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WWW.FITZHUGH.CA | DECEMBER 5, 2019 | SINGLE COPY FREE

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SANTA RIDES THE RAILS

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TEAMS REACH PEAKS

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MOUNTAIN TALES TOLD


Protective Services and Operations pitched their 2020 budget requests to council last week. | File photo

Municipal staff present second round of budget requests to council PROTECTIVE SERVICES

JOANNE LAYH SPECIAL TO THE FITZHUGH

On Wednesday, November 27 Jasper Municipal Council heard the second of two public budget presentations scheduled last week. The second round of budget requests included presentations from the protective services and operations departments. The proposed 2020 budget includes an estimated 5.3 per cent tax increase, which would equate to a $7 increase per $100,000 assessed value for residential properties and $35 per $100,000 for commercial properties. However, finance and administration director Natasha Malenchak said new assessment growth could result in an estimated net municipal tax increase of 5.09 per cent.

Deputy fire chief Don Smith presented a budget with a tax increase of 1.37 per cent for the protective services department. In his presentation to council, Smith identified the following priorities for the protective services department in the upcoming year: • Fire prevention inspection; • Auxiliary firefighter program; • Annual emergency exercise and training; and • Fire prevention. Smith also presented council with the following 2020 capital requests, totalling $447,000: • Rescue replacement (phase two) $375,000; • Turnout gear - $22,000; • Replace front sidewalk/parking plugs - $20,000; and

• Training room kitchen renovation $30,000; Coun. Helen Kelleher-Empey asked what would happen with the old rescue truck. “We haven’t decided what our intention is with that,” Smith said, adding they will return to council with some ideas in the future.

OPERATIONS

Director of operations John Greathead presented a budget with a tax increase of 1.23 per cent for the department. Greathead identified the following major initiatives the department would like to undertake in 2020: • Environmental services review; • Utility rate review; • Road permitting system; • Road repairs; • Dark Sky; • Operation facility and land review; and • Wastewater treatment plant. Greathead’s requested operations service review would explore solid waste and recycling, compost, road maintenance and winter maintenance, recommendations of best practices and ways of addressing service creep. Greathead also proposed the addition of two new positions: a health and safety advisor and an office manager. The operations director also presented council with the following 2020 capital requests: • Operations service review $120,000; • Level 3 EV charger station $100,000;

• Missing sidewalk linkage with the town site TBD - $50,000; • Aerway aerator - $13,000; • AMA building demolition and rehabilitation - $50,000; • Memorial board replacements $15,000; • Overseeder - $8,200; • Irrigation vault replacement program - $20,000; • Small equipment - $10,000; • Streetscape study - $80,000; • Jasper stage heaters, retractable walls and park electrical - $75,000; • Bulk water station - $125,000; • Pickup truck - $60,000; • Valve replacement program $50,000; • Hydrant rebuilds - $55,000; • Reservoir cleaning - $10,000; • Valve actuator upgrades - $25,000; • WWTC operational update and preparation of plant for next operating contract bid process $300,000; • Abandoned trailer park manholes $30,000; • Davit arm upgrades - $10,000; • Garbage bin refurbishment $60,000; and • Camera system for solid waste vehicles - $7,500. “When I look at what you have proposed for the next two years it is substantial,” Mayor Richard Ireland said. “I would really like to know from you what is most important.” Greathead responded that he believes what they’ve asked for they can achieve departmentally.

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Cenotaph change-up on the cards

FUCHSIA DRAGON PUBLISHER@FITZHUGH.CA

Its two main grants are the Alberta Foundation for the Arts government grant and a summer student grant. Boocock said the Arts grant has been about $4,000 but is set to be cut by 50 per cent by the new Alberta government. And the summer student grant pays for about half the wages for that seasonal employee. Boocock offered three solutions that could help the gallery out of financial despair. The first was a cash injection from council of $15,000 per year, the second was to pay rent once a year from profits made by the gallery, and the third was to pass administration to council and have the space become a public art gallery. “We would be more than happy to continue what we do now,” said Boocock. “This facility is amazing - it is world class and we are so proud to be here. “We are so thankful but the reality is this.” Councillor Paul Butler said: “It seems the business model of this building is not really working. “One tenant is paying rent and it’s not working and the other is not paying rent and looking for money. “We are going to have to come up with some answers.”

