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The Fitzwilliam Museum: 2 July – 3 November Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology: 2 July – 28 September

Exhibition Discover the extraordinary 6,000-year history of African hair combs in this joint exhibition between the Fitzwilliam Museum and Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology, Cambridge. Material culture on display includes hundreds of remarkable combs – from pre-dynastic Egypt to modern-day black fist combs referencing the Black Power Movement – as well as associated images and sculpture showing the wide variety of hair styles found in Africa and around the world. There will be a special area for digital interaction, personal stories about hair combs and African type hair, plus live demonstrations of contemporary styling practices. Origins of the Afro Comb is part of Black History Matters - the Fitzwilliam Museum’s programme of events promoting the importance of Black history. It also complements celebrations for Black History Month every October and forms part of the University of Cambridge Museums Connecting Collections programme, funded by Arts Council England. Exhibition generously supported by

The Monument Trust Heritage Lottery Fund Arts Council England The Marlay Group The Art Fund


EVENTS PROGRAMME Talks Free Wednesday 10 July 13.15 - 14.00 The Fitzwilliam Museum An introduction to Origins of the Afro Comb Sally-Ann Ashton, Assistant Keeper of Antiquities, The Fitzwilliam Museum Wednesday 28 August 13.15 - 14.00 The Fitzwilliam Museum ‘No Smiling Please’: Northcote Thomas’ ethnographic portraits of southern Nigeria Jocelyn Dudding, Photographic Collections Manager, Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology Saturdays 6 July & 14 September 14.00 - 16.00 The Fitzwilliam Museum Natural hair past & present Sandra Gittens, Author and Lecturer with a specialism in African Caribbean Hair Saturday 13 July 14.00 - 16.00 Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology Afro picks and hot iron combs modern black hair styling Michael McMillan, Freelance Writer, Artist and Curator Saturday 3 August 14.00 - 16.00 The Fitzwilliam Museum Press and curl: Imitating or embracing fashion Sandra Gittens, Author and Lecturer with a specialism in African Caribbean Hair


Saturday 21 September 14.00 - 16.00 Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology Good Hair/Bad Hair: Black hair culture, style and politics Michael McMillan, Freelance Writer, Artist and Curator Saturday 12 October 14.00 - 16.00 The Fitzwilliam Museum The use of wigs and extensions in Afro hairdressing June Forbes, Freelance Hairdresser and Afro Hair Consultant Presented as part of Black History Month

Drop-In Free unless otherwise stated Tuesday 13 August 13.15 The Fitzwilliam Museum Art Speak Enjoy half an hour looking at and talking about art in the Origins of the Afro Comb exhibition. Meet at Courtyard Entrance Tuesdays 16 July & 6 August 14.00 - 16.00 Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology Hair braiding demos Join us in the Origins of the Afro Comb exhibition at the Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology for demonstrations of styling and braiding by expert hairdresser Lorraine Dublin.


Saturday 13 July • 14.00 - 16.00 The Fitzwilliam Museum Thursday 18 July • 14.00 - 16.00 Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology Saturdays 10 & 17 August • 14.00 - 16.00 The Fitzwilliam Museum Saturday 14 September • 12.00 - 14.00 Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology Saturday 12 October • 12.00 - 14.00 The Fitzwilliam Museum Presented as part of Black History Month Object handling sessions An opportunity to look in more detail at some of the pieces in the Origins of the Afro Comb exhibition.

Saturdays 20 July & 24 August 14.00 - 16.00 The Fitzwilliam Museum Black hair stories Hear a selection of personal audio recordings about black hair, collected for the Origins of the Afro Comb website. In response to the recordings join discussions on topics such as cultural politics and iconic moments, including: my first hair style, bad hair days and gericurl nightmares. Attendees will be invited to bring in a personal hair styling product/instrument and to share oral histories about their own hair experiences. Workshop led by Michael McMillan, Freelance Writer, Artist and Curator. Booking essential. T   o register your interest please contact 01223 332904 or email fitzmuseumeducation@lists.cam. ac.uk. Places will be confirmed on receipt of payment.


