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Student Handbook

2009-2010

43 Dreams that will touch thousands. Class of 2013. Inaugural year.


The FIU Medical Student Oath (patterned after the Oath of Hippocrates)

I do solemnly swear by that which I hold most sacred; That I will be loyal to the profession of medicine and just and generous to all; That I will lead my life and practice my art in uprightness and honor; That into whatsoever house I shall enter, it shall be for the good of the sick to the utmost of my power. I shall hold myself aloof from wrong, from corruption, and from the temptation of others to vice; That I will exercise my art solely for the cure of my patients, and will give no drug, perform no operation for a criminal purpose, even if solicited, and far less suggest such a thing. That whatsoever I shall see or hear of the lives of others which is not fitting to be spoken, I will keep inviolably secret. These things I do promise, and in proportion as I am faithful to this, my oath, may happiness and good repute be ever mine – the opposite if I shall be forsworn.


Florida International University

The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Student Handbook

2009-2010

43 Dreams that will touch thousands. Class of 2013. Inaugural year.

Information current as of June 30, 2009. Published by: FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Office of Student Affairs Sanford Markham, M.D. – Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs Editors: Robert Dollinger, M.D., Assistant Dean for Student Affairs Jody Lehman, J.D., Deputy General Counsel, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Liz Marston, J.D., Associate General Counsel, FIU Office of the General Counsel Handbook Design and Production Team: Robert Dollinger, M.D., Office of Student Affairs Aileen Solå-Trautmann, Senior Designer, FIU Publications Hope Herman, Senior Account Manager, FIU Marketing and New Media


The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction

Welcome to Florida International University...........................................................7 Preamble..............................................................................................................8 Dean’s Message...................................................................................................9 Welcome from the Office of Student Affairs.........................................................10 Florida International University: A Brief History.....................................................11 History of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine...........................................13 College of Medicine Mission & Goals...................................................................16 Definitions...........................................................................................................18 Facilities .............................................................................................................20 Student Lounge..................................................................................................20

I. Office of Student Affairs (OSA) OSA General Services OSA Mission, Vision, Values.........................................................................23 Organization and Activities...........................................................................24 Admission to the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine..............................28 Tutoring . .....................................................................................................28 Faculty Mentors and Advising.......................................................................29 Counseling Services Personal Counseling: The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Student Counseling & Wellness Center.........................................................30 Provision of Psychological Counseling & Medical Care to Medical Students.32 Academic Counseling; Careers in Medicine..................................................33 Financial Counseling; Financial Aid...............................................................35 Tuition Refund Policy....................................................................................37

II. Academic Affairs and Clinical Affairs

1. Curriculum Overview.......................................................................................39 2. Requirements for the Doctorate of Medicine Degree.......................................43 3. The NeighborhoodHELP™ Program...............................................................43 4. Affiliate Clinical Sites . .....................................................................................45 5. Jackson North Medical Center........................................................................46 6. Miami Children’s Hospital................................................................................46 7. Mount Sinai Medical Center............................................................................47 8. Mercy Hospital................................................................................................47

9. Michael S. Gordon Center for Research in Medical Education ........................48

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III. Policies and Regulations

A. Matriculation Policies

1. Health History and Medical Examination . ................................................51

2. Immunization Policy..................................................................................52

3. Health Insurance......................................................................................57

4. Disability Insurance...................................................................................59

5. Criminal Background Checks...................................................................59

B. Technical Standards

1. Technical Standards ................................................................................59

2. Students with Disabilities..........................................................................61

C. Accreditation

Accreditation Statement...............................................................................64

D. Academic Policies Teacher – Learner Relationship.....................................................................65

E. Attendance

1. Attendance Policy....................................................................................68

2. Religious Observance...............................................................................68

3. Leave of Absence Policy..........................................................................69

F. Professionalism

1. Standards of Conduct for Medical Students.............................................73

2. Honor Code & Honor Council...................................................................74

3. Confidentiality...........................................................................................86

4. Professional Dress Guidelines...................................................................87

G. Grades, Evaluation, Promotion, & Processes

1. Academic Evaluation ...............................................................................91

2. United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE)......................................95

3. Medical Student Evaluation and Promotions Process...............................96

4. Appeals Committee................................................................................102

H. Grievances

Grievance Procedure..................................................................................105

I. Sexual Battery and Harassment

1. Sexual Battery........................................................................................110

2. Sexual Harassment................................................................................111

J. Health Policies

1. Alcohol...................................................................................................119

2. Smoking.................................................................................................120

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The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

3. Drug-free School and Workplace............................................................121

4. Communicable Diseases........................................................................130

5. HIV/AIDS . .............................................................................................132

6. Bio-safety, Blood-borne Pathogens........................................................134

7. Needle-stick injury..................................................................................140

8. Worker’s Compensation.........................................................................141

K. Information Technology Policies

Medical Library...........................................................................................150

N. FIU Emergency Policies

Policy on Medical Student Records............................................................145

M. Medical Library

Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Technology Policies........................142

L. Medical Student Records

Types of Emergencies................................................................................154

O. Miscellaneous Policies

1. Medical Student Employment.................................................................159

2. Media Requests for Student Interviews..................................................159

3. Lost and Found......................................................................................160

IV. Student Activities & FIU Services

A. Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Student Activities

New Student Orientation ...........................................................................161

White Coat Ceremony................................................................................162

Panther Communities.................................................................................162

B. FIU Student Services

Preventive and Therapeutic Health Services...............................................165

Wellness ...................................................................................................168

Victim Advocacy Center.............................................................................168

FIU Police Department and Public Safety...................................................169

Graham University Center...........................................................................172

FIU Athletics...............................................................................................176

Recreation Services....................................................................................176

Housing and Residential Life......................................................................177

Parking and Transportation.........................................................................178

Patricia and Phillip Frost Art Museum.........................................................180

Wolfsonian – FIU........................................................................................180

Biscayne Bay Campus...............................................................................181

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V. Appendix

A. Contact Information

Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Staff Directory.................................183

FIU Directory..............................................................................................186

FIU Maps...................................................................................................188

B. College of Medicine Forms

Health and Safety Agreement.....................................................................190

Health Insurance Verification . ....................................................................192

C. Health Information

Meningitis Information................................................................................194

Hepatitis B Information...............................................................................196

D. Academic Calendar....................................................................................198

E. Flow Charts

Health Clinic Services for FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Students.....................................................................202

Counseling Services ..................................................................................203

Bio-safety Post-exposure Plan...................................................................204

Honor Council............................................................................................205

Evaluation and Promotion Committee.........................................................206

Appeals Committee....................................................................................207

Grievance Committee.................................................................................208

FIU Alma Mater / FIU Fight Song................................................ Inside Back Cover

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The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

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Introduction

Introduction

The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Student Handbook

2009-2010


Introduction


Introduction

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Welcome to Florida International University State universities in Florida have been charged with the responsibility of providing students with an educational experience, which prepares them to participate in a rapidly changing world and to do so with a commitment to the highest moral and ethical standards. The University Standards of Student Conduct addresses three major areas of moral integrity. These include academic honesty, respect for the law, and respect for people. The latter, respect for people, is somewhat intangible in nature, and yet the most important, because it governs one’s response to the first two. Students should take responsibility to serve as leaders in promoting compassion for others and challenging prejudice against all individuals and groups, whether due to race, gender, age, marital status, religion, nationality, political persuasion, sexual orientation, handicap, or disease. Honesty and integrity in academic achievement, personal growth and development are encouraged by the University through the publication of these standards and statements of desired values and attitudes. The full text of the University Standards of Student Conduct and several related statements of policies and procedures appear in the FIU Student Handbook. All students are encouraged to read these statements and integrate them into their daily lives. Being part of the University community provides many opportunities to exercise individual rights, but also requires the assumption of responsibilities. Enjoy your university and medical school experience and maintain it at a level of personal integrity and caring, which will reflect well upon you and the university you have elected to attend. We wish you the very best of success.

—The Faculty and Staff of FIU and The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

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Introduction

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Preamble The Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Student Handbook is, a publication developed and maintained by the Office of Student Affairs with collaborative input from faculty, administrators, and staff from the College and Florida International University (FIU). The policies and procedures herein apply to all medical students. The information contained in the Handbook should serve as a guide throughout their academic, clinical, and extracurricular life as a member of the FIU community and specifically as a medical student. Certain policies and procedures also apply to faculty and staff members who are employed or provide volunteer services to FIU and the College. Medical students must abide by the Student Handbook policies and guidelines whenever participating in College-sponsored programs that are located at off campus sites. The basic premise for these student guidelines is the understanding that individual rights are also accompanied by responsibilities. By becoming an enrolled medical student in the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, students also become members of the larger FIU community and thus, acquire rights in, as well as responsibilities to, the entire University community. Medical students are required to abide by all University regulations as well as the FIU Student Handbook, published annually by the Student Government Association under the Department of Campus Life in the Division of Student Affairs. All policies and procedures described in this Student Handbook and the FIU Student Handbook are subject to revision at any time and without notice. Such revisions are applicable to all medical students. The policies and information contained were last updated May 2009. The most recent information will appear on the College website at http://medicine.fiu.edu. Questions regarding the policies should be directed to the Office of Student Affairs at (305) 348-0644.

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Dean’s Message The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine stands alone among U.S. medical schools. We have seized the opportunity afforded to us in building a program from scratch to design a curriculum that is infused with opportunities to learn and to help. Our innovative NeighborhoodHELP™

(Health

Education

Learning

Program),

which runs through the entire four years of medical school, will put medical students in teams with students of other disciplines. They will work together to address real medical, social and ethical issues experienced by disadvantaged families in South Florida. This program – indeed the entire College – is as much about learning as it is about giving back to the community, of which FIU is such an integral part. It is my hope that our medical students help save lives and make important contributions to the improvement of the quality of life throughout South Florida, especially the region’s poorest areas. Further, through our partnerships with Jackson North Medical Center, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Children’s Hospital, Mercy Hospital, the Florida Department of Health, the Leon Medical Centers, and other community-based health providers, FIU medical students will be in contact with our community on a daily basis. The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine team and the leadership of Florida International University look forward to creating a model that will contribute to the improvement of the quality and access to health care in South Florida and ultimately throughout the nation. To make this vision a reality, the College is dedicated to providing its students with an innovative and challenging curriculum taught by some of the best clinical and research faculty in the community and the nation.

John Rock, M.D. Founding Dean, FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs

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Introduction

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Welcome from the Office of Student Affairs The Office of Student Affairs at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine is designed to be supportive of medical students’ needs throughout their medical education program. This support involves most of the day-to-day events and activities, including scheduling of classes and extracurricular activities, development and support of student organizations, maintenance of your transcript and recording grades, academic counseling, personal counseling, financial counseling, assignment of mentors and tutors, oversight of the Panther Learning Communities, information on residencies and fellowships, information on the USMLE and other national examinations, completion of various academic forms and letters of recommendation, as well as provision of the Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE). The faculty and staff of the Office of Student Affairs have been carefully selected with appointments given to professionals with a strong interest in medical student advocacy. Our offices will generally be open and available to all medical students from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM during published College academic days. Additionally, a Dean or Director will be on call 24/7 to address individual problems or requests of an urgent or emergent nature. Our combined goal is to make each medical student’s experience at FIU an extremely productive and rewarding one by helping each student achieve to their maximum ability and potential. Additionally, it is our goal to help each student select the area of medicine of greatest interest and potential and to be selected for residency training in the area of their choice. On behalf of the entire faculty and staff of the Office of Student Affairs, I would like to welcome you to FIU and to the beginning of a new chapter in your life. We are here to help you succeed and welcome your visits.

Sanford M. Markham, M.D. Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs

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Florida International University: A Brief History Florida International University was chartered in 1965 and is the only public research university serving South Florida. FIU opened for classes in 1972 with 5,667 students, the largest opening day enrollment in U.S. collegiate history. Today it has more than 38,000 students, 1,000 full-time faculty and almost 135,000 alumni. FIU is one of the 25 largest universities in the nation, based on enrollment. FIU ranked first in the nation among four-year colleges for awarding bachelor’s and master’s degrees to Hispanic students. Fifty-six percent of the students are female and approximately 35,000 are residents of Florida. FIU’s dynamic student body reflects the vibrant diversity of South Florida: 59% Hispanic; 17% White NonHispanic; 13% Black; 4% Asian or Pacific Islander and 7% other minority groups FIU has two campuses, the 344-acre Modesto A. Maidique Campus (formerly known as the University Park Campus) in western Miami-Dade County, and the 200-acre Biscayne Bay Campus in northeast Miami-Dade County. The University also has an academic site in Broward County, FIU Broward Pines Center in Pembroke Pines. The University offers more than 200 bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its colleges and schools: College of Architecture and the Arts; School of Music; College of Arts and Sciences; College of Business Administration; School of Accounting; College of Education; College of Engineering and Computing; School of Computing and Information Sciences; Honors

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Introduction

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

College; College of Law; College of Medicine; College of Nursing and Health Sciences; School of Hospitality and Tourism Management; School of Journalism and Mass Communication; and the Robert Stempel College of Public Health and Social Work. With more than 135,000 alumni, Golden Panthers constitute the fastest growing university alumni group in Miami-Dade County. FIU confers approximately half of all degrees now awarded by universities in Miami-Dade County. In 1984, the University received authority to begin offering degree programs at the doctoral level; these programs received Level IV accreditation from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) in 1986. In 1994, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching classified FIU as a Doctoral I University. In 2000, the Carnegie Foundation reclassified the University as a Carnegie Doctoral/Research Universities- Extensive. In August 2009, the FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, the only public medical school in South Florida, will enroll its first class of future physicians providing another way for the University to provide innovative research, professional education, and public service to improve the quality of life in the South Florida community. The University contributes to improving the South Florida community through the creation of jobs, and by providing higher education and community service with impressive academic and research environments that power the region’s economic development. The vision of FIU to become one of the top 15 public, urban, research universities in the United States is driven by the institution’s commitment to quality education and community service designed to improve the quality and access to health care to the culturally diverse South Florida community that FIU calls home.

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History of the FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine: Since the turn of the century, there has been a growing perception that there was a need for more health professionals to serve Florida and specifically the South Florida population. A similar need was noted throughout the United States and prompted the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) to make the recommendation that the number of U.S. medical school graduates be increased by thirty percent over the next decade. This need also prompted the Florida legislature to consider the option to develop two new medical schools in the State of Florida. As a result of this initiative, Florida International University developed a ten-year strategic plan for health education and biomedical research. This plan initially resulted in the establishment of a College of Health and Urban Affairs with a School of Public Health. Additionally FIU strengthened its biomedical engineering educational and research programs. In September 2005, FIU’s plan for the first public College of Medicine in South Florida was approved by the University’s Board of Trustees. In March 2006, the plan for a new College of Medicine at FIU was formally approved by the Florida Board of Governors and later by the Florida legislature which provided funding to address the growing physician shortage nationwide and provide economic benefits to South Florida and the state. In the Fall of 2006 Dr. John Rock was appointed as the founding Dean of the College of Medicine and Vice President for Medical Affairs at FIU. Shortly thereafter, the structure of the Dean’s Office was completed with the appointment of Dr. Joe Leigh Simpson as Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Dr. Patrick O’Leary as Executive Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs, and Dr. Sanford Markham as Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs. During that time, a number of FIU faculty, along with the new Deans, developed and submitted an application for accreditation by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), a federally recognized body responsible for the accreditation of medical schools in the United States. The LCME visited FIU in November 2007 to perform a site evaluation of the facilities and operational plan. They provided accreditation in February 2008 allowing the new College of Medicine to begin operation. Students were recruited and interviewed in late 2008 and early 2009 and the first medical school class begins its Orientation on August 3, 2009.

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Introduction

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

The emphasis of the new medical school is to recruit and educate larger numbers of ethnically and culturally diverse students to serve the growing elderly patient population and to address physician shortages of culturally competent, ethnically diverse physicians in the area. The medical school will provide quality, affordable medical education and educate physicians who are culturally sensitive to South Florida’s diverse demographics. The new medical school will help advance South Florida’s health care community by facilitating improved access to first-rate medical care among our medically underserved populations and lead an economic impact that will eventually reach more than $1 billion each year.

The birth of South Florida’s first public medical school: A timeline of events leading up to the admittance of the first class 1996

The University develops a ten-year strategic plan, making health education, medical education and biomedical research FIU’s top priorities.

1999

FIU establishes a College of Health and Urban Affairs, which contains a School of Public Health and a School of Nursing, and invests in the growth of its biomedical research and biomedical engineering programs.

2000

The FIU Medical School Planning Task Force commences a feasibility study and implementation report.

2005

FIU Board of Trustees approves university plan for medical school. This vote coincides with AAMC’s call to increase number of medical school graduates through enrollment increases and up to eight new medical schools.

March 2006

Florida Board of Governors and Florida Legislature approve creation of FIU’s College of Medicine.

November 2006 University selects John Rock, M.D., M.P.H., as Senior Vice President for Medical Affairs and the Founding Dean of the College of Medicine. August 2007

North Dade Medical Foundation makes a gift of $5 million to the College of Medicine. With state matching funds, it becomes a $10 million endowment for scholarships and the medical school’s first endowed chairs.

September 2007 FIU and the Florida Department of Health sign an agreement to relocate the department’s Miami-Dade headquarters to FIU.

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November 2007 LCME initial site visit takes place. December 2007 Miami-Dade County commissioners approve $10 million for an ambulatory care facility at FIU’s College of Medicine. February 2008 FIU College of Medicine receives preliminary accreditation from LCME and begins recruiting inaugural class. May 28, 2008

College of Medicine receives a $10 million gift from Benjamin León Jr., founder of Leon Medical Centers, to establish the Benjamin León, Jr. Family Center for Geriatric Research and Education. This is among the largest gifts ever made by a Cuban-American family to a U.S. university, the largest made to FIU, and the first to name a center of the College of Medicine. The gift is eligible for matching dollars under the State of Florida Major Gifts Trust Fund, increasing its total impact to $20 million.

June 2008

First applications for the inaugural class are received.

December 2008 FIU College of Medicine receives a total of 3,332 applications for the inaugural class of 43 students. June 12, 2009

Dr. Herbert Wertheim, internationally renowned optometrist, inventor, and philanthropist, donates $20 million to the College of Medicine, the largest donation in the history of FIU. This gift is also eligible for matching dollars under the State of Florida Major Gifts Trust Fund, increasing its total impact to $40 million. The donation is transformational and sets the foundation for future philanthropic support of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at FIU.

June 24, 2009 The Green Family Foundation, a private, non-profit organization that supports social programs dedicated to improving community health and elevating universal socio-economic conditions, donates $10 million, including state match, to fund a community medicine program, the Green Family Medicine & Society Program Endowment, that will become a cornerstone of Florida International University’s Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine. August 3, 2009 Inaugural class of medical students’ first day of orientation. August 7, 2009 White Coat Ceremony for the inaugural class. August 10, 2009 First day of classes for students.

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Introduction

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Mission and Goals The mission of the Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine is to serve the citizens of the State of Florida, particularly South Florida, by serving as a model for the next generation of medical education and elevating the level of healthcare available to the South Florida community through: •

Training culturally competent physicians to serve the region’s diverse population.

Providing South Florida students greater access to medical education, admitting a student body that reflects the rich diversity of the region.

Developing a curriculum focused on community medicine, elevating the quality of medical care available in the region.

Developing basic, translational and clinical research programs that will ensure state-of-the-art health care and will substantially expand the economic growth potential of the region.

Goals include: 1.

Providing an affordable, accessible College of Medicine in South Florida that partners with community hospitals and healthcare clinics throughout the region.

2.

Maximizing an effective public/private partnership funding model.

3.

Enhancing the quality of healthcare by increasing the number of culturally competent, underrepresented minority physicians providing care to underserved populations in Florida, particularly South Florida, and throughout the nation.

4.

Graduating up to 120 medical students each year, and assisting in the development of 500 residency positions, addressing the region’s current and anticipated physician shortages.

5.

Forging biomedical and scientific advances through its existing foundation in the basic sciences.

6.

Contributing to the economic development of the region, state and nation.

7.

Providing scholarships to students to support the College’s diversity goals.

The educational mission of the Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine is to provide a program of study for the Doctor of Medicine degree enabling graduates to pursue a wide spectrum of professional careers in medicine. Careers in private practice, academic medicine, public service, leadership in health care and public

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policy are considered in the design of the educational program. A special emphasis of the FIU curriculum is a focus on community health in the metropolitan region and educating physicians for medical practice in South Florida. This emphasis includes the study of culture and society in the region in relation to personal and community health.

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Introduction

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Definitions Below is a list of definitions that will be used throughout the Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Student Handbook. AAMC

The term “AAMC” refers to the Association of American Medical Colleges.

ACGME

The term “ACGME” refers to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education.

CDC

The term “CDC” refers to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

COLLEGE This refers to the FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine. DRC

The term “DRC” refers to the Disability Resource Center.

EAD

The term “EAD” refers to Executive Associate Dean.

E&P Committee The term “E&P Committee” refers to the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Evaluation and Promotion Committee. ERAS

The term “ERAS” refers to the Electronic Residency Application Service, which is an AAMC service that transmits residency applications, personal statements, letters of recommendation, Medical Student Performance Evaluations or Dean’s letters, medical school transcripts, board exam scores, and other supporting credentials from applicants and medical schools to the fellowship and residency programs the prospective student selects using the Internet.

Faculty

The term “Faculty” refers to the members of the faculty of the Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine.

FAFSA

The term “FAFSA” refers to Free Application for Federal Student Aid.

FERPA

The term “FERPA” refers to the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act as amended from time to time.

Grievance Committee The term “Grievance Committee” refers to the Student Grievance Committee for the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine. HIPAA

The term “HIPAA” refers to Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 as amended from time to time.

HIV

The term “HIV” refers to human immunodeficiency virus.

LCME

The term “LCME” refers to the Liaison Committee on Medical Education.

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Medical Student The term “medical student” refers to any person who is registered as a medical student within the FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine. Persons who withdraw from the College or persons who are not officially enrolled at the College for a particular term but who have a continuing relationship with the College, and persons who have been notified of their acceptance for admission are considered “students” as well as persons who are living in the residence halls but are not enrolled at the University. Member of the University community The term “member of the University community” refers to any person who is a student, faculty member, official, or any other person employed by the University. Notice

The term “notice” when used in the context of delivering a notification to someone, refers to notification in writing by hand-delivery or other means providing evidence of receipt.

OSA

The term “OSA” refers to the Office of Student Affairs.

OSHA

The term “OSHA” refers to the Occupational Health and Safety Administration.

UHS

The term “UHS” refers to the FIU University Health Services.

University or FIU The terms “University” and “FIU” refer to Florida International University, including all of its branch campuses and sites. USMLE

The term “USMLE” refers to the United States Medical Licensing Examination.

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Introduction

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Facilities The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine will serve as the anchor to the newly created Academic Health Sciences Center. Located primarily in the Health and Life Sciences (HLS) II building, the College has recently constructed a state-of-the-art lecture room, teaching/study rooms, and a student lounge. These spaces have been designed to meet the needs of the entering inaugural class and includes wireles card access technology, a complementary audio/visual infrastructure, and comfortable, modern furniture. Students will have 24/7 access to the student lounge and several small group/study rooms on the sixth floor of HLS II, gaining access by swiping their magnetic photo ID cards. The student lounge will feature individual lockers. Each student will have a mailbox in the lounge to receive information from the College. HLS II has 24/7 security on call through the FIU Public Safety department. Police officers and public safety technicians are available to personally escort students to areas on the UP campus, by calling 7-2626 at least ten minutes in advance. Medical students may receive personal counseling at the Student Counseling and Wellness Center, located in a private confidential office suite (room 340B) located on the third floor of the Green Library. As the College continues its planned growth, plans are to ensure all of our medical students have access to comfortable and secure settings. The future FIU Academic Health Sciences Center will also continue its growth to enhance its educational, research, and community service mission, with additional buildings planned, including a new Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine building, a new parking garage and the new Florida Department of Health Miami-Dade building.

Student Lounge Medical students have a dedicated place within the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine facility to relax and socialize while on campus. This space is truly a medical student’s “home away from home.” To ensure that everyone’s personal, social, and safety needs are met in a fair manner, the following guidelines have been established.

Mail and student mailboxes Students are assigned a mailbox and are required to periodically check and clear their mailboxes to ensure timely receipt of College and University-related mail. Any items left in mailboxes after the last day of classes in each period will be discarded. Students who desire to mail personal letters must affix the proper postage and place in the “Outgoing

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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Mail� bin. Large packages and all mail without postage must be taken to a full service U.S. Post Office.

Refrigerators Refrigerators are provided for short-term storage of perishable foods. Non-perishable foods should not be stored in the refrigerators. To ensure sufficient space for all medical students, a student may only store food of a quantity sufficient for a two day period of time; this includes frozen food. All food must be removed on a weekly basis; all food remaining in the refrigerators after 6:00 PM on Fridays may be discarded.

Common amenities The use of television, microwave, furniture, games, videos, books, journals, photo copier, phone/fax machine, vending machines, and other community amenities will be mutually decided on a first-come, first-served basis. When conflicts arise, it is expected that the competing interests communicate and come up with a compromise or consensus. If an agreement still cannot be reached, this issue should be taken to the Office of Student Affairs.

Lockers First- and second-year students will be assigned a locker each academic year. Students are responsible for obtaining their own lock (combination or key type) and for periodically cleaning out the locker. Lockers must be cleaned out on or before the last day of classes. Any items left in lockers after the last day of classes will be discarded.

Electricity All lights and electrical appliances must be turned off by the last person leaving the lounge.

General As the lounge is designed for group activities, including study groups, students who prefer a quiet place to study should go to the College of Medicine Library. A student is permitted to invite no more than two guests at a time to visit and utilize the amenities of the lounge; all guests must be accompanied by an FIU medical student unless prior permission is obtained from the OSA.

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Introduction

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

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Student Affairs

Student Affairs

The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Student Handbook

2009-2010


Student Affairs


Student Affairs

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Office of Student Affairs Mission College of Medicine strives to recruit, admit, educate, counsel, advise, and professionally transform a diverse group of students into culturally competent, empathic, and ethical physicians. The OSA works in concert with the academic mission of the College by

General Services

The Office of Student Affairs at the Florida International University Herbert Wertheim

fostering medical students’ intellectual, physical, emotional, spiritual, and social growth. We promote student-centered educational and leadership opportunities to enhance communication, critical thinking, ethical judgment, problem-solving, and professional skills. while providing developmental programs and counseling services designed to promote optimal learning. In addition to academic support, the OSA will strive to enhance students’ personal awareness and wellness while preparing them to become outstanding medical professionals who provide patient-centered health care that is responsive to the medical, social, and cultural needs of the community we serve.

Vision The Office of Student Affairs at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine will become the leader in promoting quality and professional support services and fostering innovative, stateof-the art, and culturally competent medical student learning from admission to graduation.

Values • •

Integrity and honesty Human dignity, compassion, and respect for all without discrimination or harassment based on race, color, religion, age, disability, sex, national origin, marital status, sexual orientation and veteran status

Provision of culturally competent and multidisciplinary services that complement the academic mission of the University

Professionalism that respects the rights, abilities, beliefs, and confidentiality of students and patients

Scholarship, wisdom, creativity, and innovation that foster best practices and “outside the box” thinking

Quality and continual improvement based on student feedback

Responsible, responsive, fair, honorable, and ethical decisions by students and faculty/staff

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Counseling Services

The OSA facilitates altruism, mentoring, volunteerism, and community service outreach


Student Affairs General Services

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Student-focused education

Advocacy for disease prevention

Life-long learning and the scholarly advancement of the honorable profession of medicine

Office of Student Affairs Organization & Activities Counseling Services

The Office of Student Affairs provides programs and services for all medical students at FIU from the time of recruitment to the time of commencement, and beyond. Activities of the OSA include: recruitment of students; the admissions process; mentorship of students; personal, academic, and financial counseling; medical student communities providing educational and extracurricular activities, organizations, and student leadership opportunities. The Office of Student Affairs features experienced faculty and staff who are dedicated to the overall well-being of medical students. The OSA provides learning opportunities outside of the formal classroom and clinical settings that are designed to complement and enhance the overall educational experience. Hours: 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Monday through Friday except on University holidays. On-call: The three Deans in the OSA are also available on a rotational basis for urgent student issues or situations at times when the Office is closed. For urgent matters, students should call the on-call phone number 305-348-0696. Most activities in the Office of Student Affairs function in an “open-door” manner so students may visit the office for help and support by the faculty and staff without making appointments. Because the OSA is committed to medical student support and exercises confidentiality, it is strongly recommended that students make appointments in advance to ensure the availability of the specific professional and to generate availability of time to discuss the issue to the student’s satisfaction.

Professional Staff Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs Responsible for student enrollment, including recruitment, admissions, and records, as well as the areas of student support encompassing orientation, personal counseling, financial counseling, academic counseling, student code of conduct, the Honor Code, as well as the Panther Communities.

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

2009-2010

Assistant Dean for Student Affairs: Admissions and Records Responsible for the direction and oversight of medical student enrollment including records system. Participates in student activities, support services, counseling and mentoring of medical students. Director of Admissions and Records: Responsible for the direction and

General Services

recruitment, the application process, interviews, admissions, and the student

management of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine’s recruitment, interview and admissions process and of the medical student record system. Serves as the Registrar for the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, statistics related to applicants and matriculants. Associate Director of Admissions and Records: Responsible for collaborating with the Director of Admissions and Records to coordinate the medical student recruitment, interview and admissions process and the medical student record system. Assists in the maintenance of all records and statistics related to applicants and matriculants. Assistant Dean for Student Affairs: Counseling and Communities Responsible for various student support services, including personal and psychological counseling, tutoring, financial aid, career counseling, preparation for residency, as well as opportunities for medical student fellowship programs sponsored by different medical institutions. The Assistant Dean also provides oversight of the student learning communities and medical student organizations, which offer students a variety of extracurricular opportunities to enhance leadership and professionalism through educational, altruistic, spiritual, and social experiences both at the university and in the community. Director of Counseling and Wellness: Responsible for providing confidential psychological evaluations and consultations for students in individual and group sessions; provides psycho-educational and wellness programs on a variety of mental health topics, including stress management, time management, depression, personality profiles, identifying cognitive strengths, anger management, relationships, maintaining academic and social balance; study skills, test-taking skills, enhancing self-esteem, leadership, and seminars alerting the College community to the early-warning signs, recognition and follow-up of disruptive or troubled students; and providing neuropsychological evaluations designed to enhance academic performance and retention.

25

Counseling Services

responsible for maintenance of grades and transcripts, as well as records and


Student Affairs

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Director of Financial Aid: Responsible for the administration and coordination of all financial aid programs, including financial aid and debt management

General Services

counseling and student assistance in obtaining financial aid resources. Faculty Director of a Panther Community: Physician responsible for the supervision of the service learning, educational, social, and cultural activities for one of the four Panther Communities; serves as the liaison between students and the various academic and support services available at the College, the

Counseling Services

university, and outside organizations.

26


General Services

Counseling Services

Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Office of Students Affairs (OSA)

Student Handbook Inaugural class 2009-2010

27


Student Affairs

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Admission to the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine General Services

As part of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Office of Student Affairs, the Office of Admissions and Registration recruits, facilitates interviews, determines acceptance, enrolls, and registers a diverse student body capable of pursuing a full range of opportunities available to physicians through medical practice, service, education, and research.

Tutoring The complexity and volume of information to be learned as part of the medical school

Counseling Services

curriculum are very different from most undergraduate experiences. Not everyone can be at the top of his/her class and simply adjusting to this fact often leaves many students feeling insecure about their academic skills and ability to integrate the large amount of information well. To help medical students excel in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical settings, the College’s Student Counseling and Wellness Center (CWC) offers the following individual and group programs: study skill strategies, time management, improving organizational skills, and other special techniques designed to assist students meet the rigorous demands of the curriculum. The psychologist at the CWC specializes in conducting programs designed to enhance the academic performance of medical students. The CWC offers tutoring to students in need of academic support outside of the College classroom and laboratories. During the first two periods, the faculty will be responsible for tutoring their students who request or need academic assistance and support. In subsequent years, the Office of Student Affairs will make arrangements to sponsor free tutorial services from upperclassmen and graduate science and allied health students. Students may access tutoring services through any of the following means: self-referral; suggestion from course directors, faculty, advisors, and mentors; or recommendation or mandate of the Evaluation and Promotions (E&P) Committee. Tutoring sessions will be free for all medical students and will be provided by faculty who are teaching the first and second period courses. Tutoring may be provided on an individual or group basis. Students who are at risk of failing a course are sent personal invitations to schedule an appointment with a staff member of the OSA. This is an opportunity for a student to express his/her academic and personal concerns and for the OSA staff to recommend strategies or services to help, including tutoring. Students are encouraged to have ongoing communication with course faculty to answer questions and facilitate the arrangement of additional academic assistance.

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

2009-2010

Faculty Mentors and Advising Newly admitted medical students will receive a list of M.D. and Ph.D. faculty members CV and contact information for each mentor as well as a brief outline pertaining to the professional’s clinical, teaching, research, leadership, and community service activities and interests.

General Services

who have volunteered to serve as medical student mentors. The list will contain the

During Orientation Week or shortly thereafter, all students will be expected to select one faculty member to serve as their official mentor. If a student fails to select a faculty mentor, he/she will have a mentor assigned.

who will serve as their basic science and pre-clinical advisors and who are typically the students’ first point of contact for issues concerning personal and professional development. Students are expected to meet with their mentor at least once a month during their first two periods. Additional contact may be initiated by either the student or the mentor. The Clinical Experiences: Each affiliate clinical site will have an on-site Director of Clinical Education, a physician who will serve as the first point of contact for questions pertaining to the various clerkships, accidents and injuries, needle-stick injuries, communicable diseases, substance abuse policies, harassment and discrimination policies, personal illness, attendance and scheduling, emergency policies and procedures, as well as site-specific, day-to-day operations. Prior to the start of the third period clinical clerkships, all medical students will have an orientation with the Directors of Clinical Education who will provide academic and non-academic advice pertinent to the overall clinical clerkship experiences. Each student’s faculty mentor will also be expected to assist with this process and will ultimately provide some content pertaining to the evaluation of his/her student’s clinical training necessary for the composition of the Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE), formerly known as the Dean’s Letter. The faculty mentor, the Directors of Clinical Education, and the Deans of the OSA will be available to assist students with their residency decisions. Students will also have access to a series of seminars and web-based programs related to careers in medicine as arranged by the OSA. In addition, the Panther Communities will provide peer advising, tutoring and mentorship. Special programs pertaining to clinical clerkships and post-graduate training entitled “Specialty Nights” will be provided periodically. These are designed to be informal events with physicians of various specialties meeting with student groups to provide information and answer questions about post-graduate training options. “Specialty Nights” are open to all medical students.

29

Counseling Services

Preclinical Advising: Early during their first year, medical students select a faculty mentor


Student Affairs

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

College of Medicine: Counseling Services General Services

The Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine provides all medical students with professional and comprehensive counseling services. The counselors are College faculty and staff dedicated to providing professional and confidential personal, psychological, financial, and academic counseling services. Students may be self-referred or may be referred by family, friends, professors, staff, colleagues, or other caring individuals. The Office of Student Affairs provides counseling in three key areas that are critical to a

Counseling Services

student’s academic and professional success: (1)

Personal Counseling

(2)

Academic Counseling

(3)

Financial Counseling

Personal Counseling: The Student Counseling and Wellness Center The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Student Counseling and Wellness Center is a multidisciplinary medical student support program under the auspices of the Office of Student Affairs which provides a full range of psychological and mental health services designed to support medical student success through professional diagnosis, counseling, and life-skills coaching. Services are designed to foster the academic potential of students by enhancing their personal development as well as their psychosocial and emotional health. The treatment philosophy of the Student Counseling and Wellness Center is strength focused, embracing the values of individualism, empowerment, positivity, dignity and respect. The personal counseling services offered by the Student Counseling and Wellness Center are professional and strictly confidential. The Director of the Student Counseling and Wellness Center is a licensed psychologist with board certification in neuropsychopharmacology and specialized expertise in neuropsychology and the diagnosis and therapy of a variety of student mental health concerns that could impact a medical student’s educational success. Some of the common concerns medical students typically address include: stress, relationship problems, anxiety disorders, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, attention deficit disorder, adjustment difficulties, perfectionism, substance abuse, victimization, and simply dealing with being average academically.

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

2009-2010

The faculty at the Student Counseling and Wellness Center maintain the highest professional standards with regard to ethical and competent care. Modes of intervention neuropsychological testing. Enrolled students may receive short-term and solution-focused outpatient counseling and therapy during all phases of their professional education and training. Counseling services and consultations are provided free of charge to students.

General Services

include individual, group and couples counseling as well as individual psychological and

The Director of Student Counseling and Wellness has no involvement in the academic evaluation or promotion of students. The psychologist(s) in this office is available to work with individuals and small groups of students with concerns related to academic performance as well as those experiencing academic difficulty are eligible to consult with the psychologist to receive assistance in improving the quality and efficiency of study skills and time management as well as better ways to cope with test or performance anxiety. Students experiencing issues of a personal or psychological nature that might be interfering or have the potential to interfere with academic progress, are also able to consult with the psychologist for short-term mental health therapy to address issues related to anxiety, depression, family, or relationship issues; grief or anger issues; and crisis intervention. In situations where a student requires ongoing mental health care or needs diagnosis and/or treatment beyond the scope of services the Student Counseling and Wellness Center can provide, a referral will be made to an appropriate health professional, including a psychiatrist, within the University or local community. Professional services also include group workshops designed to promote mental health to include the following topics: stress management and time management, depression and anxiety screening, relationships, developing personal strengths, team building, communication skills, personality assessment, student development, improving testtaking skills, and wellness programs specifically designed to promote medical student personal health and academic success. Faculty, course directors, mentors, and deans are additionally charged with providing counseling for student’s personal issues that do not require the services of a psychologist. The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine understands that many physical and psychological health issues confronting medical students may be of a sensitive nature and that a professional-patient relationship between FIU faculty and students would be inconsistent with a teacher-student relationship. FIU faculty members who provide health care services of a sensitive nature to any medical student will have no involvement in the academic evaluation or promotion of students.

