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WWW.FITZHUGH.CA | OCTOBER 10, 2019 | SINGLE COPY FREE

PG.2

MEET YOUR CANDIDATES

PG.9

RETURN OF THE REFS

PG.20-21 WHAT’S ON: JASPER


Introducing your YELLOWHEAD CANDIDATES FUCHSIA DRAGON PUBLISHER@FITZHUGH.CA It is now less than two weeks until Canadians head to the polls for the federal election. Here are your choices in Jasper, as a part of the Yellowhead constituency, for who you can vote for on October 21 to be your new representative in parliament.

GREEN PARTY Angelena Satdeo

PEOPLE’S PARTY OF CANADA (PPC) Douglas Galavan

VETERANS COALITION PARTY OF CANADA Gordon Francey

CONSERVATIVE Gerald Soroka

Who is Conservative Candidate Gerald Soroka? Gerald Soroka is a third generation Yellowhead county resident and is proud of his roots in rural Alberta. Gerald resides on a farm north of Evansburg on the original homestead his grandparents settled in 1930. Having spent his life on his family’s farm, Gerald understands the importance of hard work. He understands the issues facing farmers and rural Albertans because he is one. Having served for almost 12 years as the Mayor of Yellowhead County, Gerald has experience finding solutions to rural issues. In addition, Gerald previously served as the Vice President and President of the West Central Forage Association, as well as the Vice President of the Alberta Forage Council. As the former Mayor of Yellowhead County, Gerald understands how hard it can be for Albertans to get ahead without the government making it more difficult. Gerald Soroka is running to champion the residents of Yellowhead. To learn more about Gerald visit geraldsoroka.com or contact his campaign office at info@geraldsoroka. com or 780 600-0171. A federal election forum will take place at the Legion on October 15 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. The forum has been organized by 21-year-old Jasperite Simon Golla. Confirmed so far to attend are the Conservative, PPC, Veterans Coalition Party of Canada and Libertarian candidates.

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Angelena Satdeo is a multi-faceted artist, educator, academic and dedicated yogini who has had the honour of living in Canadian cities from Victoria to Quebec. This national exposure fostered a deep commitment and passion for the amelioration and upliftment of life in Canada for all Canadians. The child of Guyanese immigrants, Angelena arrived in Edmonton, Alberta, as a six-month old baby. As a woman of colour, Angelena is cognizant of the challenges that come with being part of a marginalized or racialized group, and is a champion of the underdog. She is keen to help those who are often forgotten by mainstream political voices and determined to help create a better life for all Canadians. Five years ago, she completed her Master’s in Education from O.I.S.E. with a focus on Holistic Education. Upon completion, Angelena opened a plant based community home, yoga and meditation space in Edmonton. Her centre has provided affordable housing and mentorship for people of various backgrounds as well as art, yoga and music events. Her vision for a green Canada is bold. Angelena is a devoted supporter of local food movements and organic farm practices. As a rural riding, Yellowhead currently faces challenges including heavy rains, polluted lakes and a shortage of new and innovative industry. Angelena would love to get green and integral energy projects moving in central Alberta, as well as cultivate and support the local zero waste movements. Alberta has a remarkable history with the land. Let’s focus on soil rejuvenation and the abundance of farming possibilities. By including the vital indigenous voices we are able to draw from a broader perspective and community and start new and powerful conversations, and truly create change for all. Angelena believes the time is now to build an equitable, sustainable and prosperous economy.

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Douglas Galavan is the second youngest from a large farming family of six children and was raised in the rural Calmar area. He is educated as a Mechanical Engineer Technologist and moved to Drayton Valley in 1990, where he has been a business owner, operator for 29 years. Douglas and his wife, Christina of 32 years, have four grown children and have recently been blessed with a daughter-in-law and two grandchildren. While raising his family, he was involved in the community and all the children’s activities; sports, dance and theatre and has been running the Edmonton Screen Writer’s Group for the past five years. More recently, Douglas is one of the founding members of Rally Canada; a non-profit, non-partisan, advocacy group that has been active in the Pro-Pipeline rallies and an instrumental part in facilitating the First Nations and Metis Groups of Alberta to help stop the Big Horn proposal last winter. The main reason I’m running is that I can no longer stand by and watch as my town and community, other communities in the Yellowhead riding and in Alberta continue to face increased economic hardship under our current government’s policies. I intend to bring a much sharper focus on our economy and on much needed economic recovery in Yellowhead. I also have a plan to work with our provincial government counterparts, along with all municipalities in the riding, focusing on economic recovery while looking ahead to future economic planning and development to strengthen and expand the economies of these regions. People should vote for me because, as a business owner for many years, I know that funds are finite and I know that these funds come from you, the taxpayer, and are too precious to waste. I realize that without a strong Alberta economy you can not expect people to support local businesses, to support things like tourism and to earn incomes to support the many public services necessary for all Canadians such as healthcare and education. It’s hard for Yellowheadians to plan a vacation to the mountains when you they can’t feed their families and are losing their homes.

Gordon Francey, retired Leading Seaman, a husband and father. My wife Josephine and I have two children ages six and eight. Like others before me, my father, his father, I signed on the dotted line and served 14 years in the Canadian Military both land and sea, Reserve and Regular forces. I was a member of a Lions Club for over 15 years and volunteered for Habitat for Humanity. I am currently employed in the Information Technology field. I was asked why I chose to get involved with politics and specifically this party. The answer is really quite simple. I do this for both my children and yours. All children deserve a future where they can grow and learn and play without fear or prejudice. They are our future and it is our duty to not only protect that future but to ensure it will always be there for them. I have always been aware of politics throughout my life but never thought I would actively participate. As time went by I saw more and more broken promises by whoever was in power, always doing what benefited themselves and their reelection, never the people as a whole. All politicians need to be held accountable. For that to happen, something has to change. Whoever sits in Ottawa will never initiate that change, why would they? It doesn’t benefit them. Change can only happen when you look in a new direction. VCP is that new direction. I would be honoured to serve you faithfully and openly, with an open-door policy to hear your advice and concerns.

LIBERAL Jeremy Hoefsloot LIBERTARIAN Cory Lystang NDP Kristine Bowman All seven Yellowhead candidates were contacted for biographies and photographs for this feature. Some of these submitted bios have been shortened in length but not edited in any other way.


Legal and budgetary implications of changing the roles of peace officers in Jasper were presented to council by licensing and enforcement manager Neil Jones on Tuesday. | F. Dragon photo

Debate continues on Peace Officer status FUCHSIA DRAGON PUBLISHER@FITZHUGH.CA

The future of Peace Officer status in Jasper is still to be decided. Licensing and enforcement manager Neil Jones returned to council this week with answers to their questions on legal and budgetary implications of training officers to a higher level or changing their designation to Municipal Compliance Officers. One or the other will have to happen as in Alberta the level that Jasper’s officers are currently trained at is being phased out. The change is coming about following findings from a public inquiry into the death of an on-duty peace officer in Alberta. This week, Sergeant Rick Bidaisee, commander of the Jasper RCMP detachment, wrote a letter to council. Bidaisee said the municipal enforcement services FEDERAL ELECTION

play “an integral role not only in bylaw compliance but also in enhancing road safety through enforcement, education and visibility”. He said municipal enforcement provides “the most complimentary service to our local detachment and the community of Jasper”. Councillor Bert Journault said he was “disturbed” that Bidaisee “indicated bylaw is supporting the RCMP”. “I think they should be clearly separated,” he said. Councillors Paul Butler and Jenna McGrath said they were not ready to make a decision on the designation yet, Butler said the council should look at strategic policy first and McGrath said they needed “many more hours to discuss this and look to the scope of procedures and the levels of service”. But Mayor Richard Ireland did not agree. He said strategic policy and the safety of officers are two distinct issues.

“I think this is a safety issue for our staff and even if in the end we come to the conclusion that we should have only Municipal Compliance Officers and no Community Peace Officers, which is potentially the outcome, how do we properly train and equip those officers?” he said. “This is a dangerous occupation. “It doesn’t matter what we call them, we are now aware of the dangers and we have to consider best practises regardless of what our strategic process is. “I am prepared to deal with safety issues at the earliest opportunity.” McGrath agreed that municipal staff should be safe but encouraged Jones to put additional safety needs into the department’s budget. “If any department needed to upgrade something to be in line with best policies to take care of staff, the department should have the ability to take care of whatever those needs are,” she said.

M O N D AY, O C TO B E R 21

#ItsOurVote

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Can’t vote on election day? If you think you’ll be away or too busy on October 21, you can vote early: Q Q Q

At your assigned advance polling station from October 11 to 14 At any Elections Canada office before October 15, 6:00 p.m. By mail – apply by October 15, 6:00 p.m.

Check your voter information card for all the ways you can vote. Visit elections.ca for the official information you need to vote 1-800-463-6868

elections.ca

TTY 1-800-361-8935

J A S P ER , A B

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The watercolour group meets for a week in May and two weeks in September, painting different Jasper views each day. | Supplied photos

Jasper in watercolour FUCHSIA DRAGON PUBLISHER@FITZHUGH.CA

Artists from across Canada spent last week in Jasper to paint our scenic views. Jasper Watercolour Retreat society, a non-profit group, has brought artists to the park for 25 years. They meet for a week in May and two weeks in September, based at Tekarra Lodge, to paint a different view each day as a group. Tom Phillips, president of the society, said: “When we are painting we often paint alone so we can get a reinvigoration from this and turn back into painting. “With seeing new techniques it’s a chance to think, ‘I’ll go home and try that.’” Phillips said all the artists are open and friendly and happy to share techniques. “We are a group of likeminded artists at various levels,” he said “Usually not raw beginners but intermediate and some people paint professionally, most of us not. “We try to stay relatively close together and often encourage people who are less experienced to stay a bit behind and look over shoulders to get a way of doing things.” Some of the artists at the retreat, including Hinton’s Sam Wilson, have work shown at the Jasper Artists Guild. The group last week painted locations including Edith Cavell, Medicine Lake, Snaring River and Cottonwood Slough. Judith Lam, from Vancouver, said: “This is my first time here and it has been amazing, better than I realized. “People here are so helpful, just so open and very willing to share.” Lam said she signed up for the retreat when a friend from a studio in Vancouver recommended it. She said: “The scenery is stunning. It is a wonderful experience, I highly recommend it if you love nature.” And for Anne McCartney, from Edmonton, it was her first retreat after taking a few years break. She said: “I love going outside constantly and it’s an escape from all the things from home. “I love going out as a group and painting as a group and it’s supportive.” Jasper Watercolour Retreat is run by volunteers. “Without them we couldn’t do it,” said Phillips.

