 12 ..................................................... Veteran’s Day Thursday, November 22 – Sunday, November 25 ............ Thanksgiving Day Break Monday, December 24 – Sunday, January 6 .................... Winter Break Monday, January 21 .......................................................... Martin Luther King Day Friday, March 29............................................................... CLERKSHIP ENDS Monday, April 1 – Sunday, April 28 ................................ USMLE Study Monday, April 29 – Sunday, May 12................................ Break

Class of 2015 (Period 2) Monday, March 26 ............................................................ CLASSES BEGIN Monday, May 28 ............................................................... Memorial Day Wednesday, June 13 – Sunday, July 29 ............................ Summer Break Monday, July 30................................................................ CLASSES RESUME Monday, September 3 ....................................................... Labor Day Monday, November 12 ..................................................... Veteran’s Day Thursday, November 22 – Sunday, November 25 ............ Thanksgiving Day Break Saturday, December 22 – Tuesday, January 1 .................. Winter Break Monday, January 21 .......................................................... Martin Luther King Day Friday, March 15............................................................... CLASSES END Saturday, March 16 – Sunday, March 31.......................... Spring Break

Class of 2016 (Period 1) Monday, August 6 – Friday, August 10 ............................ Orientation Friday, August 10 ............................................................. White Coat Ceremony Monday, August 13 .......................................................... CLASSES BEGIN Monday, September 3 ...................................................... Labor Day Monday, November 12 .................................................... Veteran's Day Thursday, November 22 – Sunday, November 25 ........... Thanksgiving Break Saturday, December 22 – Tuesday, January 1 ................. Winter Break Monday, January 21 ......................................................... Martin Luther King Day Friday, March 22............................................................... CLASSES END Saturday, March 23 – Sunday, March 31.......................... Spring Break

Appendices

A-3


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 Appendix 2. Assessment of HWCOM Educational Program Objectives and General Competencies

A-4

Appendices


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Appendix 3. FIU Maps: Modesto A. Maidique Campus

Appendices

A-5


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Appendix 3. FIU Maps: Biscayne Bay Campus

A-6

Appendices


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Appendix 4. Map of HWCOM Affiliate Hospitals

Appendices

A-7


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Appendix 5. Access to Health Services

A-8

Appendices


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Appendix 4. Excused Absence Form

Appendices

A-9


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Appendix 5. Leave of Absence Form

A-10

Appendices


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Appendix 6. Biosafety Plan

Appendices

A-11


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Appendix 7. Counseling Services

A-12

Appendices


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Appendix 8. Faculty Directors

Appendices

A-13


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Appendix 9. Health Information: Meningitis and Hepatitis B Meningitis Information Meningitis is an infection of the fluid of a person’s spinal cord and the fluid that surrounds the brain. People sometimes refer to it as spinal meningitis. Meningitis is usually caused by a viral or bacterial infection. Knowing whether meningitis is caused by a virus or bacterium is important because the severity of illness and the treatments differ. Viral meningitis is generally less severe and resolves without specific treatment, while bacterial meningitis can be quite severe and may result in brain damage, hearing loss, learning disability, or death. For bacterial meningitis, it is also important to know which strain of bacteria is causing the meningitis because antibiotics can prevent some types from spreading and infecting other people. Neisseria meningitidis (also called meningococcal meningitis) is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis. What are the signs and symptoms of meningitis? Common triad of symptoms: high fever, headache and stiff neck. These symptoms can develop over several hours, or they may take 1-2 days. Other symptoms include nausea, vomiting, skin rash, discomfort looking into light, confusion, and sleepiness. How is meningitis diagnosed? Early diagnosis and treatment are very important as patients should see a doctor immediately after onset of symptoms. The diagnosis is usually made in the laboratory from a sample of spinal fluid. The spinal fluid is obtained by performing a spinal tap, in which a needle is inserted into an area in the lower back where fluid in the spinal canal is readily accessible. Test results from the spinal fluid can identify if the cause is viral or bacterial and, if the latter, may help determine the selection of antibiotics most effective in treatment. Can meningitis be treated? Bacterial meningitis can be treated with a number of effective antibiotics. It is very important, however, that treatment be started early in the course of the disease. Appropriate antibiotic treatment of most common types of bacterial meningitis should reduce the risk of dying from meningitis to below 15%, although the risk is higher among the elderly. Is meningitis contagious? Yes, bacterial meningitis is highly contagious. The bacteria are spread through the exchange of respiratory and throat secretions (i.e., coughing, kissing). Fortunately, none of the bacteria that cause meningitis are as contagious as things like the common cold or the flu, and they are not spread by casual contact or by simply breathing the air where a person with meningitis has been. However, sometimes the bacteria that cause meningitis have spread to other people who have had close or prolonged contact with a patient with meningitis. People in the same household or day-care center, or anyone sharing a bathroom or having direct contact with a patient’s oral secretions (such as a boyfriend or girlfriend) would be considered at increased risk of acquiring the infection. People who qualify as close contacts of a person with meningitis caused by N. meningitidis should receive antibiotics immediately to prevent them from getting the disease. Are there vaccines against meningitis? Yes, there are vaccines that protect against some strains of N. meningitidis but there are no vaccines to protect against viral forms. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that all people at risk should receive one dose of the conjugate vaccine (Menactra) whenever possible. This is particularly true for college students who are under the age of 25 and live in close quarters with others or someone who has had his/her spleen removed; these are two groups who have an increased risk of acquiring meningococcal infection relative to other persons their age. To learn more about meningococcal meningitis and the vaccine, contact your physician, the FIU University Health Services or visit the CDC web site at www.cdc.gov.