31

Counseling Services

improvement and personal issues. Students wishing to enhance their current academic


Student Affairs

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Office Location: The Student Counseling and Wellness Center is located in a dedicated

General Services

suite of offices in the Green Library (rooms 340A, B, and C) located near the Medical Library. The Student Counseling and Wellness Center features a dedicated office for confidential personal counseling staffed by the Director of Counseling and Wellness, a licensed board-certified psychologist, and an office designed for testing, stressmanagement, and a series of performance enhancing programs designed specifically to meet the needs of medical students. The emphasis of the Student Counseling and Wellness Center is to foster success through personal psychological intervention when necessary as well as general lifestyle enhancement through individualized academic

Counseling Services

counseling and wellness programs. Medical students seeking personal counseling should first call the Student Counseling and Wellness Center at 305-348-1460 during normal business hours to make an appointment. Whenever possible, special appointments will made to accommodate students’ schedules, as necessary. Urgent or crisis matters will be triaged immediately with on-campus psychological services or referral to services in the community. Medical students who experience an emergency during the evenings, weekends, and holidays should call 305-348-0696, the emergency phone number to speak to the “on-call� dean in the Office of Student Affairs. Students on campus who need emergency assistance should call the FIU Department of Public Safety at 305-348-5911. Students who need emergency services and are not currently on campus should call 911. Medical students can also contact the Victim Advocacy Center 24-hour hotline at 305-348-3000 for free and confidential services if the student experiences actual or threatened violence.

Policy on the Provision of Psychological Counseling and Medical Care to Medical Students It is imperative that all clinical faculty who provide psychological counseling and/or medical care to medical students have no role in the academic evaluation process of the students whom they treat. Since many of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine clinical training programs take place under the supervision and care of clinical faculty who maintain practices at various outpatient and inpatient settings in the Miami-Dade County area, it is possible that a student may seek medical care and/or psychological counseling in a practice where a faculty member sees patients or clients. Health care professionals who provide psychiatric/psychological counseling or other sensitive health care services to medical students shall not be involved in the academic evaluation or promotion of those students they treat.

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

2009-2010

General Services

Faculty members of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine who have an evaluative relationship with a student cannot provide psychological counseling or medical care to that student. A student who has received psychological counseling or medical care from a faculty member prior to entering an evaluative relationship may request reassigment from the Executive Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs. A faculty member who has provided psychological counseling or medical care to a student prior to entering an evaluative relationship will request and receive reassignment of the student to another faculty member.

Academic Counseling

The “Careers in Medicine” program of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC);

The Deans of the Office of Student Affairs;

The Student Counseling and Wellness Center for personal counseling; and

Faculty, course directors, and mentors

Faculty members will advise, mentor, and assist students throughout their medical school educational process in the following ways: •

transition to medical school and later, transition to the clinical years

medical career exploration, including helping to arrange meaningful and appropriate shadowing opportunities

assessment of the student’s progress, achievements, and professionalism

educational, personal and professional development

decision-making

leadership skills

communication skills

preparation for USMLE Step 1

preparation for the USMLE Step 2

assisting with development of each student’s portfolio for residency application

identifying individuals who are able to write appropriate letters of recommendation for residency application

33

Counseling Services

Academic counseling for medical students may occur through a variety of different sources including:


Student Affairs

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

The Assistant Dean for Student Affairs (Counseling and Communities) will oversee

General Services

academic counseling for all students throughout their four-year medical school experience. “Careers in Medicine” is an online guidance program that features a four-year career planning series designed to help students select a medical specialty, as well as prepare for the application for residency training. The four-phase process describes the components of career planning, including self-awareness. This program ideally should start during class year 1 with completion of the first phase, “Understanding Yourself,” consisting of a series of online workshops and self-assessment exercises. During year 2, the “Careers in Medicine” phase explores options during which time students will continue with self-

Counseling Services

assessment tools as well as attend specialty panel and group sessions that will be held at the University. At this critical time, students will compare their self-assessment information to the information received about the specialties. Students take the USMLE Step 1 of the Board examinations at the end of Year 3. Year 3 is the time when students likely choose a specialty, a time to research various residency training programs and establish contact with professional associations. At this time or early in year 4, students should register with the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS), an AAMC online service that transmits residency applications, personal statements, letters of recommendation, Medical Student Performance Evaluations (MSPE’s) or Dean’s letters, medical school transcripts, board exam scores, and other supporting credentials from applicants and medical schools to the selected fellowship and residency programs. During this time, students also register with the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP), a private, not-for-profit corporation established in 1952 to provide a uniform date of appointment to positions in graduate medical education (GME) in the United States. Students will also begin travels for interviews at the invitation of the residency programs that have been selected. The “Careers in Medicine” program will be used at FIU both as a self-managed online course as well as a part of the COM’s Student CWC program. The URL address for this program is: http://www.aamc.org/careersinmedicine. The Director of the Student Counseling and Wellness Center will work closely with the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs (Counseling and Communities) to provide coordinated workshops on the match process, including mock interviews, specialist mentoring, and various specialty-focused workshops based on the student’s strengths and personal interests.

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

2009-2010

The Deans in the Office of Student Affairs serve as a primary contact point for academic and career counseling and advice. Through each Dean’s professional and personal programs, and their association with professional medical education bodies such as the Association of American Medical Colleges, medical students will have the benefit of considerable expertise in academic and career counseling. As with personal counseling,

General Services

experiences, their association with other medical schools and residency training

academic counseling is available on a walk-in or appointment basis to accommodate each student’s needs. In addition to the “Careers in Medicine” program, the psychologist in the Student for medical students regarding study and test-taking skills, time management, preparation for examinations and oral presentations. This counseling may be accomplished individually, in small groups, or in academic preparation sessions arranged by the medical student Panther Communities . Faculty members, course directors, clinical attending physicians, tutors and mentors will interact with their students on a regular basis and thus, will additionally be available for academic and career counseling to enhance the counseling services provided by the Office of Student Affairs.

Financial Counseling The Financial Aid Office The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Financial Aid Office is located in the Office of Student Affairs. The Director of Financial Aid is dedicated to assisting students with the financial aid application process and provides one-on-one counseling regarding the availability of federal, private and institutional funds. Students can meet with the Director of Financial Aid Mondays through Fridays. Extended office hours are available upon request. There are several financial aid and scholarship options available to medical students, such as the FIU Graduate (Need) Grant, institutional and private scholarships, and federal and private student loans. The main types of aid available are listed below. For additional information and applicable forms, please visit http://finaid.fiu.edu.

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Counseling Services

Counseling and Wellness Center will provide a program of individual and group counseling


Student Affairs

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Types of aid General Services

FIU Graduate (Need) Grant: Award based on financial need which does not have to be repaid.

Scholarships: Non-repayable awards, which may be based on merit, financial need, and other considerations.

Federal Stafford Loans: Available to students at low interest rates with the option to defer repayment until after graduation or after withdrawal. Federal Stafford loans are

Counseling Services

available to students to help meet the cost of education after grant/scholarship options have been exhausted. Federal Stafford Loans are considered a form of financial aid and, since the loans are federally guaranteed, there are no credit checks on them. Every student is eligible as long as the criteria is met, the student is not in default on a current student loan, or has not exceeded the federal aggregate loan limit. •

Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan: Awarded to students demonstrating a financial need as determined by the federal processor. Interest payments on this loan are subsidized (i.e., the student is not charged interest) by the federal government while the student is in school or during authorized periods of deferments.

Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan: A student does not have to demonstrate financial need to receive this loan. Interest payments on this loan are not subsidized by the government. The student can make arrangements with the lender to pay the interest while he or she is in school or can allow the interest to capitalize, adding to the principal balance.

Federal Graduate Plus Loan: This loan is available to graduate students who are enrolled in an eligible program. Students must file a FAFSA form in order to apply for a Federal Graduate Plus Loan. This loan requires a credit check for eligibility.

Private Student Loans: Private student loans can be obtained in addition to Federal Stafford Loans. Private student loans are based on credit and the interest rate is variable.

For more information, please visit the main FIU Financial Aid website (http://finaid.fiu. edu), the College website http://medicine.fiu.edu or make an appointment with the College’s Director of Financial Aid. Financial aid funds are disbursed by the College’s Financial Aid Office in coordination with the Florida International University Financial Aid Office and in accordance with the requirements of the particular financial aid. For more information on the disbursement procedures, please visit the website: http://finaid.fiu.edu.

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

2009-2010

The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Scholarships These College scholarships require students to maintain satisfactory academic progress. may continue to receive the scholarships upon their return to the College, provided that the leave of absence was not granted because of academic or professional deficiency. Students who fail to maintain satisfactory academic levels of progress will lose their

General Services

Students who have had a leave of absence approved by the Office of Student Affairs

eligibility for the renewal of the scholarship.

Debt Management and Loan Exit Counseling borrowing habits. Personal or group debt management sessions will be available throughout the program. All students who have received loans during medical school are required to attend a mandatory “Loan Exit� counseling session. This is a federal requirement for graduation for any student who has received federal student loans for school.

Tuition Refund Policy The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine adheres to the policy on tuition refunds and will refund the full tuition and fees if the student officially withdraws from the College in writing before the first day of Orientation. Students may receive twenty-five (25%) of the tuition and fees if they officially withdraw from the College before the first four weeks of classes.

37

Counseling Services

The Director of Financial Aid will meet with students to encourage smart and conscientious


Student Affairs

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

38


Academic Affairs & Clinical Affairs

Academic Affairs and Clinical Affairs The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Student Handbook

2009-2010


Academic Affairs & Clinical Affairs From left to right: Mt. Sinai Medical Center, Miami Children’s Hospital, Mercy Hospital and Jackson North Medical Center


Academic Affairs and Clinical Affairs The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Curriculum Overview The curriculum leading to the M.D. degree is a four-year course of study divided into four periods. The curriculum encompasses five major thematic strands which include: Human Biology (core sciences); Disease, Illness and Injury (pathology); Clinical Medicine; Professional Development; and Medicine and Society (cultural competence). Each of these strands has its own distinct set of courses, which are offered in sequential fashion. Courses in each of the five strands run concurrently in all periods. During period one, students will become competent with the core scientific principles while concurrently developing the required skills, behaviors and attitudes for clinical medicine. The second period emphasizes anatomy and pathology of human disease, while reinforcing scientific principles introduced earlier. During the third period clerkship year, direct clinical experiences are combined with translational application of medical advances applying an evidence-based updated approach to management of medical illness. The final period involves advanced clinical medicine, scholarship and varied clinical experiences in multiple specialties. The entire curriculum is outcome based. Courses are planned utilizing learning objectives which have been selected in order to fulfill the necessary competencies expected for graduation. Active, self-directed learning and scholarship are the primary modes of learning in the FIU curriculum. Great emphasis is placed on active (small group) learning as compared to passive (lecture hall) learning. It has been the observation of medical educators that students achieve greater understanding and retention of course material through the small group learning process. Problem-based clinical cases are favored as the basis for study. Throughout problem-based studies, instruction is predicated on three successive levels: 1)

Initial introduction, recognition of terminology and understanding in the broad context of human biology,

2)

Understanding clinical context of disease, illness and injury, and

3)

Application of knowledge and skills in the diagnosis and management of clinical problems.

Students will develop a portfolio of their clinical care experiences that documents their knowledge, skill and behavioral development. This portfolio will aid both students and faculty in measuring and achieving competencies, and in fulfillment of requirements for entry into postgraduate study. The courses are assigned credits based on course content. The degree requirement is 200 earned credits. The basic calendar and course plan for the periods of study are summarized in the table below.

39


Academic Affairs and Clinical Affairs The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Promotion Promotion will be determined for all successive Periods of study. The requirements for promotion are: •

Pass all required courses in the period and participate in all required activities.

Promotion to Period 4 also requires passing the USMLE Step I exam.

Outline of Curriculum Calendar Period # Months Dates

Course Content

# courses # credits

1

7

Aug. 2009 – March 2010 Foundations

12

38

2

12

April 2010 – March 2011 Integrated

17

49

20-24

113

Organ Systems

3 & 4 26 April 2011 – May 2013

Advanced Clinical Medicine/Selectives/ Electives,Sub-internship and Scholarship

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

2009-2010

PERIOD 1 Foundations August 10, 2009 - March 19, 2010 Course Name Credits Course Start Date End date Numbers

Course Director

Genes Molecules & Cells

7

BMS 6001 Aug. 10, 2009 Oct. 6, 2009

Rao

PD: Epidemiology & Biostatistics

1

BMS 6880 Aug. 10, 2009 Oct. 6, 2009

Acuna

M&S: Ethical Foundations of Medicine

1

BMS 6826 Aug. 10, 2009 Oct. 6, 2009

Martinez

CM: Doctor Patient 5 BMS 6015 Aug. 10, 2009 Mar. 19, 2010 Obeso Communication, Graham Patient History and Physical Exam Structure & Function

7

BMS 6002L Oct. 8, 2009

Dec. 4, 2009

Castellanos

PD: Epidemiology & Evidence Based Medicine

1

BMS 6881 Oct. 8, 2009

Dec. 4, 2009

Acuna

M&S: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Health

1

BMS 6828 Oct. 8, 2009

Dec. 4, 2009

Martinez

Microbiology & 3 BMS 6300 Dec. 7, 2010 Jan. 11, 2010 Mathee Infection & Rosenthal (Immunology) Cuellar PD: Preparation for 2 BMS 6820 Dec. 7, 2010 Mar. 19, 2010 Konpfal Medicine & Society Valverde Lehman M&S: Intro To Social Medicine, Health Disparities

2

BMS 6827 Dec. 7, 2010

Mar. 19, 2010 Martinez

Cellular & General 4 BMS 6600 Jan. 13, 2010 Feb. 19, 2010 CastellanosPathology Sanchez Pharmacology

4

BMS 6400 Feb. 22, 2010 Mar. 19, 2010 Petroianu

Exams March 22 March 25 Period 1

38

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Academic Affairs and Clinical Affairs The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

PERIOD 2 Integrated Organ Systems Session 1: Spring & Summer March 29, 2010 - June 18, 2010 (Year 1) Course Name Credits Course Start Date End date Numbers

Course Director

Hematopoietic & 3 BMS 6xxx Mar. 29, 2010 Apr. 19, 2010 CastellanosLymphoreticular Sanchez Systems Endocrine Systems

3

BMS 6xxx Apr. 20, 2010 May 13/14, 2010 Karl

Reproductive Systems 3 BMS 6xxx May 17, 2010 Jun. 11, 2010 Ory Keegan PD: Health Systems

1

BMS 6xxx Mar. 29, 2010 Jun. 11, 2010 Roldan

M&S: Community Partnerships

1

BMS 6xxx Mar. 29, 2010 Jun. 11, 2010 Martinez

CM: Physical

1

BMS 6016 Mar. 29, 2010 Jun. 11, 2010 Obeso

Diagnosis of Organ Systems

Graham

Competency 0 NA Jun. 13, 2010 Jun. 18, 2010 Obeso Evaluation Graham Period 2

12

YEAR 1

42

50


Student Handbook Inaugural class

2009-2010

Requirements for the Doctorate of Medicine Degree Prior to graduation and the receipt of the Doctorate of Medicine degree from the Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, students must demonstrate proficiency in each of the following five areas: 1. Courses:

Students must complete the required core courses and the appropriate number of elective and selective courses earning a minimum of 200 credits with pass level performance.

2. Licensing exams:

Students must pass the USMLE Step I examination (required for promotion to Period 4)

Students must take and record a score for the USMLE Step II Clinical Knowledge and Clinical Skills examinations.

3. Competency Assessments:

Students must pass and earn certification for Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and Basic Life Support (BLS).

4. Professional Performance:

Students must demonstrate consistent evidence of professionalism as assessed by the Evaluation and Promotion (E&P) Committee. As part of its assessment, the E&P Committee will take into consideration information obtained from other sources at the Herbert Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine and/or FIU who have evaluated the student and/or the student’s behavior.

5. Review and approval of academic and professional record by the E&P Committee prior to graduation:

Students must receive the E&P Committee’s recommendation for graduation and receipt of the Doctorate of Medicine degree.

The E&P Committee’s recommendation for graduation and receipt of the M.D. degree must be approved by the Dean of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine.

The NeighborhoodHELP™ The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine has a commitment to bring state-ofthe-art medical care and education to the neediest households in the South Florida community by total immersion of medical students with real families who have real physical, mental, psychological, social, spiritual, and financial needs.

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Academic Affairs and Clinical Affairs The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

NeighborhoodHELP™, a core component of the unique Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine curriculum, will bring greater access to health care services, personalized health education, and a definite personal touch to the most vulnerable families living in South Florida. Students will follow their families throughout their four-year medical school education and become a member of an interdisciplinary team that will track and monitor the health of individuals of each household. Teams will be comprised of medical students and students majoring in nursing, public health, social work, dietetics, physical therapy, business, and law. College graduates will be highly skilled, compassionate, culturally competent physicians who will be attuned to the complex medical needs of the diverse and underserved South Florida population. The household visits begin in Period 2 during the Medicine & Society course 5, “Community, Cultures, and Health,” and continue through course 8, “Medicine & Society CAPSTONE,” at the end of Period 4. In collaboration with the teams and households, students will develop, implement, and monitor care plans that incorporate the social determinants of poor health in order to improve health outcomes. They will conduct assessments of the households’ strengths, resources and needs, facilitate health and social services referrals, and advocate for the households by addressing barriers to services. Simultaneously, medical students will teach household members to be their own health care advocates as they access services and become more empowered to improve their health.

Household Visits Each home visit has specific learning objectives that build upon previous visits, coinciding with the expanding knowledge and increasing skills of the medical students. During Period 2, there will be 11 household visits. The household visits will be integrated in Period 3 during the Clinical Clerkships and in Period 4, through the selectives and electives. Depending on the goal of the household visit, medical students will be paired with a nursing, social work, public health, or law student on alternating visits. Additionally, as needed, occupational therapy, physical therapy and nutrition students will be involved.  A general description of the first three visits is provided below to illustrate the progressive nature of the household visits (subject to change): •

First visit (with a nursing student): Orientation to the neighborhood and home environment; begin relationships with household members and sharpen observation skills by assessing the internal and external household environments

Second visit (with a social work student): Gather the household’s sociodemographic data and elicit the primary health concerns of family members

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Student Handbook Inaugural class •

2009-2010

Third Visit (with nursing and public health students): Conduct assessments based on the household’s primary concerns. For example, if there is an elderly resident in the home, the medical students will work side-by-side with nursing, physical therapy, and public health students to conduct a safety assessment of the living environment

Affiliate Clinical Sites General Policy: At present, there are four major hospital sites that have become affiliated with the FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine to provide clinical education, clerkships, and other experiences for medical students throughout the four-year curriculum. These sites include: •

Jackson North Medical Center

Miami Children’s Hospital

Mount Sinai Medical Center

Mercy Hospital

Medical students who receive clinical education or participate in a clinical clerkship at each of the affiliate clinical sites of the College are required to abide by all of the rules and regulations of the particular site. Prior to their first patient contact experience at each of these sites, medical students will receive an orientation to the major policies and procedures by their supervising faculty physician(s) for their educational experiences at the affiliate site. The office of the Dean and the Office of Student Affairs each maintain a manual from each of the affiliate hospitals which contain the policies and procedures that are most pertinent for medical students, including but not limited to the following: •

Professional dress code

Blood-borne pathogen and needle stick injury

Communicable diseases

Safety and incident reporting

Drug-free workplace

Students are responsible for understanding and following all of the rules and regulations. Failure to abide by these policies and procedures will be reported to the supervising

45


Academic Affairs and Clinical Affairs The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

faculty physician and could result in referral to the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Evaluation and E&P Committee for recommendation and action.

Hospital Affiliates Jackson North Medical Center http://www.jhsmiami.org Jackson North Medical Center, the primary teaching facility for the Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is a member of the Jackson Health System, an internationally recognized academic medical system serving as the cornerstone health care system of the South Florida community for more than ninety years. Jackson North Medical Center is a 382-bed acute care center located in North Miami Beach that serves the residents of north Miami-Dade and south Broward counties. A variety of services are offered, including 24-hour adult and pediatric emergency care, maternity, orthopedics, surgery, psychiatry, and inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation. Jackson North Medical Center also is home to the following specialized centers: the Weight Loss Surgery Center; Wound Care Center; Center for Mental Health, and the Pain and Spine Institute. Jackson Health System, an integrated healthcare delivery system, is governed by the Public Health Trust of Miami-Dade County. The Jackson Health System consists of its centerpiece, Jackson Memorial Hospital; 12 primary care centers and two primary care mobile vans; multiple school-based clinics serving many elementary, middle, and high schools; two long-term nursing facilities; six Corrections Health Services clinics; a network of mental health facilities; Holtz Children’s Hospital; Jackson Rehabilitation Hospital; Jackson South Community Hospital, and Jackson North Medical Center.

Miami Children’s Hospital http://www.mch.com Miami Children’s Hospital (MCH) is South Florida’s only licensed specialty hospital exclusively for children and is home to the largest pediatric teaching program in the Southeastern United States. The hospital features 289 pediatric and neonatal beds, more than any other children’s hospital in Florida and offers more than 40 pediatric specialties and subspecialties. MCH is renowned for excellence in all aspects of pediatric health care from birth through adolescence and is routinely ranked as one of the best children’s hospital in the nation. MCH is home to Florida’s only free-standing pediatric trauma center, the largest children’s cancer center in the region, and the Brain Institute which is the largest clinical neurology program in the nation, treating more than 45,000 children annually. MCH has been designated as an American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet Facility, the

46


Student Handbook Inaugural class

2009-2010

nursing profession’s most prestigious institutional honor, and is the first children’s hospital in Florida and the fifth children’s hospital in the United Statues to achieve this distinction.

Mount Sinai Medical Center http://www.msmc.com Located in Miami Beach, with more than 700 physicians, Mount Sinai Medical Center (MSMC) is South Florida’s largest, private, independent, not-for-profit teaching hospital. MSMC was founded in 1949 and currently has more than 950 licensed beds and 26 operating suites. The medical center has the most active cardiac program in South Florida, performing more than 550 open heart surgeries and 3,749 diagnostic and therapeutic cardiac catheterizations. MSMC participates in more than 15 national and international cardiac research clinical trials annually. Some of the major centers associated with MSMC include the largest memory disorder center in Florida (Wien Center for Alzheimer’s Disease and Memory Disorders), a state-of-the-art cancer center (The Mount Sinai Comprehensive Cancer Center), and the only NCI-sponsored Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) for adults in Florida. Mount Sinai became a teaching hospital in 1953, when it established its first medical residency programs.  Currently, it is one of only six statutory teaching hospitals in the state of Florida, attracting leaders in all fields and specialties. Each year, MSMC trains approximately 160 doctors representing 22 medical specialties including anesthesia; cardiology; cardiothoracic surgery; dermatology; emergency medicine; gastroenterology; general surgery; internal medicine; pathology; pediatrics; psychiatry; pulmonary disease; radiology; sleep disorders; surgical oncology, and urologic oncology. 

Mercy Hospital http://www.mercymiami.org Mercy Hospital is a 473-bed acute care hospital, staffed by more than 700 physicians representing 27 medical specialties. Established in 1950, Mercy Hospital is the only Catholic hospital in Miami Dade County and is a ministry of the Roman Catholic Church, a member of Catholic Health East, and sponsored by the Sisters of St. Joseph of St. Augustine, Florida. Centers of Excellence include the Heart Center, the Miami Cancer Center, the Orthopedic Institute, and the Minimally Invasive Surgical Institute. Mercy Hospital is a recipient of the prestigious Magnet™ award for nursing excellence and HealthGrades’ Distinguished Hospital for Clinical Excellence Award™. Mercy Research Institute participates in a variety of clinical research in cardiology, diabetes, infectious disease, oncology, rheumatology, oncology and many other therapeutic areas. Mercy Hospital is recognized as a leader in neurology, diabetes, and surgical weight loss procedures.

47


Academic Affairs and Clinical Affairs The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

The Gordon Center for Research in Medical Education The Gordon Center for Research in Medical Education (GCRME) is a University of Miami designated Center of Excellence that was established forty years ago as a unique laboratory for the application of advanced technology to medical education for medical students and other health care providers. The GCRME is now housed in an expanded 34,000 square foot, new state-of–the-art facility, that houses a high technology auditorium and classrooms. The classrooms are used for both small and large group sessions and are equipped with an audience response system to facilitate individual and group participation. There are thirty computers in the self-learning laboratory, each in a private setting, where students can review computer-based teaching programs and take course examinations. There are also six standardized patient/simulator training areas, each equipped with AV recording, archiving and play back capability. For more than forty years, the GCRME has developed, evaluated, implemented and disseminated advanced training programs using simulation technology. These include the UMedic multi-media training systems in Cardiology, Neurology and Emergency Medicine. The GCRME is also the home for “Harvey”, the Cardiopulmonary Patient Simulator used to train and evaluate medical students and other health care providers on the cardiopulmonary examination. More than 200 medical centers worldwide currently use “Harvey” and/or the UMedic systems in their training programs; the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons currently uses “Harvey” in its high-stakes certification examination for internists. The GCRME houses an emergency training area where high-fidelity mannequin simulators are used for teaching Basic and Advanced Life Support, Pediatric Advanced Life Support, Advanced Trauma Life Support, Advanced Stroke Life Support, Management of Acute Coronary Syndromes, Emergency Response to Terrorism, Catastrophic Health Incident Response, and Advanced Airway Management. The Life Support training area contains six high-fidelity simulators used for task training in a controlled environment. In addition, there are mock emergency and trauma areas to provide more realistic experience and team training. At the GCRME, students will have the opportunity to apply and demonstrate their knowledge and skills through the use of simulation technology as part of clinical medicine education. Clinical Medicine is a longitudinal “strand” throughout the four-year medical school curriculum, designed to provide students with the foundations of patient care that will not only prepare them for the clinical clerkship years but also provide them with the tools that will foster a lifetime of clinical competence. FIU student sessions will take place at the GCRME one afternoon per week, typically from 1 P.M. to 5 P.M.

48


Policies & Regulations

Policies and Regulations The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Student Handbook

2009-2010


Policies & Regulations


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

A. Matriculation Policies

B

B. Technical Standards

C

C. Accreditation

D

D. Academic Policies

E

E. Attendance

F

F. Professionalism

G

G. Grades, EvaluAtion, Promotion & Processes

H

H. Grievances

I

I. Sexual Battery and Harassment

J

J. Health Policies

K

K. Technology Policies

L

L. Medical Students Records

M

M. Medical Library

N

N. FIU Emergency Policies

O

O. Miscellaneous Policies

49


Policies and Regulations A

A. Matriculation Policies

B

B. Technical Standards

C

C. Accreditation

D

D. Academic Policies

E

E. Attendance

F

F. Professionalism

G

G. Grades, EvaluAtion, Promotion & Processes

H

H. Grievances

I

I. Sexual Battery and Harassment

J

J. Health Policies

K

K. Technology Policies

L

L. Medical Students Records

M

M. Medical Library

N

N. FIU Emergency Policies

O

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

O. Miscellaneous Policies

50


Student Handbook Inaugural class

2009-2010

A

A. Matriculation Policies Health History and Medical Examination Once applicants accept the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine’s offer to enroll and

B

matriculate, they will receive a welcome cover letter from the Office of Student Affairs accompanied by a packet of information, a “Pre-Orientation Checklist” and several types of The information packet includes the following health information forms:

Immunization Documentation Form

Health Insurance Verification Form

Health and Safety Agreement

E

Medical History and Physical Examination Form

D

C

forms that need to be submitted at least four (4) weeks prior to the first day of Orientation.

F

The “Health Insurance Verification Form” and the “Health and Safety Agreement” must be completed annually. Copies of these two forms are in the Appendix.

G

As a pre-matriculation requirement, all admitted students to the College are required to see a licensed physician of their choice for a medical history and physical examination prior (see the College’s Immunization Policy). The “Medical History and Physical Examination

H

to the first day of Orientation. In addition, they must receive all required immunizations Form” and the “Immunization Documentation Form” must be completed and signed

I

by the student’s personal physician and submitted to University Health Services (UHS) for processing, as instructed in the cover letter. After processing, UHS will provide the requirements. Students who fail to complete and submit these forms will receive a hold

J

Office of Student Affairs with documentation of compliance with the pre-matriculation on their registration.

K

The “Health Insurance Verification Form” and the “Health and Safety Agreement” forms, in addition to the other forms indicated in the “Pre-Orientation Checklist,” should be sent

L

directly to the Office of Student Affairs. Students who fail to complete and submit all of these forms will receive a hold on their registration.

M N O 51


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

Immunization Policy The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine is committed to protecting its

B

students, staff, and patients from all potential health threats including infections. As a prerequisite to registration, all students must comply with the immunization policy regulations from the Florida International University Board of Trustees

C

regarding measles, mumps, rubella, meningitis, and hepatitis B immunity. The FIU Board of Trustees requires that “prior to registration, each applicant accepted for

D

admission must submit appropriate medical documentation to include, but not be limited to, documentation of appropriate immunization required by the University. Exceptions may be granted pursuant to University policies.” (FIU402 Admission

E

to the University.) The College follows the most recent immunization requirements and recommendations as approved by the Advisory Committee of Immunization

F

Practices (ACIP) and endorsed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) based on the guidelines located on their website: www.cdc.gov/vaccines.

G

Prior to the first day of Orientation, medical students must provide written documentation of immunity to all of the infectious diseases below, either by providing documentation of having had the disease or documentation evidencing vaccination or positive blood

H

antibody titer. Students may receive immunizations at their own healthcare provider office, ambulatory clinic, or at the General Medical Clinic at FIU’s University Health Services if

I

already enrolled as a medical student.

J

The basic immunization requirements for medical students include the following: 1. Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR):

All students born after December 31, 1956 must present documented proof of

K

immunity to measles (Rubeola) and German measles (Rubella), as described below: Acceptable Proof of Immunity consists of:

L

a. Proof of two (2) vaccinations (doses) of MMR (Measles/Mumps/Rubella) received

M

at least 28 days apart or two doses of measles and one Rubella

− Vaccinations must have been received after your first birthday

− Vaccinations must have been received in 1969 or later

N

b. Proof of immunity by way of a blood test lab result (Measles and Rubella Titer) c. A written statement from a healthcare provider documenting a diagnosis of

O

measles (Rubeola) including the date of diagnosis and signed by the health care

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

2009-2010

provider on his/her official stationery. This is acceptable for measles only and

A

does not apply to Rubella Exemptions: You will be exempt from the pre-registration immunization

B

requirement for measles, mumps, and rubella, only if you meet any one of the following three criteria:

C

a. You were born before January 1, 1957; b. Medical Exemption: To claim a medical exemption, you must produce a letter

D

from a healthcare provider, signed on his/her stationery, stating the medical reason(s) why you are not able to receive the measles and/or Rubella vaccine(s) condition). Temporary deferments are acceptable for the following conditions:

• Documented pregnancy or fertility treatment

• Documentation of breastfeeding

• Documented illness

Deferment status requests must be submitted to the University Health Services

F

E

and the duration for the exemption (i.e., for a permanent or temporary medical

G H

preferably at least four (4) weeks prior to orientation. The request must be signed

I

by a health care provider on his/her official stationery. c. Religious Exemption: For details on how to claim religious exemption, please

J

visit the University Health Services website at studenthealth.fiu.edu. To prevent delays in your ability to register for classes, all of the above documents should

K

be received by University Health Services at least four (4) weeks prior to registration. 2. Meningitis All students must present written documentation of receiving one dose of meningitis

L

vaccine (Menactra) as proof of vaccination/immunity to meningococcal meningitis.

M

Information about meningtis can be found in the Appendix. − Students may elect to sign a waiver of liability acknowledging that they have received and read information pertaining to meningitis and despite knowledge

N

of the risks, have decided to waive receiving the vaccine. The waiver of liability can be obtained by contacting the University Health Services department or by

53

O

visiting the FIU University Health Services website at studenthealth.fiu.edu.


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Students who choose the waiver option are advised that if there is an outbreak

A

of meningococcal meningitis on campus or at the clinical site where the student currently is located, he/she may not be allowed to enter campus, attend classes

C

B

or visit the clinical site, until the risk of infection has been reduced as determined by the Miami-Dade Health Department. 3. Hepatitis B

Students must show documented proof of vaccination/immunity to Hepatitis B, as

D

described below. Acceptable Proof of Immunity to Hepatitis B consists of:

E

a. A total of three doses of hepatitis B vaccine; or b. Proof of immunity with a positive hepatitis B antibody blood test; or

F

c. A written statement from a healthcare provider documenting a diagnosis of hepatitis B; must include date of diagnosis and signed by the provider on his/

G

her official stationery. − If not already completed, the student will be responsible to complete vaccination

H

with all 3 doses within the first 6 months of classes. − Proof of receiving at the least the first dose of the Hepatitis B immunization

I

series is required before a student begins a clinical care experience. − Information about hepatitis B can be found in the Appendix.

J

Waivers: − Students declining to receive vaccination for hepatitis B must present a signed waiver of liability acknowledging that they have received and read information

K

pertaining to hepatitis B and despite knowledge of the risks have decided to waive receiving the vaccine. The waiver of liability can be obtained by contacting

L

the University Health Services department or by visiting the FIU University Health

M

Additional Immunization Requirements for the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine:

N

Services web site at: studenthealth.fiu.edu.

requires proof of immunity to the following, as established by the Advisory Committee

In addition to the above state-mandated immunization requirements, the College

O

of Immunization Practices (ACIP) and endorsed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

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Student Handbook Inaugural class 1.

2009-2010

Tetanus/diphtheria immunization:

A

a. Based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines, matriculating students who have not had a tetanus booster within the past two years should

B

receive the Tdap vaccine. b. A single dose of Tdap must be given for adults aged 19 through 64 years who

C

have not received a dose of Tdap previously. c. Afterwards, adults should receive Td booster every 10 years; can be given as

2.

D

early as 2 years since last Td dose if uncertain of the last Td dose. Varicella (chickenpox): Medical students are required to provide one of the

E

following types of documentation prior to matriculation: a. Varivax (2 doses) Note: Second dose should be taken at least 4-8 weeks following first dose.

F b. Positive varicella titer (Student must provide copy of lab documentation of a positive titer.)

G 3. Influenza vaccine: An influenza vaccine is required for all medical students to be

H

administered in the Fall of each year during which the student is enrolled in the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine. PPD screening:

I

4.

a. Proof of Screening. Proof of annual PPD screening and/or testing is required

J

for all students. b. Baseline Two-Step Process Required. The College follows CDC guidelines a PPD test in the past 12 months can be used to minimize the likelihood of

K

which state that “for baseline testing, a two-step procedure for persons without confusing reactivity from an old infection (boosting) with reactivity from a recent

L

infection (conversion.)” − Unless a student has proof of having a current two-step PPD test (defined

M

as at least 2 intracutaneous Mantoux tests, given a minimum of 1-3 weeks apart, within the previous 12 months) or history of a positive PPD at the time of the first clinical experience.

prior to matriculation will be sufficient to meet the two-step test requirement.

55

O

− If the student has had at least one PPD done in the past 12 months, one test

N

matriculation, he/she is required to have the two-step test completed prior to


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

c. Annual PPD test. Once the two-step test is done initially, students are required

A

to have one annual PPD test performed. The two-step test is generally a onetime process.

B

d. Prior PPD test. If a student has documentation of a previous positive PPD test, proof of at least one baseline chest x-ray is required. After that, the student is

C

required to complete the tuberculosis symptom screen annually in lieu of the PPD test.

D

– In 2005, the FDA approved a blood assay for M. tuberculosis, Quantiferon Gold (QFT-G). The College is not requiring this test currently. In the event the CDC recommendations and/or requirements change or this assay is

E

required from a College clinical teaching site, students will be notified. e. PPD Positive Tests. Students who are found to be PPD positive by initial

F

testing will be required to have a baseline chest x-ray and an evaluation by their private physician for further recommendations, including possible TB treatment.

G

Decisions will be made on an individual basis as to the ability of a student on active TB treatment to pursue coursework and/or clinical rotations, based on

H

the recommendations.

Send immunization documents directly to University Health Services. I

All immunization documents must be submitted to the Immunization Department at the University Health Services Complex, room 101, on the Modesto A. Maidique Campus

J

for processing at least four (4) weeks prior to the first day of medical student orientation. Medical students may document receipt of their immunizations using the College’s “Immunization Documentation” form or substitute a similar form from their healthcare

K

practitioner and the license number or office stamp with address.

L

provider. The form must carry the original signature of a physician or a licensed medical

Unable to complete an immunization? In the event that the student is unable to complete an immunization, series of immunizations,

M

or screenings as required for any medical or non-medical reason, the student will be required to sign a formal declination acknowledging the risks and provide a physician’s

N

note documenting the medical exemption. The signed formal declination also states that, should a local outbreak occur of the infectious disease to which a student is not immune, the student will not be permitted to participate in any clinical care activity until the epidemic

O

is cleared by the Miami-Dade Department of Health.

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

2009-2010

Health Insurance A

Providing care to patients poses inherent risks of acquiring a communicable disease. Therefore, all students enrolled at the Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College

B

of Medicine are required to maintain continuous health insurance coverage that provides benefits to meet the established minimum standards. Such insurance coverage shall be maintained continuously throughout a student’s attendance at the College. Prior to Orientation

C

and annually thereafter, all students must submit the “Verification of Health Insurance Form” to the Office of Student Affairs, attesting to the fact that they are currently covered by a health

D

insurance policy that meets the basic requirements as outlined below. Students are responsible for immediately notifying the OSA should the status of their health insurance coverage change for any reason (e.g., voluntary change in policy, non-payment, etc.).

E Students who need to purchase health insurance are eligible to participate in the group PPO student health insurance plan which is available to all FIU students and reviewed by the FIU

F

University Health Services Department. The current university student health insurance plan is administered through Collegiate Risk Management. Students should contact University

G

Health Services at 305-348-3080, or visit the web site: www.fiu.edu/~health to learn more about the current group health insurance plan available to registered FIU graduate students. Students are responsible for all charges related to both the insurance premium

H

and all out-of-pocket medical expenses for services. Prior to Orientation week, all students must submit the Insurance Verification Form to the

I

Office of Student Affairs attesting to the fact that they currently are covered by a health insurance policy that meets certain basic requirements. In addition to this form, a copy of

J

the student’s health insurance card will be kept in the OSA. Students are responsible for immediately notifying the OSA should the status of their health insurance coverage change for any reason (e.g., voluntary change in policy, non-payment, etc.).

K

Minimum Basic Insurance Requirements: Coverage Period: Coverage must include the entire academic year, including

L

1.

annual breaks, regardless of the student’s terms of enrollment. The policy must eligible student. Payment of benefits must be renewable Maximum Benefit of $100,000 per person per calendar year. - Preferable: Maximum coverage of $200,000 for covered injuries/illnesses per

N

2.