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NEWS BITES

Jasper Trustee Dale Karpluk visited Jasper Elementary School with GYPSD superintendent Carolyn Lewis. | Supplied photo

A 23-year-old tourist who was reported missing in August has been found dead. Zexin “Joe” Yue was last seen at the Jasper Shell on August 19 when he was dropped off by a bus. He was reported missing August 25. RCMP confirmed they had found Yue, deceased, in an official release on Tuesday. Since August, Jasper RCMP have been helped by Parks Canada visitor safety employees, dog services, air services and the Edmonton Police missing persons service, and a number of areas including Brazeau Loop and Bald Hills were searched. Police said there is no indication that his death is criminal and no further media information will be provided.

Back to school

Jasper schools were visited by the superintendent of the Grande Yellowhead Public School Division and its trustees. Superintendent Carolyn Lewis is spending October visiting schools across the region, including Jasper, Grande Cache, Edson and Fulham. She said: “The instructional practices and the focused learning taking place from one end of the jurisdiction to the other are second to none. “It is an honour to showcase our schools to the Board where they personally see how GYPSD educators not only do their job well but are willing to go above and beyond - every day - to ensure that every student at a Grande Yellowhead school is successful.”

Smoked out

As part of the wildfire fuel reduction activities that were completed in Jasper National Park this past year, debris piles are now being burned at different locations throughout the park. Expect smoke in the air this fall along the Icefield Parkway and Highway 93A, approximately eight kilometres from the town of Jasper, as well as in Maligne Lake area. Burning will only be permitted on days when conditions are safe and will minimize smoke production. Parks Canada said in a press release: “Safety is our top priority. The safety of people, facilities and surrounding lands is our first concern in all fire management actions.”

People with respiratory ailments are encouraged to contact their local health professional for advice specific to their condition if they have questions. LI NE ST W IN G

Missing tourist found dead

Get to know Evergreens

The CAO of the Evergreens Foundation will be at next week’s council meeting to talk about how the foundation operates. The Evergreens Foundation is a non-profit housing management body that provides affordable housing options to seniors, individuals and families. In Jasper, the foundation owns the Alpine Summit Senior Lodge and manages Pine Grove Senior Citizens Manor. And Kristen Chambers, CAO, will give a presentation on how the foundation is organized and how tax money flows from municipalities through the organization next Tuesday, October 15, at 1:30 p.m. in the Quorum Room at Jasper Library and Cultural Centre.

Bag ban blooms

$689,000

SOLD

$739,000

737 PATRICIA STREET

707 B GEIKIE STREET

This older 1 ½ storey has been well kept over the years. Large windows and room sizes make for a bright home that shows well. 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, plus a finished basement that could easily accommodate more bedrooms and bathrooms. Double detached garage, beautifully landscaped R2 lot.

Stunning, like new 3 bedrooms, 3 bathroom half duplex features new composite deck, 5 stainless steel appliances, sauna, heated bathroom floors, gas fireplace, nicely finished basement with 8ft ceiling. Bright and spacious, shows like a show home!

$1,069,000

$739,000

The Community in Bloom judges who awarded Jasper 5 Blooms Silver praised the group who inspired the plastic bag ban in town. Jasper received a special mention at the award ceremony for Grassroots Waste Reduction. Judges Lorna McIlroy and Andrea Bocsi wrote in their report: “Over the years, the local Communities in Bloom committee has championed many waste reduction strategies. “This year, they recognized local residents who have held a successful campaign to reduce the amount of plastic waste by making free reusable bags available for one year. Legislation came after positive public input and compliance is still voluntary.” Mayor Richard Ireland said at Tuesday’s council meeting: “I commend and credit the judges for recognizing the role of the residents who brought forward the recent waste reduction efforts which resulted in the single use plastics bylaw. It is great these residents have been singled out for credit.”

fitzhugh J A S P ER , A B

205 GEIKIE STREET

200 GEIKIE STREET

Nicely updated cottage style 3 bedroom home sits on a beautifully landscaped R2 lot. Very bright open floor plan, large newer Jeldwyn vinyl windows, spacious living room with wood burning fireplace. Lower level features a rec room, sauna, large jacuzzi soaker tub. An almost new heated garage completes this fine family home.

A True Jasper Classic Home! This beautiful 2 storey home sits on a nicely landscaped corner lot with a south facing veranda. This home features large room sizes, high ceilings, large windows allowing for plenty of natural sunlight. The oversized lot is a gardeners paradise! Give us a call for more details on this “Jasper Gem”.

$439,000

SOLD

$363,000 1024 LODGEPOLE STREET

1007 LODGEPOLE STREET

This well kept 2 bedroom one and ½ bath mobile home sits on ideal location with Snapes Hill out the front and backs onto Municipal green space. Four appliances and wood stove included. Priced to sell!

This updated mobile home has an open concept living area. Two bedrooms sit at the front of the home. The back has a great sized master bedroom and a 4 piece bathroom. Kitchen features stainless steel appliances and updated cabinets. Wood burning stove compliments the living room.

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History at a Glance is bought to you by the Jasper-Yellowhead Museum & Archives. The photos are selected by the editor. Online: www.jaspermuseum.org Twitter @jaspermuse

HISTORY AT A GL ANCE

Robinsons on the corner of Connaught Drive & Balsam Avenue, 1969.

J A S P E R by James Simpkins

CORRECTION

In last week’s edition we published Marmot Basin’s scheduled opening date as November 23 but, weather permitting, the ski resort is hoping for an early November opening.

FA C E B O O K

POLL Have you decided who you will vote for in the upcoming federal election? LAST QUESTION RESULTS Would you benefit from ‘Time of Use’ electricity rates with a peak price from 4pm to 9pm, and lower rates the rest of the day? (Proposed by ATCO)

YES 107 / NO 188

“Stay away from your Daddy, he swallowed a queen bee.”

OUR LETTERS POLICY:

VOLUME 14, ISSUE 49 PUBLISHER & EDITOR

Fuchsia Dragon............................publisher@fitzhugh.ca

PRODUCTION MANAGER

Melissa Morris...........................production@fitzhugh.ca

M A R K E T I N G C O N S U LTA N T

Ann Thomas.............................advertising@fitzhugh.ca The Fitzhugh is available free of charge at more than 60 locations in Jasper and the surrounding area, limited to one copy per reader. We are funded solely through the support of our advertisers. The Fitzhugh is a division of Aberdeen Publishing LP (Robert W. Doull, President) and is published every Thursday. The Fitzhugh may be distributed only by its authorized contractors and employees. No person may, without the prior written permission of The Fitzhugh, take more than one copy of each issue of The Fitzhugh. The content is protected by copyright. Reproduction by any means is prohibited except with the permission of the publisher.

Visit our Facebook page to cast your vote.

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The Fitzhugh welcomes complaints, praise, damnation and any other form of response to what you read in our newspaper. Diverse and varied opinions are welcome. Letters can be submitted by email, fax or snail mail. The Fitzhugh reserves the right to accept or refuse any or all material submitted for publication and maintains the right to exercise discretion in these matters. The Fitzhugh reserves the right to edit all submissions for libel, length, content and style. Please limit letters to 400 words. Letters must include your name and phone number or email, for verification purposes. We do not publish Anonymous Letters.

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CORRECTIONS: All stories are checked for accuracy, but a newspaper is a human endeavour and although we strive for perfection, we make no claim to it. Any error will be corrected in the next edition of the paper.

PO BOX 428, JASPER, ALBERTA T0E 1E0 PHONE: 1.780.852.4888; FAX: 1.780.852.4858


JASPER JUNIOR/SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

OP-ED

‘The unresponsive four’ Putting pen to paper, or keyboard, can be part of the job; everyone gets that. Regardless of the medium, when one has to write for less than celebratory reasons it becomes, well, complicated. In this particular case and this particular piece, it is not only complicated, it is downright difficult. If someone had said Yellowhead would be ‘ghosted’ by federal election candidates in the riding, they would have been greeted with a wink and nod; really? The decision to cancel an election institution in Jasper was one of the most difficult in the Jasper Park Chamber of Commerce’s collective memory, however it did indeed happen and it hurt. From the day the writ was dropped, no big surprise to anyone, the race began; not the race to win but rather the race to find and contact registered candidates. Bear with this piece of writing, as normal procedures are outlined and where it will then become clear everything was ‘off ’ from the start. The Elections Canada website listed one registered candidate, representing the Progressive Conservative Party. Ok, that’s great. Who else is out there? As of Thursday, September 19, through some serious investigative activity (Facebook, LinkedIn, media, and frantic calls to other Chambers of Commerce throughout the constituency – and it is a large one) a few more names surfaced. How to contact them remained a complete mystery but tenacity, determination and several Facebook stalking episodes resulted in a bit of information. Here is where it becomes interesting. As of that date, Yellowhead had six candidates listed on the Elections Canada website, with the initial one being the only one with contact information so with emails sussed out by various means for the remaining five candidates, JPCC set out to invite each and every one to the Election Forum set for November 7. Venue? Check! A/V Technicians? Check! Volunteers? Check! Hospitality? Check! Media? Check! Candidates? Houston we have a problem. One, yes one, candidate responded to the invitation and he will be named: Thank you to Douglas Galavan of the Peoples Party of Canada for an immediate response and dare it be said… confirmation of attendance. A further email was sent to all candidates on Thursday, September 26, advising the forum was in danger of being cancelled due to the underwhelming response. Indeed, while Mr. Galavan’s confirmation was most appreciated, one individual does not a forum make and to use the vernacular, it would better classified as a ‘rally’ at Chamber expense. So, not to be perceived as throwing a tantrum, or in fact, being downright inconsiderate of the needs of the electorate, one final email was sent out to the candidates on Monday, September 30, advising a deadline of close of business on Wednesday, October 2, had been set to either accept or decline the invitation. It should be noted a seventh candidate had, by that day, emerged and the previously noted technique of ‘stalking’ on Facebook and a personal message was sent, lo and behold a response was received, unfortunately Mr. Gordon Francey of the Veterans Coalition Party of Canada was unable to attend. A rally for one remained. Time marches on and so, at close of