Jasper’s cenotaph is a centrepiece of the town. But cracks are appearing between the stones and the memorial does not comply with national standards. Jasper Legion presented a proposal to the municipal council this week for a $125,000 project which would see the memorial park fixed up, updated and expanded. “The cenotaph is the centrepiece of the Millenium Memorial Park and is an important and highly visible municipal asset but requires updating to represent the past and present wars and conflicts,” said Greg Key in his presentation. Millenium Memorial Park was built in 2000, supported by Jasper Legion and the municipality. “We have seen many changes in the world since then,” said Key. “Canada has been part of many UN mandated peacekeeping missions.” According to Key, the national standard is to not include individual names of people on our memorials or cenotaphs but highlight the actions and conflicts to which Canadians participated. Key said the cenotaph sizing, design and placement identifies it as a war memorial but by adding and properly locating more plaques, conformity can be achieved. He said the cenotaph should include: the South African War (1899 to 1902), First World War (1914 to 1918), Second World War (1939 to 1944), Korean War (1950 to 1953), Peacekeeping, Afghanistan (2001 to 2014). This portion of the project would have a price tag, including installation, of $18,500. Additional memoriam to honour Indigineous War Veterans, Wardens Service and Parks Canada, United Nations Missions, Jasper Emergency Services and the RCMP was also proposed by Key. He said the cenotaph should also have a topper, in a military style or of an animal that represents the area and indigenous cultures. “We have the idea of a bear which represents the park area and is a symbol of strength, courage, leadership and family,” he said. And memory bricks could be added to the park for dedication to lost loved ones. These additions, including installation,

NEW SLIDE NOT READY

Jasper’s cenotaph is non-compliant to National War Memorial standards and in need of repair. The Legion presented a $125,000 project to council this week to update and expand the memorial park. | File photo

would cost $81,500 - $50,000 of which would be for the topper. In the presented budget, the total cost of the project would be $125,000, with the rest of the costs coming from the $15,000 repair on the stones and $9,600 contingency.

ARTISTS GUILD IN DOWNWARD TURN Jasper Artists Guild ( JAG) is running out of money and could be broke by the end of next year. Member Claude Boocock went to council week to explain the Guild’s financial troubles. She explained that JAG moved into the Cultural Centre in 2016 with $71,000 in cash assets but said their expenditure is much greater than before and they are down to $20,000.

“At this rate we expect JAG to have exhausted its funds, earned and saved in the 16 years before moving into the new facility, by December 31, 2020,” she said. Boocock said JAG’s biggest expense is its $1,700 per month rent, plus utilities. And the gallery is not selling enough art to meet its expenses. “We find this new location compared to the old Fire Hall is very difficult to entice visitors to us,” said Boocock. “We still get visitors but it seems to be that block and a half is a big issue. “We have put up signs but it’s difficult to entice people.” The artist said the gallery had 300 to 350 visitors a day at its old location and now draws in 60 to 65. Unlike Habitat for the Arts, JAG can’t apply for many grants because it is a retail facility.

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The new slide at Jasper Aquatic Centre will not be ready for use before the new year. The pool closed in September to allow for a massive $800,000 repair operation, which included replacing the slide, deepening the slide’s landing pool and other general repairs. Culture and Recreation director Yvonne McNabb told council this week that the pool should reopen for December 21 - but the slide won’t be ready for use. “The slide will be in place just the stairs need to be completed,” she said. “We are waiting for follow-up from the contractors on design work for the stairs.” McNabb said the pool should remain open while work is done to finish the stairs as the area could be blocked off. And the opening date for the slide “could be around mid January”. Councillor Scott Wilson said: “This is pretty poor media. The pool has been closed for three months to do this project and the stairs to the new slide aren’t ready. We are spending all this money on this and it is not completed.”