A-14

Appendices


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013 Hepatitis B Information Hepatitis B is a serious infectious disease caused by a virus that attacks the liver. The hepatitis B virus (HBV) can cause life-long infection that may lead to cirrhosis (scarring) of the liver, liver cancer, liver failure, or death. There is no cure for hepatitis B, but the infection can be prevented by vaccination. Symptoms of the Disease Symptoms of hepatitis B can resemble the flu and may include fever, loss of appetite, low energy, joint pain, cramping, or nausea and vomiting, as well as jaundice (yellow skin or eyes). However, in about 50 percent of cases, hepatitis B causes no symptoms and some of these become chronic carriers who are able to transmit the disease to others. Transmission of the Disease Hepatitis B is contagious and spreads when the blood or other body fluids of a person with the virus are absorbed into an individual’s blood stream. The hepatitis B virus can live in all body fluids of an infected person, including blood, saliva, semen, and vaginal fluids. It can enter the body through cuts, tears, or abrasions in the skin and through mucous membranes of the mouth, vagina, anus, and eyes. Hepatitis B can be transmitted through sexual contact; by sharing razors, toothbrushes, shared needles for drug injection, or by getting a tattoo or body piercing using non-sterile instruments or needles. Risk Factors for Hepatitis B Anyone who comes in contact with the blood or body fluids of an infected person is at risk for hepatitis B. Certain behaviors can increase the risk, including unprotected sex (vaginal, anal, and oral); getting a tattoo or body piercing; sharing items such as razors, earrings, and toothbrushes; sharing injection drug paraphernalia; travel abroad to areas where the disease is widespread; health care and other occupations that involve exposure to infected blood or body fluids, and household contact with someone with chronic infection. Vaccination Recommendations for College Students A vaccine is available to help protect against hepatitis B. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends vaccination of everyone age 18 and under, and anyone at high risk for hepatitis B, including health care professionals. The American College Health Association (ACHA) recommends that all college students be vaccinated. The hepatitis B vaccine is safe and effective. The most common side effect of the vaccine is soreness at the site of the injection. Vaccination requires a series of three shots over a six-month period. About four weeks after the third dose, a Hepatitis B surface antibody blood titer is required to document postvaccination immunity and is required by most of the FIU HWCOM hospital affiliates. A booster series of three vaccines over another six months is necessary if the blood antibody titer is negative although the vaccine is effective in protecting more than 96 percent of those who complete the three-dose vaccination series. Students who have not yet submitted the pre-matriculation documentation of complete hepatitis B immunity with positive antibody titer results will not be permitted to participate in any medical procedures at any of the HWCOM clinical affiliates that potentially could increase the risk of transmission of blood borne pathogens until the student is cleared. Other Forms of Prevention In addition to vaccination, people can modify their behavior by using condoms during sex and avoiding tattooing and body piercing with non-sterile instruments or techniques. People should also avoid sharing needles, razors, or toothbrushes. For more information about Hepatitis B and other infectious diseases To learn more about hepatitis B and the vaccine, please contact your physician, visit the CDC web site at www.cdc.gov, or contact the FIU University Health Services (www.fiu.edu/~health) to receive the vaccine.

Appendices

A-15


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Appendix 10. Consent Agreement Form

A-16

Appendices


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine – Medical Student Handbook 2012–2013

Appendix 11. FIU Alma Mater and FIU Fight Song To view the lyrics and listen to the FIU Alma Mater and Fight Song online, go to http://fiualumni.com/page.aspx?pid=593 .

FIU Alma Mater Hail to thee dear FIU With voices true we pledge to thee All our love and our devotion Humble faith and loyalty We will strive for understanding and for peace and unity We will search for truth and wisdom We will always honor thee FIU alma mater Hail hail to thee

FIU Fight Song We are the panthers of FIU the golden panthers of FIU We will continue to fight with all of our might for victory for gold and blue we stand together and proudly say our golden panthers go all the way We'll always strive for victory blue-blooded through and through 'cause we're F-I-UGo F Go I Go U Go F-I-U Panthers fight! Panthers fight! Panthers fight! (repeat)

Appendices

A-17


Medical Student Handbook 2012-2013