business, as advertised, it was decided that the party for one would not proceed. An email was prepared and sent out to candidates, venue cancelled, AV Techs relieved of duty, coffee pots turned off, volunteers told to take the night off and of course, media advised… Thursday morning, following the cancellation announcement, two candidates replied by email – disconcerting, disappointing, unfortunate and other such adjectives were used by Mr. Galavan and Mr. Francey. A phone call was received from Mr. Gerald Soroka (PC) with apologies, the SPAM file had gobbled up all previous email attempts to contact him and yes, most can relate to that at some point in their technological adventures. Thank you, Mr. Soroka, for taking the time to call personally, the attempt to confirm your attendance was most appreciated however the event had officially been cancelled. This is where the diatribe gets serious. Where are the other four candidates? Referring back to the comment about being ‘ghosted’, other terms could be used; ‘MIA’ comes to mind. At the time of writing this piece, the Jasper Park Chamber of Commerce has not yet heard from candidates representing the Green Party, the New Democratic Party, the Liberals or the Libertarians in any shape, form or respect. For shame. Through ongoing investigation two things have been confirmed; other organizations attempting to carry on tradition and invest resources of all types in public forums have heard from some, but not others, and the list varies according to their geography in the constituency so, electorate, these individuals do exist and to round out that notion, other organizations are considering cancelling their forums as well. The simple courtesy of responding to the invite could have saved a great deal of angst for all but the question begs, why? Why are individuals who want the electorate to put MP behind their name so darn elusive? It further begs the question why should voters care? Candidates who fail to even acknowledge one of the fundamental protocols in Canadian elections fail to have websites with bona fide contact information available to organizations and media? Why are organizations forced to exhaust every known form of investigative resources to carry on tradition, be denied? The most serious infraction of the ‘unresponsive four’ could lead to the lack of engagement with the electorate and for that reason, two things are likely to happen: Voters simply won’t vote because they know nothing of the people who want to represent them in Ottawa and, possibly will result in the formation of a government that will not have Canadians. For shame. There are more than just the aforementioned and spoken concerns in this piece. It speaks to the unspoken Canadian political landscape and should make every individual regardless of stripes, colours or tendencies to consider the immediate need for candidates who want to represent to actually commit to the electorate and be ‘present’ throughout the campaign, but perhaps it speaks to an immediate need for electoral reforms in Canada. Pattie Pavlov, General Manager Jasper Park Chamber of Commerce

Special recognition & grade 12 awards 2018/2019 GOVERNOR GENERAL ACADEMIC MEDAL

Congratulations to Jessa Czorny for receiving the Governor General Academic Award! This medal is awarded to the student who achieves the highest average upon graduation (includes all grade 11 and 12 courses).

HIGH ACADEMIC AVERAGE: 30-1 LEVEL High Honours: Jessa Czorny 2nd High Honours: Kate Waeser 3rd High Honours: Itzel Rodriguez Herrera

SERVICE AWARDS:

FAITH AWARD: Itzel Rodriguez Herrera - Sponsored by asper United Church, Catholic Women’s League, St. Mary’s and St. George’s Anglican Church GENERAL JOE AWARD: Thomas McKenney - Sponsored by the Jasper Lions Club KRIS HOLTOM MEMORIAL AWARD: Arianne St-Jacques STUDENT CITIZENSHIP AWARD: Jessa Czorny - Sponsored by the Rotary Club of Jasper

OUTSTANDING INTERSCHOLASTIC ATHLETIC AWARDS: Junior Girl Athlete: Kira Peel / Junior Boy Athlete: Donovan Fawcett Senior Girl Athlete: Faith Claxton / Senior Boy Athlete: Lance Faurillo

ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS:

Canadian Parents for French Award - Top: Hope Deagle & Thomas McKenney Sponsored by Canadian Parents for French Sawridge Literary Award - Top: Thomas McKenney Sponsored by Sawridge Inn & Conference Centre Merit Contractors Award: Ethan Morin Sponsored by Merit Contractors Association Leah Brown Memorial Visual Arts Award: Emma Glover Sponsored by Destanne Norris and family

POST SECONDARY AWARDS:

Calla Medig Memorial Award: Angella Muli Sponsored by the Jasper Park Chamber of Commerce Grade 12 Female Athletic Award - Hope Deagle & Itzel Rodriguez Herrera Sponsored by Jasper Volunteer Fire Brigade The Jasper Junior/Senior High School would like to thank the following sponsors for their support of our Scholarship Awards Program: Canadian Parents for French Kimchi House Restaurant Catholic Women’s League Merit Contractors Destanne Norris and Family Mount Robson Inn Fairmont Jasper Park Lodge Pine Bungalows Jasper Dental Clinic R.C.M.P. Jasper Lions Club Robinson Foods Jasper Park Chamber of Commerce Rotary Club of Jasper Jasper Source for Sports St. Mary’s and St. George’s Jasper Student Council Anglican Church Jasper United Church Sawridge Inn and Conference Centre Jasper Veterinary Clinic Jasper Volunteer Fire Brigade Totem Ski Shop The 2019 Graduating Class would like to thank the community for their support. Whether you purchased cookie dough, donated to our bottle drive or gave to the Scholarship Fund, your contributions are greatly appreciated. GRADE 12 SUBJECT AWARDS: English 30-1 Top: Jessa Czorny Honourable mention: Aven Lodge Severin Golla Social Studies 30-1 Top: Jessa Czorny Honourable mention: Oscar Danks Severin Golla Aven Lodge Itzel Rodriguez Herrera John Kenneth Torio Social Studies 30-2 Top: Joshua Kearnan Honourable mention: Alexander Rabago Reshunna Yarde

Biology 30 Top: Itzel Rodriguez Herrera

Art 30 Top : Emma Glover

Honourable mention: Oscar Danks Aven Lodge

Honourable mention: Hailey Duguay Itzel Rodriguez Herrera Andrea Tampus Reshunna Yarde

Physics 30 Top: Kate Waeser Honourable mention: Jessa Czorny Joshua Kearnan Reshunna Yarde Chemistry 30 Top: Joshua Kearnan Honourable mention: Jessa Czorny Hope Deagle John Kenneth Torio Kate Waeser

Mathematics 30-1 Top: Kate Waeser Honourable mention: Jessa Czorny Hope Deagle Joshua Kearnan Reshunna Yarde

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Instrumental Music 30 Top: Kate Waeser Honourable mention: Jessa De Suyo Angella Muli John Kenneth Torio Physical Education 30 Top: Severin Golla Honourable mention: Braeden Van De Bogart Thomas McKenney Ethan Morin

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TIM SHOULTS SPECIAL TO THE FITZHUGH It’s hard to get the sense of just how big something is when you’re right in the middle of it. In the summer of 1987, a massive tornado passed right through Edmonton, killing dozens of people on its way through. My family lived on the other side of town, far from the main tornado. But a second funnel cloud started to form near us. When we saw the entire sky turn green and start to circle itself, we ran for the basement. It sounded like the end of the world was going on above us as we huddled there. But as the wind subsided and we emerged a half-hour later, all that was left was a lawn covered in golf-ball sized

chunks of hail – not a sign in the sky of what we thought would be total disaster. Sometimes, when I look at my chosen trade of community media, I think about that. There’s no doubt we are in the midst of a storm. Will it sweep us aside or pass us by? This week, as we celebrate National Newspaper Week, it’s a good time to contemplate that storm, and our place in it. When people ask me how the newspaper business is doing – and when they do, they often use that same tone of voice you hear when you’re asked about an aging relative who’s been in the hospital – I usually answer with one word: “Exciting!” Yes, sometimes I may add “And

Thanksgiving AT FAIRMONT JASPER PARK LODGE

THANKSGIVING SUNDAY BUFFET BRUNCH

Dig into local and organic signature dishes, breakfast classics, house-made pastries, carved meats, fresh salads, seasonal desserts and so much more. ORSO TRATTORIA October 13 | 11:00AM - 1:00PM $45 per adult • $22.50 per child aged 6 - 12

THANKSGIVING SUNDAY BUFFET DINNER

Ditch your kitchen and let our extraordinary culinary team treat you to a scrumptious feast. You’ll enjoy an extensive buffet with chef attended carving stations and classic dishes. Even the little ones will be treated to a buffet with kid-friendly favourites. BEAUVERT DINING ROOM October 13 | 5:30PM - 8:30PM $79 per adult • $39.50 per child aged 6 - 12 Taxes and gratuities not included. Reservations are required. T 780 852 6091 E jpl.concierge@fairmont.com

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terrifying!” to that, depending on the day. But even on those days, it’s an amazing time to be in our line of work. We’ve got more readers than ever – nearly 9 out of 10 Canadians read community media between print and digital every week, according to the latest research from News Media Canada. And we have more ways than ever to reach them. When breaking news happens in our community, we can write a story, post it to our website and link to it on social media, add some video and maybe even make a podcast about it, while at the same time printing thousands of copies of it on recycled trees and put it at thousands of doorsteps the next morning. The problem is how it all gets paid for. The local advertising dollars which support that local journalism, are being sucked up by two massive foreign corporations – Facebook and Google. Between them, they take 75 per cent of the online advertising revenue in Canada. There’s no doubt the power of Facebook and Google have to reach local people in the community. But you won’t see a reporter from Google in your city council chambers. And Facebook won’t sponsor your community’s campaign to build that new arts centre. And it’s not just our business model that’s been disrupted. The local businesses who support us with their

advertising also face disruption from that same media. Ask any retailer who’s seen someone come into their store to look at a product, then pull out their phone and order that product from Amazon right in front of them. The definition of community has changed dramatically. It used to be defined simply by geography. Now the internet and the rise of social media has redefined community to be anyone, connected anywhere by shared interest. But geographic community – where we choose to live – still matters. And it needs support. Reading local, and making deliberate choices to shop local, is how to do it. That’s our shelter from the storm. So on this National Newspaper Week, please go to our new website, newspapersmatter.ca, to sign a pledge of support and send a message—to Canadian businesses, advertisers, to all levels of government, to newspaper journalists and all Canadians—that what we do matters, now more than ever. Thanks for your support, and for the privilege of supporting our community by telling its stories. Tim Shoults is Operations Manager of Aberdeen Publishing, which publishes the Fitzhugh and seven other community newspapers in B.C. and Alberta.