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Lifelong Jasperite Jessica Reed and her partners, Christopher Stolfa and Timothy McClelland are here to help you with your legal needs. | F.Dragon photo

ALWAYS HERE TO HELP

FUCHSIA DRAGON PUBLISHER@FITZHUGH.CA

For Jessica Reed there’s no place like home - and no better feeling than helping her community. The barrister and solicitor grew up in Jasper before heading to the Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia to study law, then articled and wrote the bar exam in Vancouver. “Then I fell in love with someone I knew from kindergarten and that’s what brought me back,” said Reed. “It has been incredible. There is such a rich, deep sense of community here. “It’s cool being here as a kid, but as an adult it is the most amazing place to be a part of.” Reed has been living and practising law in Jasper since 2014. She started by working from home, then partnered up with Christopher Stolfa in 2018. And Stolfa, an experienced family law lawyer, has been in Jasper since 2011. “He is the kind of lawyer you want on your side,” said Reed. “He is not going to start fires, he is so reasonable and knows the law so well. “There is a shortage of family lawyers in the region and I am proud to have him on my team.” By November 2018, the law firm was so busy that

the duo partnered up with a law firm in Hinton, Tim McClelland. “Tim and I have complementary practices,” said Reed. “We are counterparts and able to support each other’s practices and have each other’s backs.” McClelland Stolfa Reed works in real estate, family law, estate law, corporate services and civil litigation. Reed said her goal is always to help people in times of need - it’s why she got into the practice in the first place. “I wanted to help people and problem solve and use my brain,” she said. “Law school was very much theoretical but in Jasper I love meeting people and figuring out problems and doing what I can to help.” And Reed’s office in the Jasper clock tower is always open and ready to take you in. “We try to be very welcoming,” said the solicitor. “All three of us think law offices can be intimidating but we have made the conscious decision to strive to make it more welcoming. “We want to throw that right away - you are a human being and your problems are very much worthwhile.” And Reed said all three partners’ favourite thing is to help people. “We are welcoming and giving a high quality of work and our staff are so invaluable, we couldn’t do it without them,” she said.

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NEWS BITES

205 GEIKIE STREET - $739,000

This nicely updated three bedroom home sits on a beautifully landscaped R2 lot. Very bright open floor plan, large windows, spacious living room with wood burning fireplace. The lower level features a rec room, sauna, large jacuzzi soaker tub. Heated double garage completes this fine family home.

There was no going hungry at this year’s Cookie Walk at Alpine Summit. | Supplied photo

Cookie monsters bring the cash

Alpine Summit Seniors Lodge held its annual Cookie Walk this weekend. Tables of donated homemade cookies were up for grabs on Saturday with all manner of decorations including reindeer cookies, sprinkle cookies and candy cane cookies. And there was a silent auction with prizes including steaks, ribs and Alpine Summit dinner cards. Ornesto Tassoni, manager of Alpine Summit, said: “It was absolutely phenomenal, thank you so much to the community.” The event raised more than $4,100, which will go towards the purchase of a new bus. Alpine Summit would like to give thanks to Bear’s Paw Bakery, Diannes Gifts, Evil Daves, Gail Leong Knitting, Glenda the Great, Jasper Inn, Jasper Liquor Store and Wine Cellar, Jasper Tire and Auto, Jaspers Bright Lights, Jennifer Ottaway Art, Jasper Park Lodge, Syrahs, Wild Orchid Salon, all the generous cookie makers, all the cookie monsters, volunteers, families and friends.

All lifts open at Marmot

The ski season is now in full swing at Marmot Basin. The Jasper ski hill opened the lower half of the hill for the winter on November 8, with the upper and Eagle Ridge lifts opening the following week. And last Thursday, November 28, the last lift, The Knob was opened at noon. According to Marmot Basin, opening the Knob Chair is the beacon for intermediate and experts to head to the mountain. Knob Traverse is a cruiser option for those getting back into gear, but Dupres Bowl and Knob Bowl await those ready to rip. As of Wednesday morning, Marmot has a snow base of 66 centimetres and has accumulated 128 centimetres of snow. And more was on the way, with flurries forecast for Wednesday afternoon, Thursday, Friday and Saturday.