M

provide continuous coverage for the entire period the insured is enrolled as an

policy year

O

- Preferable: Minimum coverage of $50,000 per accident or illness

57


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

3.

Deductible per calendar year: Maximum of $100 per person per policy year.

A

- Preferable: An out-of-pocket financial incentive to receive non-emergency

B

outpatient primary care services at the FIU University Health Services clinics 4. Basic Benefits: Room, board, hospital services, physician fees, surgeon fees, ambulance, outpatient services, and outpatient customary fees for network provider

C

services to be paid at 80% or more of usual, customary, reasonable charge per accident or illness, after deductible is met, and at least 60% of usual, customary, and

D

reasonable charge for out-of-network providers per accident or illness 5.

Physician office visits in private office location: maximum of $25 copay for

E

primary care and $40 copay for specialist 6.

Inpatient Mental Health Care: Must be paid at 80% in-network or at least 60% out-of-network of the usual and customary fees with a minimum 30-day cap per

F

benefit period. - Preferable: In Network Mental Health (inpatient and outpatient) – paid as any

G

other sickness; 7.

Outpatient Mental Health Care (psychotherapy): Coverage of at least 80% in-network or at least 60% out-of-network of the usual and customary fees for a

H

minimum of 20 outpatient sessions per year, preferably without a dollar maximum. 8.

Maternity Benefits: Must be treated as any other temporary medical condition

I

and paid at no less than 80% of usual and customary fees in-network or 60% out-

J

of-network. 9.

Prescription Medication: 100% after $15 copay for generic medications and $30 copay for brand name prescription medications provided at in-network pharmacies. Must have at least $1,000 calendar year coverage, preferably to include

K

contraceptives. 10. Exclusion for Pre-Existing Conditions: First twelve months of policy period,

L

at most.

M

11. Additional Benefits:

• Insurance Carrier must have an “A” rating or above per Part 62.14(c)(1)

N

• Policy must not unreasonably exclude coverage for perils inherent to the

O

of Section 22 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

student’s program of study.

• Policy must provide in-network physician, hospital, diagnostic, and therapeutic

58


Student Handbook Inaugural class

coverage in local facilities for non-emergency outpatient and inpatient

services in the South Florida area (e.g., Miami-Dade and/or Broward Counties).

A

2009-2010

• Policy must provide at least partial coverage for routine immunizations, health screenings, substance abuse treatment, maternity, emergency dental coverage,

out-of-area coverage, and coverage while on leave of absence.

B

C

Disability Insurance are required to enroll in the group disability insurance policy provided through the Herbert

D

Because of the nature of and the expense of training for a career in medicine, students Wertheim College of Medicine. This requirement is designed to protect the student’s

E

investment in his/her medical education and training should a disability occur that would not allow the student to complete medical school. Students must pay the required premium

F

for the annual disability insurance plan during Orientation and annually thereafter.

G

Criminal Background Checks Upon acceptance to the College and before the first day of Orientation, all students must pass a criminal background check conducted by a service selected by the Association of

H

American Medical Colleges. Findings in background checks may affect the student being admitted as well as a student’s ability to participate in clinical experiences and complete

I

the program, and/or obtain a medical license. During the student’s tenure at the College, if a student is arrested, charged or convicted of a felony or misdemeanor, he or she must disclose such an event to the Executive Associate Dean of Student Affairs. Background

J

checks are also performed by the State on application for licensure. Failure to disclose this information can result in a required appearance before the Board of Medicine and a

K

significant delay (or possible denial) of a medical license.

L

B. Technical Standards Technical Standards

M

Candidates for the M.D. degree must be able to fully and promptly perform the essential functions in each of the following categories: Observation, Communication, Motor, Intellectual, and Behavioral/Social. However, it is recognized that degrees of ability vary

N

widely between individuals. Individuals are encouraged to discuss their disabilities with the Director of Student Counseling and Wellness Center of the College and the FIU

59

O

Disability Resource Center to determine whether there is a reasonable accommodation


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

available to train and function effectively as a physician. (Please also see the Students with Disabilities Policy.) The Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College

C

B

of Medicine is committed to enabling its students with disabilities a reasonable accommodation to complete the course of study leading to the medical degree. •

Observation

The student must be able to observe demonstrations and experiments in the basic sciences, including but not limited to anatomic dissections and gross pathologic abnormalities in humans and animals, radiologic imaging studies,

D

evaluation of lab tests to include blood, urine and microbiologic cultures, and performance of microscopic studies of microorganisms and tissues in normal

E

and pathologic states. The candidate must be able to observe a patient accurately at a distance and close at hand. Observation necessitates the functional use of the sense of vision, hearing, and touch which can further be

G

F

enhanced by the sense of smell. •

Communication (speech, writing, reading, and computer literacy)

The student must be able to communicate effectively and sensitively with patients. The focus of this communication is to elicit information, describe changes in mood,

H

activity, and posture, and perceive nonverbal communications. The candidate must be able to communicate effectively and efficiently in oral and written form with all

Motor

The student must have sufficient motor function to elicit information from patients by palpation, auscultation, percussion and other diagnostic maneuvers in a timely

J

I

members of the health care team.

manner. The candidate must be able to execute motor movements reasonably

K

required to provide general care and emergency treatments to patients. Such actions require coordination of both gross and fine muscular movements, equilibrium and

Intellectual (Conceptual, Integrative, and Quantitative Abilities)

The student must have the ability to measure, calculate, reason and analyze; the student must be able to synthesize and apply complex information. All personal

M

L

functional use of the senses of touch and vision.

qualities are assessed throughout the education process. Students must be fully

N

alert and attentive at all times in clinical and educational settings. Behavioral/Social Attributes

A student must possess the emotional health required for full utilization of his/her

O

intellectual abilities, the exercise of good judgment, the prompt completion of all

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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responsibilities attendant to the diagnosis and care of patients, and the development

A

of mature, sensitive, and effective relationships with patients. Students must be able to adapt to changing environments, to display flexibility and to learn to function in

B

the face of uncertainties inherent in the clinical problems of many patients. Commitment, integrity, compassion, motivation, and interpersonal skills

These are personal qualities that are assessed during the admission and personal interview processes, and re-assessed objectively and subjectively throughout both

C

the basic science and clinical educational processes.

D

Task Completion

A student must possess the intellectual, motor, and communication abilities to

F

Students With Disabilities

E

performing duties in a timely manner that enhances patient recovery and survival.

The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine adopts the FIU policies and procedures Students with specific questions regarding the FIU policies governing students with

G

regarding students with disabilities. The FIU policies and procedures are written below. disabilities may contact the University’s Disability Resource Center (DRC). Medical students

H

with disabilities who wish to receive accommodations based on a disability must notify the College’s Office of Student Affairs and register with the FIU DRC.

I

Definitions

Student - A person who is currently registered for classes at Florida International

J

University in accordance with the requirements and procedures of the Office of Student Affairs, or a prospective student who seeks information or assistance prior

K

to being admitted or registering for classes. Disability - FIU DRC adopts the definition of “disability” as set forth in the Americans

L

with Disabilities Act of 1990, USC 12101, Sec. 23(2), as being “(A) a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more of the major activities of such individual; (B) a record of such an impairment; or (C) being regarded as having such

M

an impairment.”

Temporary Disability - As the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990 and the

N

Rehabilitation Act of 1973 only extend to persons with permanent disabilities and as it is recognized that students with a temporary disability may also need appropriate

61

O

assistance, FIU DRC defines a “temporary disability” as one which, for a stated period


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

of time, will limit one or more of a person’s major life activities. The existence of the

A

disability and the period of time it will last must be certified by a physician’s report or other appropriate documentation. The DRC will use its discretion to determine if the

B

extent of the disability is sufficient to warrant the services requested.

C

Procedures Medical students may receive services from DRC through self-referral or by referral of

D

the College faculty, OSA Deans, or the Director of the Student Counseling and Wellness Center. As a condition to receiving services from the FIU DRC, students are required to complete a Student Information Intake Form indicating identification information

E

(name, address, Panther ID number, etc.), the nature of the disability, auxiliary aids or other accommodations requested, and other pertinent information needed by the DRC

F

to provide services to the student. The student must provide the DRC with current, appropriate documentation certifying the existence of a disability (physicians report, neuro-psycho evaluation, audiograms, etc.) and the functional limitations imposed by

G

the disability in order to be entitled to services. Students who contact the office are given an appointment to speak to a DRC counselor and advised that they will need

H

to provide documentation of their disability prior to receiving services. Students are asked to complete the Student Information Intake Form at or before the time of the appointment. At the meeting with the counselor, the student’s specific needs will be

I

discussed and an appropriate program to assist that student will be established. The student is also advised of any additional requirements which may be necessary and told how to access the services of the Center. Counseling is provided by the director and

J

coordinators. General and common questions are frequently answered by the clerical staff, where possible. Fees/Charges: No fees are charged for the services provided. However, the

K

student must bear the cost of providing the documentation of his/her disability. Permits/Identification Required: The documentation of a disability, is

L

required to certify entitlement to DRC services. Documentation must be issued by an appropriate professional or agency such as a physician, optometrist,

M

audiologist, psychologist, or other health care professional, the Division of Blind Services, a prior educational institution, etc. Documentation must be current

N

and complete. The DRC reserves the right to request additional documentation of disability in the event the documentation presented is insufficient to establish the existence of a disability or if the documentation fails to support the type of

O

aids and services requested.

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Records Management: The completed Student Information Intake Form and

A

supporting documentation are kept in a file under the student’s name in the Disability Resource Center. Information about prospective students may be kept in a common

B

Prospective Student’s file until all information is received and/or the student enrolls. Exemptions: In the event a student’s disability is readily apparent, and the need for provided current or complete documentation of the disability. The Director of the DRC, or

C

services is immediate, the DRC will not withhold services because the student has not the Director’s designee at his or her discretion will provide services, if the documentation

D

provided is sufficient to indicate the need for services but requires supplementation or updating. This exception is conditioned upon the student providing the required

E

documentation within a reasonable period of time, not to exceed three months. Policy Violations: In the event a student fails to comply with this policy, the FIU into compliance. If after appropriate notification, the student still fails to meet the

F

DRC will notify the student of the requirements necessary to bring him or her requirements, the DRC will cease providing services.

G

Forms/Online Processes H

Student Intake Form https://drc.fiu.edu/Forms.htm In addition to the procedures described above, the DRC and the College require the

1.

I

following when a medical student is requesting an accommodation: The DRC staff may prepare a confidential letter addressed to the Assistant Dean

J

for Student Affairs (Counseling and Communities) indicating that the medical documentation supports specific accommodations with the written consent of the student. The student’s consent will allow the Assistant Dean to discuss with the

K

Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs, and/or the Director of the Student Counseling and Wellness Center, as appropriate. The medical student signs a understanding of his/her responsibility. The medical student will then present the

L

statement at the DRC indicating agreement with suggested accommodations and letter to the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs. The DRC prints two copies of the letter and retains a copy as a record of the meeting,

M

2.

eligibility and accommodation request. The other copy is given to the student. The medical student will schedule an appointment to meet with the Assistant Dean

N

3.

for Student Affairs within ten (10) business days to present the letter. The student is

O

encouraged to keep a copy of this document.

63


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

4.

Once accommodations have been confirmed, the student is to schedule an

A

appointment with the Student Counseling and Wellness Center. 5.

The Director of the Student Counseling and Wellness will be the professional

B

representative responsible for facilitating accommodations for medical school students who have been determined eligible for services. Professional staff

C

members from both the DRC and the Student Counseling and Wellness Center will explain to the student how the accommodations will be facilitated usually at

D

the same meeting.

Examinations E

Students who qualify for exam accommodations will follow DRC’s Testing Center policies, which can be found at http://drc.fiu.edu. If the examination is not taken at

F

the DRC, the College (in collaboration with the DRC) will coordinate the provision of other accommodations. This might also occur for quizzes or shorter, in-class exams. The student is responsible for notifying the instructor at least five (5) working days

G

prior to the quiz/exam if on-site accommodations are desired. Except for extenuating circumstances, all exams requiring accommodation will be administered at the DRC

H

or the College. A special situation arises with the NBME examinations. Since these examinations

I

must be ordered well in advance of the test date, students who are requesting to take an NBME exam under special accommodations should begin the process at least five

K

J

(5) weeks prior to the date the exam is to be administered.

C. Accreditation Accreditation Statement

L

The Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) is the accrediting body for medical schools in the United States and solely determines the accreditation status of every medical program leading to the Doctor of Medicine degree. To be accredited, a medical

M

program must meet comprehensive standards that answer to the quality, integrity and educational objectives required by the LCME. The academic program is structured to

N

provide students with an education that meets the faculty’s expected standards for the attainment of the Doctor of Medicine degree.

O

Accreditation for a new medical school is a five-step process. The last two steps of the LCME guidelines intentionally coincide with the progress of the inaugural class of students

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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though their program of study. Currently, the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine at

A

Florida International University has reached the third step and been awarded Preliminary Accreditation status. The fourth step in the accreditation process is called Provisional final step in accreditation is called “Full Accreditation” and that is anticipated to coincide

B

Accreditation, and it is anticipated to be awarded to the College in 2011. The fifth and with the graduation of the inaugural class in 2013. According to the Accreditation Council

C

for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), a student who completes the graduation requirements for the M.D. degree from a medical school in the process of completing accredited residency training programs. Additional information regarding accreditation

D

full accreditation by the LCME is eligible for complete consideration in applying for can be found in the “Overview and Accreditation Procedures” sections of the LCME site

E

located at www.lcme.org.

F

D. Academic Policies Teacher-Learner Relationship

G

The College is committed to promoting academic and professional success for learners and teachers at all levels. The achievement of such success is dependent on an

H

environment free of actions and behaviors which can undermine the important missions of our institution. An atmosphere of mutual respect, collegiality, fairness, and trust is essential. Although both teachers and learners bear significant responsibility in creating

I

and maintaining this atmosphere, teachers also bear particular responsibility with respect to their evaluative roles relative to student work and with respect to modeling

J

appropriate professional behaviors. Teachers must be ever mindful of this responsibility in their interactions with their colleagues, their patients, and those whose education has been entrusted to them.

K

Responsibilities of teachers include: To treat all learners with respect and fairness

2.

To treat all learners equally regardless of age, gender, race, ethnicity, national origin,

L

1.

M

religion, disability, or sexual orientation To provide current materials in an effective format for learning

4.

To be on time for didactic, investigational, and clinical encounters

5.

To provide timely feedback with constructive suggestions and opportunities for

N

3.

O

improvement or remediation, when needed.

65


Policies and Regulations A

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

6.

To grade/evaluate on factors related to performance, effort, or level of achievement

7.

To be available for contact and timely response through various means of communication, including official university email, cellular phone, and accurate

C

B

home phone and mailing address 8.

To respond to official email communications within 72 hours

9.

To maintain high professional standards in all interactions with learners, patients,

D

colleagues, and staff 10. To refrain from requesting learners to perform inappropriate personal errands

E

unrelated to the didactic, investigational, or clinical situation at hand 11. To nurture both the intellectual and personal development of learners 12. To pursue confidential mental and physical support for any conditions that might

F

compromise the learning environment and/or patient care

G

13. To abide by the values of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine 14. To adhere to all of the rules and responsibilities outlined in the Medical

Responsibilities of learners include: 1.

To treat all fellow learners and teachers with respect and fairness

2.

To treat all fellow learners and teachers equally regardless of age, gender, race,

I

H

Student Handbook

J

ethnicity, national origin, religion, disability, or sexual orientation 3.

To commit the time and energy to your studies necessary to achieve the goals and

4.

To be on time for didactic, investigational, and clinical encounters

5.

To communicate concerns and suggestions about the curriculum, didactic

L

K

objectives of each course

methods, teachers, or the learning environment in a respectful and

M

professional manner 6.

To maintain high professional standards in all interactions with fellow learners, teachers, and staff consistent with the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine and

N

FIU Student Standards of Conduct and the Honor Code 7.

To notify the appropriate faculty and staff members in a timely manner of any

O

problems that adversely affects the learning environment

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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To participate in the process of program evaluation, improvement, and development

9.

To respond to official email communications within 72 hours

A

8.

10. To be available for contact and timely response through various means of

B

communication, including official university email, cellular phone, and accurate home phone and mailing address.

C

11. To take time to nurture one’s own intellectual and personal development 12. To pursue confidential mental and physical support for any conditions that might

D

compromise achievement of one’s educational goals or patient care 13. To abide by the values of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

E

14. To adhere to all of the rules and responsibilities outlined in the College’s Student Handbook

F

Compact Between Teachers and Learners of Medicine: Adapted from the Association of American Medical Colleges

G

Preparation for a career in medicine requires the acquisition of a large fund of knowledge and a variety of professional skills inherent in the doctor/patient relationship. The following

1.

H

are the guiding principles of this contract: Duty. Medical educators have a duty, not only to convey the knowledge and

I

professional skills required for the delivery of the contemporary standard of care required of physicians, but also to inculcate the values and attitudes required for 2.

J

preserving the medical profession’s social contract across generations. Integrity. The learning environments conducive to conveying professional values must foster integrity. Students learn enduring lessons of professionalism by

K

observing and emulating role models who epitomize authentic professional values and attitudes.

L

3. Respect. Respect for all individuals is fundamental to the practice of medicine. Mutual respect between learners, as novice members of the medical profession, nurturing respect.

M

and their teachers, as experienced and esteemed professionals, is essential for

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Policies and Regulations A

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

E. Attendance Attendance Policy

B

Professionalism is a major component of the College’s curriculum. Therefore, medical students as future professionals should conduct themselves appropriately in all

C

curricular activities, including classroom work, laboratory work, and clinical experiences. The professionalism of a medical student includes arriving to educational activities on-time, using laptop computers only for course work during the educational activity,

D

and minimizing disruptions to the educational exercise. Students are accountable and personally responsible for attending all educational activities including large and small group sessions and lectures, labs, clinical experiences, examinations, etc. Faculty may

E

establish specific attendance and punctuality requirements for certain courses and clerkships by notifying students of the requirements in the course syllabus or by an

F

alternate means of written communication. Academically successful medical students are expected to attend all educational activities to best prepare them to meet the

G

curricular goals leading to the M.D. degree. Students are expected to attend all scheduled activities on time and ready to begin. If a first or second period student has an emergency that prevents him/her from attending

H

a scheduled activity, he/she is to call and notify the Office of Student Affairs and request that they inform the faculty member for that activity. If possible, the student should

I

also call and leave a message with the faculty member responsible for teaching the course. It is important that students realize that their absence or tardiness negatively impacts a number of other people. Unexcused absences demonstrate unprofessional

J

behavior by the student. Attendance, including tardiness, is part of the evaluation for professionalism, and poor evaluations may result in decreased grades and, in severe

K

cases, referral to the E&P Committee.

L

Religious Observance (adapted from the FIU Policy) The College recognizes that students, faculty and staff observe a variety of religious faiths

M

and practices. Although many religious holidays are observed with time off, a few of the religious days of observance may be part of the academic calendar. The College

N

respects the religious beliefs and practices of its students and seeks to accommodate them within the requirements of the academic schedule. As a result, a student who must be absent from a class requirement will not be penalized. Students who anticipate

O

absence should notify the OSA and the supervising faculty in advance.

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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A

The College will follow the established FIU policy regarding absences due to personal observances of religious holidays. To review the policy, access the FIU Student Handbook at: http://www.fiu.edu/~camplife.

B C

Leave of Absence Policy A. Leave of Absence Policy Overview

D

A leave of absence is a temporary period of non-enrollment and may either be voluntary or involuntary.

1. Provisions Relating to Any Leave of Absence: E

a) Students must keep their health insurance policy current.

F

b) Medical students should be aware that taking a leave of absence may affect student loan deferment/repayment status, housing, health insurance coverage, or financial aid eligibility. Prior to applying for a leave of absence, students should investigate these implications as they pertain to their personal situations.

G c) If conditions have been set for a student’s eligibility to return from a leave, particularly if returning from a Summary Involuntary Withdrawal, the student must demonstrate satisfaction of those conditions prior to return date.

H

d) Students must complete all course requirements within a six (6) year period from the time of matriculation in order to receive the M.D. degree.

I J

B. Voluntary Leaves of Absence

K

Students may request a voluntary leave of absence for any one of three (3) reasons: personal, health, or educational/research. Students requesting a voluntary leave of absence need to complete a “Leave of Absence” form available at the Office of Student Affairs. The student must include the following information on the form:

L

Student’s plan to acquire information missed while on leave

Arrangement by the student for coverage of all clinical or course responsibilities

Arrangement for notification of all faculty, house staff, and other students affected by the absence

(12) months.

69

O

The maximum amount of time granted for a voluntary leave of absence is twelve

N

Reason for the absence

M


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

Personal Leave of Absence A personal leave of absence may be requested for personal or family matters, financial

B

issues, or academic issues which do not rise to the level that the Evaluations and Promotions Committee (E&P Committee) would take action. A student requesting a personal leave of absence must submit a letter outlining the reasons for the request to

C

the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs or designee as soon as practicable. The Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs or designee is responsible for granting (with

D

or without restrictions) or denying the request.

Health-Related Leave of Absence

E

A health-related leave of absence requires a statement from the student’s physician regarding the need for the absence, the diagnosis and prognosis of the illness, duration

F

of treatment, and specific dates that student is required to miss classes. The request must be submitted to the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs or designee. The Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs or designee is responsible for granting (with

G

or without restrictions) or denying the request. Reinstatement must be approved by the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs or

H

designee after receiving written clearance from the physician that the student is again ready to handle the academic rigors of the College’s curriculum. While the physician’s statement of readiness may be sufficient, the College reserves the right to require a second opinion

I

regarding a medical student’s physical or psychological readiness to return to classes and clinical care service. This consultation will come from a physician approved by the Herbert

J

Wertheim College of Medicine, and any cost involved will be borne by the College.

Educational/Research Leave of Absence K

An educational/research leave of absence may be granted to allow students opportunities to enhance their medical school experience by participating in educational and/or

L

research activities at other institutions throughout the world. The student requesting such a leave must submit a letter from his/her mentor or an appropriate College faculty member recommending the leave to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or

M

designee. The Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee is responsible for granting (with or without restrictions) or denying the request.

N

The Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee will monitor the student’s time spent in the educational/research activities and notify the Office of Student Affairs

O

when the student will return to registered student status with the College.

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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C. Involuntary Leaves of Absence A

1. Summary Involuntary Withdrawal A student who poses a serious threat of imminent or serious physical harm to himself/

B

herself or others at the College will be involuntarily withdrawn from the College (“Summary Involuntary Withdrawal�) by the Dean of the College or designee, upon appropriate consultation with a team consisting of the Executive Associate Dean of

C

Student Affairs, the Director of the Student Counseling and Wellness Center, and with any other College faculty or staff member, or their respective designees, as deemed

D

necessary by the Dean of the College. The Dean or designee reserves the right to impose an immediate and temporary withdrawal, prior to the review of all information. In such cases, the student shall be offered an opportunity to discuss the matter with

E

the Dean of the College or designee immediately prior thereto and shall be offered the opportunity to provide documentation from an appropriate healthcare provider

F

who has conducted a proper assessment of the student and has concluded that the student does not pose a serious imminent threat of harm to himself/herself or others. The student will, if practical in the judgment of the Dean of the College or

G

designee, be referred to the Director of the Student Counseling and Wellness Center who will assess whether the student poses a serious danger of imminent or serious

H

physical harm to himself or herself or others, or refer the student to an appropriately credentialed psychiatrist or psychologist for examination. If referred, the psychologist or psychiatrist will examine and assess whether the student poses a serious or

I

imminent threat of harm to him/herself or others. If the student is examined by a psychiatrist or psychologist, he or she must submit the report of findings to the Dean

J

of the College and the Director of Student Counseling and Wellness Center. A student subject to the Summary Involuntary Withdrawal is entitled to the following:

K

a) Notice of intent to remove the student pursuant to this policy stating the reasons for the action,

L

b) The opportunity to present relevant information for consideration of his/her case personally or by a health professional working with that student, if the student is not

M

capable of self-representation, and c) The opportunity to have an advisor of the student’s choice accompany

N

the student. Hold on Student Records. Students who are on a Summary Involuntarily Withdrawal

71

O

from the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine shall have a hold placed on their


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

records with the College, which will prevent them from being readmitted or reenrolled in the College unless the Summary Involuntary Withdrawal is lifted.

B

Lifting a Summary Involuntary Withdrawal. A student may request readmission or reenrollment by providing the Dean of the College or designee with documentation

C

from an appropriate psychologist or psychiatrist approved in advance by the Dean of the College or his/her designee and who has concluded that the student does not pose a serious threat of harm to him/herself or others. In cases where the Dean of the College

D

or designee has imposed other conditions on readmission, it is the responsibility of the student to provide documentation of compliance with such conditions.

E

In the event that the Summary Involuntary Leave of Absence is not lifted without restrictions within thirty (30) days of its imposition, the student shall be referred to the E&P Committee

I

H

G

F

for assessment and to determine whether he or she can return to the College and whether any other conditions will be imposed upon the student. Such process will comply with the processes applicable to the E &P Committee including appeal. Any medical student residing in FIU housing shall be subject to the FIU Involuntary Withdrawal Policy provisions contained in that policy.

2. Involuntary Withdrawal Because of Failure of the USMLE Step 1 Examination Students who do not pass the USMLE Step 1 examination may be placed on USMLE leave-of-absence by the E&P Committee. When the student is placed on an USMLE

J

leave of absence, the E&P Committee will determine the length of leave based on the conditions, if any, for return. Students will be reinstated upon successful completion

K

of the examination and any other restrictions that the E&P Committee has imposed. A leave of absence for the USMLE Step 1 examination cannot exceed one (1) year unless

L

approved by the E&P Committee (see below). A student who determines that he/she is not returning at the time scheduled for a leave to end must consult with the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or

M

designee as early as possible before the scheduled return date to allow sufficient time to learn if an extension will be granted. The extension request may be presented to the

N

E&P Committee at the discretion of the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. If the extension is not granted, the student will need to make other arrangements so that he/she will return by the end of the leave’s term. Otherwise the student will be

O

deemed to have withdrawn from the College.

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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All students who wish to extend a leave of absence for failing the USMLE examination

A

beyond the one (1) year limit must appeal to the E&P Committee in writing as soon as practicable but no later than twenty (20) days prior to expiration of the leave, outlining College. Extensions of a leave of absence are not automatic.

B

the reasons for requesting the extension and presenting a time-line for return to the

C D

F. Professionalism Standards of Conduct for Medical Students Medical Students must adhere to the principles of conduct and ethics as established by

E

the FIU Student Standards of Conduct, in addition to the following principles from the American Medical Association’s Principles of Medical Ethics, 1988, which are described as “standards of conduct that define the essentials of honorable behavior for the physician.�

F

A. AMA Principles of Conduct

A medical student:

G 1. Shall be dedicated to providing competent, compassionate, and respectful medical service to all patients, considering each as an individual, regardless

H

of characteristics such as race, national origin, color, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age, disease, or disability

I

2. Shall deal honestly with patients and colleagues, and strive to expose or otherwise respond in a professional manner to those persons of the health care

J

team whose behavior exhibits impairment or lack of professional conduct or competence, or who engage in fraud or deception

K

3. Shall abide by the law 4. Shall respect the rights of patients including the right to confidentiality, and shall

L

safeguard patient confidences within the constraints of the law 5. Shall continue to study, apply, and advance scientific knowledge; make consultation when appropriate; and use the talents of other health professionals

M

relevant information available to patients, colleagues, and the public; suggest when indicated

N

6. Shall recognize a responsibility to participate in activities contributing to an improved society

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Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

B. The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Policies Governing Professionalism.

A

Medical students shall abide by the College and FIU policies and standards of conduct which are published in the online College Handbook located at http://medicine.fiu.

C

B

edu and the FIU Student Handbook located at http://www.fiu.edu/student.htm.

The Honor Code

D

I. Policy Statement The health care professions require men and women of superb character who lead lives that exemplify high standards of ethical conduct. A shared commitment to

E

maintaining those standards, embodied in an Honor Code, creates an atmosphere in which medical students can develop professional skills and strengthen ethical

F

principles. The Honor Code requires that medical students live honestly, advance on individual merit, and demonstrate respect for others in the academic, clinical and research communities. The College shall have exclusive jurisdiction over matters

G

of academic misconduct under this Code. A violation by a medical student of the FIU Student Code of Standards and Conduct will be processed by the Director

H

for Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution in accordance with the procedures outlined in the FIU Student Handbook. The FIU Student Handbook can be found at http://www.fiu.edu/student.htm.

I

The central purpose of the Honor Code is to sustain and protect an environment of mutual respect and trust in which medical students have the freedom necessary to

J

develop their intellectual and personal potential. To support the community of trust, students and faculty must accept individual responsibility and apply themselves to developing a collegial atmosphere. The intent of the Honor Code is not merely to

K

prevent students from lying, cheating and stealing or to punish those who violate its principles. Rather, participation in the Honor Code assures the Florida International

L

University community that the integrity of its members is unquestioned and accepted by those in the academic, clinical and research communities. Participation in the Honor Code confers upon students the responsibility to respect and protect the integrity of

M

the Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine. The foundation of the Honor Code is the willingness of each individual to live up to

N

the standards established by the student body and faculty. Violation of the Honor Code affronts us individually and collectively as the College regards such violations

O

as serious offenses. In addition, the Honor Code requires the absolute honesty of each individual. When

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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meticulously observed, the Honor Code allows medical students to live with the

A

freedom of knowing that:

B

• Their personal property and academic work are respected and free from theft • Classroom, clinical and research environments for learning and evaluation

C

are honorable • The learning environment is designed to be safe and equitable regardless of the Students and faculty together establish, maintain and protect trust in these beliefs.

E

II. Application of the Honor Code

D

student’s gender, race, national origin, religion disability, or sexual orientation.

The Honor Code applies to all work submitted for academic credit. Infractions of the

F

Honor Code include but are not limited to: A. Cheating otherwise gains unfair advantage over his or her colleagues is guilty of cheating.

H

Examples of cheating are:

G

A medical student who does not do his or her own work on an academic exercise or

• Copying from another student’s examination or other class work

• Allowing any student to copy from another student’s examination or other

I

class work • Unauthorized collaboration during an examination with any person

• Using unauthorized materials or technology during a test

• Preparing notes to take into a closed-book examination, for example, writing on

J

K

one’s hand or desk

L

• Presenting the work of another person as your own

The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine recognizes plagiarism as “the act of

M

B. Plagiarism appropriating the literary composition of another, or parts or passages of his or her

N

writings, or the ideas or language of the same, and passing them off as the product of one’s own mind.” (Webster’s New Collegiate Dictionary)

75

O

There are two distinct categories of plagiarism: conscious and unintentional.


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Both are violations of the Honor Code. This means that students who do not

A

understand the process of crediting sources consulted in the writing of a paper may inadvertently find themselves subject to Honor Council investigation. To

B

avoid such unintentional plagiarism, students must familiarize themselves with the appropriate documentation of resources. Students should also consult faculty for assistance should there be any doubt about what constitutes

C

plagiarism. Any student helping another to plagiarize may be found to have violated the Honor Code.

D

C. Fabrication When a medical student consciously manufactures or manipulates information to

E

support an academic exercise, he or she has fabricated evidence.

I

H

G

F

Some examples are:

• Falsifying citations

• Manufacturing data to support research

• Taking an examination or writing a paper on behalf of another student

• Listing sources in the bibliography that were not used in the academic exercise

• Falsifying information in patients’ charts D. False Accusations False accusations of another’s violation of the Honor Code made in bad faith may

J

constitute Honor Code violations and subject the accuser to penalty. E. Misrepresentation

K

Intentionally lying to a member of the faculty, staff, administration, or an outside agency to gain academic advantage for oneself or another, or to misrepresent or in

L

other ways interfere with the investigation of a charge of academic misconduct F. Misuse of Computer Services The unauthorized use of any computer, computer resource or computer project

M

number, or the alteration or destruction of computerized information or files or

N

unauthorized appropriation of another’s program(s) G. Bribery The offering of money or any item or service to a member of the faculty, staff,

O

administration, or third party in order to commit academic misconduct

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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C D

J. Other Acts Misrepresenting information to College officials (e.g., falsifying grades or by forging College documents or records) violates the Honor Code.

B

I. Falsification of Records The tampering with, or altering in any way any academic record used or maintained by the College or the University or by the student for presentation to any University faculty or staff

A

H. Conspiracy and Collusion The planning or acting with one or more fellow students, or any other person to commit any form of academic misconduct together

E

III. Student Participation The Honor Code is designed to protect students’ academic freedom and professional integrity. For this to happen, all students must support the code by fulfilling specific obligations.

F

A. Students must:

G

• Not condone cheating on the part of others

• Refuse to assist others in acts which may violate the Honor Code

H

• Take steps to ensure that other students cannot cheat from one’s examination or paper

I

• Ask the professor for clarification if the student does not understand how the Honor Code pertains to any given assignment

J

L

B. To provide assistance to students in this endeavor, faculty and administrators should:

K

• Be willing to speak to fellow students about violations of the Honor Code, or to report suspected violations to the Honor Council

• Explain how the Honor Code applies to coursework undertaken for each class

M

• Discuss how the Honor Code applies to coursework and behavior during the clinical years

N

• Include a statement about academic integrity in each course syllabus

• Contact the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs (see below) regarding

suspected infractions of the Honor Code

77

O


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

IV. Composition and Selection of the Honor Council Adoption of the Honor Code necessitates the creation of an Honor Council, a group

B

empowered to hear allegations of suspected violations and recommend an appropriate course of action to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. The Honor Council is authorized to evaluate first time infractions of the Honor Code in accordance

C

with this policy. Administration of the Honor Code requires the individual and collective cooperation of the entire medical school community — students, faculty, staff, and

D

administration. The Honor Council will facilitate the administration of the Honor Code and act as liaison among the members of the medical school community regarding Honor Code issues. The Honor Council will hear first time allegations of suspected

E

violations and recommend an appropriate course of action to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and the E&P Committee. A. Composition of the Honor Council

F

The Honor Council will be comprised of both Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine faculty and students to ensure the representation of all stakeholders. There shall

G

be two (2) faculty members, and the number of medical students will increase with each new class until 12 students are appointed as follows:

H

• For the inaugural year and each of three (3) years thereafter, three (3) students will be selected by the Dean of the College to become members of the Honor Council until the Honor Council has twelve (12) student members. The Dean

I

shall also select two (2) faculty members to become members of the Honor Council. Honor Council members may not simultaneously be members of the

J

E&P Committee. • After the first four years, each of the four (4) medical student classes will elect

K

three (3) student representatives. The first-year medical student class will elect three (3) representatives in September to serve during the first year of the Honor Council. Honor Council elections for all classes will be held annually in

L

September. To be eligible to serve on the Honor Council, the medical student members must:

M

– Be enrolled in the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

N

– Have upheld the principles stated in Honor Code – Have a history of good academic and conduct standing, must currently be in good academic and conduct standing, and must remain in good academic and

O

conduct standing.

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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• In the fifth year, the two (2) faculty members shall be elected by the Honor

A

Council in consultation with the Deans in the Office of Student Affairs. Nominations for these positions will be presented during the first Honor Council the medical community. The election of the faculty members will take place at

B

meeting of the academic year. Nominations can be made by any member of the subsequent Honor Council meeting.

C

• The Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs or designee will be an ex-officio member on the Honor Council without a vote entitled to attend all proceedings.

D

B. Term of Honor Council Membership The term of office for the first, second, and third year medical students will be

E

from October 1st to September 30th. The term of office for fourth year medical students will be from October 1st until graduation. The term of student members The term of appointment for each faculty member is three (3) years. Faculty

F

of the Honor Council shall be one (1) year, but may be renewed by re-election. members may be reappointed to the Honor Council for two consecutive terms.

G

A faculty member who serves two terms may be reappointed after one (1) year has expired. During the inaugural year of the College, one faculty member will The Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs will determine which of the

H

serve a two-year term and one faculty member will serve a three- year term. two (2) elected faculty members for the inaugural Honor Council will serve only

I

a two- year term. Mid-term vacancies will be filled by appointment by the Dean of the College.

J

C. Honor Council Chairperson At the first meeting of the Honor Council, the members of the Honor Council will elect a chairperson. Thereafter, the chairperson will be elected during the final

K

meeting of each academic year to serve during the following academic year. It shall be the Chair’s responsibility to manage the operation of the Honor Council,

L

preside at the hearings, make determinations on procedural matters, and preserve the orderly and effective functioning of the Hearing. It will be the Chair’s decision whether the attendance of either party is mandatory. At the Chair’s discretion, either

M

the student being charged or the individual making the allegation may present his or her case in writing. The Chair will also ensure that members of the Council

N

remain on their fact-finding task and that both parties and/or witnesses do not become unduly repetitious or wander from relevancy in their testimony. The Chair will only vote to break a tie.

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Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

D. Challenges

A

The charged student or the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs has the right to challenge the impartiality of any Honor Council member and to request the

B

Chair exclude the member from participating, stating in writing to the Chair the reasons for the request. A challenge may be exercised no more than three times in a single proceeding. It will be the Chair’s decision as to the validity of the challenge

C

and what action should be taken.

D

IV. Complaint Procedures A. Filing Complaints Any medical student who believes that she or he may have violated the Honor

E

Code or may have observed another medical student violate the Honor Code will submit a written description to the Executive Associate Dean of Academic Affairs of the violation, including the names of the persons involved. If a student, faculty

F

member, staff, or a person not affiliated with the University observes a student allegedly committing a violation of the Honor Code, he or she must first inform

G

an appropriate faculty member, chair, dean, or designee (“Complainant”). The Complainant who suspects a violation of the Honor Code must meet with the student in order to inform him/her of the allegation(s) to provide any evidence, and

H

to allow the student to respond before either entering into an Informal Resolution (as described below), or proceeding to a Formal Hearing (as described below).