From the classroom to the ice

FUCHSIA DRAGON PUBLISHER@FITZHUGH.CA

Young referees in Jasper took to the ice on Saturday to refresh their skills ahead of this year’s hockey season. Jasper has a strong referee crew, led by referee chief Glen Leitch, and this year’s clinic had 28 officials, 24 of whom were from town. “Our program has been in existence for a long time, and probably never more than now has it been so strong and the strength comes from the class as a group,” said Leitch. “To me, giving back is those kids showing up. “It’s not always easy. You hear stories about being an official and it’s true.” Leitch tells stories of young referees being shouted at by coaches and parents, but learning to hold their own in stressful situations. “We talk about two things: Keep it safe and keep it fair,” said Leitch. “There are so many things we have to process and have a split second to do it. “There are stressful situations and they need to be comfortable making a commitment the best they can. “They know we are going to protect them.” Leitch has been a referee for 20 years and said Jasper has about an 80 per cent retention rate on officials

Referee chief Glen Leitch said he is proud of the strong crew of young officials, many of whom are returning. | F. Dragon photos

and puts the strong involvement down to the culture. “I am so proud of it,” he said. “We have a lot of returning kids. “The mentorship and support we give one another is brilliant.” Leitch said the young refs learn countless life skills through their experience officiating, including

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patience, healthy communication and learning how to manage money from a young age thanks to their wages. The clinic on Saturday with Hockey Alberta, led by clinic coordinator Dean Ziegler, started with a morning in the classroom learning the basics of refereeing, including rule knowledge, presentation, the benefits and negatives and what to expect. Then in the afternoon, the teenagers hit the ice to put their skills into practise with some basic drills. Leitch said: “Yet again it was a brilliant clinic, well attended by experienced and new kids. “I am excited this year to see how far those kids will go because we have such a strong crew.”

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STAGE ON SCHEDULE FUCHSIA DRAGON PUBLISHER@FITZHUGH.CA

Building work on Jasper’s new stage is on track to be completed before the grand official opening event next Friday. The Jim Vena Stage, named after the longtime local and retired CN vice president, has been facilitated by Tourism Jasper, with funding partners including CN Rail, other private sector donors and the Province of Alberta. Ground was broken at the site at the end of August to install the lower half of the stage while the top half was being constructed. Mark Fercho, chief administrative officer for Jasper, said there was a detailed plan for construction and costs for the stage, hoping to open it in the fall,

but all bids for the project came in too high so the plan had to be restructured, causing a delay over the summer. But Habitat, the maker of the top of the stage, custom-made the structure in about two-thirds of the normal time for their factory as it was designed before the bidding process. And when organizers were told the factory shipping process would take two weeks and would have brought the structure too late for the Dark Sky Festival, CN stepped in and offered its road services: DeckX and TransX. “The semi picked up the top part of the stage in Holland, Michigan, last week on Monday morning and made it to Jasper by Thursday night - we unloaded on Friday and began construction right away,” said Fercho.

“We sent thanks to Sean Finn at CN for his awesome team that got us the steel in a short timeline.” Fercho said the stage design was a few years in the making as Doug Goss, board chairman of Tourism Jasper, “had a vision”. They looked at stages in other places for ideas and settled on a design for Jasper with train station elements in its look and design. James Jackson, manager of Tourism Jasper, said he “couldn’t be prouder to be able to facilitate the development of a community asset like this”. The Jim Vena stage officially opens next Friday, October 18 with a concert by Jim Cuddy, supported by an opening performance by Maddie Storvold. It also marks the beginning of the Dark Sky Festival. The event is free to the public but tickets are required.

CN stepped in to help get the top of the new Jim Vena stage shipped to Jasper in time for it to be constructed before the Dark Sky Festival next week. | F. Dragon photo

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Fire safety and fun at open house

FUCHSIA DRAGON PUBLISHER@FITZHUGH.CA

It is Fire Prevention Week this week and Jasper Fire Hall opened its doors on Tuesday for an evening of educational fun. Families filled the hall and children tried on firefighter gear, rode in fire trucks and learned about fire safety from their local heroes. Fire chief Greg Van Tighem cooked on the barbecue and there was hot chocolate and popcorn up for grabs. This year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign is ‘Not Every Hero Wears a Cape. Plan and Practice Your Escape!’ The campaign aims to educate about the small but important actions people can take to keep themselves and those around them safe. “Situational awareness is a skill people need to use wherever they go,” said Van Tighem. “No matter where you are, look for available exits, plan ahead and if the alarm system sounds, take it seriously and exit the building immediately.” Jasper Fire Department is also visiting elementary school classrooms this week as part of the campaign. Alberta’s municipal affairs minister, Kaycee Madu issued a statement to mark Fire Prevention Week. He said: “It is important to be prepared at all times, and that includes having an emergency escape plan for your home that you practise regularly with all members of your household. “We are grateful for the heroic acts of our first responders. Yet it is up to all of us to take measures that can protect our homes and our loved ones. “This week is a critical reminder and alerts us to the dangers of fire. “Take the time to learn and know how to make your loved ones safe at home.” For more information about Fire Prevention Week and home escape planning, visit www.fpw.org.

Jasper Fire Department held an open house on Tuesday for families to meet their local firefighters and learn about planning and practicing an escape. | F. Dragon photos

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FUCHSIA DRAGON PUBLISHER@FITZHUGH.CA Jasper received its first winter weather warnings this week as cold swept through the province. The special weather statement and snowfall warnings were issued at about 10:30 a.m. on Monday. They covered Jasper National Park near Jasper, near and south of Sunwapta Falls and near Pocahontas. The snowfall warning said 10 to 30 centimetres of snow was expected and the special weather statement warned of cold ahead. The report on Monday said: “An intense cold front will sweep through the province today and tonight, bringing a mixture of rain and snow, gusty winds and a marked drop in temperatures.”

And that it did. Tuesday had a daytime high of -2 degrees and a low of -14 degrees. Snow started on Monday evening and carried on through Tuesday. And while we had a light dusting in the townsite, the SkyTram, Marmot Basin ski hill and the Columbia Icefield got a good coating. This week, nights will be below zero degrees and daytime highs will be between zero and seven degrees. Prepare for quickly changing and deteriorating travel conditions. Surfaces like highways, roads, walkways and parking lots may become difficult to navigate due to accumulating snow. Check https://511.alberta.ca for the latest conditions.

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BEARCATS BACK ON THE MENU JOHN WILMSHURST SPECIAL TO THE FITZHUGH Jasper Bantam Bearcats’ coaches Eric Bouchard and Jim Koss are like television chefs. Each year they are given a pile of ingredients, some familiar, some off-thewall, and are challenged to come up with a gourmet meal. Here’s some Alberta AAA beef, a shaker of salt, chickpeas and couscous — Go. As they mix ingredients, trying to blend talents like flavours, they learn what works and what doesn’t. The first game of the season; a preseason tilt between Jasper and Hinton played last weekend in our home kitchen was the reveal of ingredients, and while the outcome may have left a bad taste in people’s mouths, chefs Bouchard, Koss and Sawchuck are just starting to piece together a winning recipe. I’m going to spoil your meal; the Bearcats ended up losing this one 8 to 1. At the end of the day, the final score was less important than how the chefs tried out different ingredients, and gave a taste of higher speed, faceoff hockey to the new kids. For Kalan Sawchuk, Rowan Koss and MacLean Carmichael this was their first ever Bantam game where contact is allowed and making play with the puck on your stick has to be a bit quicker.

All three passed the test. Koss took some hits and figured it out. He’s got his stick on the ice and clearly knows to head to the net when his more experienced linemates have the puck. Sawchuk played a smart game, staying tight along the boards and keeping his feet moving to keep up with the offensive flow.

Gerald

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Carmichael seemed very comfortable in this new environment and just needs to get more familiar with his new team. The main course of this team consists of a group of second year Bantams. For sure there were signs of being undercooked this early in the season. But the combinations that led the Bearcats to their division finals last season were still on the menu. Goaltender Donovan Fawcett looked sharp in net, stopping 34 of 42 shots directed his way, and coming up with some signature glove saves. Defencemen Michael Hayashi, Jacob Bouchard and Dexter Fawcett were tracking the puck well, have definitely picked up the physical game but looked uncomfortable handling the puck at times. And forwards Tanner Carlton, who assisted Jasper’s only goal, and Ty Crozier looked much more composed than this time last year. A few more games under their belt and they’ll be connecting. For dessert, the Bearcats have recruited four overage players who were standout on last year’s surprise runners-

up, and who definitely will need to get going. Jacob Bartziokas on the back line was, next to Don, the best player on the ice on Sunday and almost scored a couple of times with point shots that just missed. Owen Kearnan did score Jasper’s lone goal and was an energetic presence on the ice to say the least. Finally, Liam Crozier and Sebastian Golla will need to work hard on and off the ice to get this team to gel. There were a mix of disappointed, scared and elated faces in the dressing room after Sunday’s game. But for the coaches, the mood was light and fluffy. Despite the drubbing, Hinton is a team that the Bearcats can clearly play with, particularly once Jasper has more games in them. Importantly, the coaches were sure that they had ingredients they could work with, and that every time they put Bearcat on the menu, the flavour is going to improve. The Bantam Bearcats are back on the ice here in Jasper on Thanksgiving Sunday, at 4:15 p.m. to face Maskwacis. I’ll see you in the stands.