Saturdays 27 July & 17 August 14.00 - 16.00 The Fitzwilliam Museum How to braid hair Learn hair braiding and cornrow techniques with Portia Louis, who has over 10 years experience working with natural African type hair. Suitable for people who have no practice at plaiting and those who want to build upon what they already know. £5 per person. Booking essential.   To register your interest please contact 01223 332904 or email fitzmuseumeducation@lists.cam.ac.uk. Places will be confirmed on receipt of payment.

Young People and Families Tuesday 30 July 10.30 - 12.30 The Fitzwilliam Museum Ages 5 - 7 (children must be accompanied by an adult) Bring your own comb! Bring your own comb and join us for a hunt around the Origins of the Afro Comb exhibition. K.N. Chimbiri, author of the exhibition’s children’s book, will reveal fascinating and beautiful combs used over generations. £5 per child. Booking essential. To register your interest please contact 01223 332904 or email fitzmuseumeducation@lists.cam.ac.uk. Places will be confirmed on receipt of payment.


Tuesday 30 July • Ages 8 - 11 (accompanied by an adult) Wednesday 31 July • Ages 12+ 13.30 - 16.45 Starts at the Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology and ends at The Fitzwilliam Museum African comb workshop Discover 6,000 years of art & culture through the fascinating and beautiful combs on display in the Origins of the Afro Comb exhibition, followed by a practical hands-on activity. Led by K.N. Chimbiri, author of the exhibition’s children’s book. £5 per child. Booking essential. To register your interest please contact 01223 332904 or email fitzmuseumeducation@lists.cam.ac.uk. Places will be confirmed on receipt of payment.


Special Events Presented to coincide with Black History Month 28 September 14.00 - 16.00 The Fitzwilliam Museum Kickin’ it with the Kinks A special screening of this symbolic film, which explores the complexities of haircare among women of African descent. Followed by Q&A with Cynthia Butare (film Producer) and Mundia Situmbeko (co-founder of Blackgirlflow). Free. Admission is by token, 1 per person, available at Courtyard Entrance desk from 12.00 on the day.

October 2013 (Date TBC) Alexander Crummell Lecture The first annual lecture on African history and culture in honour of Alexander Crummell – an American minister and son of a freed enslaved African. Special guest speaker to be announced. Free, for more details visit: www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk


FREE ADMISSION Opening Hours Fitzwilliam Museum and Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology Tuesday - Saturday 10.00 - 17.00 Sundays & Bank Holiday 26 August 12.00 - 17.00 CLOSED: Mondays (except Bank Holiday Mondays)

How to get here By Rail The nearest railway station is Cambridge (approx. 20 mins walk), with taxis and frequent buses to the city centre. Frequent services from London (Kings Cross 50 minutes non-stop), Stansted Airport (30 mins) and the Midlands: http://ojp.nationalrail.co.uk/service/planjourney/search By Bus The Uni 4 bus to and from Madingley Road Park & Ride and Addenbrooke’s Hospital stops outside the Fitzwilliam Museum (Mon-Fri). http://www.stagecoachbus.com/localdefault.aspx?Tag=Cambridge By Car The area around the Museums is subject to vehicle restrictions and it is advisable not to travel in by car, where possible. Nearest Car Parks: Grand Arcade off Downing Street, or Queen Anne, Gonville Place. Park and Ride information: www.parkandride.net/ cambridge/cambridge_frameset.shtml More visitor information about Cambridge www.visitcambridge.org

The Fitzwilliam Museum Trumpington Street • Cambridge • CB2 1RB Tel: 01223 332900 • Email: fitzmuseum-enquiries@lists.cam.ac.uk www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk

Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology Downing Street • Cambridge • CB2 3DZ Tel: 01223 333516 • Email: admin@maa.cam.ac.uk www.maa.cam.ac.uk


Origins of the Afro Comb