I

No anonymous accusations will be accepted. The Honor Council will also act in an advisory role by welcoming questions or concerns which will support the community of trust. Any concerns may be included in the semiannual report

J

described below. B. Charged Student’s Academic Status

K

The student’s academic status will remain unchanged pending the outcome of either an informal resolution, or the College’s final decision in the outcome of the

L

Formal Hearing. A charged student will not be allowed to register in the future until the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee is assured that the student is satisfactorily responding to the charges. If the charged student is

M

satisfactorily responding to the charges, he or she will be allowed to register and his or her current academic status will remain unchanged, pending the College of

N

Medicine’s final decision in the Honor Council proceedings. C. Preliminary Determination

O

The Honor Council has the authority to consider only one infraction for a medical student. In the event that a second alleged infraction occurs, it will be considered

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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by the E&P Committee. When incidents of alleged Honor Code violations are

A

brought, the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or his/her designee will determine whether there are prior complaints filed against the charged student the Honor Council. The purpose of this meeting is to understand the facts and

B

and will meet informally with the Complainant and the student prior to referral to circumstances of the alleged academic misconduct and for the Executive Associate

C

Dean for Academic Affairs or his/her designee to determine whether: • To refer the matter to the Honor Council

D

• To dismiss the complaint on the basis that the Complainant has not alleged a violation of the Honor Code

E

• To attempt to develop an agreement of remedial measures between the charged student and the Office for Academic Affairs within twenty-one (21) calendar days

F

from the date that this initial fact finding meeting takes place D. Informal Resolution

G

In the event that the charged student does not have any prior charges of academic misconduct, the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or his or her the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or his or her designee will meet

H

designee may offer to the student an informal resolution. If such election is made, with the Complainant and the charged student within twenty one (21) calendar

I

days from the date of the initial meeting with the student as provided above. If an informal resolution is reached, both the charged student and the Executive

J

Associate Dean for Student Affairs or designee wil sign a Consent Agreement Form which will be filed in the student’s record in the OSA, as well as with the E&P Committee not later than five (5) business days following the date of agreement

K

between the Complainant and the affected student. This form will set forth the terms and conditions of the agreement, including any sanctions allowed to be imposed.

L

If an informal agreement is not reached or is deemed inappropriate by the Executive Associate Dean (EAD) for Student Affairs or the designee, the EAD for

M

Student Affairs may either take no further action or initiate a formal hearing by filing a complaint form alleging academic misconduct within eight (8) business days after the meeting between the student and the complainant.

N

E. Formal Resolution When formal procedures are initiated, the Executive Associate Dean for Academic

81

O

Affairs or designee will review the complaint for timeliness, jurisdiction, and whether


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

there is sufficient evidence to justify a formal hearing. The Herbert Wertheim College

A

of Medicine Office of Academic Affairs will send the affected student a written notice of the charge together with a copy of the Complaint Form.

B

The charged student must respond in writing to the Office of Academic Affairs no later than five (5) business days after receipt of the notice, indicating whether he/

C

she chooses: • Not to dispute the facts of the charge and requests an Administrative Disposition

D

(described below) • To dispute the facts and have his/her case resolved by a Formal Hearing (described

E

below). The Administration Disposition or a Formal Hearing will normally be held within thirty (30) calendar days following receipt of the charged student’s

F

written response.

1. Administrative Disposition If the charged student indicates in writing that he or she will not dispute the facts

G

of the charge and accepts responsibility for the specific charges of academic misconduct, an administrative disposition meeting is held between the student

H

and the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or his or her designee. During the administrative disposition meeting, the charged student and the College official designated by the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

I

will meet to discuss the mitigating circumstances as they relate to the possible sanctions to be imposed. The Complainant may be present at the meeting. The

J

recommendation will be communicated in writing to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and he/she will approve the resolution.

K

2. Notice of Formal Hearing The charged student will be provided a minimum of five (5) business days prior written notice that the Honor Council will be meeting with the student to consider

L

a matter within its jurisdiction. Notification will be made to the student in writing and will state:

M

• A description of the matter under consideration • The time, date and place of the hearing

N

3. Formal Hearing Procedure a. Information Gathering

O

In the event that a matter is referred to the Honor Council for evaluation and recommendation, the Honor Council has the authority to gather information

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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about the incident to assist with its deliberation and evaluation of the matter.

A

b. Meeting with Student and Confidentiality of Proceedings All student meetings will be conducted in private and absolute confidentiality shall

B

be maintained. Members of the Honor Council shall not discuss an allegation of a violation of the Honor Code except during meetings formally called for that

C

purpose. Violation of confidentiality is in itself an Honor Code offense. During the meeting with the student, the charged student will be advised of will have an opportunity to respond to the information presented.

The

D

the information that forms the basis of the inquiry/allegation and the student Council will allow witnesses to the incident to present information about the

E

incident at the meeting with the student. If the accused student requests, other person(s) may appear before the Honor Council to speak on his/her advisor may only advise the student and may not address the Honor Council

F

behalf. The charged student may have an advisor present; however, that member(s) directly or examine or cross-examine witnesses. Neither the

G

student nor the complainant has the right to be represented by an attorney, and an attorney shall not be permitted to attend the meeting on the student’s Honor Council proceedings, by virtue of his/her presence, is bound by the

H

or complainant’s behalf or in any other capacity. Any person invited to the Honor Council confidentiality standards.

I

The Honor Council reserves the right to hear the case in the absence of the accused student if he or she fails to appear. The Chairperson has the authority

J

to exclude witnesses who provide redundant or duplicative information. Character witnesses shall not be permitted to testify at the hearing. If witnesses make presentations at hearing, the student shall be entitled to

K

pose relevant questions to such witnesses. The Committee will consider the information it has gathered and any additional information provided by

L

the student and make written findings of facts and recommendations based upon its assessment of the information presented at the meeting.

M

4. Quorum and Voting A quorum is at least fifty-one (51%) percent of voting members of the Committee, two (2) of whom must be faculty members. A recommendation is adopted

N

when approved by a simple majority of the members present.

5. Notice of Recommendation to Student

83

O

The findings and recommendations of the Honor Council will be forwarded


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs who will forward the

A

findings and recommendations with any amendments or modifications he or she makes to the affected student within twenty (20) business days of

B

the Honor Council’s meeting with the student. Notification will be made by hand-delivery or sent to the student’s last known address by any means

C

evidencing delivery. F. Record of Hearing Written decisions will serve as the official records of hearings and will be sent to the

D

Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs within ten (10) business days from

E

the conclusion of the Honor Council’s deliberation. G. Honor Council Recommendations The Honor Council will recommend an appropriate course of action to the

F

Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. The recommendation of the Honor Council may be any of the following:

G

• Charge is not substantiated. Advise the student that the charge of violation was not substantiated by the evidence presented and that a recommendation will be

H

made that no violation will appear on the student’s record • Charge is substantiated without further action. Advise the affected student that the Council finds the charge to be substantiated and recommends that the student be

I

reprimanded and be advised that any repeat violation will be grounds for referral to the E&P Committee for consideration and for possible academic action

J

• Charge is substantiated and requires further consideration by the E&P Committee. Advise the student that the Council finds the charge of such a nature that it

K

requires a recommendation for immediate referral to the E&P Committee for consideration and action.

L

H. Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Actions • Executive Associate Dean Review. The Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will review the Honor Council’s recommendations and

M

issue a written report of his/her recommendations either five (5) business days from the date that he/she received the written record of the Honor

N

Council’s recommendation or five (5) business days from the date that a meeting is held upon a student request pursuant to this section, whichever is later. The Executive Associate Dean may uphold or amend the

O

recommendation of the Committee.

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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I. Student Requested Meeting.

A

A student may schedule an appointment with the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs to discuss the Committee’s recommendation prior to the requested in writing no more than three (3) business days after the Honor Council’s

B

Executive Associate Dean’s evaluation and decision. The appointment must be meeting with the student. In the absence of extraordinary circumstances, the

C

meeting will take place within five (5) business days of the receipt of a student’s written request. The Office of Student Affairs will notify the student in writing of

D

the decision of the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. J. Appeals of Honor Council Recommendation may file a written request for reconsideration of his/her case with the Executive

E

Any student who wishes to appeal the recommendation of the Honor Council Associate Dean for Academic Affairs within ten (10) business days of receipt

F

of receipt of the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affair’s determination. However, a student cannot appeal a referral to the E&P Committee until that in accordance with the procedures established to appeal an action of the E&P

G

Committee’s proceedings are concluded. Such an appeal will be conducted Committee. The student may not use the Student Grievance Process as a way

H

of appealing the outcome of any other evaluation of performance by a Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine committee.

I

K. Grounds for Appeal The sole grounds for appeal are as follows:

J

• Material failure to provide a student with his/her due process rights, as set forth in this student handbook, which affected the outcome of the hearing. Appeals based on this ground will be limited solely to a review of the record of

K

the hearing • New information, which was not available at the time of the hearing and

L

therefore could not be presented. In addition, the student must show that the new information could have substantially affected the outcome of the hearing.

M

The nature of the information must be described in full detail in the appeal letter including an explanation regarding the reason the information could not have been presented at hearing.

N Individuals submitting a charge of Honor Code violations may not appeal Honor Council decisions. The Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs may ask the Honor

85

O

Council to revisit the case or may deny the appeal. The decision of the Executive


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

Associate Dean is final agency action unless the affected medical student has filed a timely appeal.

B

Records of the case shall be kept in the locked files of the Honor Council. Only active Honor Council members have access to records and the student involved will have

C

access to his/her records. Records will be kept in accordance with the State of Florida laws, rules and regulations, including records retention policy and federal law.

D

The permanent record of a student who has violated the Honor Code will contain a note of the offense, any penalty, and will include the following annotation: “action taken as the result of determined violation of the Honor Code.” This permanent record will be

E

securely maintained in the student’s official record in the Office of Student Affairs. The Honor Council will submit a semiannual summary report of its proceedings to faculty

F

except those of Council members.

G

and students. No names or other personally identifiable data will be used in this report

Confidentiality

H

Medical students are expected to respect the rights of patients, including the rights to privacy and confidentiality, and shall maintain the privacy and security of all patient records and information in accordance with University and College policies, the policies

I

of the affiliated clinical hospitals and facilities, and state and federal law. As a member of the patient care team, medical students will have access to health information

J

which is protected from disclosure under state and federal law (“protected health information”) including patient medical and/or demographic information. The Herbert Wertheim College of

K

Medicine and each of the College’s affiliated hospitals and clinics are subject to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (“HIPAA”) and have developed health information HIPAA privacy and security policies to prevent unnecessary and inappropriate

L

disclosures of health information (http://www.hhs.gov) Medical students are required to abide by these HIPAA privacy and security policies and will receive education and training

M

to understand the requirements of policies and law. In general, protected health information may not be discussed or disclosed to anyone, verbally, in writing, or electronically, unless this disclosure is necessary to perform the student’s duties and responsibilities. In particular,

N

medical students may not review medical records or access electronically stored patient information unless such review is required in the performance of assigned duties.

O

Medical students are responsible for maintaining the confidence of patients by sharing confidential information only with others who need to know and by handling

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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any documentation of information in a manner that will maintain its confidentiality.

A

Medical students are required to submit a signed confidentially statement during their orientation process and on an annual basis thereafter.

B

Medical students should note that the HIPAA privacy and security policies apply to all student-patient interactions, in formal curricular, extracurricular, or volunteer contexts. on a medical student’s professionalism and fitness to become a physician.

students at all clinical sites: Under no circumstances should any protected health information that is not required

E

1.

D

The following basic rules are considered to be a fundamental requirement for medical

C

Inappropriate disclosure of protected health information is a serious matter that reflects

in the performance of the job be accessed (read or copied). Health information obtained while providing clinical care duties may not be discussed

F

2.

with others unless an individual is involved in the treatment of a patient or it is necessary to fulfill educational objectives. Once confidential information is on paper and in a medical student’s hands, he/she

G

3.

is responsible for appropriate disposition: (a) distribute to authorized persons only,

H

(b) file securely, or (c) destroy.

I

Professional Dress Guidelines As representatives of the medical profession, all medical students at the Herbert

J

Wertheim College of Medicine are expected to convey a professional demeanor not only in their behavior but also in their dress and appearance. A professional image conveys credibility, trust, respect, and confidence in one’s colleagues and patients.

K

Appropriate dress is also essential to enhance patient safety in the clinical setting. When students are assigned to clinical activities in any of the College’s participating

L

institutions, they should consider themselves as representatives of FIU as well as the College. Hence, attire and behavior should promote a positive impression for the individual student, departments and some affiliate clinical institutions may require alternate dress guidelines

M

the specific course, and the institution. In addition to the guidelines outlined below, certain which must be followed. These requirements typically will be included in written course

N

materials, but if any doubt exists, it is the responsibility of the student to inquire. The following policy outlines some of the major expectations concerning appropriate

O

dress and personal appearance.

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Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

1. General Standards (classroom, laboratory, and clinical settings): a. College ID name badges are required to be worn by all students, faculty, staff,

B

and physicians at all times.

b. All clothing must be clean, neat, professionally styled, and in good repair.

C

• Men: slacks and shirt, preferably with collar. Tie is optional. • Women: dresses or skirts of medium length or slacks, professional style

D

• Clothing should fit well when you are in different positions, e.g., standing

E

blouse or shirt

vs. leaning over.

c. Good personal hygiene and grooming are required to be maintained at all times.

F

d. Excessive use of fragrances should be avoided as some people may be sensitive to scented chemicals which may cause allergic or other

G

adverse reactions. e. Hair should be neat and clean. Hairstyle and/or color should not interfere with assigned duties or present a physical hazard to the patient, to self, or to

H

another person.

g. Students may not have acrylic nails while providing patient care services. 2.

Standards in the classroom setting:

a. For men, a shirt with a collar is preferred.

b. For women, shirts and blouses must extend to the waistband of the pants.

c. Students are permitted to wear casual slacks, jeans, and T-shirts, provided they

are clean,in good repair, and do not contain any offensive language or pictures.

Shorts are not permitted.

3.

Standards in the laboratory setting:

a. Students should follow the guidelines as established for the classroom setting.

b. Men and women are required to wear closed-toe shoes; Occupational Safety

O

N

M

L

K

J

I

f. Fingernails should be clean and of short to medium length.

88

and Health Administration regulations prohibit open-toed shoes.


Student Handbook Inaugural class Standards in the clinical care setting:

a. Professional attire and physician-identifying clothing: • Men should wear a shirt, tie, long pants, socks, and hard-soled shoes (i.e.,

no tennis shoes).

• Women should wear comparable attire.

• A white coat with the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine embroidered

logo and a name badge are required.

D

C

B

A

4.

2009-2010

• While wearing a white coat in the clinical setting, medical students are also expected to identify themselves as students at all times and must

assume responsibility to clarify their role to patients.

b. Students should not chew gum.

5.

Standards for home visits:

F

E

G

a. The same as the general dress guidelines, except students should not wear white coats or badges when making home visits.

H

b. In general, the dress should be casual professional attire that fits in with community standards and does not draw attention to the student.

I

c. The dress guidelines for the home visits will be reviewed in more detail as a part of the coursework in preparation for the first home visits.

J

6.

Additional Guidelines:

K

a. The use of jewelry (e.g., necklaces, rings, earrings, bracelets, etc.) and other fashion accessories should be appropriate and not interfere with assigned duties. Jewelry represents a potential for infection and loose jewelry can be

L

grabbed causing a potential physical hazard to the student or the patient. b. Tattoos and body art with wording or images that may be perceived as

M

offensive should be covered during the time of professional contact with patients and families. Some examples of such offensive art or images include parts in a way that a reasonable person could perceive as inappropriate.

N

racial slurs, swear words, symbols of death, or inappropriate revealing of body

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Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

7.

Clothing/Shoes/Uniforms: a. Clothing, including white coats, should be clean, professionally styled, and in

B

good repair. b. Shoes must be comfortable, clean, in good repair and appropriate to the job and duties. In addition, specific footwear requirements, such as steel-toed shoes,

C

may be defined in areas with special safety concerns. Beach-type shoes (such

D

as thongs or flip-flops) and bedroom slippers are not appropriate. 8.

Hospital attire:

E

− In general, medical students should wear their own clothes (rather than scrubs) for patient care assignments in clinics and when performing inpatient services.

F

− Scrubs are to be worn in compliance with the policies of the institution in which the medical student is assigned for patient care rotations. They should never be

G

worn in public places outside of the clinical care facility. − Scrubs may be worn in specific patient care areas only and are especially

H

practical for night call. − If a scrub suit must be worn outside of the designated clinical areas, it should be covered with a white lab coat.

I

− Scrubs should not be taken home without prior written authorization from the

J

providing institution. − Hair covers, masks, shoe covers, and gowns should be removed before leaving the designated clinical areas and should not be worn while in the outpatient

K

clinics or when making rounds on the inpatient services. 9.

Examples of inappropriate attire in the clinical setting include, but are not

L

limited to, the following:

M

− Shorts

N

− Pants in any color that are not in good condition (e.g., have holes, ragged hems,

O

− Blue denim jean pants of any length

− Exercise or workout clothing, including sweatpants, spandex, or leggings

or patches)

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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− Sandals and bedroom slippers

A

− Caps or hats, unless worn for medical or religious reasons or for nature of specific duties (such as outdoor work)

B

− Shirts or other apparel with images, wording, or logos that may be perceived as offensive to patients, families, or others

C

− Tank tops, halter tops, translucent tops, tops with plunging necklines, or tops that leave the midriff or back exposed

D

− Clothing that exposes undergarments

E

− Sunglasses when indoors − Any attire that could be perceived as sexually provocative to a reasonable person.

F G

G. Grades, EvaluAtion, Promotion & Processes Academic Evaluation Period Performance Evaluations

H

Students will be awarded performance grades for each of the four periods. These grades are” H” Honors, “NH” Near Honors, “S” Satisfactory or “U” Unsatisfactory. The grades will be awarded by the Evaluation and Promotion (E&P) Committee based upon academic

I

achievement in the period. The grades will appear in the official transcript as period grades separately from course grades. In general, Honors represents performance in the top

J

10%, and Near Honors in the top 25% of the class.

Courses K

The curriculum is comprised of independent courses that are arranged in longitudinal strands. All courses are independent and student performance is assessed in each

L

course. Integration of study on a case based structure is built into the course programs so that a common case is the subject for discussion simultaneously in concurrent courses. Course objectives address the complexity of clinical cases from a variety of

M

perspectives and dimensions that may include basic science, clinical science, social sciences, ethics, community, multi-professional responsibilities, etc.

N

Course numbers and credits are assigned to each course. Credits are a measure of the quantity of content and the quantity of time allocated for formally scheduled learning

91

O

activities. Courses vary in number of credits, intensity of scheduled time and duration.


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

They are organized to begin and end on common dates within periods and generally have a uniform weekly schedule. To the degree possible, final exams for concurrent

B

courses will be scheduled on the same day so that final exams do not compete with other learning activities.

C

Course Syllabus and Teaching Learning Format The syllabus for each course contains the learning objectives, course schedule of

D

activities, the topics to be presented, the faculty involved, a listing of course materials, the evaluation system and grading policies. A variety of learning formats will be used, including lectures, discussion groups, individual and group projects, simulation and

E

standard patient laboratories.

F

Examinations Objective style exams will be conducted as web-based exercises using secure questions that have been created by the faculty. The exam questions will not be available for study

G

before or after exams. All exams will be constructed by the FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine faculty. Some exams may be administered in collaboration with the National

H

Board of Medical Examiners as customized exams designed specifically for our courses. The faculty will select questions from the NBME question pool to create these exams. Exam questions will be coded for content and a longitudinal profile of student performance

I

in content areas will be developed as a resource for students preparing for licensing exams and also serve as a guide to faculty on student competencies in various curriculum

J

areas. Faculty may use a variety of performance measures in addition to formal, web administered, objective exams. The performance measures will be described in the

K

syllabus for each course. Exams will be timed and questions will be scrambled in sequence and in order of answer options where appropriate within the question format. Students will take these exams in a

L

classroom format set specifically for exams that includes computer terminals linked only to servers hosting the exams at either the College or the National Board of Medical Examiners.

M

Students will have opportunities to raise concerns about exams or ask specific questions via a survey at the conclusion of each computer based exam. Exam results will be posted

N

without student identification and students will receive their results individually. Audience response technology will be available in the lecture room and may be used for

O

either general polling or individual assessments. The system is web based and students may respond via their notebook computers, cell phone or clickers. Students will sign

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in with their IDs for this system. Specific instructions for use of the audience response

A

system will be presented in classes using the audience response system.

The final grade in every course will be a number. The highest grade will be “100” and

B

Course grades the lowest passing grade will be “75.” The course syllabus will provide the scheme to

C

be used in the course to determine the final grade. A final grade that is below “75” is an unsatisfactory performance in a course and will be recorded as unsatisfactory “U” rather

D

than the earned number on the grade record for that course.

Remediation of Unsatisfactory Performance E

Remediation of unsatisfactory performance will proceed with a formal remediation plan established by the course director and the student. The plan will be formalized with a document stipulating the expectations for work to be performed, the measures to be

F

signed agreement titled “Remediation Plan for Unsatisfactory Performance,” a standard used to assess competency, and the time period for the remediation. The student, course

G

director, and the Associate Dean for Curriculum must approve the coursework remediation plan and sign the agreement.

H

Upon satisfactory performance per the agreement, the course director will report the satisfactory achievement for the course and a grade of “75” will be awarded. Failure to complete the plan for remediation (i.e., work not completed or performed at an

I

unsatisfactory level) will be reported to the E&P Committee for action.

J

Incomplete Work in a Course If a student is unable to complete required work in a course, the student may request permission to continue study with an incomplete status for the course. This requires

K

formal notification by the course director to both the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs and the Associate Dean for Curriculum, providing the information that

L

an incomplete has been given with an explanation for the incomplete. The registrar will enter a grade of “I” on the record.

M

Make up for Incomplete Course Work A plan to make up incomplete course work will be created by the course director and

N

approved by the student and the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs and the Associate Dean for Curriculum. The formal plan (“Plan for Completing Course Requirements”) will describe the activities, assessment and time period to complete the

O

work. When completed, the course director will report the grade earned.

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Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

Students with grades of “U” or “I” may continue in the course of study in a current period pending action by the E&P Committee at the end of the period. Progression to a

B

subsequent period of study with a grade of “U” or “I” will require specific approval of the E&P Committee.

C

Transcript and Grade Average The official transcript will be organized by periods listing all courses in a period followed

D

by a listing of the period performance grade. The transcript will list credit hours for each course. A grade average for a period will be calculated and posted on the transcript at the end of each period, and for each successive period. The cumulative grade average of all

E

completed courses will be calculated and posted in addition to the period average. These grade averages will be numerical in the range of “75 to 100.” Period grades of “H,” “NH,”

F

“P,” and “U” will be derived from the overall course performance in the specific period.

Competency Assessments

G

Competency in clinical skills, critical thinking and general medical knowledge will be evaluated independently from course work three times during the course of study:

H

1.

At the end of the first academic year in mid-June (immediately following the end of course work before the summer break), During the break between Periods 2 and 3, and

3.

At the end of Period 3.

J

I

2.

Evaluations will be performed in an Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE) format with test stations involving medical cases that may be virtual, standardized patients, or

K

simulations. These assessment programs will also be instructive so that students will have opportunities to improve skills during the evaluation period for reevaluation. The first

L

evaluation will be performed in mid-June, prior to the summer break, and will be formative. The evaluations following Periods 2 & 3 will be summative as students will be required to demonstrate satisfactory clinical skills before promotion to the subsequent period.

M

The second evaluation will require satisfactory performance for promotion to Period 3. The third evaluation is formative in preparation for the USMLE Clinical Skills exam with

O

N

satisfactory performance being required for promotion to Period 4.

Formative Assessments 1.

First Period Comprehensive Assessment and Preparation for USMLE Step 1

A comprehensive exam will be administered at the end of Period 1. This will be a

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half-day exam administered the day following the end of the first Period. The exam

A

will be a customized NBME exam designed to cover the entire first period. It is a required exam but the results will not impact student grades for either the period or knowledge at the end of Period 1 in relation to the USMLE Step 1 knowledge exam

B

courses. The purpose of this exam is formative for students to reflect on their overall which will be required at the end of Period 3.

C

2.

Non-Cognitive Behaviors

Development of behaviors, values and attitudes appropriate for the practice of

D

medicine are essential components of medical education. The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine has a formal curriculum strand on professional development and achievement in these courses will be measured traditionally. Student behavior in

E

a professional manner is expected throughout the study for the Doctor of Medicine Degree. Professional, non-cognitive behaviors will be evaluated in every course.

F

Behavior will be formally assessed at the end of each course by the course faculty and these measures will contribute to a periodic, formative assessment for each student. Students will be provided with formative evaluations on non-cognitive behaviors at

G

the mid-point and the end of each period. These reports will be aggregate reports from the evaluations in the courses completed in the first and second half of courses.

H

These evaluations are entirely formative and are intended for guidance and reflection. The formative evaluation of non-cognitive behaviors will be presented to students

I

during the orientation period. The formative evaluation documents, the actual assessment rubric and the report format that will be used for assessment of noncognitive behaviors in the first two periods will be distributed to students during

J

orientation and will also be available on the FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine web site (http://medicine.fiu.edu).

K

Policy on the United States Medical Licensing Exams (USMLE) L

General Policy for the FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine: All students must pass the USMLE Step 1 before being promoted to the fourth period. Students must also take the USMLE Step 2 CK (Clinical Knowledge) and USMLE Step

M

2 CS (Clinical Skills) exams prior to graduation, although passing these exams is not a requirement for graduation.

N

USMLE Step 1: Requirements

95

O

Students must be enrolled in the College to be able to register for and take the USMLE


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

Step 1. All students are required to pass the USMLE Step 1 to be approved for graduation by the Evaluation and Promotion (E&P) Committee. Students are required to take and pass

B

USMLE Step 1 by the end of their third period clinical clerkships. Registration Deadlines and Testing Dates for USMLE Step 1

C

Third period students are required to complete applications for USMLE Step 1 in sufficient time to request test dates on or before the end of the second week in June. Students with

D

circumstances that prevent them from taking USMLE Step 1 by the end of the second week in June must, as soon as possible, petition in writing to the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs and the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, who will collaborate

E

to review the request and make a determination. If the decision is made not to allow the student to delay taking the exam, the student may request that the E&P Committee

G

F

review and evaluate the decision not to extend the time to take the USMLE and make a recommendation to the Dean of the College.

Medical Student Evaluation and Promotion Process Medical students are required to abide by the Medical Student Honor Code, the Medical

H

Student Standards of Conduct, the FIU Student Code of Standards and Conduct as described in the FIU Student Handbook, the applicable policies and procedures of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, and the policies and procedures of institutions with

I

which the College has affiliation agreements.

K

J

A violation by a medical student of the Medical Student Honor Code or the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Student Standards of Conduct will be processed by the Honor Council and the E&P Committee. A violation by a medical student of the FIU Student Code of Standards and Conduct will be processed by the Director for Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution in accordance

L

with the procedures outlined in the FIU Student Handbook. The FIU Student Handbook can be found at http://www.fiu.edu/student.htm. Any decision and sanction that results

M

from a violation of the FIU Student Code of Conduct will be forwarded to the College E&P Committee to be considered as part of the professional evaluation below. The following describes the processes employed to evaluate medical student academic performance

N

and professionalism.

I.

The Medical Student Evaluation and Promotion Committee A. Statement of Purpose:

O

The purpose of the E&P Committee is:

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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• To ensure that each student who graduates from the Herbert Wertheim College

A

of Medicine possesses the skills and knowledge necessary to assume the responsibilities of a medical doctor;

B

• To evaluate academic performance in the required curriculum, to assess advancement to the next Period (as this term is defined in this Handbook), and performance; and

to become a physician and recommend appropriate intervention.

of faculty, students and administration to perform these duties. Committee

E

The E&P Committee will depend upon the cooperation, advice and judgment

D

• To evaluate personal qualities which bear on a student’s professionalism andfitness

C

to recommend appropriate intervention in the event of unacceptable academic

members are required to attend an orientation to receive education regarding their

F

responsibilities by the Office of Academic Affairs. B. Composition and Selection of the Evaluation and Promotion Committee

G

The E&P Committee will be comprised of both College faculty and students to ensure representation of all stakeholders. The E&P Committee shall have eleven be the chairperson appointed by the Dean of the Herbert Wertheim College of

H

(11) voting members. There shall be nine (9) faculty members, one of whom will Medicine, and two (2) medical student members. The term of appointment for

I

each faculty member is three (3) years and each student member will serve for one (1) year. The faculty members will be appointed by the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, subject to approval of the Dean of the College. Faculty

J

members may be reappointed to the E&P Committee for two (2) consecutive terms. A faculty member who serves two (2) terms may be reappointed after one

K

(1) year has expired. Faculty members on the E&P Committee shall not participate in any process which involves the evaluation of the findings and recommendation of the E&P Committee such as the Appeals Committee.

L During the College’s inaugural year and for three (3) years thereafter, the student members will be appointed by the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs,

M

subject to approval of the Dean of the College. Thereafter, the students will nominate and elect the student members to the E&P Committee. The student members may

N

include one (1) student in the first two academic years and one (1) student in the last two academic years. Students who serve on this Committee must have a history of good academic and conduct standing, must currently be in good academic and

O

conduct standing, and must remain in good academic and conduct standing.

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Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

II. The Medical Student Evaluation and Promotion Process A. Function The E&P Committee has two (2) functions:

B

• Assessment for Advancement and Graduation.

The E&P Committee

evaluates the academic and professional progress that a student has made

C

during the academic year and recommends whether the student should advance to the next academic level and/or graduate. This function mandates that the E&P Committee considers each student’s performance and considers all the

D

information available regarding the student’s academic performance and fitness to become a medical doctor including, without limitation, academic and behavioral

E

misconduct, if any. • Assessment for a Determination of Professional Fitness.

The second

F

function is to evaluate specific behavior, including, without limitation, alleged violations of University and College policies and the policies of affiliated

G

institutions and to recommend sanctions and interventions, if any. B. Advancement and Graduation • Advancement: At the end of each academic period, the E&P Committee will

H

review the academic and conduct records of all matriculated medical students to determine whether the student will be promoted to the next academic period.

I

Promotion is dependent upon satisfactorily completing all scheduled courses and clerkships as defined by the course directors and upon maintaining the degree of professionalism necessary to become a physician as determined by a

J

review of the medical student’s entire record. The E&P Committee will forward its recommendation for each student to the Dean of the Herbert Wertheim College

K

of Medicine for review and approval with the exception of those students whose professionalism is under review by the E&P Committee or the Honor Council, provided such review is material to the evaluation under the Dean’s review. The

L

Dean’s decision, upon receipt of the E&P or the Honor Council’s recommendation, as applicable, shall be final unless the student timely files an appeal. In such event,

M

the Dean’s determination shall not become final until the applicable committee process is completed, including appeals. It is within the discretion of the Dean to determine whether a student’s evaluation should be withheld pending the

N

outcome of such a proceeding. • Graduation: The E&P Committee will meet to review the academic

O

accomplishments and professionalism of each fourth year student to

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determine whether all requirements for graduation from the Herbert Wertheim

A

College of Medicine have been met. These requirements will be established by the College. The E&P Committee will forward to the Dean of the College the exception of those students whose professionalism is under review by

B

the names of the students who have met all requirements for graduation with the E&P Committee or the Honor Council, provided such review is material to

C

the evaluation of the student. The Dean’s decision, upon receipt of the E&P Committee’s or the Honor Council’s recommendation shall be final unless the whether a student’s graduation should be withheld pending the outcome of

D

student files an appeal. It is within the discretion of the Dean to determine such proceedings.

E

C. Evaluation and Disciplinary Action Medical students are required to abide by the Medical Student Honor Code, the

F

Medical Student Standards of Conduct, and as the FIU Student Code of Standards and Conduct as described in the FIU Student Handbook, the applicable policies and and procedures of institutions with which the College has affiliation agreements.

G

procedures of FIU and the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, and the policies Any violation of these standards will be handled:

H

• Informally by one or more faculty members in accordance with these policies • By the E&P Committee if either the conduct reflects upon a student’s fitness to

I

meet the responsibilities of being a physician; or the student has been under review by the Medical Student Honor Council on one prior occasion

J

• By one of the processes described in the Florida International University Student Handbook

K

• By the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Honor Council if the conduct involves a failure of academic integrity as described in this Student Handbook

L

In the event that a matter is handled by a committee (other than the E&P Committee), or by an officer outside of the College a description of the matter and its resolution

M

shall be forwarded to the E&P Committee to be considered as part of a student’s overall evaluation for promotion and graduation.

N

D. Student Review of Academic Performance and Opportunity to Appeal All students will be given an opportunity to review their performance in academic courses and clerkships. In the event that a student believes that a grade or

99

O

evaluation is inaccurate or unfounded, students have the opportunity to appeal


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

said grade or evaluation by using the Student Grievance process set forth in this

A

Student Handbook. E. Notifications for Evaluation and Promotion, Honors Council and Student

B

Grievance Procedures All notifications to be given under the Evaluation and Promotion, Honors Council,

D

C

and Student Grievance processes will be made by hand-delivery or to the affected individual’s last known address by any means evidencing delivery.

III. Hearing Process A. Notice of Hearing

E

All notices will be made in accordance with the notification provision set forth in this Student Handbook. Students will be provided a minimum of five (5) business days’

F

prior written notice from the day the notification is sent to the student that the E&P Committee will be meeting with the student to consider a matter within its

G

jurisdiction. The notice will state: 1. A description of the matter under consideration; and

H

2. The time, date and place of the hearing. B. Hearing Procedure

I

1. Information Gathering In addition to its annual evaluation of students for promotion, the E&P Committee shall gather information regarding any matter referred to it by the Executive

J

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs In the event that a matter is referred to the Committee for evaluation

K

and recommendation, the Committee has the authority to gather information about the incident to assist with its deliberation and evaluation of the student’s

L

academic performance and overall professionalism. 2. Meeting with Student All student meetings will be conducted in private. During the meeting with the

M

student, he/she will be advised of the information that forms the basis of the inquiry or allegation; the student will then have an opportunity to respond to the

N

information presented. The Committee will allow witnesses to the incident to present pertinent information at the meeting with the student. The Chairperson has the authority to exclude witnesses who provide redundant or duplicative

O

information. Character witnesses shall not be permitted to testify at hearing. If

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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witnesses make presentations at hearing, the student shall be entitled to pose

A

relevant questions to such witnesses. The student does not have the right to be represented by an attorney and an attorney shall not be permitted to attend the the information it has gathered and any additional information provided by the

B

meeting on the student’s behalf in any capacity. The Committee will consider student and make written findings of fact and recommendations based upon

C

its assessment of the information presented at the meeting. Such findings and recommendations shall be issued to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic

D

Affairs within ten (10) business days of the conclusion of the hearing. 3. Quorum and Voting is adopted when approved by a simple majority of the members present. A

E

A quorum is at least six (6) voting members of the Committee. A recommendation recommendation to expel a student from the Herbert Wertheim College of

F

Medicine must be approved by two thirds (2/3) of the E&P Committee. C. Notice of Recommendation to Student

G

These findings and recommendations will be forwarded to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs who will forward the findings and recommendations with (5) business days of receipt of the written record of the hearing.

H

any amendments or modifications he or she makes to the affected student within five

D. Record of Hearing

I

Written decisions will serve as the official records of a hearing. E. Evaluation & Promotion Committee Recommendations

J

The E&P Committee will make one or more of the following recommendations regarding the disposition of the matter considered by the Committee:

K

• Find that the matter does not warrant action • Issue a written reprimand or warning

L

• Allow the student to repeat or otherwise remediate academic deficiencies

M

• Allow the student to continue on a modified academic schedule • Refer the student for counseling or psychological evaluation

N

• Place the student on probation • Suspend the student or place the student on leave of absence for a specified

O

time or until specific conditions are met

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Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

• Suspend the student for a period of time • Expel the student

B

The E&P Committee may recommend to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs removal of a student’s probation once the student has fulfilled the conditions of probation. The Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will approve or deny the

C

request of the E&P Committee. F. Executive Associate Dean of Academic Affairs’ Actions

D

The Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs will review the Committee’s recommendations and issue a written report of his/her recommendations either ten

E

(10) business days of the date that he/she received the written record of the E&P Committee action or five (5) business days of the date that a student requests a meeting pursuant to this section, whichever is later. The Executive Associate Dean

F

may adopt or amend the recommendation of the Committee. A student may schedule an appointment with the Executive Associate Dean for

G

Academic Affairs to discuss the proceeding prior to the Executive Associate Dean’s evaluation and decision. The appointment must be requested in writing no more

H

than three (3) business days after the E&P Committee meeting with the student. The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Office of Student Affairs will notify the student

I

in writing of the decision of the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. The student has the right to appeal the decision of the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs by submitting a request for appeal as provided in the Appeals

J

Process. If the student does not appeal in a timely fashion, the decision becomes final

K

agency action.

L

The Appeals Process I.

The Appeals Committee A. Statement of Purpose The Appeals Committee provides the forum for medical students to appeal decisions

M

of the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs from determinations made by the E&P Committee, the College’s Honor Council, and the Medical Student

N

Grievance Committee. B. Composition and Selection of the Appeals Committee

O

The Appeals Committee will be comprised of both College faculty and students to ensure representation of all stakeholders. The Appeals Committee shall have

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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seven (7) voting members. There shall be five (5) faculty members, one of whom

A

will be the chairperson appointed by the Dean of the College, and two (2) medical student members who will also be appointed by the Dean of the College. The members one (1) year. Students who serve on this Committee must have a history

B

term of appointment for each faculty member is three (3) years and for the student of good academic and conduct standing, must currently be in good academic and

C

conduct standing and must remain in good academic and conduct standing. Any person who has participated in the E&P Committee, the Honor Council, or the

D

Medical Student Grievance Committee with respect to the matter under appeal or who has otherwise been involved in the evaluation of the incident that triggered an matter under appeal.

F

C. Grounds for Appeal

E

appeal is ineligible to serve on the Appeals Committee convened to consider the

The sole grounds for appeal are as follows:

this student handbook which affected the outcome of the hearing. Appeals based

G

1. Material failure to provide a student with his or her due process rights as set forth in on this ground will be limited solely to a review of the record of the hearing.

H

2. New information, which was not available at the time of the hearing and therefore could not be presented. In addition, the student must show that the new

I

information could have substantially affected the outcome of the hearing. The nature of the information must be described in full detail in the appeal letter including an explanation regarding the reason the information could not have

J

been presented at the hearing. 3. The severity of the sanction is disproportionate to the nature of the offense.

K

D. Procedure to Request an Appeal When a student has a right to appeal a decision of the Honor Council, the E&P

L

Committee, or the Student Grievance Committee, he/she will use the process established in this section and must submit a letter requesting appeal to the

M

Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs within five (5) business days of receiving notification of the decision triggering a right to appeal.

N

E. Appeals Committee Responsibilities and Actions 1. The following procedures shall govern the appeals process:

103

O

a. Filing Request For Appeal. The appeal letter must state the reason(s) for


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

appeal, the supporting facts, and a recommended solution. The burden of

A

proof rests with the student to clearly demonstrate that an error occurred during the Honor Council, E&P Committee or Grievance Committee hearing

B

process. The appeals process is not a re-hearing of the matter under appeal.