Srs Rock

at the Stop

He quit his day job five months ago to hit the road as a full time touring musician. And this week, Graham Strang from Maple Ridge, BC, comes to Jasper to perform his collection of classic and pop rock covers and his own original tunes. He talked with Fuchsia Dragon about touring and taking the plunge. Fitzhugh: Am I right in knowing this is your first big tour? Graham: Yes. I quit my day job in May and have been pretty much touring in British Columbia and Alberta since then. I have done three separate little legs of tours about a dozen gigs through each, so I think the final tally is about 61 since May. It has been crazy but it has been a blast. This will be my first time in Jasper. Fitz: So how did Jasper get on the big list? Graham: Just every time I book a tour out of the Vancouver area I push it that little bit further geographically. I have family in Calgary and booked in Red Deer and just messaged everywhere I could in southern and central Alberta and Jasper got back to me pretty quickly. It’s probably the tour stop I am looking most forward to. I have heard amazing things about Jasper and it will be my third ever show in Alberta. Fitz: What made you want to take the leap into fulltime touring? Graham: I have always, since I was about 12, felt like I was going to be a musician and played in different bands and I’m 23 now so stopped and thought, ‘If I’m going to do it, I’m going to do it now.’ I have put two albums out from my house so when my new album came out in May I thought it was the perfect time and honestly it has been better than I imagined it could be. Fitz: Tell me a bit about your new album. Graham: It’s called Once I Thought. It is all original tunes but in an interesting way. There are four songs with a full band, me playing all the different parts, and the other four are solo acoustic. I love classic rock music so when I write it comes out like that, anything like classic rock or pop rock. When I play live it will be classic rock, pop covers and throw in some originals as well - all originals I have written over the last two to three years and I will be playing most of them live on this tour.

usually the last thing I throw on. I have always been a guitarist and occasionally keyboard and I will just be jamming and think, ‘I could work with that.’ I listen to so much classic rock - I have a whole record collection, like 1,000 records, too much - I just take in so much. Fitz: Who or what would you say you are most influenced by? Graham: I go back and forth so much. Honestly, just whatever my parents were playing in the car growing up. A lot of Billy Joel, the Eagles, then harder rock like ACDC, Kiss, I used to listen a lot to. Most teenagers would have rebelled and not liked what their parents did but classic rock has always been mostly what I listen to. Fitz: So what’s your history? How did you get to where you are now? Graham: I started playing guitar when was ten and that summer I was taking lessons and did a band camp. It was five days with a little gig on the last day to our parents but I was like, ‘This is what I want to do.’ Throughout the years I have been in various bands but none of them did anything. Then my sixth or seventh band broke up a few years ago so I started going to my local open mics in the Greater Vancouver area and that built my confidence up and inspired me. Every time I went to a new one I wanted to get a new song ready. If you talk to the people who run the nights they know how to book a bar gig. They taught me the ropes, putting a press kit together, and I fell in love with it. I always loved travelling and it was a way to do it. Slowly it snowballed into what it is now. Fitz: What’s your favourite thing about it? Graham: I feel like I experience every town in a different way than I would have. I couchsurf a lot and befriend locals from every town and get more of the culture than I would hotel to hotel. I love travelling and sharing my music. Fitz: Who should come to your show? Graham: Anyone who enjoys classic rock, enjoys rock, pop. I do a very energetic show. It’s just me and an acoustic guitar but really do rock it up. If you want to hear classic rock songs you know like the Eagles, Fleetwood Mac, CCR, all the classics - and once every few songs one of my own. If you are into classic rock music you should love what I do.

Fitz: What’s your writing style? Graham: There really is no one way. Sometimes, usually, I have just been strumming my guitar or playing the piano and come up with a cool chord progression, but sometimes recently I have a couple of songs where I have done the lyrics first - they are

Whistle Stop Pub October 14 | 9 p.m. | No cover charge

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H E A LT H & W E L L N E S S

Realities of lice

3. Treat other family members - All lice treatments should also be used on other affected family members at the same time. 4. Wash it or bag it - Wash all personal items that have come in contact with the head of an infested person, such as hats, towels, and pillowcases, in very hot water (above 66°C or 151°F) and dry in a hot dryer for at least 15 minutes. Soak all brushes and combs in hot water for five to 10 minutes or wash them with a pediculicidal shampoo. Because lice can’t survive away from humans, non-washable things such as pillows can be dry-cleaned or sealed in airtight plastic bags for 10 to 14 days to kill lice. Thoroughly vacuum items such as rugs, furniture, mattresses, pillows, and any other surface where someone may have rested their head. Do not forget the car seats.

MERV BASHFORD SPECIAL TO THE FITZHUGH

OK. So it’s not your dinner party conversation starter. But maybe it should be. Lice are a common occurrence, especially with children. It surprisingly carries a lot of embarrassment and sometimes fear. It shouldn’t. If anything, mild annoyance and meeting it head on (no pun intended) seem to be the right kind of reaction when faced with the reality of lice in your family. So let’s debunk some myths, get the facts straight, and take the embarrassment out of it. Here’s what we know in the pharmacy business.

THE FACTS:

Lice are tiny parasitic insects that can take up residence in a number of different places on our body. They are not a serious medical problem but they can be annoying and can easily spread and infect others. Life for a louse begins as a nit (egg). Nits are commonly found glued to the base of the hair shaft, frequently behind the ears or on the nape of the neck. Adult head lice, approximately the size of a sesame seed, are found in the hair on the head, the scalp and nape of the neck and over the ears. They are barely visible to the naked eye, especially on blonde hair, where they hardly show up at all. Lice excrement looks like flecks of brown dust.

CAUSES:

Head lice are usually spread among children daycare centres and primary

It is extremely important to report children’s lice to school officials to help control its spread | Stock photo

schools. Why? Because kids are in close contact with each other when they play and learn. Lice have no wings, so they cannot jump or fly from person to person; they move by crawling quickly or by grasping a shaft of hair with tiny front claws and then swing from one hair strand to another. In this way, they travel by direct head to head contact when children play with their heads close together or indirectly through hats, coat hooks, scarves, bike helmets, headphones, hairbrushes, toys, or bedding. Poor hygiene does not play a role in head lice. It’s merely a contact sport.

WE GOT ‘EM. NOW WHAT?

1. Get rid of the existing adult lice - Medication for lice includes

lotions, cream rinses, and shampoos. Apply the medication to the affected body areas as directed. Repeated treatments may be needed and are usually recommended. Ask a pharmacist for complete directions on how to use specific products and for recommendations on treatments based on the age of the affected person and the type of infestation. 2. Remove the remaining nits – with tweezers or a fine louse comb begin to remove the remaining nits. This can take several hours per head depending on the length of the hair and the number of nits. Be on the lookout for tiny white glistening eggs or little gray hatched ones, which will be firmly attached to the hair shaft, usually close to the scalp.

5. Check, re-check - Everyone treated must recheck once a week for a few weeks to ensure that there are no signs of lingering lice. Alternative treatments to remove and kill lice, including “natural” treatments such as tea tree oil and aromatherapy; or “home remedies” are not currently recommended because there is not enough scientific evidence that they are effective. Pesticide sprays to “disinfect” your house do not help control head lice and can be toxic. Many parents are reluctant to report their children’s lice to school officials, or alert other people who’ve had contact with their child, due to embarrassment, but it’s extremely important to do so to help control its spread. More questions? Speak with us. We’re happy to help. Want more healthy hints? Find us on Facebook at Pharmasave Jasper or sign up for our monthly emails at Pharmasave.com. Just put Jasper as your local store.

GET CHECKED IN AWARENESS MONTH Breast Cancer Screening Awareness Month is every October and women are reminded to get checked for breast cancer. Breast cancer is still a problem in Alberta and the most common type of cancer for women. In fact, one out of every eight women will be diagnosed in her lifetime. And each day a woman in Alberta will die from the disease. But breast cancer doesn’t have to be a death sentence. If we can catch it early, we can treat it and beat it. Screening mammograms are a way to do just that. Using special x-rays of the breast that check for signs can help find breast cancer two to three years before it can be felt by a woman or her doctor. Mammograms are the best test we have for breast cancer, and the only test that has been shown to lower the chance of dying by 30 per cent. Thanks in part to screening mammograms, most women (almost 90 per cent) are now surviving breast cancer. Should you get a mammogram? Women ages 50 to 74 should plan to have a mammogram once every two years, and can self-refer. Women in their 40s can speak to their doctor, and get a referral for their first screening mammogram. Screening mammograms are available at many clinics in Alberta. To find the closest screening mammography centre near you, call Health Link at 811 or Screening Programs at 1-866-727-3926.

Screen Test is a service that brings free screening mammograms to rural communities with two mobile clinics. To find out when the next clinic is in your area, call 1-800-667-0604 (toll free). What else can you do to prevent breast cancer? You can talk to your doctor about your family history of breast cancer and know your risk. Know how your breasts normally look and feel, and get them checked if you find anything unusual. And of course a healthy

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lifestyle is important. Limiting alcohol and smoking can also help lower your risk. Prevention is the best protection. A screening mammogram can save your life. Get a screening mammogram in October. To find out more about breast cancer screening in Alberta, visit www.screeningforlife.ca. This health and wellness article was provided by Alberta Health Services.

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CAREERS

NORTHVIEW

APARTMENT REIT Is currently hiring for the position of:

is currently accepting applications for the following positions:

MAINTENANCE

DISHWASHER LINE COOKS LINE SUPERVISOR

Apply in person at 80 Geikie Street or email bgilbert@northviewreit.com

780-852-4482

ACCOMMODATION AVAILABLE! Excellent work environment.

Apply in person or email terry@jasperbrewingco.ca

................ is

now hiring ................

Full and part-time

LINE COOKS & PREP COOKS Accommodation available

.................

To Apply ..................

Email jnpark@famoso.ca or apply in person at 607 PATRICA STREET

Work in Jasper National Park (a UNESCO World Heritage Site) at the most northern Canadian Rocky Mountains ski resort and Jasper SkyTram!