Vehicle passes are in

It is that time of year again. Jasper resident vehicle passes for 2019 will expire at the end of the year, and the new editions are now in stock at the Parks Canada office. So take your vehicle registration to the Parks administration office, in the train station, and you will be issued the latest edition, which will be valid from January 1, 2020. The new pass features a stunning view of a glacial stream from the Stutfield Glacier in the south end of Jasper National Park. And for those living in the park temporarily, work passes are available to match the length of your employment. Documentation like a letter of employment and vehicle registration are required. The administration office is open from Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Lighting the World Tree

Jasper’s World Tree is set in place in Robson Park, ready for its official lighting this Friday. On December 6 at 7 p.m. families will gather at the park across from the library for the event. There will be carolling by the Jasper Community Choir, cider and hot chocolate served by Santa’s Anonymous, a warming fire and tales of Jasper’s bygone winters by Jasper’s Niki Wilson. The World Tree has been placed for the community and will serve as a hub for winter and Christmas festivities. And Jasperites are encouraged to bring their own decorations to brighten up the growing festive tree. Anyone is welcome to add ornaments to the World Tree at any time. They should be weather friendly and not food based.

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HISTORY AT A GL ANCE

It may be cold outside but hearts are warm in Jasper this time of year. The festive season has officially begun, a time for generosity and family. I had my dose of family time for the winter during my trip to England in November. And this week I returned to Jasper with my sister, Poppy. It was her first time here and she certainly received a royal Canadian welcome from the -20C temperatures. It is a great pleasure when family and friends come to visit and we can re-explore our favourite parts of the park and see it with fresh eyes. We may feel we still appreciate Jasper’s beauty every day but a new burst of love comes with every gasp and “It’s so pretty!” while hiking round our the snowy trails. Jasper’s forests are full of Christmas trees, the museum is holding its Festival of Trees, and the one to watch out for this week is the new World Tree due to be lit on Friday night. The World Tree, in Robson Park, is a Christmas tree for the whole town and will act as a hub for community events this winter. And if the sound of Christmas is what will get you in the mood, Jasper Community Choir is holding its Christmas concert on Sunday evening and there is a Christmas Sing-along at the activity centre on Monday. Creativity is not slowing down in town with the cold, there are workshops at Habitat for the Arts and Elysion Florals coming up and there are more festive craft fairs coming up, too. One has already run at the activity centre and events are coming up at the McCready Centre, Coco’s Cafe and the museum. See page 13’s community calendar for details. As for Christmas being a time of generosity, Jasper’s Santas Anonymous campaign is in full swing. This week, the Santa Train pulled out from Jasper station and gave children their ride of the season with their big-bellied, bearded hero. The Santa Train is the campaign’s biggest fundraiser but there are many ways to give to the cause this winter, see page 8. If you have a Christmas fundraiser or event, please do not hesitate to contact me. You can reach me at publisher@fitzhugh.ca or call 780 852 4888. ~ Fuchsia Dragon

History at a Glance is bought to you by the Jasper-Yellowhead Museum & Archives. The photos are selected by the editor. Online: www.jaspermuseum.org Twitter @jaspermuse

‘Tis the season

Skiers on route to Maligne Lake in front of the cabin at the north end of Medicine Lake,. 1940.

J A S P E R by James Simpkins

FA C E B O O K P O L L Jasper Artists Guild in the Cultural Centre is on track to go bust next year. Should the municipal council take it on and fund it as a public art gallery?

LAST QUESTION RESULTS Should the municipality spend $1,470,000 for the replacement of slab and boards at the arena?

YES 154 / NO 258

FITZ POPULI

A slice of the conversation that took place on this question’s Facebook post

David Miller - The arena is the only municipality run facility that makes money, all other lose. Replace the boards and make the rink a safer place to play. Tahlon Sweenie - Yes 100 percent Stephen Brake - Build a new arena!

OUR LETTERS POLICY:

VOLUME 15, ISSUE 5 PUBLISHER & EDITOR

Fuchsia Dragon............................publisher@fitzhugh.ca

PRODUCTION MANAGER

Melissa Morris...........................production@fitzhugh.ca

M A R K E T I N G C O N S U LTA N T

Ann Thomas.............................advertising@fitzhugh.ca

The Fitzhugh is available free of charge at more than 60 locations in Jasper and the surrounding area, limited to one copy per reader. We are funded solely through the support of our advertisers. The Fitzhugh is a division of Aberdeen Publishing LP (Robert W. Doull, President) and is published every Thursday. The Fitzhugh may be distributed only by its authorized contractors and employees. No person may, without the prior written permission of The Fitzhugh, take more than one copy of each issue of The Fitzhugh. The content is protected by copyright. Reproduction by any means is prohibited except with the permission of the publisher.