C

b. Appellate Review

(1) The Chairperson of the Appeals Committee shall be the appellate officer and shall review the appeal letter, tape recording (if applicable) and

D

documentation from the original hearing to determine if there is a basis for appeal.

E

(2) If the appellate officer determines there is no basis for appeal, a written decision upholding the hearing body decision will be sent to the student

F

stating the appeal is denied and the reason for the denial.

(3) If the appellate officer determines that there is a basis for appeal, the

G

appellate officer shall convene a meeting of the Appeals Committee. The Appeals Committee may, in its discretion, request a meeting with the charged student, the student bringing the charge in the case of a grievance,

H

or any witnesses called by the student or the hearing body. The charged student may bring an advisor to this meeting who will be subject to the same

I

restrictions that exist under the hearing procedures. 2. The Appeals Committee will provide its written recommendations to the Dean of

J

the College, the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs, and the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

K

3. The Dean will review the Appeals Committee’s recommendation and affirm, amend, and/or remand to the Appeals Committee for specific consideration of the reason(s) for the remand. Once the Dean has affirmed or amended the

L

Appeals Committee’s recommendation, the Dean’s decision shall be final agency action unless the Provost issues a decision pursuant to Section G below. Except

M

in the case of an interim suspension, the student’s status will remain unchanged and all sanctions are placed on hold during the appeals process.

N

F. Notification of Dean’s Determination The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Office of Student Affairs will provide official notification to the student of the Dean’s decision within three (3) business days

O

of receiving the signed paperwork from the Dean. The Dean has the responsibility

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to ensure due process is followed in all disciplinary actions undertaken on behalf

A

of medical students. This determination shall constitute final agency action unless the student appeals

B

the determination of the Appeals Committee to the Provost in accordance with this policy. In the case of dismissal, the student will be removed from all courses or the decision of the Dean of the College.

to the Provost

D

G. Grounds to Appeal the Determination of the Appeals Committee

C

clerkships at that time. The official effective date of the dismissal will be the date of

A student may appeal the determination of the Appeals Committee to the Provost

E

within five (5) business days of the issuance of the decision by the hearing body or official in the event that there was a material failure to provide the student with his outcome of the hearing. Appeals to the Provost will be limited solely to a review of

F

or her due process rights as set forth in this Student Handbook which affected the the record of the hearing.

G

I.

H

H. Grievances Grievance Procedure Preamble

I

Medical education is most effective in an environment of informality, mutual respect, cooperation, and open communication. Students in the Herbert Wertheim College

J

of Medicine must not only satisfy University standards but also the professional expectations of faculty members which are inherent in the medical profession.

K

Student grievances often grow out of misunderstandings or misperceptions about expectations of faculty members. Academic and clinical faculty members and advisors have an obligation to clearly and effectively communicate professional and academic

L

standards applicable to medical students. Medical students have a concomitant obligation to diligently pursue and satisfy these standards. They are bound to observe and its faculty. Most of these grievances should be settled through open informal

M

and respect the policies, rules and regulations of the University, and of the College communications between students and faculty members.

N

Occasionally, a conflict develops that cannot be resolved informally. When all means of informal resolution have been exhausted, the parties have a forum in which to seek

105

O

review and resolution of an academic grievance against a faculty or staff member.


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

Students have the right to bring grievances against a faculty or staff member concerning academic matters. This document outlines the procedures by which medical student

B

grievances are to be handled.

II. Purpose

C

The purpose of these policies and procedures is to provide a means for medical students to seek investigation and possible resolution of academic grievances, as

D

defined below.

III. Scope of Policy

E

This policy and procedures cover academic grievances which are defined as any complaint or controversy alleging: a. Unprofessional conduct by a faculty or staff member which adversely affects either

F

a student’s ability to satisfy academic expectations or his/her ability to perform

G

whether in the classroom, lab, or clinical setting b. Failure to respect the student’s right of privacy c. Arbitrary and capricious grading for coursework, examination, clinical clerkship, or

H

research project d. Arbitrary and capricious decision to deny promotion or dismissal from a course

I

or program

Students may not use the grievance process to appeal or otherwise contest

J

determinations made by any other committee or council.

K

IV. Informal Grievance Procedure Medical students must first attempt to resolve the academic grievance as soon as possible through an informal meeting with the faculty or staff member. The student

L

must initiate such informal resolution by contacting the faculty or staff member in writing with a copy to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, no later

M

than ten (10) business days after classes begin in the period following that in which the complaint arose, or the grievance will be deemed untimely. A mutually agreeable resolution shall be formalized through a notation in the student’s file/record which is

N

initialed by the student and the faculty or staff member. If the matter cannot be resolved, or if the faculty or staff member cannot be reached, the student must meet with the

O

Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs to discuss the grievance before filing a petition for a formal hearing. If an informal resolution cannot be reached within twenty

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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(20) business days after the initial informal contact with the faculty or staff member, the

A

student then has the right to seek a formal resolution of the grievance.

The request for a formal resolution, detailing the specifics of the complaint and attaching

B

V. Formal Hearing Process all previous correspondence generated during the informal resolution process, must be

C

sent by the student to the offices of the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs and the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. The student must secure for a formal hearing, to certify that the informal process has been unsuccessfully

D

the signature of the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs on the request completed. Within five (5) business days from receiving the complaint, the Executive

E

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee shall review the complaint for timeliness, jurisdiction, and to determine whether there is sufficient evidence to justify determines the complaint to be within the jurisdiction of the formal process, that it is

F

a formal hearing. If the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee timely, and that there is sufficient evidence, he/she will order a hearing by the Medical

G

Student Academic Grievance Committee (“Grievance Committee�). A. Selection of Committee Members

H

When a complaint falls within the scope of this policy and there are disputed issues of material fact to be determined, the Dean of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine will refer the matter to the Medical Student Academic

I

Grievance Committee. The Grievance Committee will be appointed on an ad hoc basis for each grievance under consideration. It will be comprised of seven

J

(7) members, two (2) of whom will be medical students selected by the Dean of the College from a list of names supplied by the Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs. After the first four years of the College’s existence, one (1)

K

student will be appointed from students in the first two years of study and one (1) student from the last two years of study. Students who serve on this Committee

L

must have a history of good academic and conduct standing; must currently be in good academic and conduct standing and must remain in good academic and conduct standing. The other five (5) members of the Grievance Committee

M

shall be full-time faculty members who have experience with the medical student curriculum. They will be selected from lists supplied by the Executive Associate

N

Dean of Academic Affairs. The faculty members of the Committee will include at least two (2) faculty members from academic or patient care units outside of the facility where the event giving rise to the grievance has allegedly occurred and two

107

O

(2) faculty members from the academic or patient care unit of the facility where


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

the event giving rise to the grievance has allegedly occurred. The Chairperson of

A

the Grievance Committee will be jointly selected by the Dean of the College and the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. In the event that a Committee

C

B

member is unable to attend the Committee meeting, the Dean will appoint a substitute who must attend. B. Hearing Procedure 1. Filing Complaint The formal academic grievance procedure is initiated by filing a written complaint

D

with the Dean of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine. The complaint must be filed within ten (10) business days of the date the informal resolution process

E

ends, or within ten (10) business days after classes begin in the period following that in which the complaint arose–whichever is later. After receipt, the Dean, in consultation with the Chairperson of the Grievance Committee, will review the

F

complaint to determine whether it falls within the scope of this policy and whether a formal hearing is warranted. When there are disputed issues of material fact

G

which must be determined and the complaint falls within the jurisdiction of the Grievance Committee, a formal hearing is warranted.

H

2. Hearing Schedule and Notice of Hearing If a complaint is within the scope of this process, a hearing shall be scheduled as soon as possible but no later than forty-five (45) business days after receipt

I

of the written grievance. Students and affected faculty members will be provided written notice at least five (5) business days prior to the Grievance Committee

J

meeting. The Dean of the College will notify the student and faculty member involved in the grievance of the hearing by hand-delivery or to the student’s and faculty member’s last known address by any means evidencing delivery. The

K

notice will state: 1. a description of the matter under consideration

L

2. the time, date and place of the hearing 3. Notices That Complaint is Not Within Policy

M

If the complaint does not fall within the scope of this policy, then the student shall be so notified in writing.

N

4. Information Gathering The Grievance Committee has the authority to gather information about the

O

incident to assist with its deliberation and evaluation of a matter. Faculty and administrators should comply with all reasonable requests for relevant information

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that will assist the student in presenting his or her case and the Committee in

A

reaching a recommendation. 5. Meeting

B

All Grievance Committee meetings will be conducted in private. During the meeting the student and the faculty and/or staff member against whom the The student will have the opportunity to present his or her complaint and may

C

grievance is made will be advised of the substance of the inquiry/allegation. call witnesses to participate with the prior consent of the Chairperson of the

D

Committee. The affected faculty and/or staff member(s) will have an opportunity to make a presentation and to call witnesses to participate with the prior consent member(s) will have an opportunity to respond to the information presented. The

E

of the Chairperson of the Committee. The student and affected faculty and/or staff parties do not have the right to be represented by an attorney, and an attorney

F

shall not be permitted to attend the meeting on a party’s behalf in any capacity. At the Chairperson’s discretion, either party can present his or her case in writing. than five (5) business days before the Committee meets to consider the case.

G

All relevant documents should be in the hands of the Committee Chair no later Any documents received after this date may be excluded at the discretion of the

H

Chair of the Committee. The Committee will consider the information presented at the meeting and make written findings of fact and recommendations based upon its assessment of such information. Its deliberations will take place outside

I

the presence of the parties. 6. Quorum and Voting

J

A quorum is seven (7) voting members of the Committee. A recommendation is adopted when approved by a simple majority of the members present.

K

7. Record of Hearing Written decisions will serve as the official records of the meeting and will be sent

L

to the Dean of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine. 8. Determination

M

A written report including findings of facts, conclusions and recommendations shall be prepared and forwarded to the Dean of the College within fifteen (15) business days from the conclusion of the Committee’s deliberation. The Dean

N

shall issue a written decision within fifteen (15) business days of receipt of the Committee’s report. The student and the faculty will be sent copies of the Dean’s

109

O

determination by hand delivery or sent to their last recorded home address in a


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

manner evidencing receipt. The Committee’s recommendations regarding the

A

student’s evaluation will be binding on the faculty member. In addition, other recommendations regarding the faculty member will be considered by the Dean

C

B

and further actions will be taken in accordance with the College faculty bylaws and applicable College and University policies and procedures.

VI. Appeals of the Grievance Committee Report

D

All appeals shall follow the process set forth in the Student Handbook.

VII. Support Services E

In addition to the Grievance Process, students are encouraged to make full use of the services available at the Student Counseling and Wellness Center and the Office of

G

health or marital difficulties and will be handled confidentially.

I. Sexual Battery and Harassment Sexual Battery Policy

H

F

Student Affairs. These resources cover the full range of academic, personal, financial,

The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine will adhere to the Florida International University

I

Sexual Battery Policy contained in the FIU Student Handbook which policy is set forth below. The Student Counseling and Wellness Center (CWC) is available for counseling

J

assistance as are the FIU resources described below. Sexual battery and attempted sexual battery will not be tolerated in any form in the University community. Acts of date rape, gang rape, acquaintance rape, marital rape, and

K

stranger rape are all considered to be sexual battery and are punishable by the Florida Criminal Statutes and disciplined under the FIU Student Code of Conduct. Both men and

L

women can be victims and perpetrators of sexual battery. Sexual battery shall be defined as oral, anal, or vaginal penetration by, or union with,

M

the sexual organ of another or the anal or vaginal penetration of another with other objects. Sexual battery occurs without a person’s intelligent, knowing, and voluntary consent. Examples of non-consensual incidences may include but not limited to the

N

following: a victim is physically helpless (unconscious, asleep, or physically unable to communicate his/her unwillingness), victim has been administered a narcotic

O

or intoxicant without his/her knowledge, or is coerced into submission through a perceived or actual threat of force.

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For help, advocacy, counseling, treatment, and referral A

Whether or not a victim wishes to press charges, he/she may consider the option of being treated at a rape treatment center. The Jackson Memorial Hospital (JMH) Rape Treatment sexually transmitted disease and pregnancy testing, and evidence collection examinations

B

Center and the Broward Rape Treatment Center offer counseling, medical assistance, free of charge. They can retain evidence for several days while a victim decides if he/she

C

wishes to pursue criminal charges. The JMH hotline is 305-585-7273 and the Broward County hotline is 954-761-RAPE (7273).

D

If a person is a victim of sexual battery or attempted sexual battery, and wishes to pursue criminal charges, he/she should either call Public Safety at 305-348-2626 or emergency by not drinking fluids, showering, douching, bathing, or changing clothing.

counseling, advocacy, information, and referral. An advocate can be contacted by calling

F

The FIU Victim Advocacy Center is accessible 24 hours a day for crisis intervention,

E

911 if the incident occurred off-campus. To press charges, it is important to save evidence

the hotline, 305-348-3000.

G

The Student Counseling and Wellness Center (CWC) as well as the FIU Counseling and Psychological Services Center (CPSC) offer counseling throughout the recovery process.

H

Appointments can be made at the CWC by calling 305-348-1460; referrals will be made to the FIU (CPSC) or Victim Advocacy Center, as appropriate.

I

If the perpetrator is a student, the victim should contact the FIU judicial administrator at 305-348-3939 to pursue disciplinary action or obtain information about FIU Student Code of Conduct violations. It is unlawful to disclose identifying information of a person who is

J

alleged to be the victim of sexual battery.

K

Sexual Harassment The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine will adhere to The Florida International University

L

Board of Trustees (BOT) regulation FIU-104 Sexual Harassment and FIU BOT regulation on FIU-103 Non-Discrimination Policy and Discrimination Complaint Procedures. These feels that he/she may have experienced sexual harassment.

N

FIU-104 Sexual Harassment

M

documents contain the procedures to be followed in the event that a student (or employee)

(1) General Statement (a) Sexual harassment undermines the integrity of the academic and work

111

O

environment and prevents its victims and their peers from achieving their


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

full potential. All members of the University community are entitled to work

A

and study in an atmosphere free from sexual overtures or innuendos that are unsolicited and unwelcome. It is the particular responsibility of those members

B

of the University community who hold positions of authority over others to avoid actions that are, or can be considered, sexually abusive or unprofessional.

C

(b) It shall be a violation of this regulation on sexual harassment, as hereinafter defined, for any member of the University community to sexually harass, as sexual harassment any other member of the University community. Sexual

D

harassment is a type of misconduct which shall result in disciplinary or other action as provided by the policies and regulations of the University.

E

(c) The University discourages amorous or sexual relations between employees and students. Such relationships, even when consensual, may be exploitive

F

and imperil the integrity of the educational process or work environment. They may also lead to charges of sexual harassment. When an individual evaluates (including academic evaluations) or supervises another individual with whom he

G

or she has an amorous or sexual relationship, a conflict is created. The University requires the resolution of any conflict of interest created by these relationships.

H

(d) Whenever a conflict of interest situation arises or is reasonably foreseen, the employee in a position of authority must resolve any potential conflict of interest

I

by taking necessary steps, including, but not limited to, removing himself or herself from evaluative or academic decisions concerning the other individual. If he or she is unable to personally resolve the conflict of interest, he or she

J

is required to inform the immediate supervisor promptly and seek advice and counsel in dealing with the conflict. The employee, along with the supervisor, is

K

responsible for taking steps to ensure unbiased supervision or evaluation of the employee or student. Failure to resolve potential or actual conflict of interest situations as described in this regulation may result in disciplinary action, in

L

accordance with University policies. (2) Definitions

M

(a) For the purpose of this regulation, sexual harassment is defined as any unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors or other verbal or physical conduct

N

of a sexual nature which: 1. Makes submission to or rejection of such conduct either an explicit or implicit

O

basis for employment and/or academic decisions affecting the individual; or

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2. Unreasonably interferes with the individual’s employment or academic

A

performance by creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive environment. (b) Conduct which falls into the definition of sexual harassment includes, but is not

B

limited to: 1. Unwelcome physical contact of a sexual nature such as patting, pinching or

C

unnecessary touching. 2. Overt or implied threats against an individual to induce him or her to provide

D

sexual favors or to engage in an unwelcome sexual relationship. 3. Verbal harassment or abuse of a sexual nature, including intimating by

E

way of suggestion a desire for sexual relations, or making jokes or remarks of a sexual nature in the work environment or which are not germane to

F

academic course content. 4. Use of sexually suggestive terms or gestures to describe a person’s body,

G

clothing, or sexual activities. 5. Displaying or posting through any medium, including, but not limited to, in the workplace.

H

electronic communication, offensive sexually suggestive pictures or materials

(3) Procedures for Reporting Violations and Conducting Investigations and

I

Complaints.

The procedures described in the University regulation concerning non-discrimination

J

shall be followed. (4) Prohibition of Retaliation No University employee or officer shall retaliate against a complainant. Any

K

attempt to penalize a student, employee or agent of the University for initiating a complaint through any form of retaliation shall be treated as a separate allegation of

L

discrimination.

In the event that a claim of sexual harassment is found to be frivolous or malicious,

M

(5) Frivolous or Malicious Complaints appropriate University sanctions shall be taken against the complainant, including

N

disciplinary action where appropriate. Disciplinary action against students shall be taken in accordance with the University’s Code of Conduct for students.

O

(6) General University Responsibility

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Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

(a) It is expected that vice presidents, deans, chairs, department heads, directors and

A

other supervisors shall continue to monitor and take corrective action whenever instances of sexual harassment are either observed or reported to them. While

B

the decision regarding resolution remains within the unit, all allegations of sexual harassment are to be immediately reported to the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs, which will provide advice and monitor the administrator’s actions and/

C

or take appropriate action. (b) There may be instances in which a potential complainant is unable or unwilling

D

to pursue a complaint of sexual harassment, but where the University administration is aware of the behavior. In such instances, the Office of Equal

E

Opportunity Programs may choose to pursue an investigation of the alleged offense. The decision of whether or not to pursue an administrative complaint will be based on the egregiousness of the alleged offense, the basis for the

F

aggrieved party’s decision not to pursue a complaint, and the apparent evidence supporting the allegations. The decision to pursue an administrative

G

complaint shall be made by the Director of the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs in consultation with the Vice President in charge of the aggrieved party’s unit and the Vice President in charge of the alleged offender’s unit, in the

H

event that the two parties are in different units. An administrative complaint will follow the same procedures as formal complaints except that no complainant

I

will be named. (7) Education and Notification.

J

(a) Copies of this regulation shall be widely disseminated in order that the University community clearly understand which acts constitute sexual harassment and

K

recognize that the University regards sexual harassment as a serious offense. (b) This regulation shall be included in the University catalog and the student handbook. Periodic workshops and other educational programs are offered to

M

L

University personnel regarding the topic of sexual harassment.

FIU-103 Non-Discrimination Policy and Discrimination Complaint Procedures (1) General Statement.

N

(a) Florida International University affirms its commitment to ensure that each member of the University community shall be permitted to work or study in an

O

environment free from any form of illegal discrimination, including race, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, marital status,

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and veteran status. The University recognizes its obligation to work towards

A

a community in which diversity is valued and opportunity is equalized. This regulation establishes procedures for an applicant or a member of the University

B

community to file a complaint of alleged discrimination or harassment. (b) It shall be a violation of this regulation for any member of the University community University community or applicant. Discrimination and harassment are forms

C

to discriminate against or harass, as hereinafter defined, any member of the of conduct which shall result in disciplinary or other action as provided by the

D

regulations/policies of the University.

(a) For the purpose of this regulation, discrimination or harassment is defined as

E

(2) Definitions. treating any member of the University community differently than others are

F

treated based upon race, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, marital status or veteran status.

G

(b) Conduct which falls into the definition of discrimination includes, but is not limited to:

H

1. Disparity of treatment in recruiting, hiring, training, promotion, transfer, reassignment, termination, salary and other economic benefits, and all other terms and conditions of employment on the basis of membership in one of

I

the listed groups. 2. Disparity of treatment in educational programs and related support services

J

on the basis of membership in one of the listed groups. 3. Limitation in access to housing, or participation in athletic, social, cultural or

K

other activities of the University because of race, color, religion, age, sexual orientation, disability, national origin, marital status or veteran status.

L

4. Discrimination of the foregoing types on the basis of sex, unless based on bona fide requirements or distinctions, in housing, restrooms, athletics and

M

other such areas. 5. Retaliation for filing complaints or protesting practices which are prohibited

N

under this regulation. (c) Conduct which falls into the definition of harassment includes, but is not limited

115

O

to, harassment based on race, color, religion, age, disability, gender, sexual


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

orientation, national origin, marital status or veteran status. For harassment on

A

the basis of sex, see FIU Sexual Harassment Regulation. Within the context of this regulation, harassment is defined as conduct which unreasonably interferes

B

with an employee’s, student’s or applicant’s status or performance by creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or educational environment. It includes offensive or demeaning language or treatment of an individual, where such

C

language or treatment is based typically on prejudicial stereotypes of a group to which an individual may belong. It includes, but is not limited to, objectionable

D

epithets, threatened or actual physical harm or abuse, or other intimidating or insulting conduct directed against the individual.

E

(d) Scope of prohibitions: Activities covered under this regulation include, but are not limited to, all educational, athletic, cultural and social activities occurring on a campus of or sponsored by the University, housing supplied by the University,

F

and employment practices between the University and its employees. (e) When referred to in this regulation, “days” means calendar days unless

G

otherwise noted. (3) Procedures for Reporting Violations and Conducting Investigations and

H

Complaints. (a) Administration and Consultation. The Office of Equal Opportunity Programs shall

I

administer the policies and procedures outlined in this regulation. The Office of Equal Opportunity Programs shall answer inquiries regarding the procedures contained in this regulation and may provide informal advice regarding issues

J

of discrimination. In cases where the potential complainant chooses not to file a formal complaint, action will be taken to inform the alleged offender of the

K

concerns, suggesting that the individual monitor and modify (if necessary) his/ her behavior.

L

(b) Complaints. 1. A complaint must be made in writing to the Office of Equal Opportunity

M

Programs. The complaint shall contain the name of the complainant and state the nature of the act(s) complained of, including such details as the name of the alleged offender and the date(s) or approximate date(s) on

N

which the offending act(s) occurred, the name(s) of any witnesses, and the desired resolution(s).

O

2. A complaint must be filed within one hundred (100) days of the alleged act(s)

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of discrimination, or in the case of a student complaint against a faculty

A

member, within fourteen (14) days from the first day of classes for the following semester.

B

3. The Office of Equal Opportunity Programs shall investigate the formal complaint. This investigation may include, but shall not be limited to, of other persons who may have information relevant to the allegations,

C

interviewing the person complained about regarding the allegations, interview preparation of witness statements for all persons interviewed, and review of

D

any relevant documents. Upon completion of the investigation, a report shall be prepared which includes a summary of the complaint, a description of

E

the investigation, the findings, and recommendations. 4. There may be instances in which a potential complainant is unable or administration is aware of the behavior. In such instances, the Office of

F

unwilling to pursue a complaint of discrimination, but where the University Equal Opportunity Programs may choose to pursue an investigation of the

G

alleged offense. The decision of whether or not to pursue an administrative complaint will be based on the egregiousness of the alleged offense, the the apparent evidence supporting the allegations. The decision to pursue

H

basis for the aggrieved party’s decision not to pursue a complaint, and an administrative complaint shall be made by the Director of the Office

I

of Equal Opportunity Programs in consultation with the Vice President in charge of the aggrieved party’s unit and the Vice President in charge of the alleged offender’s unit, in the event that the two parties are in different

J

units. An administrative complaint will follow the same procedures as formal complaints except that no complainant will be named.

K

5. In the event that a claim of discrimination is found to be frivolous or malicious, appropriate University sanctions shall be taken against the complainant,

L

including disciplinary action where appropriate. Disciplinary action against students shall be taken in accordance with the University’s Code of Conduct for students.

M (c) Conciliation. The Office of Equal Opportunity Programs may attempt conciliation during the course of an investigation of a complaint. If conciliation is not achieved,

N

then the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs shall continue to investigate the complaint, and shall issue a written finding concerning probable cause within

117

O

a maximum of one hundred (100) days. If conciliation of the complaint was


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

achieved between the parties in cooperation with the Office of Equal Opportunity

A

Programs, and the alleged offender fails to abide by the agreement or retaliates against the complainant, the complainant or supervisor should notify the Office

B

of Equal Opportunity Programs. The Vice President for Human Resources or designee may then require the complaint to proceed as if conciliation had not

C

been reached. (d) Findings. The report of the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs shall be made known to the Vice President for Human Resources or designee, the complainant,

D

the alleged offender, the immediate supervisor of the alleged offender, and the appropriate vice president.

E

(e) Review. 1. Either party may seek review of the finding of the Office of Equal Opportunity

F

Programs to the Vice President for Human Resources or a designee by filing a request for a review (“appeal�) within twenty (20) days of receipt of the

G

Office of Equal Opportunity Programs finding. It shall specify the basis of the appeal. The appeal shall be based on one or more of the following: relevant evidence was not reviewed and/or new evidence is available, or the factual

H

evidence was insufficient to support the findings. 2. The appeal shall be in writing, and shall set forth the issues to be considered

I

in the appeal. Copies of the appeal shall be provided to the opposing party and to the Director, Equal Opportunity Programs.

J

3. The opposing party and the Director, Equal Opportunity Programs, may file a response to the appeal to the Vice President for Human Resources or

K

designee within twenty (20) days of receipt of the appeal. 4. The Vice President for Human Resources or designee shall issue a written

L

finding no more than twenty (20) days after receipt of the appeal, or of a response to the appeal, whichever is later.

M

(f) Resolution. Upon final acceptance by the Vice President for Human Resources or designee of a written finding on the complaint, the immediate supervisor of the alleged offender may provide a reasonable resolution to the complaint (e.g.,

N

that a student be allowed to change sections, that the employee report to a different supervisor) and may also recommend or take disciplinary action against

O

the alleged offender. The proposed resolution shall be approved by the Office of Equal Opportunity Programs. Disciplinary action shall be taken in accordance

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with the regulations and policies affecting the class of employee and the terms of

A

any applicable collective bargaining agreement. (g) Prohibition of Retaliation. No University employee shall retaliate against a

B

complainant or any person involved in the process. Any attempt to penalize a complainant or anyone involved in the process through any form of retaliation

C

shall be treated as a separate allegation of discrimination.

D

J. Health Policies Alcohol Policy

E

Expectations for Responsible Use of Alcohol Florida International University is committed to the responsible use of alcohol by all

F

members of the FIU community. Irresponsible, high-risk use of alcohol threatens the lives, health, safety, and performance of our students and employees. When one drinks irresponsibly, he or she is more likely to become injured, to make unwise choices regarding

G

sex and relationships, to miss class, to perform poorly on tests, to perform poorly in clinical environments and possibly to endanger patients; to develop chemical dependency, and

H

to withdraw from the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine. Excessive drinking also impacts others; these second-hand consequences of drinking include interrupted sleep, inability to concentrate and study, fights, property damage, assault, rape, and death.

I

Thus, high-risk drinking undermines the academic mission of the College and jeopardizes a medical student’s professional aspirations. This policy is created to respond to the very

J

serious public health problem by acting proactively in a comprehensive effort to ensure the safety and well being of the FIU community.

K

Alcohol will be permitted at Florida International University only in those settings which comply with state and federal laws, local ordinances, and this policy. All events must respect the rights of those who choose not to drink alcohol. As the policy may change

L

since the time of submission for the Student Handbook, it is highly recommended that one read the FIU Student Handbook at www.fiu.edu/student to read the latest version

M

of the FIU Alcohol Policy. Any medical student, faculty or staff member who observes behavior indicating that a to the Office of Student Affairs. The Executive Associate Dean for Student Affairs or a

N

medical student may have an addiction to alcohol (or other drugs) should make a referral designee will meet with the student and recommend consultation at the Counseling and

119

O

Wellness Center for evaluation and possible treatment. Medical students who feel that they


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

have an alcohol (or other drug) problem may also self-refer to the Counseling and Wellness Center to receive confidential counseling. Any student who is inebriated at school or at a

B

site of a clinical rotation will immediately be removed from the classroom or clinical site and will be referred to the E&P Committee for evaluation.

D

C

In addition, the College expects its students to adhere to The Florida International University Board of Trustees Regulation 2505 on alcohol. Refer to the FIU Student Handbook for the complete policy (http://fiu.edu/student.htm)

No Smoking Policy

E

According to the National Toxicology Program, the U.S Environmental Protection Agency, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and the National Institute for

F

Occupational Safety and Health, second-hand smoke contains at least 250 chemicals known to be deleterious to the health of non-smokers who inhale it. Florida International University and the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine recognize the safety hazard and

G

negative public health impact caused by the use of smoking materials and exposure to second-hand smoke. FIU and the College seek to prevent and control these public health

H

hazards by defining limitations on the use of tobacco products and similar type materials, consumed in like manner, on its premises. The College adheres to the FIU policy regarding smoking which is set forth below.

I

DEFINITIONS: “Smoking,” means possession of a lighted cigarette, cigar, pipe or any other tobacco product. “General Public” means any faculty staff, student or visitor present

J

on University owned, leased or operated premises. “Common Areas or Public Areas” means hallway, corridor, lobby, aisle, water fountain area, restroom, inside stairwell, entryway,

K

balcony or conference room. SCOPE: The occupants of buildings and the premises, structures and facilities, or sections

L

thereof, owned, leased or operated by the University. POLICY: Smoking is specifically prohibited in classrooms, lecture halls, laboratories,

M

libraries, computer rooms, residence halls, conference rooms, faculty offices, administrative offices, dining facilities, meeting rooms, auditoriums, lobbies, museums, theaters, arenas, storage rooms, stairwells, indoor recreational facilities, eating facilities,

N

restrooms, The Children’s Creative Learning Center, healthcare and wellness facilities, elevators, corridors, offices and all enclosed areas. Smoking is prohibited in all mass

O

transportation vehicles owned, leased or operated by the University. Smoking is prohibited within 1000-ft of the perimeter fence of FIU The Children Creative Learning Center. Smoking is prohibited in all corridors, walkways, atria and other areas which

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are partially open to the atmosphere and which, by their configuration, do not allow for

A

thorough air circulation or cross ventilation at all times. Smoking is prohibited in any common areas that are expected to be used or routinely traversed by the general public. is specifically prohibited within a 20-foot radius of any structure, device or container

B

Smoking is prohibited within 10-ft feet of the fresh air intake of any facility. Smoking bearing a “No Smoking� sign.

C

Students will not be excused from class or clinical assignments in order to take smoke breaks. The FIU Wellness Center provides free smoking cessation consultations and

D

students can receive a prescription for smoking cessation aids by visiting a primary care provider at the University Health Services clinic.

E

Alcohol and Drug-free Workplace and Campus Policy free Workplace and Campus Policy set forth below.

F

Source: The FIU Student Handbook. The College adheres to the FIU Alcohol and DrugPromoting productive practices and safe healthy behaviors

G

Federal Laws Drug-free schools and campuses regulations: 34 CFR Part 86

H

Public contracts/drug free workplace: 41 US Code, Chapter 10 Public welfare/drug-free workplace requirement: 45 CFR part 76, subpart F:

I As a condition of receiving funds or any other financial assistance under any federal program, institutions of higher education shall certify that they have developed and

J

implemented an Alcohol & Drug-Free Workplace & Campus Policy.

State Laws K

Sale of Alcohol Florida Statute 561. 01: Sale of alcoholic beverages includes any admission charge, sale

L

of cups, tickets, donations, etc. Florida Statute 562.12: The sale of alcoholic beverages without a proper license

M

is unlawful. Legal Drinking Age 21 years of age or misrepresenting the age of another to induce service of alcoholic

N

Florida Statute 562.11: Selling, giving, or serving alcoholic beverages to persons under beverages to persons under 21 years of age is unlawful.

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A

Florida Statute 562.111: Possession of alcoholic beverages by persons under the age of 21 is unlawful.

B

Disorderly Inoxication Florida Statute 856.011: Endangering the safety of another person, causing property

C

damage, drinking any alcoholic beverages in a public place, or causing a public disturbance while intoxicated is unlawful.

D

Driving under the influence Florida Statute 316.193: A person is “under the influence” of alcoholic beverage, any chemical substance set forth in S. 877.111 or any substance controlled under F.S. Chapter

E

893, when affected to the extent that his/her normal faculties are impaired or that blood and breath alcohol levels exceed legal thresholds. Operating a motor vehicle while “under

F

the influence” is unlawful. Florida Statute 316.1936: Possessing an open container of alcoholic beverage while

G

operating a vehicle, or while present as a passenger in a vehicle is unlawful.

University Policies H

The FIU Student Handbook includes policies on alcohol and drugs. The section on “Standards of Student Conduct” outlines disciplinary actions that may be taken for

I

violation of these policies. Each student is encouraged to review this section of the Handbook and become familiar with possible consequences of violating these policies. In accordance with University policies, appropriate disciplinary action shall be taken

J

Free Workplace & Campus Policy.

K

regarding any employee who violates the Florida International University Alcohol & Drug-

Contracts and Grants The Drug-Free Workplace Regulations requires that Contracts & Grants employees

L

notify their supervisor or other appropriate University representative of any criminal drug statute conviction for a violation, occurring in the workplace, within five (5) days after such

M

conviction. The University shall notify federal contracting agencies within ten (10) days of having received notice that an employee (identified by position and title) engaged in the performance of a contract or grant has had a criminal drug statute conviction for a

N

violation occurring in the workplace. Within 30 calendar days of receiving notice of the employee’s conviction the University shall

O

take the appropriate personnel action, including the application of appropriate sanctions up to and including termination. The employee may also be required to participate in a

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substance abuse assistance or rehabilitation program.

A

Policy Statement environment that is safe and fosters the health of its students, faculty, staff, guests,

B

Florida International University is committed to providing a work and educational and patients. This commitment is jeopardized when anyone, including students and

C

employees, unlawfully or inappropriately possess, use, distribute, or sell illegal drugs or alcohol on University premises or at any University sponsored activity.

D

The goal of this policy is to balance the University’s respect for an individual’s rights with the need to maintain a safe, productive, and drug-free environment in which to study and abuse are incompatible with studying or working at Florida International University and to

E

work. The intent of this policy is to send a clear message that illegal drugs and alcohol provide education and counseling services to those who may need it. It is a violation of this policy for any person to possess, sell, trade, distribute, or offer

F

1.

for sale illegal drugs or to otherwise engage in the use of illegal drugs on campus

G

or within a 200 foot perimeter of University owned, leased, operated or controlled property. It is a violation of this policy for anyone to attend classes, clinical sites, and perform

H

2.

related duties and assignments “under the influence” of illegal drugs or alcohol. It is a violation of this policy for anyone to use prescription drugs illegally. The legal

I

3.

use of prescription drugs with known potential to impair personal safety should be reported to supervisors or appropriate University representatives.

J Violations of this Policy by any student or employee of Florida International University shall

K

constitute grounds for evaluation and/or treatment for drug/alcohol abuse, for disciplinary action and/or criminal sanction. Disciplinary actions may range from letters of reprimand up to and including expulsion from the University. Such actions shall be in accordance with

L

the applicable “Standards of Student Conduct” and University policies and procedures. In compliance with federal “Drug-Free Schools and Campuses” regulations, Florida

M

International University shall provide annual notification to students regarding this Policy and available alcohol and substance abuse awareness, prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation

N

programs. Further, the FIU Substance Abuse Task Force shall conduct biennial reviews of such programs in order to assure their continued conformance with the stated goal and intent of this Policy and the “Drug-Free Schools and Campuses” regulations.

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A

Health Risks Associated with Alcohol and Substance Abuse: Productivity, academic performance, work quality, motivation, judgment, and safety may all

B

be adversely affected by an individual’s abuse of alcohol and drugs. There are many physical and mental health risks associated with the abuse of alcohol and

D

C

other drugs. Further, the effects of substance abuse involve not only the user but also extend to their family, friends, and colleagues. A brief summary of the most commonly abused substances and their physiological and psychological effects is provided below. Alcohol

I

H

G

F

E

Statistics show that alcohol abuse is involved in the majority of violent behavior incidents on college campuses including sexual assault, unwanted sexual behavior, vandalism, fights and driving under the influence. Alcohol abuse may result in the following: •

Impairment in judgment

Decreased reflexes and coordination

Aggressive behavior

Impairment in learning and memory

Malnutrition

Psychosis, dementia

Cirrhosis of the liver, hepatitis, liver failure (encephalopathy)

Respiratory depression, coma, and death, especially when combined with

J

other depressants Persistent abuse of alcohol can lead to physical dependence, such that sudden cessation

K

of intake usually results in life-threatening withdrawal symptoms, including severe anxiety, hallucinations, tremors, and seizures. Prolonged alcohol abuse is frequently associated

L

with poor nutrition, brain and liver damage. Women who drink during pregnancy may give birth to infants with irreversible physical abnormalities and mental retardation, called Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. Research shows

M

that children of alcoholic parents are more likely to abuse alcohol themselves.

O

N

Narcotics (Heroin, Morphine, Codeine, Demerol, Percodan, OxyContin) Narcotics initially produce a feeling of euphoria followed by drowsiness, nausea, and vomiting. Users may experience constricted pupils, watery eyes, and itching. An overdose may

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produce slow and shallow breathing, clammy skin, convulsions, coma, and death.

A

Tolerance to narcotics develops rapidly and dependence is likely. Intravenous injection may cause HIV/AIDS, hepatitis, and cardiac disease. Addiction in pregnant women can

B

lead to premature, stillborn, or addicted infants who may exhibit withdrawal symptoms. Inhalants

C

Many psychoactive substances are inhaled as gases of volatile liquids. Some commercial products such as paint thinners, glues, and cleaning fluids are mixtures of volatile

sneezing, coughing, nosebleed,

fatigue,

lack of coordination,

loss of appetite,

airway obstruction, and death.

F

nausea,

E

D

substances, which when inhaled may cause

G Certain solvents and aerosol sprays may decrease heart and respiratory rates and impair incontinence. Long-term use may result in hepatitis, brain damage, weight loss, fatigue,

H

judgment. Amyl and butyl nitrate cause rapid pulse, headaches, and urinary and fecal electrolyte imbalance, and muscle weakness. Repeated use of inhalants may permanently

I

damage the nervous system. Marijuana

J

The effects associated with marijuana use include:

dry mouth

hunger

impairment of short-term memory and concentration

altered sense of time

decreased coordination

decreased motivation

psychological dependence Chronic lung disease and lung cancer after long-term use. Chronic use can result in lack of motivation, severe apathy, and diminished academic drive.