MARKETING AND GUEST EXPERIENCE COORDINATOR RMSI-JTAC Equipment Holdings Ltd. operating as Ski Marmot Basin and Jasper SkyTram has an immediate opening for a full-time, year-round Marketing and Guest Experience Coordinator. Reporting to the Brian Rode, Vice President this position supports a busy marketing and sales team in a variety of tasks that include, but are not limited to content creation, website updates, email and newsletter deployment, online store management, social media content, promotions and events, community activation, consumer shows. This is a varied and stimulating role that would suit a forward-thinking, outgoing, energetic and enthusiastic team player with excellent organizational skills and strong attention to details. Qualifications • Strong working knowledge of all social media platforms • Promotions and content creation experience • Strong, demonstrated communication skills, including writing and editing • Customer service experience from the ski, tourism or hospitality industries • Extensive software and computer skills, specifically the Adobe suite an asset • Working knowledge of Email Marketing platforms and principles • Website management and Online Advertising experience an asset • Graphic Design experience an asset • Solid photography skills preferred • Strong intermediate to advanced level skier or snowboarder (for assignments on the hill) • Two (2) to four (4) years of related experience. This is a salaried position with benefits, including a Season’s Ski Pass. The position description will be fully developed between the successful candidate and the Vice President, based on organizational requirements and skill sets. Expressions of interest including a cover letter and resume can be sent to dyoung@skimarmot.com with the word Marketing in the subject line

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KNOW YOUR

CAREERS

RIGHTS Ginette Marcoux, executive director Jasper Employment & Education Centre

EMPLOYER OBLIGATIONS ON ELECTION DAY

Our Centre is a key resource for both workers and employers. As an Employment and Education Centre, we are committed to sharing information through the Fitzhugh that helps both employers and employees understand their rights and obligations. We intend to use this space to address frequently asked questions at our Centre. We are also open to discussing topics that concern Employers as well, so please do call us if you’d like a topic covered.

Q. Is my employer required to give me time off to vote? A. All employees who are Canadian citizens and 18 years of age or older are entitled to have three consecutive hours off work on election day during voting hours to cast their ballots. Time off with pay must be provided, at the convenience of the employer, to the extent necessary to allow three consecutive hours for voting. Employers may select three consecutive work and non-work hours. The employer can decide when to allow the time off - for example, by allowing the employee to start later or leave early. Q. Are there exceptions to these rules? A. An employee is not entitled to additional time off if his or her regular work schedule already allows for three consecutive hours during the time that the polls are open. However, where an employee does not

BUSINESS DIRECTORY

have three consecutive hours before or after work while the polls are open, the employer must allow the employee to have time away from work to vote. Q. Can employers deduct pay or impose penalties for time off to vote? A. The Act prohibits an employer from deducting pay or imposing any penalty by reason of the employee’s absence during the allotted three hours. As a result, no employer may pay an employee less than the amount the employee would have earned on polling day if he or she had continued to work during the time allowed for voting, regardless of whether the employee is paid on an hourly or salaried basis. Q. Are there any exceptions for certain occupations? A. For employers in the transportation industry, the obligation to provide sufficient time for voting does not apply if the following circumstances exist: • the employer is a company that transports goods or passengers by land, air or water; • the employee is employed in the operation of a means of transportation; • the time off cannot be allowed without interfering with the transportation service. Employers should be mindful of the upcoming federal election and implement any necessary schedule changes in advance of October 21.

JASPER

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MAN-LIFT AND TRAILER RENTALS

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For appointments call 780-865-3915 or 1-800-323-9891 Hours: Mon & Wed: 8am - 5pm, Tues: 10am – 8pm, Thurs: 9am - 6pm, Fri: 8am – noon / 1pm - 4pm Eyewear and Sunglasses also available at Rocky Mountain Eye Wear, Parks West Mall, Hinton

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on our website new! Shop & book BUY LOCALLY!

Rick & Laurie Buck, CTC

OWNER/MANAGER laurie@buckarootravel.com, www.buckarootravel.com OWNER/MANAGER

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THE JASPER FITZHUGH

COMMUNITY EVENTS OCTOBER THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

10AM-12PM PARENT LINK PARK & PLAY

10AM-12PM PARENT LINK STAY & PLAY

9AM-12PM PARENT LINK STAY & PLAY

12-1:15PM ADULT NOON HOUR HOCKEY

12-1:15PM ADULT NOON HOUR HOCKEY

10:30AM12:30PM KNITTING CIRCLE

7-9PM COMMUNITY CHOIR

1-3PM COMMUNITY COFFEE CONNECTIONS (SENIORS)

ONGOING EVENTS 12-1:15PM ADULT NOON HOUR HOCKEY Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

1-3PM SETTLEMENT SERVICES’ WORLD CAFE Harvest Food & Drink 616 Patricia St.

1-3PM JASPER THRIFT SHOP United Church basement 700 Block on Geikie St.

1:15-3PM PARENT LINK BABY & ME

9AM-12PM PARENT LINK STAY & PLAY

9AM-12PM PARENT LINK COFFEE & SCREAM

11AM-12PM MEDITATION

1PM SENIORS BUS TO JASPER SHOPS/APTS

10AM-12PM PICKLEBALL

6-10PM DROP-IN BASKETBALL

COS 627 Patricia St.

COS 627 Patricia St.

1-3PM COMMUNITY COFFEE CONNECTIONS (SENIORS)

1:30-2:30PM SENIOR READING

Jasper Municipal Library 500 Robson Dr.

Jasper Junior Senior High School 401 Bonhomme St.

COS 627 Patricia St.

1-3PM COMMUNITY COFFEE CONNECTIONS (SENIORS)

7-8PM SOUND BATHING MEDITATION

8PM VOLLEYBALL

Sacred Ground 606 Patricia St.

COS 627 Patricia St.

COS 627 Patricia St.

8PM JAM NIGHT

COS 627 Patricia St.

Jasper Junior Senior High School 401 Bonhomme St.

The STAND EASY, Jasper Royal Canadian Legion 400 Geikie St.

6-8PM WRITE FOR RIGHTS

Sacred Ground 606 Patricia St.

Jasper Junior Senior High School 401 Bonhomme St.

COS 627 Patricia St.

Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

Jasper United Church 701 Turret St.

7-9PM JASPER THRIFT SHOP

United Church basement 700 Block on Geikie St.

8PM VOLLEYBALL

Jasper Junior Senior High School 401 Bonhomme St.

COS 627 Patricia St.

Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

COS 627 Patricia St.

1PM NORDIC WALKING (SENIORS) COS 627 Patricia St.

4-8PM SAVE MOUNTAINS OF PLASTIC Jasper Junior Senior High School 401 Bonhomme St.

7-9PM JASPER THEATRE ARTS COLLECTIVE

Jasper Municipal Library 500 Robson Dr.

The STAND EASY, Jasper Royal Canadian Legion 400 Geikie St.

6-8PM STITCH AND BITCH BEAD CIRCLE

7:45-9:15PM JALOPIES: DROP-IN HOCKEY

Robson House 401 Patricia St..

7-9PM JASPER SOCIAL DANCE COMMUNITY

Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

8-10PM DROP-IN BASKETBALL

The STAND EASY, Jasper Royal Canadian Legion 400 Geikie St.

Jasper Junior Senior High School 401 Bonhomme St.

7PM FUN, DANCE & ZUMBA Jasper Elementary School Gym 300 Elm Ave.

COS 627 Patricia St.

(SENIORS) Jasper Municipal Library 500 Robson Dr.

12-1:15PM ADULT NOON HOUR HOCKEY Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

1-3PM COMMUNITY COFFEE CONNECTIONS (SENIORS) COS 627 Patricia St.

1-5PM MIXED BRIDGE (SENIORS) Seniors Lounge Jasper Activity Centre, 305 Bonhomme St.

5-6PM AIKIDO FOR KIDS

(8-12 YEAR OLDS) Jasper Activity Centre, 305 Bonhomme St.

6-7PM AIKIDO FOR TEENS

Jasper Activity Centre, 305 Bonhomme St.

6-30-8:30PM JASPER PRENATAL CLASSES

Jasper Community Health Services 529 Turret St.

7-8PM KUAN YIN MEDITATION Sacred Ground 606 Patricia St.

7-9PM JASPER SOCIAL DANCE COMMUNITY

7-9PM JASPER THRIFT SHOP

The STAND EASY, Jasper Royal Canadian Legion 400 Geikie St.

United Church basement 700 Block on Geikie St.

8-10PM INDOOR SOCCER

8-10PM ADULT BADMINTON

Jasper Junior Senior High School 401 Bonhomme St.

Jasper Junior Senior High School 401 Bonhomme St.

9:30-11PM JALOPIES: DROP-IN HOCKEY Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

Jasper Arena schedules and events are subject to change

COntact 20

J A S P ER , A B

• T H U R S D AY, O C T OB ER 10 , 2019

TO ADD YOUR EVENT TO THESE FREE LISTINGS, EMAIL PUBLISHER@FITZHUGH.CA


THURSDAY

FRIDAY

10

11

7:45PM JHL: OUTLAWS vs ROYALS

1-3PM KIDS ADVENTURES OF THE SCHOOL YEAR: Board Games

Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

COS 627 Patricia St.

4-6PM PUBLIC SKATING

Jasper Arena, 303 Bonhomme St.

6:15PM JHL: BONESTARS vs BARLEY KINGS

Jasper Arena, 303 Bonhomme St.

SATURDAY

12 13 10AM-12PM HALLOWEEN COSTUME SWAP Jasper Arena COS 627 Patricia St.

12:30-2:30PM ATOM: JASPER BEARS VS HINTON 7:30-9:30PM PUBLIC SKATING Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

9PMFRIDAY & SATURDAY BY THE LIGHT OF THE MOON HIKE Parking Lot 13, Lake Annette

MONDAY

14

SUNDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

7-9PM

11-3PM WINTER MARKET

OCTOBER 11-17

2-4PM PEEWEE: JASPER BEARS vs EDSON 4:15-6:15PM BANTAM: JASPER BEAR CATS vs MASKWACIS 1 7-9PM PUBLIC SKATING

THE JOKER

FRIDAY & SATURDAY 6:50 & 9:05PM SUNDAY TO THURSDAY 8:00PM ONLY MATINEES SAT & SUN 1:30PM

Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

9PM ROMAN CLARKE

The STAND EASY, Jasper Legion, 400 Geikie St.

14A

15 16

Thanksgiving

FEDERAL ELECTION FORUM

HOLIDAY

Jasper Legion, 400 Geikie St.

9PM GRAHAM STRANG

9:30PM JHL: BONGS vs JPL HAWKS

Whistle Stop Pub 105 Miette Ave.