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The Fitzhugh welcomes complaints, praise, damnation and any other form of response to what you read in our newspaper. Diverse and varied opinions are welcome. Letters can be submitted by email, fax or snail mail. The Fitzhugh reserves the right to accept or refuse any or all material submitted for publication and maintains the right to exercise discretion in these matters. The Fitzhugh reserves the right to edit all submissions for libel, length, content and style. Please limit letters to 400 words. Letters must include your name and phone number or email, for verification purposes. We do not publish Anonymous Letters.

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CORRECTIONS: All stories are checked for accuracy, but a newspaper is a human endeavour and although we strive for perfection, we make no claim to it. Any error will be corrected in the next edition of the paper.

PO BOX 428, JASPER, ALBERTA T0E 1E0 PHONE: 1.780.852.4888; FAX: 1.780.852.4858


LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Pursuit of the park Dear editor,

Remember back to May 28 of this year when Pursuit acquired controlling interest of Mountain Park Lodges’ six properties as well as the Sawridge Inn and Convention Centre? Previously they had acquired the Maligne Canyon Gift Shop, Maligne Lake dining and boat tour adventures, the Columbia Icefield Skywalk and the Glacier View Lodge at the Columbia Icefield. Am I missing anything? Seems like they bought the entire park. I recall my initial reaction in reading the “official announcement” in the Fitzhugh article. I was disappointed by the emphasis on the “financials” of the company including the how to find them listed on the stock exchange. Fast-forward six months and the multinational operation based out of Denver is slashing hours for housekeeping, maintenance and servers (as well as closing and limiting hours of operation for their restaurants). Supervisors are being advised these “cuts” are temporary until the end of the company’s first quarter. We all know November is “shoulder season” but local businesses simply take the time to offer holiday time or do a “deep clean” after the busy tourist season.

MPL (under Jas Day Investments - a much smaller company) never slashed operating costs at the expense of their employees - never. So I ask, how are hourly workers expected to pay their rents or feed their families over Christmas? Worse yet, employees who are in the process of applying for permanent residency in Canada (a process that is currently over 18 months) are “tied” to Pursuit. Leaving to find alternative full time work with a different employer results in their application being denied. So Pursuit’s “Promise to Place” which they define on their website as “our responsibility (sic) to manage our impact on the environment, foster respect for people and champion our communities” is lip-service. Pursuit’s greed is apparent and their commitment is clearly to their “bottom line” and shareholders. So, to refer to their website and their culture of respect, “Whether you work with us, travel with us or are part of a community in which we work and live, you’ll have our respect—and we’ll earn yours.” I say the damage is done. I hope your executive team has a very Merry Christmas at the expense of your Jasper employees. Paula Ferguson, Jasper, AB

From left: Daisy McLeod, Molly McGown, Molleigh McGrath, Finian McGrath, Kate Dekker and Sophie O’Mahony had a pizza party with Jasper the Bear to celebrate their lemonade stand success. | F.Dragon photo

Youths rewarded for their zest

FUCHSIA DRAGON PUBLISHER@FITZHUGH.CA

Young Jasperites were rewarded for their entrepreneurial success with a pizza party with Jasper the Bear on Monday. The children and teenagers took part in Community Futures’ first Lemonade Day this summer. They acquired business licences, made lemonade and ran their stands for the day on June 22. And at Jasper Park Chamber of Commerce’s Business and Ambassador Awards gala, the Lemonade Youth were awarded the Young Entrepreneur(s) award.

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Molly McGown, Daisy McLeod and Kate Dekker won the Best Entrepreneur award for their Lil Ladies Lemonade stand. The girls had a soccer game on Lemonade Day and hired people to run their stand. Sophie O’Mahony won Best Tasting for the lemonade at her Lucky Lemonade stand. And Molleigh and Finian McGrath’s Au-Honey-Bee lemonade stand was named Best Stand. On Monday, the six youths were treated to pizza with Jasper the Bear and presented with certificates from MLA Martin Long and the Chamber of Commerce.