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O

N

blood-shot eyes

M

L

increase in heart rate and blood pressure

K


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

“Designer Club” Drugs (GHB, Rohypnol & Ecstasy) 1.

GHB is an illegal and dangerous central nervous depressant, especially when mixed with alcohol, another central nervous system depressant. It is available as

B

a tasteless liquid or powder that unfortunately is illegally slipped into the alcoholic drink of an unsuspecting individual to cause deep relaxation, sleep, and amnesia which is the setting often leading to rape. Some of the other severe adverse effects

C

of GHB include: − Liver failure

E

D

− Seizures which can result in coma and even death − Respiratory failure and/or arrest which can also result in coma and death 2.

Rohypnol, also known as “Roofies” is a strong central nervous system depressant, commonly known as the “Date Rape” drug. When ingested in conjunction with alcohol or other depressants, the effects begin within 3 minutes, peak within 2

F

hours, and persist for over 8 hours, depending upon the dosage. Adverse effects associated with the use of Rohypnol include:

G

− decreased blood pressure − memory impairment − drowsiness

H

− visual disturbances − dizziness

I

− confusion − gastrointestinal disturbances

J

− urinary retention. 3.

Ecstasy, also known as MDMA, “Adam” or “XTC,” is a synthetic, psychoactive (mind-altering) drug with amphetamine-like and hallucinogenic properties. Some of

K

the adverse effects of MDMA include: − psychological effects, including confusion, depression, severe anxiety, and

L

paranoia − muscle tension, involuntary teeth clenching − nausea

M

− blurred vision, rapid eye movement − dizziness

N

− hyperthermia and chills − increased heart rate and blood pressure − insomnia

O

− long-term brain damage

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Cocaine

A

Cocaine is a powerful and dangerous central nervous system stimulant that has the following effects: psychological and/or physical dependency

development of tolerance relatively rapidly, whereby the user needs to take larger

B

C

doses to achieve the same initial effect of the drug stimulation of the central nervous system resulting in elevated blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and body temperature

D

ulceration and rupture of the mucous membranes in the nose

potential for transmission of HIV, hepatitis B, and other blood-borne infectious diseases if injected using contaminated needles

E

the birth of a cocaine-addicted baby when used by a pregnant mother. The newborn

F

may experience withdrawal symptoms shortly after birth, mental retardation, and/or have permanent mental and physical disabilities.

G

In addition, it should be noted that crack is a concentrated form of cocaine. Its potent effects are evident within seconds. Physical effects that may have a sudden

H

onset include heart palpitations, elevated pulse and blood pressure, loss of appetite, insomnia, dilated pupils, hallucinations, paranoia, and seizures. The preparation of free-base, which involves the use of highly volatile solvents, can result in a fire

I

or explosion. Amphetamines and other stimulants

J

Symptoms of stimulant use and abuse include increased heart and respiratory rates, elevated blood pressure, dilated pupils, excessive perspiration, headache, dizziness,

K

sleepiness, anxiety, and loss of appetite. When consumed in large quantities, palpitations, irregular heartbeat, tremors, loss of coordination, coma, and death may result. Regular use can lead to an amphetamine psychosis characterized by hallucinations, delusions,

L

and paranoia.

1.

M

Hallucinogens Lysergic acid (LSD), mescaline, and psilocybin cause illusions and hallucinations.

N

Physical effects include rapid heart rate, increased blood pressure, dilated pupils, tremors, and insomnia. Psychological effects include panic, confusion, suspicion, anxiety, and flashbacks.

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Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

2.

Phencyclidine (PCP) produces dramatic behavioral alterations, memory and speech

A

difficulties, depression, paranoid and violent behavior, and hallucinations. Large doses of PCP may produce convulsions, heart and lung failure, coma, and death.

B

Inability to perceive pain may allow an individual to cause themselves severe harm.

C

Anabolic Steroids Closely related to the male sex hormone testosterone, anabolic steroids may be prescribed

H

G

F

E

D

for a limited number of medical conditions such as severe burns and certain types of anemia and cancer. A plethora of adverse effects may result from steroid use, including: −

Liver disease, liver cancer

Growth problems, premature bone fusion

Acne

Cancer

Testicular atrophy

Tendon rupture (due to unnatural hypertrophied muscles)

HIV/AIDS and other blood-borne infections (sharing needles)

Psychological problems

Rage and uncontrolled anger

Sexual dysfunction, sterility and impotence

I

Depressants (Barbiturates, Tranquilizers, Hypnotics) The effects of depressants are similar to those of alcohol. The use of depressants can cause both physical and psychological dependence. Tolerance may result after regular

J

use. Withdrawal symptoms, ranging from anxiety to seizures and death, result from abrupt termination of abuse.

K

Women who abuse depressants during pregnancy may give birth to babies who are physically dependent. These babies often have birth defects, behavioral problems, and may

L

develop withdrawal symptoms shortly after birth. Large doses can cause slurred speech, impaired coordination, and altered perception. Very large doses can cause respiratory depression, coma, and death. Even small doses of depressants, when combined with

M

alcohol, are likely to produce the symptoms described above. Medical students who have a known or suspected abuse problem will be referred to

N

seek professional care at the Student Counseling and Wellness Center which will include mandatory education and possible referral to agencies that specialize in substance

O

abuse and alcohol treatment and rehabilitation. If the student fails to attend an evaluation consultation at the Student Counseling and Wellness Center, or if such abuse interferes

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with the medical student’s academic or performance in the clinical setting, a mandatory

A

referral may be made to the Physician’s Recovery Network for evaluation and treatment, prior to return to the classroom or clinical setting. The matter will also be referred to the of the drug-abuse policy repeatedly will be subject to dismissal from the Herbert Wertheim

B

E&P Committee. Students who refuse professional treatment and/or violate the provisions College of Medicine.

C

Prevention, Treatment, and Assistance Resources for Medical Students: The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Office of Student Affairs

D

A.

− Office of Student Affairs; HLS II 660W2

Phone: 305-348-0644

E

− Student Counseling and Wellness Center; Green Library, room 340B

F

B.

Phone: 305-348-1460

The FIU Counseling and Psychological Services Center − Modesto A. Maidique Campus

G

Location: University Health Services Complex, room 270

Phone: 305-348-2434

− BBC Location: Wolfe University Center, room 320 C.

H

Phone: 305-919-5305

University Health Services General Medical Clinic

I

− Modesto A. Maidique Campus Location: University Health Services Complex, room 110 Phone: 305-348-4020

J

− BBC Location: Student Health Clinic (west of Library)

K

D.

Phone: 305-919-5307

Office of Student Conduct and Conflict Resolution. − Modesto A. Maidique Campus Phone: 305-348-3939 for both campuses

University Public Safety Department

M

E.

L

Location: Graham Center 311

− Modesto A. Maidique Campus Location: Public Safety Building

N

Phone: 305-348-2626

− BBC Location: Public Safety Building Phone: 305-919-5559

O

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Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

Disability Resource Center − Modesto A. Maidique Campus

B

F.

Location: Graham Center, room 190

C

Phone: 305-348-3532

− BBC Location: Wolfe University Center, room 139 G.

Phone: 305-919-5345

Victim Advocacy Center − Modesto A. Maidique Campus

E

D

Location: University Health Services Complex, room 210

Phone: 305-348-3000 (24 hour hotline)

Phone: 305-348-1215 (non-urgent)

− BBC Location: Wolfe University Center, room 257E Phone: 305-919-5324

F

G

Communicable Diseases General Infections:

H

Students, including all visiting students, with communicable diseases or conditions will not be permitted to engage in patient contact until such conditions have resolved as documented by a physician. This restriction is necessary to protect the health and safety

I

of FIU patients and staff. Persons with the following medical conditions will not be allowed patient contact without prior medical clearance: 1) active chickenpox, measles, German measles, herpes zoster (shingles), acute hepatitis, and tuberculosis; 2) oral herpes with

J

draining lesions; 3) group A streptococcal disease (i.e., strep throat) until 24 hours after treatment has been received; 4) draining or infected skin lesions (e.g., Methicillin Resistant

K

Staphyloccocus aureus (MRSA); or 5) HIV/AIDS (also refer to the separate FIU AIDS Policy in the FIU Student Handbook).

L

A student who has a communicable disease or is unsure whether he/she should participate in patient care should seek medical care by a private physician. All students with a communicable disease must receive written medical clearance by a physician prior

M

to return to clinical care activities. A case-by-case evaluation of each infected student shall be done by his/her physician to determine his/her ability to perform the duties required

N

of the clinical rotation. Based on the recommendations of his/her physician, it is the responsibility of each infected medical student to notify the Office of Student Affairs if unable to perform clinical work; appropriate documentation is required. See also Absence

O

Policy. All such notifications will be kept strictly confidential.

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If an ill student is unsure whether he/she should participate in patient care, the student

A

should contact his/her private physician or a physician on staff at the FIU University Health Services. All students with a communicable disease must receive written medical

B

clearance by a physician prior to return to clinical care activities. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines suggest that medical and participate in clinical clerkships and preceptorships. Prior to the start of the clinical

C

students with hepatitis B or HIV (HBV/HIV) seropositivity can continue to attend classes experience, infected students are required to seek medical consultation by a physician

D

to determine his/her ability to perform the duties required of the clinical rotation. It is the responsibility of each HBV/HIV infected medical student to notify the Office of Student

E

Affairs of his/her status. All such notifications will be kept strictly confidential. Students who are at high risk of infection from patients or other personnel because of their and educational activities with their personal health care provider. If the health care provider

F

immune status or any other reason are encouraged to discuss their work responsibilities believes that there are certain assignments the individual should not accept for personal

G

health reasons, this should be discussed with the appropriate administrator or the Executive Associate Dean for the Student Affairs. Accommodations may be available under the physical examinations by their private physician or medical staff at the University Health

H

Technical Standards. Medical students with HBV/HIV seropositivity shall have periodic Services General Medical Clinic. Written health clearance will be provided to the Executive

I

Associate Dean for Student Affairs who will notify the student’s Clerkship Director of his/her ability to return to practice direct patient care. All correspondence will be kept confidential and will not be used as a basis for discrimination.

J The greatest theoretical risk of medical student-to-patient transmission of HIV or HBV involves invasive procedures with manipulation of needles or other sharp objects not under

K

direct visualization. Medical students who have HBV/HIV seropositivity may not perform invasive procedures unless such activity is approved in writing by the student’s personal

L

physician (who may be a physician from the University Health Services), the clinical clerkship director, and the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs or designee.

M

Medical students are not obligated to answer patient questions related to their own HBV/ HIV status, nor shall they answer such questions related to other students, other health care personnel, or patients. Serologic testing of medical students for HBV/HIV antibody

N

will not be performed routinely unless the person is seropositive (see above). Testing is recommended when there has been a documented needle or sharp instrument puncture

131

O

or mucous membrane exposure to the blood or body fluids of patients, or when there


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

procedures in this Handbook.

B

has been a medical student-to-patient exposure. Refer to the “Needle stick” policies and

HIV/AIDS: Information and University Policy

C

HIV/AIDS Information: HIV/AIDS is an infectious disease caused by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). HIV attacks certain white blood cells called T-lymphocytes, leading to a progressively weakening

D

immune system. Once infected, a person may have no symptoms for a variable period of time, usually five to ten years, or more. It may take anywhere from two weeks to six months

E

or more after the initial infection, before one is able to detect the presence of antibody to HIV in the blood. However, the person is infectious and can pass the virus to others even before the HIV test becomes positive. Afterwards, symptoms may include enlarged lymph glands,

F

low-grade fevers, sweats, weight loss, fatigue, diarrhea, and loss of appetite. With continued immune system destruction, a person living with HIV may develop serious opportunistic

G

infections or cancers, leading to the terminal phase of HIV disease, known as Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Infections which characterize AIDS are usually caused by relatively common infectious agents, including bacteria, fungi, and other viruses. These

H

agents take advantage of the weakened immune system of someone living with AIDS to cause potentially life-threatening infections and certain types of cancer.

I

HIV cannot be contracted through casual contact, like touching, hugging, kissing, or sharing eating utensils, telephones, or restroom facilities. There is no scientific evidence

J

for transmission by mosquitoes. Transmission of the virus can only occur via unprotected sexual contact (oral, vaginal, or anal), sharing contaminated needles, direct contact with infected blood, breast milk, or from a pregnant mother to her fetus. The risk of acquiring

N

M

L

K

HIV from tainted blood during a transfusion is very low since all donated blood is tested for the presence of HIV. There is absolutely no risk of getting infected by donating blood. Certain types of behaviors increase the chances of acquiring HIV infection and include: −

Injecting drugs, using contaminated needles (i.e., body piercing, tatooes)

Being the sex partner of someone who injects drugs or shares needles

Being a sex partner of someone with HIV infection

Having multiple sex partners

Persons who know or suspect that they are HIV seropositive are encouraged to seek expert

O

medical care, and are ethically and legally responsible to protect others from acquiring HIV. In South Florida, there is a higher incidence of HIV than in almost anywhere in the United

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States; approximately one in forty people living in Miami-Dade County is infected with HIV,

A

with the greatest majority being asymptomatic.

B

To reduce your risk of exposure to the virus: Do not share needles;

If you are sexually active, always use a latex condom. Only use water-based

C

lubricants, never petroleum-based lubricants. The virus may be transmitted via the vaginal, anal, and oral sex. Abstinence from sexual intercourse and alcohol/drug use is

D

exchange of blood, vaginal fluid, and semen, and can readily occur during unprotected the only way to remain absolutely protected. Remember, condoms need to be always −

E

used properly and they may break. Ask about the health of your partner and his/her past sexual activity. This is hard to

F

do, but is very important if you want to better ensure safer sex; Maintain mutually monogamous relationships;

Do not use drugs or alcohol before sex, as they impair your judgment and can

G

depress your immune system; and Be certain proper sterilization procedures are followed before receiving acupuncture,

H

tattoos and body piercings. To minimize your chances of acquiring any viral illness, it is always prudent to follow

I

a healthy lifestyle, which includes eating a diet high in complex carbohydrates and low in fats, getting adequate rest, exercising regularly, not smoking, and effectively

J

managing stress. For more information concerning HIV/AIDS visit the FIU University Health Services web site

K

at www.fiu.edu/~health.

L

Florida International University HIV/AIDS Policy Students and employees of Florida International University who may become infected with the HIV virus will not be excluded from enrollment or employment, or restricted in their

M

access to University services or facilities, unless individual medical evaluation establishes that such exclusion or restrictions are necessary for the welfare of the individual and/or with membership including FIU students, faculty, administrators, and staff, as well as

N

other members of the University community. FIU has established an HIV/AIDS Committee representatives from several community organizations committed to HIV/AIDS education

133

O

and treatment. The Committee meets as needed and is responsible for monitoring the


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

medical, psychosocial, and administrative developments regarding HIV/AIDS for the FIU community. Additional responsibilities include administration and implementation of the FIU

B

proactive prevention. In addition, the Committee will meet as needed to consider individual

C

policy in specific cases and coordination of all University educational activities emphasizing

Contacts: Oscar Loynaz, MD – Interim Director, University Health Services

cases which may require University action.

Elvira Velez, ARNP – Director, University Health Services at BBC

Locations: University Health Services Complex 281, Modesto A. Maidique Campus

Health Care Center, BBC

Phones:

305-348-2401, Modesto A. Maidique Campus

305-919-5620, BBC

G

F

E

D

Biosafety Policy: Occupational Exposure to Infectious Materials The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine has adopted the FIU policy regarding the

H

exposure to infectious materials and environmental hazards. The policy has been developed using contemporary knowledge available regarding these issues and is based on established principles of epidemiology, disease prevention, and infection control. The

I

policy applies to all students.

1.

“Student” = an individual enrolled in classes at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine.

2.

“Blood-borne Pathogen” = an infectious disease transmitted by blood including

K

J

Definitions:

human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B (HBV) or hepatitis C (HCV), or any

L

infectious disease primarily transmitted in blood. 3.

“Body Substance Precautions” = a method of infection control where potentially infectious materials are treated as if known to be infectious for HIV, HBV, HCV and

N

M

other blood-borne pathogens. 4.

“Blood” = human blood, including its components and derived products.

5.

“Occupational Exposure Incident” = an inoculation involving eye, mouth, nonintact skin, mucous membranes; or injection contact with blood or other potentially

O

infectious materials; or exposure to an environmental hazard that results from an activity related to education or employment.

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“Other Potentially Infectious Materials” = semen, vaginal secretions, cerebrospinal

A

fluid, synovial fluid, pleural fluid, peritoneal fluid, amniotic fluid, sputum, urine, feces, concentrated HIV, HBV and HCV viruses, aerosolized particles, and saliva. “Airborne Pathogen” = an infectious disease transmitted via aerosolized particles

B

7.

including tuberculosis, chicken pox (Varicella), and measles. “Environmental Hazard” = any exposure which may have health repercussions, such

C

8.

as chemical spills or radiation. “Personal Protective Equipment” = specialized clothing or equipment worn by an

D

9.

employee or student for protection against a hazard. General work clothes (e.g., uniforms, pants, shirts, or blouses) not intended to function as protection against a

E

hazard are not considered to be personal protective equipment. The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine strives to safeguard the health and well

F

being of its students, faculty, residents, staff, and patients. It is the policy of the College to treat in a sensitive and compassionate manner, an individual infected with any against any individuals with such an infection and complies with all applicable federal

G

blood-borne or airborne pathogen, including HIV. The College does not discriminate and state laws.

H

Ultimately, each student is responsible for his/her health and safety while in the clinical setting. Therefore, all students will be required to learn about the appropriate

I

policies and procedures to follow in the event that they are injured or potentially exposed to blood borne pathogens or other communicable diseases. Universal setting by all students, faculty, and staff who may be exposed to blood and other

J

precautions must be followed both in the laboratory as well as in the clinical care body fluids of another individual.

K

Education and Training transmission of occupational exposures during the Orientation to the College. During

L

All students initially receive general information pertaining to the prevention and this time, students will be required to receive an immunization to hepatitis B, meningitis,

M

varicella, and skin testing for TB if not documented on the history and physical exam form submitted prior to registration. More formal clinical information about the prevention a clinical care setting is provided prior to the start of clinical clerkships. This would

N

and pathophysiology of all infectious diseases that might potentially be transmitted in include education regarding hepatitis A, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, TB, varicella, influenza,

O

meningitis, and HIV.

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A

Required education of medical students on universal blood and body fluid precautions During orientation sessions for first year students and prior to the start of the clinical

B

clerkships, students will receive information on universal blood and body fluid precautions, infection control and prevention of the spread of communicable disease. During the first day students are assigned to work at a clinical rotation site, the faculty

C

at the affiliate site will provide information regarding the policies and procedures at their respective site that students must follow in case of exposure, as described

D

above. In addition to the formal presentations and personalized review of the policies and procedures at the respective clinical care sites (FIU and the affiliate hospitals), students will be required to annually take and successfully pass the following selfand Safety prior to the start of the clinical rotations: −

Needle-stick prevention

Blood-borne pathogens (sharps, micro-organisms, exposure control)

Biohazardous waste – exposure control and safety precautions

Recommended tutorials (i.e., not required) include −

Personal Protective Equipment

Infection Control

TB Awareness

Health Care Safety Orientation

I

H

G

F

E

directed online tutorials sponsored by the FIU Department of Environmental Health

J

Tutorials are available at: http://www.fiuehs.com/health.aspx. Advance online registration is required. Students must print the certificate of completion for each self-directed online tutorial and bring it to the Office of Student Affairs at least

K

one day prior to the first day of clinical care. Annual renewals are required. Infection control policies are established for the surveillance, prevention, and

L

control of infection caused by a variety of microorganisms. These guidelines include definitions, symptoms, mode of transmission, as well as prevention and control

M

information. Blood, semen, and vaginal fluids are the three most potentially infectious body fluids but other body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, pericardial fluid, peritoneal fluid, amniotic fluid, and unfixed body tissues should be considered

N

potentially infectious, especially if contaminated with blood. Universal precautions should always be followed, even when handling fluids and tissues which are not

O

normally infectious such as saliva, feces, urine, sweat, sputum, vomitus, and tears; it should be noted that these body fluids carry a greater risk of infection if contaminated

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with visible blood, sometimes an accidental occurrence or complication of patient

A

contact and procedures.

One of the prime objectives of this policy is to encourage student education

B

Standard Universal Precautions about HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, hepatitis B, and other infectious materials and

C

environmental hazards. Education is the best form of prevention and protection against fear and prejudice.

D

Students are required to follow appropriate infection control procedures, including the use of personal protective equipment, whenever there is a risk of parental, cutaneous, any patient, irrespective of the perceived risk of a blood borne or airborne pathogen.

E

or mucous membrane exposure to blood, body fluids, or aerosolized secretions from Regardless of the real or perceived communicable disease status of the patient, all

F

students and staff should follow standard universal precautions when providing patient care. The basic precautions include: Always wash hands before and after patient contact, according to the policy of the

G

clinical site, even if gloves are used. Always wear gloves when exposure to blood, body fluids, and other body excretions

H

is likely. Use gloves appropriately according to aseptic and/or sterile techniques and always

I

change gloves between patients. Wear gowns/aprons when soiling of clothing with blood or body fluids is likely.

Wear masks, face shields, and eye protection when aerosolization of blood or body

K

fluids may occur. Dispose of sharps in designated rigid sharp containers. Never recap needles

L

by hand. −

J

Dispose of waste saturated with blood or body fluids in designated red biohazardous

M

waste containers. The FIU Department of Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S) handles cases of

N

occupational exposure for students and staff in clinical settings. The FIU policies and procedures pertaining to occupational exposure to contaminated body fluids (e.g., a

137

O

needle stick injury) in both laboratory and clinical care settings for both students and staff


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

members is available online at: http://www.fiu.edu/~ehs. The “OSHA Blood-borne Pathogen Standard 29 CFR 1910.1030” is available at:

B

http://www.fiu.edu/~ehs.

C

Exposure at FIU Students who become exposed to contaminated body fluids while at a clinic or lab site on the FIU campus will follow the established follow-up protocols at FIU in order to

D

receive diagnostic and therapeutic care post-exposure incident. Depending on the level of complexity, diagnostic testing and treatment may be provided at the University Health

E

Services clinic during normal business hours; if complex services are required or exposure takes place when the FIU clinic(s) are closed, the student will be referred to obtain care at an outpatient facility in the community. The procedures are outlined in the “Biosafety Plan”

F

flow chart (see appendix).

G

Exposure at a Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine affiliate site not located on the Modesto A. Maidique Campus of FIU A student who becomes exposed to contaminated body fluids while at a clinic or lab

H

site that is not located at the FIU Modesto A. Maidique Campus is required to contact his/her supervising faculty member at the affiliate site. This physician will ensure that the student follows the appropriate needle-stick protocols established at the specific

I

affiliate site in order to receive immediate diagnostic and therapeutic care post-exposure incident. All clinical care sites that have become affiliated with the College are required

J

to have established bio-safety protocols to provide follow-up diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic care for medical students who sustain needle stick injuries. Current copies of the Bio-Safety policy and procedures for each of the affiliate clinical care sites are kept

K

in the Office of Student Affairs and the Dean’s Office (Legal Counsel) at the College. The student will need to complete the FIU “Exposure Incident Investigation Form” available

L

online at the Environmental Health and Safety web site at: http://www.fiu.edu/~ehs. Upon exposure to blood and body fluid, the student assumes the responsibility for all

M

insurance plan.

N

charges associated with diagnosis and treatment that are not covered by his/her health

Confidentiality and Testing As with any blood-borne exposure, appropriate documentation is necessary. The clinical site

O

and the College require that a formal report of the exposure incident or unusual occurrence be filed. The student will need to complete the FIU “Exposure Incident Investigation Form”

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as discussed above. The College shall respect the confidentiality of individuals with blood-

A

borne or airborne pathogens to the extent permitted by state and federal law. Students and personnel will not be tested for HIV without their knowledge or consent, except that by occupational exposure incident protocols. In cases of non-occupational exposure,

B

in certain circumstances testing may be a condition of employment or may be required confidential testing is available through University Health Services, the student’s private

C

health insurance company, or the Miami-Dade Health Department.

Acquisition of infections from patients and staff particularly due to respiratory pathogens

D

Students with Blood-borne and Airborne Infections is an all too frequent and avoidable event. To help protect students from this risk of

E

nosocomially-acquired infection, the College has implemented a broad, multi-level educational program on respiratory pathogens. This program is based on the CDC/ protection, with presentations given by physicians and nurses trained in current

F

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) curriculum on respiratory guidelines on prevention of respiratory infections. Students are taught about blood-

G

borne and respiratory pathogens and protection guidelines during their first week of orientation using direct instruction based on CDC/NIOSH recommendations. A second given at the end of the second year, preceding the beginning of clinical rotations in the

H

presentation on blood-borne and respiratory pathogens and guidelines for prevention is third year. At this time, further instruction on the technique of using personal protective

I

equipment will be taught.

Participation in Clinical Care Activities J

Students infected with blood-borne or other pathogens shall not, solely because of such infection, be excluded from participation in any phase of medical school life, including

K

educational opportunities, employment, and extra-curricular activities, except as otherwise required by applicable federal, state, or local law or unless their health care condition presents a direct threat to the health and safety of themselves or others. Students infected

L

with airborne pathogens may be excluded from participation in such activities during the infectious stage of their disease.

M

Students who know or who have reasonable basis for believing that they are infected with blood-borne or airborne pathogens are expected to seek expert advice regarding their

N

health circumstances to have a clear understanding of the medical issues presented by these infections. See the “Communicable Disease Policy” for any additional requirements. Supportive, confidential, and individualized counseling is available at the FIU General

O

Medical Clinic of the University Health Services.

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Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

Students who are at high risk of infection from patients or other personnel because of their immune status or any other reason are encouraged to discuss their work responsibilities

B

and educational activities with their personal health care provider. If the health care provider believes that there are certain assignments the individual should not accept due to personal health reasons, this should be discussed with his/her faculty supervisor. In some cases,

C

students may be unable to participate fully in medical school life or meet the Technical Standards of the COM because of their disease. In these cases, the individual should contact

D

the OSA for a referral to the FIU Disability Resource Center to discuss the existence and nature of the disability and whether reasonable accommodations are available. If a student’s exposure results in the contraction of a disease or disability, the student will be allowed to

E

continue in the education program with as little disruption as safely possible depending on the circumstances. The student’s specific medical circumstances will be confidentially

G

F

evaluated on a case-by-case basis and non-discriminatory recommendations regarding the student’s progress through medical school may be submitted to the Evaluation and Promotion (E&P) Committee for appropriate action, if necessary. All medical students, including visiting students, will be required to complete the online tutorial sponsored by the FIU Environmental Health and Safety office, as well as will receive an

H

orientation to the blood-borne pathogen policy of the affiliate hospital prior to commencing laboratory and/or patient care activities. The sponsoring faculty member will be responsible for ensuring that any visiting students receive the appropriate training and orientation prior

I

to starting laboratory or clinical work at FIU or one of its hospital affiliates. In addition, the sponsoring faculty member is responsible for ensuring the proper procedures are followed

J

in the event of a potential exposure.

K

Needle-stick Injury: Potential Blood-borne Pathogen Exposure The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, working in conjunction with the FIU

L

Department of Environmental Health and Safety, provides a system in which all medical students, including visiting students, must report all accidental exposures to blood and other potentially hazardous biological fluids that occur through accidental needle stick

O

N

M

injury. This process is necessary for the following reasons: −

to quickly evaluate the risk of infection

to inform the exposed student about treatments available to help prevent infection,

to monitor for side effects of treatments, and

to determine if infection subsequently occurs

This process initially involves the immediate provision of appropriate first aid, including

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simple washing the exposed area that was punctured by the needle with soap and water.

A

The student must immediately contact his/her clinical supervisor to report the incident as described in the Biosafety Plan. The student needs to also complete the FIU Environmental

B

Health and Safety Incident Report Form, located online at http://www.fiu.edu/~ehs. Subsequently, the student may require blood testing to rule out the presence of hepatitis plan provides for appropriate post-exposure treatment and addresses the key aspects

C

B, HIV, and/or other infectious agents in both the index patient as well as the student. The of OSHA Directive 29 CFR Part 1910.1030, Post-exposure Evaluation and Follow-up

D

http://www.osha.gov. Any patient identified as a candidate for post-exposure HIV prophylaxis as a result of

E

this protocol is to be immediately referred to one of the College’s hospital affiliates or local ambulatory care center for initiation of these medications as prescribed by the for appropriate management, including immediate and follow-up testing of the student

F

medical staff. It should be noted that locating and testing the source individual is critical and/or source and, if medically indicated (e.g., HIV infection), for the student to receive

G

prophylactic antiretroviral medication as soon as possible, preferably within two hours of exposure.

H

The “Selected Measures of Access to and Utilization of Treatment and Prophylaxis for HIV-infected Persons” is available at the Centers for Disease Control web site: http://www.cdc.gov.

I

Workers’ Compensation J

Because students are not employees of the FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine nor its clinical affiliate sites, they are not eligible for Worker’s Compensation coverage.

K

Therefore, any coverage for illness or injuries incurred as a medical student will be the responsibility of the student via his/her private health insurance plan.

L

K. Technology Policies M

The College expects medical students to abide by the FIU policies on the use of information technology. Those policies can be found at:

N

• Overall policies: http://policies.fiu.edu/files/96.pdf • Data Stewardship policy: http://policies.fiu.edu/record_profile.php?id=560

141

O

• Digital Millennium Copyright Act policy: http://policies.fiu.edu/files/545.pdf


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

• Gramm-Leach-Billey Act: Safeguards to Protect Confidential Financial Information:

A

http://policies.fiu.edu/files/129.pdf

B

• Information Technology Security: http://policies.fiu.edu/files/96.pdf • IT Security Procedure: Sharing Access to IT Resources; Password Management:

C

http://policies.fiu.edu/files/559.pdf • IT Security Procedure: System and Application Management: http://policies.fiu. edu/files/562.pdf

D

• Access Sharing policy: http://policies.fiu.edu/record_profile.php?id=559 • Internet Software Usage policy: http://policies.fiu.edu/files/545.pdf • IT Security Office policy in the FIU Student Handbook: http://www.fiu.edu/

F

E

student.htm The College will provide lap top computers to medical students. They are provided to students for educational purposes only. Students have no expectation of privacy with

G

respect to information stored within or the use of these lap tops. Students must take personal responsibility for the security of the portable computer and mobile device, software

H

and data in their care. In the event that the lap top computer is misused and damaged, the medical student shall be responsible for the replacement cost of the computer. Medical students are expected to keep all health information confidential and to not disclose

I

such information unless necessary and appropriate to fulfill educational and/or patient care needs. There are State of Florida and federal laws that govern the confidentiality, privacy, and

J

security of health information and records. Consequently, students will become educated about and abide by laws, policies and procedures regarding the use, disclosure and dissemination of health information. In particular, health information that is accessed and retained electronically

K

must be kept private and secure via encryption using Sharepoint as the storage device of sensitive documents. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 and its

L

amendments establish the minimum protections for health information. In addition, there are State of Florida and federal laws that require special consents for disclosure of sensitive health

M

information such as HIV status and mental health records. There will be education on the policies of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine clinical

O

N

affiliates and on policies adopted by the College in preparation for the clinical experiences.

Technology Policies The College provides medical students access to network resources such as computers, printers, network peripherals, software, e-mail, and internet access for academic purposes.

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Students must abide by the technology policies and regulations governing both the

A

University as well as those that are specific to the Information Technology (IT) department of the College. The policies contained in this document are to ensure that technological goals of the College and the University.

C

E-mail Policy

B

resources provided by the College are utilized in a manner consistent with the educational

Only the College’s faculty, staff, students, and other persons who have received permission Use of e-mail is permitted and encouraged where such use supports the University’s

D

under the appropriate authority are authorized users of the FIU e-mail systems and resources. academic goals and facilitate communication between faculty and students. However, if a

E

student uses email in an unacceptable manner, he or she is subject to sanctions, including but not limited to, having his or her campus e-mail account deactivated. The student will and Promotions Committee for final recommendations and action.

G

Unacceptable Use of E-mail

F

receive an initial warning and reports of any subsequent violations will be to the Evaluation

Unacceptable uses of e-mail include, but are not limited to: Distributing, disseminating or storing images, text or materials that might be

H

considered discriminatory, offensive or abusive, in that the context is a personal attack, sexist or racist, or might be considered as harassment.

I

Use of e-mail systems for any purpose restricted or prohibited by laws or regulations. “Spoofing,” i.e., constructing an e-mail communication so it appears to be from

J

someone else. “Snooping,” i.e., obtaining access to the files or e-mail of others for the purpose of

K

satisfying idle curiosity, with no substantial academic purpose. Attempting unauthorized access to e-mail or attempting to breach any security

L

measures on any e-mail system, or attempting to intercept any e-mail transmissions −

M

without proper authorization. Chain mail that misuses or disrupts resources: E-mail sent repeatedly from user to Introducing any form of computer virus or malware into the network.

Sending copies of documents in violation of copyright laws

O

N

user, with requests to send to others.

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Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

copyright laws

A B

Inclusion of the work of others into e-mail communications in violation of

Portable Computers and Mobile Devices Policy Portable computer and mobile device users must take personal responsibility for the

C

security of the equipment, software and data in their care. Students will be provided with laptop (tablet) computers that are purchased for the student using funds specifically paid

D

by the student for this purpose during Orientation. The laptops are the property of FIU and upon which, will be subject to random software

E

scans and antivirus updates. The laptops will be standardized with a Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine image that will contain the necessary operating system and software to complete the four years of medical school. Part of the fee also includes extended

H

G

F

warranty to cover four (4) years. Since these are leased for academic purposes, students should understand that there is no reasonable expectation of privacy. Additional Regulations pertaining to the use of the College laptop computers (tablets): −

Unauthorized or unlicensed software must not be loaded on laptops.

Students must ensure that the laptop or mobile device is not used by unauthorized persons. Students must take all reasonable steps to ensure that the laptop or mobile device

I

is not damaged through misuse.

J

The IT department of the College will house spare laptops in the event that the unit requires repair or maintenance. Since the laptop will have a “standardized” image – there will little or no disruption in service to the student as the student’s data will be

K

housed on the network drives and backed up daily. −

All students will have access to both “Mysite” and the Sharepoint web portal and are

L

encouraged to regularly save all data to the network drives and a central location, i.e., Sharepoint. The College will not be responsible for any loss of data on the

M

laptops themselves. −

Laptops or mobile devices should never be left unattended in public places (e.g., car, library, restaurant, restroom, etc.). Laptops or mobile devices in cars must be

N

stored out of sight when the car is left unattended. −

Students must return the laptop or mobile device to the IT department in the College

O

for regular health checks or when requested.

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Students must immediately report any possible security breaches to the IT

A

department of the College (e.g., laptop stolen or misplaced); Public Safety may need to also be notified should it be discovered that the laptop was stolen. Students must not access porn sites using the College laptop; this is also a violation

B

of University policy Students must abide by all of the IT policies of the University in regulations pertaining to security and privacy.

D

Using Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine software on Home computers

C

addition to those specifically for the College. This includes all HIPAA and FERPA

College-owned software cannot be taken home and/or be loaded on user’s home computer.

E F

L. Medical Students Records Policy on Medical Student Records

G

The College will adhere to The Florida International University Board of Trustees regulation FIU-108 Access to Student Education Records, which is set forth in pertinent part below.

H

The University and the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine will not release or permit access to education records and personally identifiable information kept on a student

I

except as otherwise permitted by law and this regulation. Responsibility for custody of all student educational records belongs to the Dean of the College, Vice President, or

J

the University officials in charge of the area in which the records are maintained. Each Dean, Vice President or designated custodian shall ensure that the procedures required by federal and Florida law and this regulation are in place to control access to and disclosure of student education records and personally identifiable information contained therein.

K

Policies and Procedures for Access and Release of Student Records

L

Personally identifiable information contained in student education records shall be released, or open for inspection, only to the student, or parents of dependent students as defined in

M

Section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. “Personally identifiable” means that the data or information includes the name of a student, the student’s parent, or other family security number or a student number, a list of personal characteristics which would make

N

member, the address of the student, a personal identifier, such as the student’s social the student’s identity easily traceable or other information which would make the student’s

145

O

identity easily traceable. The custodian of the records shall require the student, or parents


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

of the student when applicable, requesting access to or release of the records to present proper identification such as a valid driver’s license or passport. The request must be in

B

writing and signed by the person seeking access or release. A copy of the request for access or release shall be retained in the student’s file. The custodian shall have thirty (30) days in which to comply with the request. When the record includes information on

C

more than one student, the custodian shall release, or permit access to only that part of the record which relates to the student who is the subject of the request. Students

D

requesting the release to others of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records must provide the custodian of such records with a signed, written request specifying the information to be released, the purpose(s) for such release,

E

and the person or organization to whom such information shall be released. A copy of all requests for access and release shall be retained by the custodian of the records and shall

F

be available for inspection and review by the student or a parent. The University reserves the right to deny a request for copies of education records made by a student or a parent when there is a financial obligation to the University which has not been satisfied or when

G

there is an unresolved disciplinary action pending against the student.

I

H

Access to and Release of Records without Consent The following persons and organizations are considered “university officials” and may have access to personally identifiable information without the student’s prior consent: a)

Faculty, administrators, staff and consultants employed by the University, the Florida International University Board of Trustees, or the Florida Board of Governors whose work involves:

J

- Performance of administrative tasks which relate to students; - Performance of supervisory or instructional tasks which relate to students; or

K

- Performance of services which benefit students. b)

Other persons who are authorized by federal and state law and regulations to have

L

access to or receive copies of such information.

M

Directory Information a)

It is the University’s policy to release and publish directory information regarding its students. “Directory Information” includes:

N

- Student’s name, local and permanent address, and telephone number(s); - Date and place of birth;

O

- Student classification and major and minor fields of study; - Participation in officially recognized activities and sports;

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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- Weight and height of members of athletic teams;

A

- Dates of attendance, degrees and awards received; - The most recent previous educational agency or institution attended by the

B

student; and - Photographic image In order to prevent access to or release of directory information, a student, or the parents of a dependent student, must so notify the designated custodian of record

C

b)

in writing within the time provided in the annual Notice of Rights. Access to, or

D

release of directory information will be withheld until further written instruction is received from the student, or the parents of a dependent student.