Jasper Arena, 303 Bonhomme St.

ABOMINABLE IN 3D FRIDAY & SATURDAY 7:00& 9:05PM SUNDAY TO THURSDAY 8:00PM ONLY MATINEES SAT & SUN 1:30PM

Jasper Museum, 400 Bonhomme St.

3-5PM SETTLEMENT SERVICES’ SPONSORSHIP INFO Jasper Municipal Library, 500 Robson Dr.

7-9PM PAINTNIGHT

PG

Jasper Museum, 400 Bonhomme St.

3D MOVIES SUBJECT TO A $3 SURCHARGE WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY WILL BE IN 2D

9:30PM JHL: BEAVERS vs ROYALS Jasper Arena, 303 Bonhomme St.

THURSDAY

17

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

3-6PM DARK SKIES & BOLD REDS

12-1:30PM FOOD LAB

1:30-3:30PM ATOM: JASPER BEARS vs MAYERTHORPE

18 19 20

1:30-3:30PM PUBLIC SKATING Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

Liquor Lodge, 306 Connaught Dr.

7:45PM JHL: BARLEY KINGS vs OUTLAWS

5-6:30PM DE’D DOGS vs JASPER BLUES

Jasper Arena, 303 Bonhomme St.

Jasper Arena, 303 Bonhomme St.

9PM MOONTRICKS W/ MAANDALA

6:45PM JHL: BONESTARS vs BONGS

4 Peaks Nightclub 612 Patricia St.

Jasper Arena, 303 Bonhomme St.

6-8PM JIM CUDDY BAND CN Place, Commemoration Park

Olive Bistro, 3401 Patricia St.

12:30-2:30PM WINTER SPORTS GEAR AND SKI SWAP

VIOLENCE, COARSE LANGUAGE,

TWIN SCREEN CINEMA CENTRE

24-HR INFO LINE 780-852-4749 • ACROSS FROM THE TRAIN STATION

Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

PROGRAM SUBJECT TO UNAVOIDABLE CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE

Activity Centre, 305 Bonhomme St. 3:45-5:45PM

1-4PM DARK SKY PAINTING WORKSHOP Mountain Galleries, 1 Old Lodge Rd.

PEEWEE: JASPER BEARS VS MAYERTHORPE

Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

6PM JHL: JPL HAWKS vs 2-3:30PM BEAVERS PHOTOGRAPH THE STARS Jasper Arena,

Jasper Legion, 400 Geikie St.

303 Bonhomme St.

3-6PM DARK SKIES & BOLD REDS 7:45PM Liquor Lodge, 306 Connaught Dr. JHL: ROYALS vs OUTLAWS 7PM Jasper Arena, SYMPHONY UNDER THE STARS Jasper Park Lodge, 1 Old Lodge Rd. 303 Bonhomme St.

7-8PM ORA RANGI SOUND HEALING EXPERIENCE

9PM LASER GUIDED TOUR OF THE CONSTELLATIONS

Jasper Wellness, 618 Connaught Dr. Parking Lot 13, Annette Lake

9PM LASER GUIDED TOUR OF THE CONSTELLATIONS Parking Lot 13, Annette Lake

10PM-12AM PAINT A STILL LIFE

Habitat for the Arts,500 Robson St.

Project Black Hole

MONDAY

(Dark Sky) October 18-27 at Habitat

DARK SKY FESTIVAL October 18-27 TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

1-3PM WATERCOLOUR PAINTING AT COMMUNITY COFFEE CONNECTIONS (SENIORS)

8-9AM CHAMBER OF COMMERCE GENERAL MEETING

10AM-12PM TAKE ME OUTSIDE DAY: Hike to the Fairy Tree

4-6PM SETTLEMENT SERVICES’ MOSAIC MONDAY

8:30AM-4:30PM CONVERSATIONS WORTH HAVING for the WORKPLACE

9:30PM JHL: BARLEY KINGS vs BONESTARS

9:30PM JHL: BONGS V BEAVERS

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COS, 627 Patricia St.

Municipal Library, 500 Robson Dr.

Jasper Arena, 303 Bonhomme St.

22 23

Wicked Cup, 912 Connaught Dr.

Hotel Fairmont Jasper Park Lodge, 1 Old Lodge Rd.

Jasper Arena, 303 Bonhomme St.

Project Black Hole

Sawridge Inn and Conference Centre Jasper, 76 Connaught Dr

7PM REUBEN AND THE DARK The STAND EASY, Jasper Royal Canadian Legion 400 Geikie St.

(Dark Sky) October 18-27 at Habitat

DARK SKY FESTIVAL October 18-27 J A S P ER , A B

• T HU R S D AY, O C T OB ER 10 , 2019

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JASPER SENIORS COMMUNITY EVENTS/ACTIVITIES CALENDAR OCTOBER 2019 SUNDAY

MONDAY

6

TUESDAY

1-3pm Coffee Connection, COS

13

7

14

HAPPY THANKS -GIVING

WEDNESDAY

8

1-3pm Community Coffee Connection, COS 1:30pm Cards, Sr. Lounge

15

1-3pm Community Coffee Connection, COS 1:30pm Cards, Sr. Lounge

1-3pm Community Coffee Connection, COS 1-5pm Mixed Bridge, Sr. Lounge

9

16

1-3pm Community Coffee Connection, COS 1-5pm Mixed Bridge, Sr. Lounge

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

10 1-3pm World Cafe, COS 1:30pm Sr. Reading, Library

8am-4pm Seniors Bus Trip to Hinton 1-3pm World Cafe, COS 1:30pm Sr. Reading, Library

SATURDAY

11

12

17 1pm Seniors 18

19

1pm Seniors Bus to Jasper shops/apts. 1-3pm Coffee Connection, COS 7pm Bridge, Pine Grove

Bus to Jasper shops/apts. 1-3pm Coffee Connection, COS 7pm Bridge, Pine Grove

To book a trip on the

Italic events at Seniors’ lounge, Jasper Activity Centre Gray events at Jasper Library & Cultural Centre Compiled by COS with the Seniors Society. COS is located at 627 Patricia. Open M-F, 9:00 am-4:30 pm. 780-852-2100 OR community@town.jasper.ab.ca.

EVERGREENS SENIORS BUS,

call 780-852-4881 ext. 3.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR

COMMUNITY SERVICES COMMUNITY LISTINGS Lions Club Meets every third Tuesday of the month at the Anglican Church Hall at 7 p.m. Contact 780-852-7273 for more info. Town Council Meetings Meetings on the first and third Tuesday of each month at 1:30 p.m. in the basement of the Jasper Municipal Library. West Yellowhead Constituency Jasper Office Hours: Constituency Staff will be available the first Wednesday of every month from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Jasper Public Library: 400 Geikie Street, Jasper. For more information or to make an appointment please call 1- 800-661-6517. Community Outreach Services Free, confidential, non-judgmental support and referral. Make an appointment or drop in. The coffee is always on. M – F, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 627 Patricia Street. 780-852-2100. Jasper Alberta Supports Come in: Community Outreach Services (627 Patricia Street, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) Call: 780-852-6292 Call: 1-877-644-9992 (toll-free/after hours) Click: myalbertasupports.ca Services & Programs: Seniors, Disabilities, Homelessness, Income Support, and more......

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Thrift Shop Hours The Jasper Thrift Shop is open on Monday and Wednesday from 7 to 9 p.m. and Thursdays from 1 to 3 p.m. Located in the 700 Block on Geikie Street in the United Church basement.

Skills for Success Do you need help with reading, writing, speaking English or basic computer skills? We can help! Call 780.852.4418 for more information. Program is FREE. Open Mon to Fri from 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Closed at lunch.

Al-Anon Al-Anon Family Group help friends and families of alcoholics - meetings Friday at 7 p.m. at the hospital in the Cavell room. For more info please call 780-852-4518 or 780-852-4578.

Habitat for the Arts Engage, explore, experience all things art. What do you want to do? For more info stop by Wednesdays 12 p.m.-8 p.m. 780.883.ARTS (2787)

Royal Canadian Legion 401 Geikie St. Open Tues. to Sat. at 4 p.m. Children welcome until 8 p.m. Free pool, shuffle Board & darts available. 780-852-3740. Food service now available. Check our menu online; www.jasperlegion.ca. New Location for MLA office Satellite Office Hours in Jasper Jasper Public Library, 500 Robson Street. First Wednesday of every month from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. L’ACFA régionale de Jasper Follow the activities organized by the ACFA (Association canadiennefrançaise de l’Alberta) on our web and Facebook pages. Join the francophones of Jasper! Suivez les activités organisées par l’ACFA (Association canadiennefrançaise de l’Alberta) sur notre site Internet et notre page Facebook. Joignez-vous à la communauté francophone de Jasper! For more informations/pour plus d’informations : 780-852-7476, www.acfa.ab.ca/jasper www.facebook.com/ACFA Jasper.

J A S P ER , A B

ASK (Advocates for Special Kids) Meetings first Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Community Outreach office. Jasper Food Bank Help is available from the Jasper Food Bank Thurs nights. Drop in at St. Mary and St. George Anglican Church at the corner of Miette and Geikie St. Open from 6 to 6:30pm. 12 Step Meetings Alcoholics Anonymous - meetings Monday and Saturday at 8 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meetings Thursdays at 8 p.m. All meetings are held at the hospital in the Cavell room. For more information or to talk to someone regarding alcohol, drugs or gambling problems please call 780-852-2909.

Jasper Victim Services Confidential advice and referrals for victims of crime and trauma. Information is available about restitution, financial benefits, victim impact statements, court process and counseling services. Located in the RCMP Detachment at 600 Bonhomme St., or call 780-852-2275. Jasper Social Dance Community Every Thursday at the Jasper Legion. FUSION dancing from 7-9 p.m! Beginning with basics, then exploring some more advanced techniques. $5 suggested donation. We hope to see you out! Jasper Prenatal Classes Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 p.m., September 18 and 25, October 2, 9 and 16. For more info or to register call Jasper Community Health Services at 780-852-4759. Parent Link Centre 627 Patricia St. – Open playroom, crafts, children’s yoga, infant massage and MORE (all FREE). Like us on Facebook “Parent Link Jasper”or call 780-852-6535.