E

Requests to Amend Education Records Students who challenge the correctness of student education records shall file a written

F

request for amendment with the custodian of the records. The student shall also present to the custodian of the records copies of all available evidence relating to the data or material being challenged. The custodian of the records shall consider the request and

G

shall notify the student in writing within fifteen (15) school days whether the request will be granted or denied. During that time, any challenge may be settled informally between

H

the students or the parents of a dependent student and the custodian of the records, in consultation with other appropriate University officials. If an agreement is reached, it shall be in writing and signed by all parties involved. A copy of such agreement shall

I

be maintained in the student’s records. If an agreement is not reached informally, or if the request for amendment is denied, the student or the parents of a dependent

J

student shall be informed in writing of the denial and the right to a hearing on the matter. A student or the parents of a dependent student shall not have the right to challenge through this process the evaluation reflected by a grade which an instructor

K

has assigned to student coursework.

L

Hearing Rights and Procedures 1. Rights of Appeal. A student whose request for amendment to education records has not been settled or has been denied may file a request for a hearing within

M

thirty (30) days of the receipt of the letter of denial. The request shall be in writing and shall be filed with the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The request shall set records. Upon receipt, the Vice-President shall appoint a disinterested University

N

forth the legal and factual basis for seeking correction of the student’s education official to serve as a hearing officer. The hearing officer shall schedule a hearing

147

O

within twenty-five (25) days of the date of receipt of the request for a hearing. The


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

student shall be given written notice of the time, date and place of the hearing

A

allowing sufficient time for the student to prepare his or her appeal. 2.

Hearing Procedures. The hearing shall be informal in nature but shall afford the

B

student a full and fair opportunity to present evidence relative to the issues raised in the appeal. The student shall be entitled to be assisted or represented by an

C

individual of his or her choice and expense, including an attorney. The custodian of records shall have the same rights as the student.

D

3.

Hearing Officer’s Recommended Order. The hearing officer shall issue a recommended order within twenty-five (25) days of the close of the hearing. In rendering a recommended order, the hearing officer shall consider only such

E

evidence as was offered at the hearing. The hearing officer shall include in the recommended order a summary of the evidence presented and the reasons for his

F

or her recommendations. The original report shall be filed with the Vice-President and a copy of the recommended order shall be sent to the student or the parents of a dependent student and to the custodian of records. Upon receipt, the Vice-

G

President shall have ten (10) days in which to issue a final determination on the issues raised in the appeal. If a determination is made that the information in the education

H

record does not require correction, then the student or a parent of a dependent student shall have the right to place a statement in the record commenting that the

I

information has been challenged and the reason for the challenge.

Fees

K

J

The University will charge the following fees for furnishing copies of student records and reports, or any material included therein: -

Copies of official transcripts – Ten dollars ($10.00).

-

Copies of all other educational records – Fifteen cents ($.15) per page for copying,

L

plus any administrative costs incurred for search, retrieval and mailing.

M

FERPA Notice The University shall provide notification annually to students of their rights relating to education records, including the right to file complaints, the procedures to be followed in

N

order to exercise such rights, the types of information entered in the education records maintained by the University, and the University’s policy to support the law. Notifications

O

are published in the University catalog, the Student Handbook and the Fall semester class schedule.

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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Waiver of Right of Access Students and parents of dependent students have the right to waive their right

A

1.

of access to confidential letters of recommendation and other documents which a part of the official academic record. A waiver of right to access shall be effective only

B

evaluate student academic performance. Such waivers shall be in writing and made when the student or the parents of a dependent student are notified, upon request,

C

of the names of all persons who are submitting confidential recommendations or evaluations and when the confidential letters of recommendation and other 2.

D

evaluative documents are used solely for the purpose intended. The University may not condition admission to the University, grants of financial public educational institution in the State of Florida or by any other public agency

E

aid, or receipt of any other service or benefit offered by the University, by another upon being provided a waiver of the right to access by the student or the parents

F

of a dependent student.

1.

All requests for academic research dealing with data from student education records

G

Requests for Information in Connection with Research shall be referred to the University Registrar and to the Provost. Such requests must

H

be in writing and must set forth specifically the type(s) of information to which access is requested and the intended scope of the research project. The applicable custodian of records and the Provost shall determine whether to grant

I

2.

the request, in whole or in part, and may condition access upon a guarantee that the researcher will appropriately safeguard the data; that no personally identifiable

J

information about any individual will be published or made available to others; or, upon other reasonable conditions.

K

Specific Application to the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine The College’s Director of Admissions and Records is the custodian of all medical student

L

records and has the responsibility of maintaining the security of all such records. The Executive Associate Dean and the Assistant Deans for Student Affairs have oversight Affairs maintains a confidential copy of records for each medical student enrolled in the

M

responsibility of medical student records security and storage. The Office of Student College. These medical student records will be maintained in locked, fire proof file cabinets

N

in the Office of Student Affairs. The College will retain all student records in accordance with LCME, federal, and state requirements as well as FIU Board of Trustees regulations.

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Policies and Regulations A

The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

M. Medical Library Medical Library

B

The FIU Medical Library is located on the third floor of the Green Library (GL 380) on the Modesto A. Maidique Campus. The Medical Library offers ample study spaces, computer

C

workstations, wireless connection and a wide variety of library services. The latter includes copying, printing, interlibrary loans, reference service, and individual assistance in using databases and other virtual resources. The Medical Library is a member of the National

D

Network of Libraries of Medicine.

Library Open Hours

E

The Medical Library hours of operation mirror those of the Green Library during the academic year. The hours of operation can be found at the website: http://library.fiu.edu. Hours are

F

subject to change; be sure to check the website for the latest schedule of operations.

Resources

G

More than 4,000 journals and a large collection of books in biomedicine are available in electronic format. A broad variety of databases provide up-to-date knowledge on medical topics, and offer tools for drug reference, laboratory values, medical images, differential

H

diagnoses, and more.

I

Study Spaces In addition to study carrels and tables, two rooms are available for large and small group collaboration. A projector, laptop and document camera may be checked out for use in

J

location for quiet study, collaborative learning, and relaxation.

K

the rooms. A selection of chairs and reading tables complete the Medical Library as a

Access to the Medical Library Use of the Medical Library as a study center is limited to students and faculty of the

L

Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine. Panther I.D. cards must be swiped on the door’s automated access system to enter the library. Visitors may use the Medical: Library upon

M

request to the Help Desk staff.

Book Check-Out

N

Books may be checked-out for 30 days with one renewal. The Medical Library is not a part of the Green Library, so Medical Library collection materials must be checked out and returned

O

only in the Medical Library. Green Library materials must be checked-out and returned only in the Green Library (second floor). A Panther I.D. card is needed to check out materials.

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Student Handbook Inaugural class

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Reserve Materials A

Books and other materials that are ‘required’ or ‘recommended’ for courses are kept in the Course Reserve cabinet in the library. They may be checked out for a two-hour period

B

upon request at the Help Desk in the Medical Library.

Computer C

Wireless access is available throughout the Medical Library and the Green Library. A number of computer workstations are available for use in the Medical Library. Students rebooted at the end of the night, so documents should not be saved to the desk top or

D

needing workstations for educational purposes have priority. All library computers are hard drive. Items left on the desktop or hard drive will be removed every night. Documents

E

may be saved to personally owned disks or flash drives. The Medical Library follows the University Library’s policy regarding internet use: http://library.fiu.edu.

F

Printing & Scanning A copier/printer/scanner is available in the Medical Library. Others are located throughout

G

the Green Library and in HLS II. Using it requires purchase of a copy card and incurs a perpage charge. See a Medical Library Help Desk staff member for more information.

H

Personal Belongings Personal belongings should never be left unattended. The Medical Library is not responsible

I

for lost or stolen items. Students should inquire at the Medical Library offices (GL 323) for lost items.

J

Behavior Professional and respectful behavior and compliance with policies is expected at all times

K

in the Medical Library. Violators will be asked to leave. Medical students who abuse library policies will be reported to the Office of Student Affairs.

L

College of Medicine Help Desk The Help Desk in the Medical Library is staffed by Library Assistants who are knowledgeable

M

on how to access and use the library’s digital resources, and in trouble-shooting library computer and printer problems. They are prepared to assist students on request.

N

Reference/Research Assistance & Tutorials Dedicated and experienced medical librarians are available weekdays to assist students

151

O

who have reference questions or need help with research. Librarians will also provide


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

hands-on database tutorials for individuals and small groups. Supplemental virtual tutorials are available at the Medical Library home page. Librarians may be reached in

B

the Medical Library Offices on the third floor of the Green Library (GL 323) or by request at the Help Desk in the Medical Library.

C

Interlibrary Loan Service Students may obtain articles from journals that are not available online, as well as books

D

that are not available locally, by requesting an Interlibrary Loan on the Medical Library’s home page.

E

Problems, issues, concerns and compliments The Medical Library is an academic unit of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine and

G

F

is not a unit of the University (Green) Library. Problems or issues regarding services in the Medical Library should be brought to the attention the medical librarians in GL 323 or to the Executive Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the College.

Medical Library Offices

H

Medical Library administrative offices are located near the Medical Library in GL 323.

Other services located near the Green Library

I

Student services located near the Medical Library on the third floor include the Student Counseling and Wellness Center, a dedicated suite of three professional offices providing a private entrance and confidential services to students for both personal counseling as

J

Counseling and Wellness Center is room 340B.

K

well as for student success, testing, and wellness services. The entrance to the Student

University Library (Green Library) The mission of the University Libraries is to provide the FIU community with a pleasant

L

environment conducive to study, research and the continuation of the educational process. It is important that there be procedures and policies in place to protect the safety of library

M

users and preserve materials, equipment and the facilities. Dedicated areas of the libraries, such as the Medical Library, have additional policies that apply to that area. The following

N

policies will apply in all public areas of the buildings

Food and Drink

O

Most snack food and drinks are permitted in the building including chips, nuts, and cookies, can and bottled drinks.

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Pizza, fries, hamburgers, sub-sandwiches, and foods with strong odors are

A

not permitted. Food deliveries from vendors (pizzas, etc.) are prohibited and will be turned away at

B

the entrance to the libraries.

Use containers that prevents spills.

Deposit containers in waste receptacles.

Avoid bringing food with strong odors should be brought into the building.

D

C

Patrons are requested to:

E

Disruptions Disruption to the study and research of patrons or is prohibited.

F

Examples include but are not limited to:

Harassment of others

Odor constituting a nuisance or health and safety concern

Behavior that disturbs users or staff and interferes with use of the facility

H

Creating excessive noise

G

I

MP3 Players, I-Pods, CD Players, Cell Phones or other Electronic Equipment The use of any equipment that disrupts patrons is prohibited. Beepers and cellular phones must be placed on vibrating mode or turned off. The use of cellular phones in public areas

J

of the library is prohibited. The use of video cameras requires the permission of the library administration.

K

Destroying or Damaging Materials, Equipment, Software or the Facility The following are examples of actions that are prohibited (this is not a comprehensive list).

L

Damaging of hardware or equipment

Misuse of furniture or the facility

Intentional introduction of viruses into any system

Tampering with software or changing equipment settings

N

Destruction, mutilation or defacement of any materials

M

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Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

Smoking or other use of tobacco is prohibited within the facility.

B

Animals

C

Library Staff Equipment

D

Smoking

Children and Minors

No animals are allowed in the facilities other than those assisting persons with disabilities.

The use of library staff equipment by patrons is prohibited.

E

Individuals under the age of sixteen (16) must be attended by a parent or caregiver. Parents or caregivers that bring children into the facility are responsible for monitoring their activities and regulating their behavior. Disruption of patrons by children or minors

F

is prohibited.

H

G

Skateboards, Roller or Inline Skates, and Bicycles Skateboarding, roller or inline skating and cycling are prohibited within the building. Bicycles must be parked in designated outside areas.

Loitering, Soliciting and Advertising Loitering and soliciting for donations or accosting patrons or staff for any purpose that

I

disrupts their use of the facility is prohibited. Non-FIU advertising materials may not be displayed or distributed without permission from the Library Administration. No materials

J

may be affixed to library interior or exterior walls without permission from the Library Administrative Office.

K

Group Tours/Instruction Any persons wishing to bring groups of people into the library need to obtain prior

L

permission from the appropriate department. Persons who are unwilling to abide by this policy will be asked to leave the facility. Those refusing to do so will be subject to removal

N

M

by Public Safety. Students could be liable for disciplinary action as established by FIU.

N. FIU Emergency Policies Emergency Policy

O

When faced with any type of emergency or inclement weather, the health and safety of students are the paramount concerns of the FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine.

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As emergencies occur unexpectedly, the College in conjunction with the FIU Office of

A

Emergency Management (OEM) will ensure that all medical students will receive immediate notification of all emergency alerts provided to FIU students.

Fatal or critical accidents, injuries or illnesses occurring on University premises, involving employees, students or visitors

University-related transportation accidents involving hazardous materials or major

D

property damage •

Reports of acute illnesses involving persons or animals, arising from chemical or

E

biological emissions or exposures on University premises •

Reports of acute illnesses or injuries arising from the consumption or use of any

F

product purchased, sold or distributed by the University or on University premises •

C

B

By definition, an emergency at FIU can include all of the following:

Major spills or emission of hazardous materials inside buildings on University

G

premises to the extent that that the well-being of University community, the local community and/or the environment may be affected

Fires, explosions, bomb threats and terrorist threats on and off campus

Violence or rioting on, or in close proximity, to University premises

I

Natural disasters, including storms, floods, hurricanes, or tornadoes

H

Extended and/or widespread utility interruptions with particular emphasis on how

J

they affect class schedules, research projects, University residential facilities, or the ability of the University to continue normal operations Unauthorized major work stoppages, boycotts or threatened boycotts of University

K

sponsored events.

L

In addition to the above, any incident which has the potential for adverse publicity concerning campus resources, and/or instruments of the University, may be considered of sufficient gravity to activate the University’s Emergency plan.

M During an emergency, there are several ways that students of the College will receive alerts from the FIU Office of Emergency Management (OEM), part of the FIU Police

N

Department. First, emergency messages will be broadcast to emergency VoIP phones located in most classrooms, offices, and buildings, as well as to FIU email accounts.

155

O

Audio messages and sirens will be broadcast via outdoor speakers. Students and staff


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

can receive emergency text messages to their personal cell phones by signing up for Panther Alert, the emergency text messaging system designed to alert FIU students

B

and staff, as well as their friends and families. Panther Alert will provide automatic text message notification to medical students’ cell phones during an emergency that affects the University. All students are urged to visit the FIU homepage, http://fiu.edu for a link

C

and instructions on how to sign up for Panther Alert. In addition, FIU’s Office of Emergency Management maintains a website

D

www.fiuoem.com, that will provide immediate status updates throughout emergency situations. The OEM works to mitigate, plan and prepare for emergencies; educate the FIU

E

community about preparedness; coordinate emergency response and recovery efforts and collect and disseminate critical information. Inherent in the OEM mission is the continued and safe operation of the University. The Office of Emergency Management also oversees

F

the Emergency Management Group (EMG). The EMG is comprised of FIU employees specifically assigned by their area Vice President or Dean, whose responsibilities are

G

critical to the University’s overall response and recovery. The EMG meets regularly and as needed when an emergency is imminent (e.g., hurricane in the geographical quadrant with impending hurricane watch) to discuss issues that will or may adversely affect operations

H

at the University. EMG members are trained in the National Incident Management System, which enables FIU to interface with outside governmental agencies in the event of a disaster. FIU has received the designation of “Disaster Resistant University (DRU)” and has

J

I

obtained the required qualifications to receive post-disaster FEMA funding.

FIU Classes and Clerkships

K

All classes in the basic and clinical sciences that are scheduled on any FIU campus will follow the University’s temporary closure policy. Students who are assigned to clinical clerkships that take place outside of the FIU campuses at the time of a local or

L

geographically widespread emergency should contact the Director of Clinical Education of the specific site for specific instructions pertaining to students’ instructional responsibilities.

M

As a general rule, clinical care responsibilities are expected to be fulfilled and students should follow the policies of the affiliate clinical site where they are currently rotating. Students on clinical rotations are generally expected to report to their hospital assignments unless severe

N

weather conditions prohibit safe travel; each student should make a prudent judgment as to the possibility of safe travel. The student should contact his/her resident (or whoever

O

is covering), the clerkship director (through voice mail if he/she is not available), and the Office of Student Affairs. The OSA will provide informational messages regarding weather-

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related attendance on voice mail, and these messages will be updated regularly. Voice mail

A

messages will be updated regularly and monitored for incoming messages left by students. Throughout the emergency, students should tune in to local television and radio broadcasts

B

to remain informed regarding emergencies affecting any of the FIU campuses. This is especially true regarding hurricanes, tropical storms, and other natural disasters. In addition, as one of two online sources: the FIU home page www.fiu.edu or the home page for the

C

students can contact the FIU HELP line at 305-348-HELP for the latest updates as well FIU Office of Emergency Management www.oem.fiu.edu. Additionally, students who sign

D

up for the Panther Alert emergency text service will receive periodic text message updates directly to their cellular phone.

E

Additional information about the University’s Emergency response plans for students for various types of emergency situations, from minor fires to extreme terrorism, can be found Emergency Management.

F

on the Emergency Management website www.fiuoem.com or by calling the FIU Office of

G

General Safety Guidelines There are inherent risks in any situation requiring contact with the public. Students must

H

be aware of the need for personal safety and act accordingly to minimize risks. The safety and security of medical students are the first priority of the College.

I

Safety and security practices will be reviewed prior to community and clinical experiences. Examples of such educational training programs include:

needle-stick prevention

response to needle-stick or bodily fluid exposure

de-escalation techniques when dealing with angry patient

emergency procedures involving medical care (e.g., CPR), natural disasters,

K

universal precautions

J

L

terrorism, assault, illegal activities, and others. While working in community settings, including hospitals, clinics, home visits, and other

M

off-campus venues, medical students should take precautions and use common sense including but not limited to the following:

Don’t stand out (e.g., wearing flashy or expensive jewelry).

Don’t carry excessive amounts of money.

Don’t leave valuables in plain sight.

O

Be aware of your surroundings.

N

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The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Travel in pairs whenever possible.

Keep car doors locked and windows closed.

B

While working or studying on campus, it is important to note that the Department of Public Safety has jurisdiction over the entire University, including the Herbert Wertheim

E

D

C

College. Emergency phones have been installed at strategic locations around the College and University which connect directly to the Department of Public Safety. Students are urged to take notice of and become familiar with their locations. As members of the FIU community, students can enhance their personal safety and help keep the campus safe by taking precautions, including but not limited to, the following: •

Use prudent precautions for personal safety including walking in pairs in isolated places or during the evening. Students should not hesitate to call Public Safety to

F

request a student escort or other security services at night. •

Keep close watch on your personal property. Do not leave personal property such as

G

books, audio or video players, cell phones, PDA’s, laptops, purses, wallets, jewelry, cameras, or other valuable objects unattended or out of your sight or in classrooms, the library, restrooms, clinic, campus dining areas, the bookstore, your vehicle, or in

I

H

any public place. •

Report all on-campus thefts to the Department of Public Safety.

Report any suspicious persons or activities to the Department of Public Safety.

J

While fulfilling the College’s educational objectives, students must also be aware of the need for personal safety and act accordingly to minimize risks. The key message for students

K

is to be cautious and use common sense. Always listen to your “gut” feeling and follow your instincts. If an environment or situation feels unsafe, stay calm and leave immediately.

M

L

Discuss with a faculty supervisor and/or call law enforcement. Additional guidelines will be provided prior to the start of the household visits.

Emergency contact information: •

N

For all off-campus emergencies, call 911. For all on-campus emergencies and urgent scenarios involving safety, call Public Safety at 305-348-5911 for the Modesto A. Maidique Campus or 305-919-5911 for

O

the Biscayne Bay Campus (BBC). •

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For non-urgent safety concerns or questions, contact:


Student Handbook Inaugural class University Police Non-Emergency UP: 305-348-2626

University Police Non-Emergency BBC: 305-919-5559

A

2009-2010

Students may also contact the College’s Office of Student Affairs to address these

B

issues and seek guidance regarding in non-urgent situations. Call 305-348-0696 for urgent matters during nights and weekends.

C

Medical students who reside in the FIU residential housing should be familiar with the safety guidelines contained in the FIU Student Handbook under the Housing and Residential Life

D

section (http://fiu.edu/students.htm).

E

O. Miscellaneous Policies Medical Student Employment Medical students enrolled at the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine should not undertake

F

any type of employment outside of the College. The rigorous demands of the medical school curricula in the basic sciences and the clinical clerkships require the full energy, attention and

G

time of the student. However, on rare occasions, individual exceptions may be made due to documented financial hardship. Students who feel they need additional income and thus absolutely must work are required to provide a written request to the Executive Associate

H

Dean of Student Affairs prior to starting work or during the first day of Orientation Week. The medical student will also be required to provide verified documentation of financial burden to

I

the Office of Financial Aid and have a personal consultation with the Director of Financial Aid. The final decision regarding employment will be made by the Executive Associate Dean

J

of Student Affairs or designee. These students will also be expected to attend classes and clinical rotations like any other medical student and maintain a satisfactory academic record throughout their medical school experience. Violations of this policy or a student’s

K

inability to maintain satisfactory academic performance will be subject to review by the E&P Committee.

L

Media Requests for Student Interviews M

The College follows the FIU Media Policy which can be found at http://policies.fiu.edu/. Students should contact the College’s Office of Student Affairs (OSA) whenever approached by members of the media, including radio, television, newspaper, magazine,

N

cable, internet, etc. Media personnel are required to have permission from the FIU Office of Media Relations before approaching anyone on campus. The Deans at the OSA will make

159

O

the appropriate contact with the Office of Media Relations. All students, faculty, and staff


Policies and Regulations The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A

must be careful that the privacy of patients, colleagues, as well as the professional work of researchers must be respected. Thoughtless, incomplete, or casual answers to some

B

or FERPA regulations.

C

queries could have serious ethical or legal repercussions and could be a breach of HIPAA

Lost and Found Articles that are found in classrooms or other public areas within the College should be

D

brought to the Office of Student Affairs (OSA). Students who have lost an item should first contact the OSA. If the missing item is not there, students should contact the Department

O

N

M

L

K

J

I

H

G

F

E

of Public Safety at 305-348-2626.

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Student Activities and FIU Services The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Student Handbook

2009-2010


Student Activities & FIU Services


Student Activities & FIU Services The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

A. Student Activities New Student Orientation Prior to matriculation, all selected first-year students are required to participate in a weeklong New Student Orientation that takes place one week before the first day of classes. During Orientation, students meet with the Dean, Executive Associate Deans, Assistant Deans, Directors, as well as other key faculty and staff members. In addition, medical students are provided with a wealth of important information, including but not limited to the following: −

The necessary information about matriculation into the FIU Wertheim College of Medicine

Important policies and procedures

Information about the various student services available at the College as well as the University at large

Information about the curriculum and the five strands

Financial aid information

Distribution and analysis of each student’s Myer’s-Briggs Personality assessment

Assignment to a Panther Community

Photo identification cards

Tours of the Medical Library

Tours and orientation to several of the clinical affiliate sites

Professionalism, Code of Conduct

Receipt and training on the laptop computer and the installed software programs

Biosafety procedures

Public safety

Field trips to local attractions designed to promote camaraderie and team building among all medical students

Attendance is required at all scheduled events during Orientation. The Orientation Week concludes with the White Coat Ceremony when the medical student has the opportunity to share the start of his/her new educational experience with family and friends.

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Student Activities & FIU Services The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

White Coat Ceremony The White Coat Ceremony of the FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine is the concluding and most signature event of Orientation Week for first year medical students. The White Coat Ceremony serves as an important symbol for students about to embark on a medical education that will transform them from a neophyte student into a physician with the learned and privileged abilities to heal the infirmed and injured. In the presence of family, friends, and faculty members, student-physicians are welcomed into the medical community and are “cloaked” with their first white coats. The purpose of the ceremony, as initially conceived by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, is to clarify for students, prior to entrance into the medical community, the physician’s responsibility to both take care of patients and also to care for patients. In other words, doctors should care as well as cure. The white coat symbolizes an entry into a world where one’s contributions have the potential to have a lasting impact on the health and well-being of humanity. The ceremony reminds our novice medical students of humility and never forgetting the many people, parents, friends, professors, that have helped bring them to receive this white coat – a symbol of a most noble profession of service to all humanity. During the ceremony, all of the medical students will be adorned with their white coat featuring the FIU seal and College’s logo and partake in a photo opportunity. Students will recite an oath, pledging commitment to the profession and to lead lives of compassion, integrity, and honor. The ceremony will feature a keynote speaker who provides inspiration and advice to the aspiring physicians. Students receiving scholarships will have an opportunity to meet their donor and partake in a photo opportunity. Following the formal ceremony, medical students will join their families, friends, and faculty at a reception for informal networking.

Panther Communities The Panther Communities provide an educational and social organization to promote a sense of community and unity within the medical school environment. The Panther Communities will allow a formal structure for medical students to connect and network with other students at all stages of the medical school experience, as well as to network informally with faculty, Student Affairs staff, and individuals in the local community. The overall goal of such communities is to facilitate the physical, emotional, social, intellectual, spiritual, and professional development of the medical students. Students who are connected and supported by the community structure learn more efficiently and effectively through shared peer-to-peer educational and social experiences. Developing

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long-lasting interpersonal relationships is invaluable for productive learning, creating a support network during the medical school years, and for fostering future professional success. In addition, enhanced student-staff interactions will allow for earlier and more effective interventions that could lead students to obtain prophylactic and/or therapeutic academic and/or counseling assistance earlier in the course of academic deficiency. There will be a total of four (4) distinct Panther Communities, each to be designated by a specific name related to the health care field that will be selected by the students comprising the first medical school class (class of 2013). Initially, each Panther Community will consist of ten or eleven students. Ultimately, a total of approximately 120 students will be assigned to each Panther Community, consisting of 25% first year, 25% second year, 25% third year, and 25% fourth year medical students. Each student will remain in the same assigned Panther Community throughout the four year medical school experience. Each community will elect a mayor to serve as its administrative leader, as well as a vice mayor. The four mayors will work with the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs (Counseling and Communities), the Faculty Director (a physician), and the Community Coordinator to develop a series of educational and social programs, to include professional shadowing, service learning, volunteer work, tutoring, community service, fundraising activities, field trips, talent shows, and academic and athletic competitions. Each Community may develop its own specific educational and social programs and activities or may collaborate with members of any of the other communities. During the four-year medical school experience, FIU medical students are expected to develop the following skills necessary to become knowledgeable, empathic, culturallycompetent, and patient-centered physicians: •

Leadership skills: Student leaders not only contribute to the quality of the medical school environment but also gain valuable experience that will help them for leadership roles as physicians. Each class elects officers who represent the class in academic matters, plan activities, and organize social events. The Panther Communities will foster the development of medical students’ leadership skills by providing the following opportunities: – The mayor and vice mayor of each Community elected by peers who are members of the respective Panther Community – Participation as student members of various College standing committees, including the Honor Council, the Evaluation and Promotions Committee, the

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Student Activities & FIU Services The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Admissions Committee, the Grievance Committee, and several committees important to the LCME accreditation process – Founding officers of student government, other medical student organizations and student interest groups – Participation in various service learning opportunities available at the University and in the local community, working with community agencies such as AHEC, the Miami-Dade Health Department, and other community health organizations as well as departments within the University. – Mentorship and tutoring of undergraduate pre-medical students. • Interpersonal and communication skills: Students will learn the importance of developing strong interpersonal relationships as well as assertiveness, cultural competency, and conflict resolution skills. •

Academic skills: The Panther Communities provide opportunities for students to share their best practices with their peers in terms of tutoring, mentorship, as well as share their successful study, time management, and test-preparation skills.

Professional skills: Professional skills development will be fostered in the Panther Communities through the following activities: – Simulated patient encounters using trained actors – Computerized mannequin patients – Programs on interviewing skills – Sessions devoted to preparation for residency – Guest speakers representing a variety of medical specialties and nonmedical disciplines – Volunteer programs enabling students to shadow physicians and allied health practitioners in the community in both ambulatory and hospital settings through established contacts affiliated with the NeighborhoodHELP™ program. – Work with various allied health departments and groups at FIU to participate in health fairs and health theme events and presentations, the Healthy University Task Force initiatives, as well as participate with Dance Marathon, Relay for Life, March of Dimes, Race for the Cure, and other altruistic endeavors.

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Social skills: The Panther Communities will create a “home away from home” to provide medical students with a sense of belonging to a smaller group and provide social support to help students with a variety of issues, including the following: personal health care (taking care of the care-giver); personal counseling services; stress management; personal strengths; physical fitness; financial planning and debt management; parenting; relationships; housing; cultural entertainment; friendly athletic, talent, and academic competitions; and the establishment of new College traditions.

The Panther Communities will provide students with informal opportunities to share various aspects of their medical student experiences with their peers. There may be opportunities for students to interact with College and guest faculty in a social setting outside of the classroom, laboratory, and clinical setting as well as informal opportunities for medical students to interact with students majoring in nursing, public health, and other allied health disciplines where discussions regarding professionalism, innovation, community service, leadership, and research could take place. In addition, medical students will have opportunities to collaborate with the medical students at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and at Nova Southeastern University to provide community service in a variety of different programs and activities, such as health fairs. Finally, extracurricular programs will be developed as part of the Panther Community experience to introduce students to physicians of various specialties and ethnicities designed to enhance cultural competency and professionalism in ways that complement learning in the classroom and clinical settings.

B. FIU Student Services Preventive and Therapeutic Health Services The University Health Services at FIU provides registered medical students with confidential, professional, culturally sensitive, and primary medical care and health education for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of routine illness and injuries in two convenient ambulatory care centers located on both campuses. The Modesto A. Maidique Campus University Health Services Complex (UHSC) is an approximately 20,000-square-feet facility consisting of the following departments: The General Medical Clinic, Women’s Health Services, the Wellness Center, pharmacy, immunization and laboratory services, the Counseling and Psychological Services Center, and the Victim Advocacy Center. All students are required to pay a student health fee per academic year, which

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Student Activities & FIU Services The FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

entitles them to unlimited office visits to see a licensed primary care physician, nurse practitioner, or registered nurse, as well as access to receive immunizations, lab tests, and office procedures. This fee is paid at the time of registration prior to the first day of class. Students requesting clinical care services are requested to call to schedule an appointment whenever possible. Students without appointments are first triaged by a Registered Nurse and then referred to see a nurse practitioner or physician based on the type and severity of symptoms and/or urgency of the medical complaint. There is a nominal charge for ancillary services, such as vaccines, lab tests, medications, and office procedures which is considerably lower than that charged by local urgent care centers and emergency rooms. Appointments are required to access the Wellness Center services and personal consultations. The following is an outline of services offered to registered, health-fee paying students through the University Health Services:

Clinical Care Services •

General Medical Clinic – primary care services, including physical examinations and screenings; diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic illness and injuries

Women’s Health Services – prevention and treatment – GYN services, including pap and pelvic exams; colposcopy performed by a gynecologist

Laboratory – CLIA-waived testing done on site. The UHS has entered into an agreement with local community laboratories to provide services for a discount to FIU students. Typical tests include blood, urine, cultures, STD checks, pregnancy, mono, Strep, and others

Office procedures: EKG, TB screenings, respiratory therapy, vision screening, audiology, pap smears, suturing, allergy injections (with allergist Rx), and IV hydration

Immunizations: MMR (measles, mumps, rubella), hepatitis A and B, influenza, tetanus/diphtheria, varicella, meningitis, HPV, and others

Wellness Center •

Services: one-on-one consultations; Micro-Fit computerized fitness assessment; anonymous HIV testing and counseling;

Special events: health screenings; theme weeks; health fairs

Alternative Therapies: massage therapy, aromatherapy, acupuncture, chiropractic

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FIU Pharmacy • •

Prescription medications Over-the-counter products, including vitamin and herbal supplements, first aid products, cold and flu products, aromatherapy, and more

SERVICES NOT PROVIDED •

X rays and other sophisticated diagnostic testing

Specialty physician care (i.e., obstetrics, surgery, orthopedics, ophthalmology, cardiology, gastroenterology, etc.) and dental care

Emergency care after clinic hours

Overnight infirmary services

If the above services are needed or requested, referrals will be made to several local hospitals, pharmacies and physicians. The student must assume financial responsibility for these services, as the Student Health Fee only covers services which are performed at the campus clinics. To help offset these costs, the University strongly recommends the purchase of health insurance. Brochures describing special student health insurance plans are available at the University Health Services offices on both campuses.

For Emergency Situations: On campus: Call Public Safety 24 hours a day at (305) 348-2626 Off campus: Call 911 or go to the nearest hospital ER. A list of nearby hospitals

is located on the University Health Services web site:

www.fiu.edu/~health.

For urgent, not life-threatening, situations: Go to the University Health Services during the hours of operation Monday through Friday. If the clinic is closed, students are instructed by phone or web site to go to one of several local urgent care centers where students will receive a professional discount on all services and physician charges. The closest urgent care center to the College is located within a two mile radius. Source: FIU University Health Services web site www.fiu.edu/~health

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Wellness The Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine and the University provide services to help medical students become successful academically and professionally. All students are encouraged to take care of themselves physically, emotionally, mentally, socially, and spiritually. Physical wellness is achieved by eating properly, exercising regularly, not smoking, avoiding excessive alcohol use and the use of recreational substances, and adopting healthy sleep habits. Visit the campus Recreation Center to exercise with free weights, machines, or aerobics classes. Visit the University Health Services General Medical Clinic and Women’s Health Clinic for minor illnesses, injuries, and regular preventive care (physical exams, screening tests, and immunizations). It is imperative that you visit the Wellness Center, located in the University Health Services Complex, for a variety of health educational programs, personal consultations, computerized fitness testing, massage, chiropractic, and acupuncture, as well as workshops on all wellness topics important for all young adults. Emotional wellness can be maintained by becoming better organized, managing time well, keeping in touch with family and friends, managing stress well, knowing yourself, and developing meaningful personal relationships as well as more collegial relationships with other students and faculty who could serve as tutors and mentors. All medical students are encouraged to regularly visit the Student Counseling and Wellness Center in GL 340B for a variety of programs. Keeping well spiritually is not only limited to your specific place of worship but can be defined as keeping in touch with your own inner source of strength, often through meditation, prayer, contemplation, and visualization. Finally, while it is recognized that time for extracurricular activities will often be limited, medical students are encouraged to continue their personal interests, hobbies, and personal relationships while in medical school.

Victim Advocacy Center The FIU Victim Advocacy Center provides free and confidential services to assist students, faculty, staff, and university visitors who have experienced actual or threatened violence. The Center is dedicated to providing advocacy and assisting students in overcoming traumatic events. Victim advocates provide comprehensive supportive services to aid in recovery from assault, battery, relationship abuse (physical, verbal or emotional), sexual and/or attempted sexual battery (acquaintance rape, date rape, stranger rape, molestation), stalking (repeated following or harassment), hate and/or property crimes. Police reports are not required to receive services. Clients are provided with information and options and are free to decide which, if any, course of action they will pursue.

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Services provided by the Victim Advocacy Center include: −

24 hour-a-day “Hotline” for support, information, referrals, and advocacy: 305-348-3000

Supportive, confidential counseling and referral for individuals who have been victimized

Assistance with exploration of options and accessing community resources

Accompaniment to court, meetings, hearings, and depositions involving the criminal justice system or the FIU student conduct process

Facilitate academic accommodations with the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Office of Student Affairs, as needed

Speaking with professors, legal representatives, family members, employers, landlords, and other campus or community service providers, upon request

The Victim Advocacy Center also provides free educational and victimization prevention workshops as well as volunteer opportunities for students

Locations: −

Modesto A. Maidique Campus – University Health Services Complex UHSC 210

Biscayne Bay Campus by Appointment – Wolfe University Center

Contact Information 24-hour emergency and crisis line: (305) 348-3000 Phone: Emergency Walk-in Hours:

(305) 348-1215 (appointments, information). Evening appointments are also available. Modesto A. Maidique Campus,

8:30 am to 4:00 pm,

Monday through Friday.

FIU Police and Public Safety Department The Florida International University Police Department and Public Safety (FIUPD) is located in the Tower Building on the Modesto A. Maidique Campus and in the SO II Building at Biscayne Bay Campus. The department provides a full range of public services to the neighboring community 24 hours a day, seven days a week on both campuses. Law enforcement personnel are required to complete the minimum training as established by Florida State Statute for certification. The State of Florida certifies all police officers of the university prior

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to being hired. FIUPD patrols the Modesto A. Maidique and Biscayne Bay campuses on foot and in police marked and unmarked vehicles. The department is comprised of several sections, including: •

Administration

Patrol

Investigations

Communications

The FIUPD has an excellent working relationship with other local law enforcement agencies. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE), and other state and federal agencies also assist the department when necessary, ensuring that professional police services are provided to the university community. Communication and coordination with all new law enforcement agencies is maintained on a 24-hour basis through the Florida Crime Information Center (FCIC) and the National Crime Information Center (NCIC). The safety and security of the University community is the department’s primary function; students and members of the faculty and staff are encouraged to be involved in campus crime prevention. In an ongoing effort to facilitate this process, law enforcement personnel provide crime prevention programs each semester on various topics. Please take time to explore the various programs that are available to the University community. FIUPD is dedicated to the policing philosophy of Community-Oriented Policing (COP). The Office of Community-Oriented Policing Services defines COP as a “policing philosophy that promotes and supports organizational strategies to address the causes and reduce the fear of crime and social disorder through problem-solving tactics and police-community partnerships.” This type of policing focuses on the community which is an essential function of the university’s mission statement.