Jasper Theatre Arts Collective Are you interested in theatre arts? Get involved here in Jasper! We meet Tuesday nights 7 p.m. at the Jasper Legion. Follow us on Facebook (Jasper Theatre Arts Collective).

Jasper Social Dance Community Continue to teach Salsa at the Legion throughout the Winter. We have beginners classes starting at 7 p.m. and improvers at 8 p.m., with some social dancing afterwards. $5 drop-in fee. No partner required.

STI Screening Free, Confidential and NONJudgemental STI testing. Please contact Jasper Community Health Services to make an appointment at 780-852-4759.

Save Mountains of Plastic Looking for volunteers to help sew reusable bags. Come out for a social night every Tuesday at the high school from 4-8 p.m.

• T H U R S D AY, O C T OB ER 10 , 2019

JASPER MUNICIPAL LIBRARY Open Mon-Thurs 10am-8pm, Fri-Sat 10am-5pm. Office services, free wifi, activities & programming for all ages. Call 780-852-3652, check out our website at www.jasperlibrary.ab.ca or find us on Facebook. Pick-up broomball league Every Friday at 7 p.m. at the Pat. Circle Arena. Bring $5 and a helmet. Knee pads are helpful to have but not necessary. Rules and how to play will be explained at the beginning of each session so folks are welcomed to come play regardless of experience or whether they’ve even heard of the game before. PICKLEBALL ANYONE? Saturdays at 10 am and Thursdays at 7 pm. Paddles & balls available. Activity Centre outdoor courts. Court and membership fees apply. TENNIS ANYONE? Tuesdays at 7 pm and Sundays at 2 pm. Racquets & balls available. Activity Centre outdoor courts. Court and membership fees apply. JASPER VOLLEYBALL LEAGUE Indoor volleyball, Mondays and Saturdays from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. at the high school. $2 drop in fee. All ages and skill levels welcome. Join our Facebook Group for more information, league events & updates.


CLASSIFIEDS AUCTIONS

AUCTIONS

AUCTIONS

AUCTIONS

COMING EVENTS

FOR SALE

FARMLAND - Spruce View, AB. Ritchie Bros. Auctioneers Unreserved Auction, October 29 - Edmonton Site. 159.09 +/- Title Acres, 353,400 m3 Proven Gravel Reserves, $2000 Surface Lease Revenue. Jerry Hodge: 780.706.6652; Ritchie Bros. Real Estate Services Ltd. rbauction.com/realestate.

3 PARCELS OF REAL ESTATE - Willingdon, AB. Ritchie Bros. Auctioneers Unreserved Auction, October 29 - Edmonton Site. 229.91 +/- Title Acres - Riverfront Farmland w/ Unquantified Gravel Reserves, Home & Shop. 159.92 +/- & 177.8 +/- Title Acres Farmland. Jerry Hodge: 780.706.6652; Ritchie Bros. Real Estate Services Ltd. rbauction.com/realestate.

1 PARCEL OF LAND - Dapp, AB. Ritchie Bros. Auctioneers Unreserved Auction, October 29 - Edmonton Site. 135 +/Title Acres, 12 +/- Acre Lake. Jerry Hodge: 780.706.6652; Ritchie Bros. Real Estate Services Ltd. rbauction.com/realestate.

COLLECTOR TRACTOR AUCTION for Les Lehman (780-582-2332), 3 km north of Forestburg. Saturday, OCTOBER 19. 11 Restored Tractors, Parts, Tools. www.prodaniukauctions.com.

FIREARMS WANTED FOR OCTOBER 19th, 2019 Live & Online Auction. Rifles, Shotguns, Handguns, Militaria. Auction or Purchase: Collections, Estates, individual items. Contact Paul, Switzer’s Auction. Toll-Free 1-800694-2609, info@switzersauction.com or www.switzersauction.com.

STEEL BUILDING CLEARANCE Super Savings Sale - Falling Prices!” 20X23 $6,080. 25X27 $6,640. 28X27 $7,462. 32X35 $10,336. 35X35 $12,576. One End Wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-855-212-7036; www. pioneersteel.ca.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

METAL ROOFING & SIDING. 37+ colours available at over 55 Distributors. 40 year warranty. 24-48 hour Express Service available at supporting Distributors. Call 1-888-2638254.

TENDER In accordance with Alberta Utilities Commission Decision, ATCO is accepting bids for the sale of decommissioned electricity generating units and associated equipment.

HOME PARCEL - Blackfalds, AB. Ritchie Bros. Auctioneers Unreserved Auction, October 29 - Edmonton Site. 59.29 +/Title Acres, 49 +/- Acres Cultivated, 1389 +/- Sq Ft Home. Jerry Hodge: 780.706.6652; Ritchie Bros. Real Estate Services Ltd. rbauction.com/realestate. HOBBY RANCH - Elk Island Park, AB. Ritchie Bros. Auctioneers Unreserved Auction, October 29 - Edmonton Site. 79.07 +/- Title Acres, 4800 +/- Sq Ft Shop w/Executive Living Quarters, 4800+/- Sq Ft Shop w/Guest Suite, 1600 +/- Sq Ft Shop . Jerry Hodge: 780.706.6652; Ritchie Bros. Real Estate Services Ltd. rbauction.com/realestate.

The decommissioned electricity generating units and associated equipment currently located in Jasper, Alberta will be sold on an “as is, where is” basis. For detailed information about the configuration of the equipment, sale offering process and other relevant details, please consult ATCO’s website at www.atco. com/en-ca/projects/electric-jasper-interconnect.html

The Weekly Crossword

DOWN 1 Break up

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ACROSS 1 Table leftover 6 Annexes 10 Unwanted email 14 Exploratory investigation 15 Rider's grip 16 Frat party attire 17 Spoil, with "up" 18 Woman's undergarments 20 Time between 1918 and 1939 22 Pass on 23 Numerical suffix 24 Brainchild 26 Waterlogged 27 Piano's cousin 30 Word with dish or effect 33 Off course 36 Slave away 38 Crow's cry 39 Plunder 41 Vulgar 43 Little toymaker 44 It gets hit on the head 46 Shirt part 47 A Baldwin brother 49 Pair of people 51 Pasture grazer 53 Crazy about 54 Cobblers' tools 58 Military status statement 61 Something sliced or chipped 63 Pollster's prop 65 Hawaiian island 66 Japanese aboriginal 67 Metal spacer in printing 68 Writer's rep. 69 They may be checked 70 Extremely small 71 Precursor to Windows

by Margie E. Burke

COWLEY LIONS CLUB requires a host for Castle River Campground commencing spring 2020. Application deadline Nov. 1. For details call Katarina 403-627-7825 or Earl 403-627-9200.

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To participate in the Request for Quote (RFQ) process and submit a bid to purchase the decommissioned equipment please contact EGBUProcurement@ K & K AUCTIONS presents atco.com to receive your copy ofof the9/9/19 Bid Form.-Once Week 9/15/19a large antique , toy & collectthe form has been signed, all bids to purchase the able auction, Saturday, Ocequipment can be submitted between October 9 and tober 19th at 9:00AM at the 2pm, November 7, 2019 as per the RFQ instructions. Camrose Regional Exhibition, Camrose, AB. Doug & Loraine 780-679-4142, www.globalauctionguide.com.

FALL EQUIPMENT CONSIGNMENT, MAS Sales Centre, Blackfalds, AB Sat. Oct 19 @ 9am. Farm Machinery, Acreage & 3PT, Skid Steer Attachments, Vehicles, Trucks, Forklift, Trailers, Commercial Storage, Livestock Equipment, Lumber & Trusses, Building Supplies, Sq. Tubing, Lawn & Garden, Tire Changer, Tool Cabinets & Work Benches, Auto Lift, Tools & More. www.montgomeryauctions.com 1-800-371-6963.

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the

Copyright 2019 by The Puzzle Syndicate

2 Witchy woman 3 GPS suggestion 4 Attendance book entries 5 Social equal 6 Game keeper? 7 1981 film, "Mommie _____" 8 Headlight setting 9 Scissors sound 10 Mall units 11 Kind of party 12 Gets on 13 Alda series 19 Attach, as a patch 21 University of Arizona athlete 25 On the peak of 28 Pizazz 29 Use a fan on 31 Actress Delany 32 Wide-mouthed pitcher 33 Geometric measure 34 Cider season 35 Tainting 37 Weaving frame

40 Fuzzy fruit 42 Cheap hotels 45 In the _____: Eventually 48 _____ Christi, TX 50 Pompous 52 Arachnoid work 55 Abated 56 South American plain

57 Buttonholes, usually 58 Picket-line crosser 59 Pelvic bones 60 Assignment 62 Flim-___ (scam) 64 Former boxing champ

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A V I A R Y

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HEALTH GET UP TO $50,000 from the Government of Canada. Do you or someone you know have any of these conditions? ADHD, Anxiety, Arthritis, Asthma, Cancer, COPD, Depression, Diabetes, Difficulty Walking, Fibromyalgia, Irritable Bowels, Overweight, Trouble Dressingµ.and hundreds more. All ages and medical conditions qualify. Call the Benefits Program 1-800-2113550 or send a text message with your name and mailing address to 403-980-3605 for your free benefits package. LIKE TO TRAVEL BUT have a medical condition that requires medical assistance? We can supply experienced medical. Over 40 years of experience, reasonable rates - travel anywhere. For more details email: cns@cnsmedicalinc.ca. REAL ESTATE

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1600 ACRES OF GOOD QUALITY FARMLAND For Sale in SE Saskatchewan. $2,987,000. 1560 cultivated acres. $155,000.00 rent with 10 year lease. Great farmers renting and excellent investment opportunity. Call Doug 306-716-2671. SERVICES CRIMINAL RECORD? Why suffer employment/licensing loss? Travel/business opportunities? Be embarrassed? Think: Criminal Pardon. US entry waiver. Record purge. File destruction. Free consultation. 1-800-347-2540. www.accesslegalmjf.com. GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest. com.

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• T HU R S D AY, O C T OB ER 10 , 2019

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• T H U R S D AY, O C T OB ER 10 , 2019

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The Jasper Fitzhugh - Thursday, October 10, 2019  

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