COP consists of two basic fundamentals: 1. Community partnerships 2. Problem solving FIU police officers strive to foster positive community contacts leading to effective communication within the University and surrounding communities. This builds and maintains a mutual trust that is vital in the development of community partnerships. With this broadened police perspective, FIU police officers are enhancing the quality of life for the FIU community through a variety of approaches such as Bicycle Patrol, Operation Book Stamp, Community Barbecues, Self-defense Workshops, Crime Prevention Seminars,

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Officer Initiated Projects and various other activities and programs. The FIU Police Department provides several services to the FIU community. Contained in this section are descriptions of the various services. Most of the services indicated are of no charge to the students, staff, faculty or any other member of the FIU community. They include: •

Fingerprinting Services

Special Events

Bicycle Registration

Travel Plan

Rape Aggression Defense Program

Operation Book Stamp

Contact Information and Emergency Numbers 24 hours a day – 7 days a week (for emergencies) Modesto A. Maidique Campus: (305) 348-5911 Biscayne Bay Campus: (305) 919-5911 Modesto A. Maidique Campus 11200 S.W. 8th Street Public Safety Tower Miami, FL 33199 Tel: (305) 348-2623 Fax: (305) 348-1566 BISCAYNE BAY CAMPUS 3000 N.E. 151st Street Building SO II North Miami, FL 33181 Tel: (305) 919-5559 Fax: (305) 919-5505

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The Graham University Center The Graham Center (GC), located on the Modesto A. Maidique Campus of FIU, is essential to campus life and to the University’s mission of providing a pleasant and educational environment for camaraderie and enhancement of the University’s community spirit. The experiences afforded to students strive to expand knowledge, develop skills, and clarify values for individual and community growth. As the “living room” of the campus, the Center offers unique facilities, conveniences, services and amenities needed in the daily life of the University community. It is the focal point for formal and informal gatherings; the stage for presenting social, educational, cultural and recreational programs; and a setting for quiet reading and lively conversation with friends. Students enjoy the benefits of leadership and practical business experiences by participating in governing bodies, student organizations, and employment opportunities. The Graham University Center houses retail operations that generate valuable financial returns to support a wide-range of University programs.

Graham Center Services The Graham Center provides the following services: 1.

The Laser Printing Lab was established in 1994 in cooperation with University Computer Services and Student Government Association to provide students with an opportunity to produce laser printed materials at no charge. Currently, the GC Computer Lab has more than 70 personal computers, networked laser printers, a color laser printer, and scanners. The Computer Lab provides expanded night and weekend hours and a staff of assistants.

2.

Panther CARD: Students and Faculty are able to obtain Panther CARDs, passport pictures, OPT pictures, lamination, and other photo ID cards. Currently enrolled FIU students will need a PantherCARD. Your PantherCARD allows you access to the Libraries, Recreation Centers, University Health Services, Multicultural Programs and Services, Student Government and homecoming elections, University and theme events, and Instructional Media Centers, Career Services, athletic events, computer labs, Financial Aid Book Advances and Campus Life lectures, comedy shows, concerts, movies, dances, and more.

You are also able to use your PantherCARD as a debit card throughout the FIU campus.

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The Porter Davis Game Room is a place to relax, meet friends, and enjoy a variety of indoor games including billiards, table tennis, board games and video games. The Game Room programs and activities provide students with opportunities for leisure and competitive tournaments. The Game Room hosts campus tournaments where winners qualify to represent FIU at the Association of College Unions International (ACU-I) Regional Tournaments. The Game Room also works with the recreational clubs to host clinics for students to improve their chances in regional and national competitions. The Game Room has sponsored teams to represent FIU in regional and national in-door recreational competitions with the Association of College Unions International (ACU-I) and has provided first place winners in chess, billiards and table tennis.

4.

The Information Desk: The information desk is the place to go if you need help, directions, general information, or if you have lost something.

5.

The Graham Center provides convenient notary services to the FIU community.

6.

The Graham Center Business Office makes reservations to rent various types of spaces for student organizations and outside agencies, for private or public meetings, lectures, meal functions, parties, weddings, and other types of celebrations.

Graham Center Business Services The Graham Center at the Modesto A. Maidique Campus is a short distance from the major Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine locations and the home to many popular services. Since hours of operation vary and are subject to change during different times of the year, it is best to check the web site for specific hours of operation as well as more detailed descriptions of services. Some services are open evenings and during the weekends. •

Books: FIU Bookstore

http://obs.fiu.edu/services_book.html

The FIU Bookstore, operated by Barnes & Noble Booksellers, has been serving the FIU campuses for more than twenty years. The bookstore sells all required and recommended textbooks for all classes, both new and used copies when available. The price for used textbooks is approximately 25% less than new textbook prices. For convenience, medical students can order textbooks online at fiu.bncollege.com and pick them up in the store or have then shipped to the home. The bookstore will also buy textbooks back for cash during finals week. In addition to materials for classes, the FIU Bookstore also sells office and computer supplies, maintains a large inventory of popular fiction and nonfiction books and

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audio, and possesses the largest inventory of FIU spirit clothing and other FIU merchandise. The Panther Stop at the FIU Bookstore offers convenient and quick breakfast or lunch and the bookstore Café located on the second floor provides meal service. The Bookstore carries more than 30,000 titles in the general reading sections, including bestsellers, new releases, bargain books, and campus authors along with many other areas of general reading books. If the book is not in stock, the bookstore will order it. •

Toshiba Copy Center

http://obs.fiu.edu/services_cop.html

The Toshiba Copy Center at FIU provides the following business services to students, faculty and staff: copying, printing and scanning from the desktop to the Copy Center; on site creative copy and printing services; laminating; shredding; signage; posters; banners; off-line finishing and binding; and the sale of retail products such as small electronics, computer peripherals, and more.

Dining and Catering Services: Panther Dining

http://www.campusdish.com

Panther Dining is the food service provider for FIU. The administrative and culinary staff is dedicated to providing superior customer service and a variety of quality foods. Panther Dining provides of national brand restaurants including Subway, Einstein Bagels, Starbucks, Pollo Tropical, Burger King, Bustelo Café, and more. In addition, the Fresh Food Company provides cafeteria style all you can eat options featuring daily menu specials, soups, salad bar, and healthy food selections low in fat and calories, and high in fiber. Other food options on campus include the Breezeway convenience store in the Housing Quad, Camille’s Sidewalk Café at the Recreation Center, or various coffee shops located in the Green Library and the FIU Bookstore, that feature a variety of snacks, soups, salads, ready-made sandwiches, pizza, vegetables, entrees and desserts as well as made-to-order delicatessen sandwiches, ethnic dishes, low-fat and lowcarb options and specialty coffees.

Panther Catering will help cater a special on-campus function with a qualified staff that is dedicated to providing excellent food and service to make the event truly successful and memorable. Go to http://obs.fiu.edu/services_cat.html to review the catering options.

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Afrodita’s Garden

http://www.afroditasgarden.com

Afrodita’s Garden is a full service design studio that specializes in event planning for private and corporate events. Services include elaborate floral arrangements, an array of fresh-cut flowers, and intricate orchid plants. In addition to floral services, Afrodita’s Garden also sells a variety of unique gifts, such as handmade jewelry, aroma therapy incense, plush toys, greeting cards and more. For special occasions such as birthdays, anniversaries, graduation, etc., Afrodita’s Garden can make special, one of a kind floral gifts or gourmet baskets. Afrodita’s Garden also carries a special line of picture frames, desk supplies, and custom-made t-shirts. Delivery is available to both on-campus and off-campus addresses.

Santi’s Hair and Nail Salon

http://www.wavesspafiu.com/santisalon

Santi’s Hair and Nail Salon provides the following services: hair cut, hair coloring, permanent waving, hair removal, waxing, and hand and foot care. The professional team of talented stylists take care of women and men and provide the most up-todate services and products. The staff is dedicated to meet the needs of busy college students and staff. Santi’s provides gift certificates for any event such as birthdays, anniversaries, holidays, bridal showers, graduation, administrative assistant day, etc.

Waves Spa

http://www.wavesspafiu.com

The licensed staff at Waves Spa provides professional care, specializing in the Rolf Method of Structural Integration, Brennan Healing, Massage and Microdermabrasion. Students often feel overwhelmed and show signs of intense stress, anxiety, feeling trapped, difficulty sleeping, withdrawing and being overwhelmed. Research shows that massage can provide improvement with these conditions. (See the website for a full list of benefits of massage). Waves Spa has been voted “Best Massage in Miami” in 2007 & 2008 and “Best Facials in Miami” in 2008 by City Search voters. One can schedule appointments and purchase gift certificates online 24 hours a day.

University Credit Union

http://www.ucumiami.org

The University Credit Union operates as a member owned, not-for-profit, cooperative financial institution that is governed by a volunteer Board of Directors and a volunteer Supervisory Committee. Credit Unions are the only democratically controlled financial institutions in the United States The University Credit Union is in business to provide

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the best possible financial services to its members at low cost with favorable rates and overall financial assistance while in constant pursuit of excellent Service.

The University Credit Union has two FIU locations: at the Modesto A. Maidique Campus on the first floor of the Graham Center, and in the Wolfe University Center at the Biscayne Bay Campus. The University Credit Union is a full-banking center having served FIU students, faculty and staff since 1982 with a full range of financial services that include no-fee checking, savings, money market and CD accounts, as well as a notary.

FIU Athletics Florida International University’s Department of Athletics adheres to the belief that intercollegiate athletics are an integral part of the educational framework of the institution. The program exists to support and compliment the mission and goals of the University. The mission of the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics at FIU is to initiate, stimulate and continually improve the athletic and recreation programs for students by promoting academic excellence and educational leadership, assuring gender equity and cultivating diversity, and fostering and promoting personal integrity among its participants. FIU participates in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) in the following sports: football, basketball (men and women), volleyball (women), soccer (men and women), baseball (men), softball (women), tennis (women), golf (women), swimming and diving (women), cross country / track and field (men and women). FIU is a member of the Sun Belt Conference in all sports except men’s soccer (Conference USA). The Athletic Department also supports the Golden Dazzlers dance team and a cheerleader squad which is consistently one of the best in the nation. All FIU students, including medical students, pay an athletic fee as part of registration, which entitles them to attend all athletic events free of charge. To learn more about the various men’s and women’s athletic teams, view game schedules, purchase guest tickets, view the online store, as well receive game day information, visit www.fiusports.com Wear your blue and gold and show your Panther spirit!

Recreation Services The Recreation Center is located west of the University Health Services Complex, east of the U.S. Century Bank Arena, and south of the Law School. It’s convenient to those living in the residence halls and is easy walking distance from almost any or office or classroom on campus. Parking is available in the Panther Parking Garage (located north of the U.S. Century Bank Arena), and in Lot #8, just south of the building.

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The Recreation Center features: •

A two-court gym for intramural & recreational basketball, volleyball and badminton,

12,500 square feet of fitness space including free weights, resistance machines and cardio equipment

2 multipurpose group fitness rooms (for expanded fitness classes)

Large men’s and women’s locker rooms (each with over 200 day and semester lockers)

Camille’s Sidewalk Café, featuring wraps, paninis, sandwiches, smoothies and gourmet coffees

Services include: •

A diverse PantherFIT Group Fitness Class schedule of more than 30 fitness classes each week

Recreation Center Orientations offered free daily on a walk-in basis,

Body Composition Assessments using the latest in bioimpedance technology.

Exercise charts for tracking your workout routine and improvements

Friendly, supportive staff with a thorough knowledge of all equipment, always available and willing to help

Personal Training with nationally certified trainers at one of the lowest rates in the area

The Pro Shop for towel and laundry service, equipment checkout, and retail sales of energy drinks/bars, fitness accessories and locker room sundries

Cardiovascular equipment reservations 24 hours in advance

The FIU Debit Card is accepted for Pro Shop purchases and group fitness class fees

Housing and Residential Life Live. Learn. Excel. University Housing has designated several apartment-style efficiency, one-bedroom, and two bedroom units exclusively for medical students and other professional students, including law and business majors. These units typically consist of single or double suite-style apartments and some have living areas and kitchenettes. Units reserved for medical students will be primarily located in the Modesto A. Maidique

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Campus Apartments (Buildings G, H, & J). A limited number of units will accommodate married couples. Resident students benefit from convenient access to the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, the Medical Library, and on-campus research and clinical facilities. In addition, resident students have convenient access to a vast array of non-academic resources, including the main campus library, computer labs, recreation center, student health clinic, dining facilities, convenience store, dry cleaning, spa, florist, copy center, and the FIU bookstore. Also, each residential student enjoys unlimited Internet access directly from his or her room. In addition, students will have an opportunity to live in a diverse community designed to support personal growth and form life-long friendships. Rent includes utilities, high-speed internet, cable televisions, full kitchen, laundry facilities, a multipurpose lounge, computer lab, basketball court, picnic gazebo, and access to an on-campus swimming pool. For more information, please visit the FIU Housing web site at http://www.housing.fiu.edu or call 305-348-4190. Off-campus Housing. The FIU Office of Orientation Commuter Student Services provides a web site with listings of a variety of different types of living accommodations located near the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine that are currently available for rent or sale: http:// classifieds.fiu.edu. Contact the Office at 305-348-6414 for more information on offcampus housing.

Parking and Transportation Students and their guests who park a vehicle on any of the University’s campuses must register it with the FIU Department of Parking & Transportation. They must obtain a decal, hangtag, or permit and display it as prescribed by the University’s Parking Rules and Regulations. Decals must be displayed and affixed to the lower left corner of the outside rear window or bumper. Students pay a transportation access fee in their tuition, which entitles them to a decal each academic year at no additional charge. Decals may be obtained by accessing the parking website http://parking.fiu.edu, entering Panther ID, and verifying your vehicle registration information. The University assumes no liability for vehicles parked or operated on University property. The issuance of a decal or permit does not guarantee a place to park. All students residing in University Housing complexes must obtain a current housing vehicle sicker. This sticker allows the vehicle to be parked legally in student housing areas. The housing sticker should be affixed adjacent to the current student decal or on the bottom of the hangtag. Students having guests visit should pick up a housing permit from the Housing Resident office.

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A duplicate hangtag may be purchased for additionally owned vehicles. This hangtap is valid only for the vehicle under which it is registered. Hangtags are available to persons who have been issued an original decal for the semester or year. Any person who has a current decal and needs to use temporary transportation must obtain a temporary permit. Medical students are encouraged to review the University’s Parking Rules & Regulations. Students will be provided a copy of the University’s Rules & Regulations when their decal is mailed. The regulations are also posted on the Parking and Transportation website at http://parking.fiu.edu. It is the responsibility of each student to become familiar and comply with the University’s Parking & Transportation Rules & Regulations. All questions may be answered by reviewing the website, calling Parking & Transportation at (305) 348-3615, or visiting the offices in the Blue and Gold Parking Garages. Some of the most common parking violations are parking in the Executive, Administrative, or Faculty/Staff spaces, parking on the roadway, parking on the grass, parking in Housing lots without a Housing permit, and parking in loading zones without a loading permit. Students are reminded that anyone who park at meters must pay the meter even though they have a decal. Accumulation of these violations will result in the vehicle being booted or towed and a financial hold being placed on the student’s record.

The Department of Parking & Transportation provides the following services: •

Parking website, http://parking.fiu.edu, providing 24-hour-a-day access where one can order a parking decal, pay citations and appeal citations.

Public Service Aide (PSA) Program, providing transportation throughout the campus from 7 P.M. to 1 A.M.; call (305) 348-6173 to arrange transportation.

GreenRide Carpool Program – www.fiu.greenride.com, a free carpool database. Enrollment allows drivers to park closer to major buildings while helping save the environment, gas, time, and money.

Golden Panther Express Shuttle (GPE), providing low cost and convenient transportation between the UP and BBC campuses. Tickets are sold at the UP campus in offices located in the Gold Garage, Blue Garage, and Graham Center office, and sold at the BBC campus in Wolfe University Center (WUC) 353 and the information desk.

CATS Shuttle providing free transportation between various sites on the UP campus and between UP and the Engineering campus.

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The Patricia and Phillip Frost Art Museum at FIU The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum, located on the Modesto A. Maidique Campus, has gained a respected reputation for its innovative exhibitions, outstanding lecture series and educational outreach programs for South Florida’s diverse audiences. Through generous support from private donations as well as state and local government agencies, the Frost Art Museum is able to offer free admission to all exhibitions and public events. The museum In 1999, the Museum received accreditation from the American Associations of Museums (AAM) and in 2001 became an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution. Student and faculty exhibitions, an important component of the Museum’s academic function, present the work of artists who have achieved significant state and national recognition, including NEA, MacArthur, Guggenheim and Florida Visual Artist Fellowships. The Betty Laird Perry Emerging Artist Collection was established with work acquired through the Betty Laird Perry Purchase Award which is granted to selected BFA and MFA students graduating from the FIU programs in visual arts.  The Frost Art Museum complements its exhibitions with a wide range of regionally unique and nationally recognized educational programs. The Steven and Dorothea Green Critics’ Lecture Series and the Latin American & Caribbean Art Lecture Series directly connect South Florida audiences with important artists, critics and art historians living today. The Wednesday After-Hours programming is designed to complement the Museum’s exhibitions and give visitors the chance to engage with the contemporary and confront the controversial via gallery talks, films, live music and performance art. Admission is free. Visit the web site at: http://thefrost.fiu.edu/museum.htm for updated information regarding specific exhibits, special events, and updated hours of operation.

The Wolfsonian-Florida International University The Wolfsonian-FIU is a museum located in the heart of historic Miami Beach, within easy walking distance of the world-famous Art Deco hotels. Its fascinating collection of objects from the modern era (1885-1945) focuses on how art and design shape and reflect the human experience. The museum further engages the visitor by complementing its collection with thought-provoking discussions of the context and connection among its objects. Visitors are encouraged to explore the culture of the past to better understand its relevance to the present.

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Location: 1001 Washington Avenue Miami Beach, FL 33139 (At the corner of 10th Street and Washington Avenue) Tel: 305.531.1001 Fax: 305 531.2133

FIU–Biscayne Bay Campus The Biscayne Bay Campus of FIU, located in North Miami, is home to nationally and internationally recognized academic programs. The School of Hospitality and Tourism Management is responsible for the famed South Beach Wine & Food Festival held annually on Miami Beach. Anticipating the future of hospitality management, in 2006 the School opened a teaching center at the Tianjin University of Commerce in Tianjin, China. The School of Journalism and Mass Communication recently hosted the first ever New York Times Hispanic Student Journalism Institute and is the only school in the nation to offer a bilingual master’s program for students who want access to both the Spanish and English media markets. FIU offers many degrees in the College of Arts & Sciences, some of which are based on the Biscayne Bay Campus, including a stellar program in creative writing. The marine sciences program is located in a new state-of-the-art facility that is fully equipped with a marine water system that pumps water directly from the Bay into student labs. BBC has a student body of nearly 8,000 and celebrates the international and multicultural heritage of its students and faculty. Beyond the classroom, BBC offers a wide array of activities for students including many student organizations, recreational activities such as kayaking on the Bay, and a variety of academic lectures and events. Community members are ecouraged to visit this campus, attend events, and take advantage of the many educational and recreational activities open to the public. The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute holds classes every semester for interested adults, and FIU’s Office of Continuing and Professional Studies offers training programs for career advancement. The Kovens Conference Center hosts meetings, conferences and social events, and features a terrace overlooking Biscayne Bay. The Biscayne Bay Campus is located approximately 3.5 miles (a 12-15 minute commute) from Jackson North Medical Center in North Miami Beach. The BBC is approximately 32 miles northeast of the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine on the Modesto A. Maidique Campus, a 45-50 minute commute during non-rush hour traffic.

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B. College of Medicine Forms 2009-2010 Health and Safety Agreement I agree to fulfill and provide documentation of all health and safety requirements listed below. The “Immunization and Documentation” form must be submitted to the FIU University Health Services (UHS) office no later than July 1, 2009. All other requirements must be satisfied by providing documentation to the College’s Office of Student Affairs (OSA). The OSA will receive written notification from UHS regarding IM compliance status. If vaccine information or medical testing is incomplete, I agree to comply with any requirements and submit documentation to UHS as soon as possible. All tests and at least the first dose of all vaccine series must be done prior to the first day of Orientation, preferably before July 1, 2009. I also agree to comply with all annual and future health requirements that may be subsequently prescribed by the Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine designed to protect my health.

ONGOING REQUIREMENTS: 1.

TB SCREENING: I will receive a two-step Tuberculosis Skin Test (TST) and have it read 48 – 72 hours later. If the test is negative, I agree to receive another skin test placed one to two weeks later and read 48 - 72 hours after placement. If the first test is positive, I must provide documentation in the form of a chest x-ray and clearance from my personal physician. If I don’t have a personal physician, I agree to be evaluated at the FIU General Medical Clinic when I arrive for Orientation. [Note: The first TST should be done either prior to Orientation or done on August 3, 2009 at the General Medical Clinic; both tests must be done and documentation submitted no later than August 31, 2009]. Thereafter, I agree to receive a PPD annually at the FIU General Medical Clinic or by my personal physician.

2.

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY TRAINING: I will attend annual Bloodborne Pathogen training sessions and provide verification of my attendance to the OSA. The first training will be provided during Period One prior to the start of clinical activities.

3.

CPR CERTIFICATION: I agree to become certified in CPR for health providers and renew it as needed. CPR training will be provided during Orientation Week.

4.

DISABILITY INSURANCE: I will purchase the school’s designated Disability Insurance Policy during Orientation and agree to renew it annually while enrolled as a student at the FIU College of Medicine.

5.

HEALTH INSURANCE: I will purchase and maintain a health Insurance policy for the duration of my registration that meets the basic minimum requirements. I will not

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cancel this policy unless I provide proof of coverage to the Office of Student Affairs under an alternate acceptable policy. I will verify this coverage using the “Health Insurance Verification” form and submit to the OSA. 6.

INFLUENZA VACCINE: I agree to receive the influenza vaccine annually or sign a waiver.

7.

TETANUS VACCINE: I have received one Tdap dose within the past two years and thereafter I agree to remain current with my tetanus vaccination requirements.

INCOMPLETE IMMUNIZATION SERIES – PREMATRICULATION REQUIREMENTS (Submit all documents to UHS 1.

HEPATITIS B: I agree to receive at least the first dose prior to Orientation and all three doses no later than Jan. 10, 2010, if the complete series is not documented. Alternatively, I will provide serologic evidence of hepatitis B immunity prior to Orientation or after I have been vaccinated with the complete hepatitis B series (month/day/year) administered within current CDC guidelines on or before January 10, 2010.

2.

VARICELLA: I will provide proof that I have been vaccinated with TWO doses of varicella vaccine done 30-45 days apart or proof of serologic evidence of varicella immunity. If no documentation of the two doses, I will receive the first dose prior to Orientation and agree to have the second dose no later than Sept. 30, 2009.

3.

MENINGITIS: The Menactra vaccine is strongly recommended and I agree to receive the one dose of vaccine prior to Orientation or sign the appropriate waiver during Orientation Week.

I understand the consequences for non-compliance as described in the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Student Handbook which may include being placed on Administrative Leave of Absence and/or inability to participate in clinical education courses until compliance is documented which may delay my graduation and/or lead to my dismissal.

Name (please PRINT):________________________________________________________

Signed:_____________________________________ Date:__________________________

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Annual Health Insurance Verification Form PART A: Student Information Name: ____________________________________________________________________ Please select:

Male

Female

Date of Birth: _ ______________________

Have you enrolled in the FIU Student Health insurance plan? _ _____________________ YES, proceed to Part C below NO, please complete Parts B & C below

PART B: Insurance Policy Information Name of Insurance Company: ________________________________________________ Policy #:___________________________________________ Group #:_________________ Type of Insurance:

PPO

HMO

Indemnity

Other

Unknown

Effective Date:_________________End Date (unless renewed):______________________ Name of Insured or policy holder: _ ____________________________________________ Relationship to student_______________________________________________________

Part C: Verification and Statement of Financial Responsibility Verification of your insurance coverage may be made in the following ways: • Photocopy of valid insurance card (Attach copy to this document and submit) • Photocopy of your insurance policy that demonstrates uninterrupted coverage for this timeframe I, ____________________________________________, hereby certify that I am personally covered by health insurance or an equivalent health care plan as required by the Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine. If the College determines that the above coverage does not comply with the basic health insurance requirement, I understand and agree that the College may charge my University account for health insurance coverage, and I agree to pay all such charges in accordance with University policy. I understand and agree that I will be responsible for any and all charges for health care services regardless of whether or not covered by insurance or equivalent plan. I

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further understand and agree that the College and all of its representatives will not be responsible for paying for or providing any medical/hospital care or health insurance coverage for me. The above information is requested for the purpose of compliance with the health insurance requirement for medical students. The information will only be used by the Office of Student Affairs for the purpose of identifying and evaluating health care financial responsibility information in accordance with established requirements and will not be released to any party outside the College or its affiliates without my written permission, except as permitted by law. I understand and agree that I must complete this form at the start of each academic year and whenever my health insurance coverage changes for any reason. Signature:__________________________________________ Print Name:_ _______________________________________ Date:___________________ DEADLINE: JULY 1 Annually Please return this completed form to: Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Office of Student Affairs – Insurance Verification 11200 SW 8th St., HLS II 660W2 Miami, FL 33199 Phone: (305) 348-0644 Fax: (305) 348-0650 http://medicine.fiu.edu

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C. Health Information Meningitis Information & Vaccination Waiver Meningitis is an infection of the fluid of a person’s spinal cord and the fluid that surrounds the brain. People sometimes refer to it as spinal meningitis. Meningitis is usually caused by a viral or bacterial infection. Knowing whether meningitis is caused by a virus or bacterium is important because the severity of illness and the treatments differ. Viral meningitis is generally less severe and resolves without specific treatment, while bacterial meningitis can be quite severe and may result in brain damage, hearing loss, learning disability, or death. For bacterial meningitis, it is also important to know which strain of bacteria is causing the meningitis because antibiotics can prevent some types from spreading and infecting other people. Neisseria meningitidis (also called meningococcal meningitis) is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis. What are the signs and symptoms of meningitis? Common Triad of symptoms: high fever, headache and stiff neck. These symptoms can develop over several hours, or they may take 1-2 days. Other symptoms include nausea, vomiting, skin rash, discomfort looking into light, confusion, and sleepiness. How is meningitis diagnosed? Early diagnosis and treatment are very important. If symptoms occur, the patient should see a doctor immediately. The diagnosis is usually made in the laboratory from a sample of spinal fluid. The spinal fluid is obtained by performing a spinal tap, in which a needle is inserted into an area in the lower back where fluid in the spinal canal is readily accessible. Test results from the spinal fluid can identify if the cause is viral or bacterial and, if the latter, may help determine the selection of antibiotics most effective in treatment. Can meningitis be treated? Bacterial meningitis can be treated with a number of effective antibiotics. It is important, however, that treatment be started early in the course of the disease. Appropriate antibiotic treatment of most common types of bacterial meningitis should reduce the risk of dying from meningitis to below 15%, although the risk is higher among the elderly. Is meningitis contagious? Yes, bacterial meningitis is highly contagious. The bacteria are spread through the exchange of respiratory and throat secretions (i.e., coughing, kissing). Fortunately, none of the bacteria that cause meningitis are as contagious as things like the common cold or the flu, and they are not spread by casual contact or by simply breathing the air where a person with meningitis has been. However, sometimes the bacteria that cause meningitis have spread to other people who have had close or prolonged contact with a patient

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with meningitis. People in the same household or day-care center, or anyone sharing a bathroom or having direct contact with a patient’s oral secretions (such as a boyfriend or girlfriend) would be considered at increased risk of acquiring the infection. People who qualify as close contacts of a person with meningitis caused by N. meningitidis should receive antibiotics immediately to prevent them from getting the disease. Are there vaccines against meningitis? Yes, there are vaccines that protect against some strains of N. meningitidis but there are no vaccines to protect against viral forms. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that all people at risk should receive one dose of the conjugate vaccine (Menactra) whenever possible. This is particularly true for college students who are under the age of 25 and live in close quarters with others or someone who has had his/her spleen removed; these are two groups who have an increased risk of acquiring meningococcal infection relative to other persons their age. To learn more about meningitis and the vaccine, please contact a physician or visit the CDC web site at www.cdc.gov.

WAIVER OF LIABILITY: I have read the information above pertaining to meningitis. I understand the risks involved and I decline to receive the meningitis vaccine.

______________________________________________________________________________________ Last Name

First Name

D.O.B.

____________________________________________________________________________ Signature of student (or parent/legal guardian, if under 18 years of age)

Date

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Hepatitis B Information & Vaccination Waiver Hepatitis B is a serious infectious disease caused by a virus that attacks the liver. The hepatitis B virus (HBV) can cause life-long infection that may lead to cirrhosis (scarring) of the liver, liver cancer, liver failure, or death. There is no cure for hepatitis B, but the infection can be prevented by vaccination. Symptoms of the Disease Symptoms of hepatitis B can resemble the flu and may include fever, loss of appetite, low energy, joint pain, cramping, or nausea and vomiting, as well as jaundice (yellow skin or eyes). However, in about 50 percent of cases, hepatitis B causes no symptoms and some of these become chronic carriers who are able to transmit the disease to others. Transmission of the Disease Hepatitis B is contagious and spreads when the blood or other body fluids of a person with the virus are absorbed into an individual’s blood stream. The hepatitis B virus can live in all body fluids of an infected person, including blood, saliva, semen, and vaginal fluids. It can enter the body through cuts, tears, or abrasions in the skin and through mucous membranes of the mouth, vagina, anus, and eyes. Hepatitis B can be transmitted through sexual contact; by sharing razors, toothbrushes, shared needles for drug injection, or by getting a tattoo or body piercing using non-sterile instruments or needles. Risk Factors for Hepatitis B Anyone who comes in contact with the blood or body fluids of an infected person is at risk for hepatitis B. Certain behaviors can increase the risk, including unprotected sex (vaginal, anal, and oral); contact sports (sports during which players may be exposed to each other’s blood or saliva); getting a tattoo or body piercing; sharing items such as razors, earrings, and toothbrushes; sharing injection drug paraphernalia; travel abroad to areas where the disease is widespread; health care and other occupations that involve exposure to infected blood or body fluids, and household contact with someone with chronic infection. Vaccination Recommendations for College Students A vaccine is available to help protect against hepatitis B. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends vaccination of everyone age 18 and under, and anyone at high risk for hepatitis B. The American College Health Association (ACHA) recommends that all college students be vaccinated and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) recommends that all student athletes be vaccinated. The hepatitis B vaccine is safe and effective. You cannot get the disease from the vaccine. The most common side effect of the vaccine is soreness at the site of the injection. Vaccination

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requires a series of three shots over a six-month period. After that, a booster shot is usually not necessary. The vaccine is effective in protecting more than 96 percent of those who complete the three-dose vaccination series. Other Forms of Prevention In addition to vaccination, people can modify their behavior by using condoms during sex and avoiding tattooing and body piercing with non-sterile instruments or techniques. People should also avoid sharing needles, razors, or toothbrushes. For more information about Hepatitis B and other infectious diseases To learn more about hepatitis B and the vaccine, please contact your physician or visit the CDC web site at www.cdc.gov, or contact University Health Services (www.fiu. edu/~health) to receive the vaccine.

WAIVER OF LIABILITY: I have read the information above pertaining to hepatitis B. I understand the risks involved and I decline to receive the hepatitis B vaccine.

______________________________________________________________________________________ Last Name

First Name

D.O.B.

____________________________________________________________________________ Signature of student (or parent/legal guardian, if under 18 years of age)

Date

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D. Academic Calendar Subject to Change

Orientation Week August 3 – August 7, 2009 White Coat Ceremony August 7, 2009 Period 1 (Foundations) August 10, 2009 – March 19, 2010 Period 1 - Educational Block 1 August 10 - October 6, 2009 − Genes Molecules and Cells − CM: Doctor Patient Communication, Patient History, Physical Exam − PD: Epidemiology and Biostatistics − M&S: Ethical Foundations of Medicine Labor Day Holiday, University Closed September 7, 2009 Period 1 - Educational Block 2 October 8 - December 4, 2009 − Structure and Function − PD: Epidemiology and Evidence Based Medicine − M&S: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Health Veteran’s Day Holiday, University Closed November 11, 2009 Thanksgiving Holiday, University Closed November 26-27, 2009 Period 1 - Educational Block 3 December 7 - March 19 − Microbiology and Infection − CM: Doctor Patient Communication, Patient History, Physical Exam − PD: Preparation for Medicine and Society − M&S: Intro to Social Medicine, Health Disparities Winter Holiday, University Closed December 24-25, 2009 New Year’s Holiday, University Closed December 31, 2009, January 1, 2010 Period 1 - Educational Block 4 January 13 - February 19, 2010 − Cellular and General Pathology and Immunology − CM: Doctor Patient Communication, Patient History, Physical Exam − PD: Preparation for Medicine and Society (continued) M&S: Intro to Social Medicine, Health Disparities (continued) Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday, University Closed January 18, 2010 Period 1 - Educational Block 5 February 22 - March 19, 2010 − Basic Pharmacology − CM: Doctor Patient Communication, Patient History, Physical Exam − PD: Preparation for Medicine and Society (continued) − M&S: Intro to Social Medicine, Health Disparities (continued) Exam Week / Vacation March 22-25, 2010

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Period 2– Session 1 March 29, 2010 - June 18, 2010 (Integrated Organ Systems) Period 2 - Educational Block 1 March 29- April 19, 2010 − Hematopoietic & Lymphoreticular Systems − CM: Physical Diagnosis of Organ Systems − PD: Health Systems − M&S: Community Partnerships Period 2 - Educational Block 2 April 20- May 13/14, 2010 − Endocrine Systems − CM: Physical Diagnosis of Organ Systems − PD: Health Systems − M&S: Community Partnerships Period 2 - Educational Block 3 May 17- June 11, 2010 − Reproductive Systems − CM: Physical Diagnosis of Organ Systems − PD: Health Systems − M&S: Community Partnerships Memorial Day Holiday, University Closed May 31, 2010 Period 2 - Educational Block 4 June 13- June 18, 2010 − Competency Evaluation − CM: Physical Diagnosis of Organ Systems − PD: Health Systems M&S: Community Partnerships Vacation (aproximates dates) June 19- August 1, 2010 Period 2 (Session 2 – MS 2) August, 2010 – March, 2011 Independence Day Holiday, University Closed July 4, 2010 Labor Day Holiday, University Closed September 6, 2010 Veteran’s Day Holiday, University Closed November 11, 2010 Thanksgiving Holiday, University Closed November 25-26, 2010 Winter Holiday, University Closed December 24-25, 2010 New Year’s Holiday December 31, 2010- January 1, 2011 Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday, University Closed January 17, 2011 Vacation March 5- 27, 2011 Period 3 Memorial Day Holiday, University Closed Independence Day Holiday, University Closed Labor Day Holiday, University Closed Veteran’s Day Holiday, University Closed

March, 2011 - June, 2012 May 30, 2011 July 4, 2011 September 5, 2011 November 11, 2011

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Thanksgiving Holiday, University Closed Winter Holiday, University Closed Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday, University Closed Vacation

November 24-25, 2011 December 26, 2011 January 16, 2012 March, 2012

NOTE: USMLE Part I must be taken by the end of Period 3.

Period 4 Memorial Day Holiday, University Closed Independence Day Holiday, University Closed Labor Day Holiday, University Closed Veteran’s Day Holiday, University Closed Thanksgiving Holiday, University Closed Winter Holiday, University Closed Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday, University Closed Memorial Day Holiday, University Closed

June, 2012 - May, 2013 May 28, 2012 July 4, 2012 September 3, 2012 November 12, 2012 November 22-23, 2012 December 24-25, 2012 January 21, 2013 May 27, 2013

NOTE: USMLE Part II (CK and CS) must be taken prior to graduation.

Dates subject to change. Check your course syllabus and the College’s web site (http://medicine.fiu.edu) for the latest academic schedule.

KEY: CM PD

Clinical Medicine Strand Professional Development Strand

M&S

Medicine and Society Strand

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Calendar of Religious Holidays (Catholic, Episcopalian, Jewish, Lutheran, Muslim and Orthodox Christian religious groups) Religious Observance Rosh Hashanah Yom Kippur Sukkot Shemini Atzeret & Simchat Torah Passover Shavuot Ramadan begins Eid al-Fitr Ash Wednesday Purim Holy Thursday Good Friday Holy Saturday Easter Sunday Eid al-Adha Hanukah Christmas

2009 Sept 19-20 Sept 28 Oct 3-9

2010 Sept 9-10 Sept 18 Oct 23-29

2011 Sept 29-30 Oct 8 Oct 13-19

2012 Sept 17-18 Sept 26 Oct 1-7

Oct 10-11 Apr 9-15 May 29 Aug 22 Sept 20 Feb 25 Mar 10-11 Apr 9 Apr 10 Apr 11 Apr 12 Nov 27 Dec 12-19 Dec 25

Sept 30-Oct 1 Mar 30- Apr 5 May 19 Aug 12 Sept 10 Feb 17 Feb 28- Mar 1 Apr 1 Apr 2 Apr 3 Apr 4 Nov 17 Dec 2-9 Dec 25

Oct 20-21 Apr 19-25 June 8 Aug 1 Aug 31 Mar 9 Mar 20-21 Apr 21 Apr 22 Apr 23 Apr 24 Nov 7 Dec 21-28 Dec 25

Oct 8-9 Apr 7-13 May 27 July 21 Aug 19 Feb 22 Mar 8-9 Apr 5 Apr 6 Apr 7 Apr 8 Oct 26 Dec 9-16 Dec 25

Source: www.when-is.com

NOTE: - Jewish and Muslim holidays begin at sunset on the day preceding the given date.

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E. Flow charts

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NOTES

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I acknowledge receipt of the policies and procedures contained in the Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Student Handbook. By signing this statement, I agree to abide by all the policies and procedures contained therein and any amendments that may occur from time to time. I understand that the College will periodically review its policies and procedures in order to serve the needs of the University and the College and to respond to mandates of the Florida Legislature, the Florida Board of Governors, the Florida International University Board of Trustees, the federal government, and other regulatory and accrediting agencies. The Florida International University and the College reserve the right to change, rescind, or include additional policies and procedures in the College’s Student Handbook. I understand that such changes may occur without notice and that I agree to periodically check the online version of the College Student Handbook located at http://medicine.fiu.edu for the latest version.

______________________________________________________________________________________ Signature Date

____________________________________________________________________________ Print Name

________________________________ FIU Panther ID (provided by consent) Return this signed form to the Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Office of Student Affairs by the end of Orientation Week. Your Registration will not be complete until this signed form is returned.Thank you!


FIU Spirit FIU Fight Song We are the Panthers of FIU The Golden Panthers of FIU We will continue to fight With all of our might For victory, for gold and blue We stand together and proudly say Our Golden Panthers go all the way We’ll always strive for victory Blue-blooded through and through ‘Cause we’re FIU Go “F”! Go “I”! Go “U”! Go “FIU”! Panthers fight! Panthers fight! Panthers fight! ________________________________________

FIU Alma Mater Hail to thee dear FIU With voices true we pledge to thee All our love and our devotion Humble faith and loyalty We will strive for understanding and for peace and unity We will search for truth and wisdom We will always honor thee FIU alma mater Hail hail to thee


FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Student Handbook  

FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Student Handbook (Updated 8-11-2009)

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