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FUCHSIA DRAGON PUBLISHER@FITZHUGH.CA The festive spirit was alive this week as Jasper families rode the 16th annual Santa Train. Children climbed on board and took their seats ready for a magical ride through the mountains - next stop, the North Pole. Railroading legend Harry Home donned his striped engineers’ overalls, entertained the young passengers, and waited for the opportune moment to bring out the guest of honour: Santa Claus himself. “We go through the Geikie tunnel, slow right down, it gets dark then I bring Santa out,” said Home, with a grin. “Suddenly, when the train comes into the light, there is Santa Claus.” And with Santa came bags of goodies from VIA Rail and CN for everyone on board - plus candy canes and manadrin oranges from TGP and the Masonic Lodge. Jasper Community Choir travelled on board too and sang “just about every Christmas carol” with the passengers. The Santa Train travelled 17-and-a-half miles to Yellowhead and back on two trips, at 9:30 a.m and 3 p.m with honorary conductor Warren Waxer, honorary brakeman Rob Black, and Home as the honorary engineer. This year is the 16th annual Santa Train, first brought to Jasper by VIA Rail’s Sue McCarthy. McCarthy wanted to give back to the community and offer children an opportunity to connect with train travel after hearing about a similar event taking place in Prince George. “It has been quite a process, I give full marks to Sue for this,” said Home. “This was done in other places but this is the only one that survives and seems to flourish. “I think because of the good will of Jasper people.” Home railroaded for 49 years with CN, from 1949 to 1998, and still works on the railroad with his steam engine, the 6060 “Even at my age,” he laughed.

He said this event is special to him as a longtime railroader and resident of Jasper. “It is the Christmas spirit,” he said. “The Christmas spirit of giving and for the children the fantasy of Santa Claus.” And the event is a major fundraiser for Jasper’s Santas Anonymous, which supports around 70 local families with gifts and food hampers. For those who missed their opportunity to purchase a train ticket, there are many other ways to support Santas Anonymous this season. Cash donations are the number one way to support the program, but there are other options as well. Cash, cheque or gift card donations can be made at 627 Patricia St. weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. You can visit the Jasper Library and Cultural Centre and Jasper Activity Centre, select a mitten from the mitten line and shop for the specific request inside the mitten. And residents can also support the program by shopping locally and buying items with a Santas Anonymous sticker or by dropping cash into collection tubes in businesses around town.

Christmas came early in Jasper as children filled the 16th annual Santa Train, dubbed the Harry Home Express, on Tuesday. | F. Dragon photos

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BACKCOUNTRY CABIN OPENS FOR WINTER FUCHSIA DRAGON PUBLISHER@FITZHUGH.CA

The perfect winter setting: Deep snow, stars bright above, and a cosy log cabin in the forest. If you thought exploring the Jasper backcountry this winter would be too much of a challenge, think again. Parks Canada and the Alpine Club of Canada (ACC) have opened Jacques Lake Cabin for the winter - and it is much more accessible than Jasper’s other backcountry cabins. From the Medicine Lake turnoff, the cabin is a 12 kilometre ski or snowshoe trip along a relatively flat trail with very little elevation at 250 metres. Keith Haberl, marketing and communications manager for the ACC, said: “We hope people see that area and fall in love with it and become more aware of the Alpine Club of Canada and visit other places.

“We hope people take up healthy, active, outdoor lifestyles, those things that drive our organization, and just go out and have great rewarding experiences in the backcountry.” This is the club’s fifth cabin in Jasper, with huts already running in the Tonquin Valley, Fryatt Valley, at Mount Colin and Mount Alberta. Parks Canada’s backcountry operations in Jasper National Park have changed over the years, reducing the frequency of use of patrol cabins, such as Jacques Lake. These cabins are valued for their cultural associations with the historical management of the park. And the Jacques Lake Cabin was identified as a viable option to be used for public enjoyment as it is not required for operations during the winter months. Parks Canada communications officer Steve Young said in a press release: “Jasper’s backcountry users are looking for easier,

introductory experiences to connect with nature in ways they are comfortable with. “Providing visitors with rustic, small roofed accommodation options in the backcountry will allow them to build more meaningful connections with the park and nature.” Haberl said the ACC and Parks Canada’s mandates coincide “a great deal”, including the use of backcountry areas and encouraging people to get out to explore the backcountry. “It’s a way to enjoy the wilderness and introduce more people to the backcountry,” said Haberl. “We believe people who know the backcountry and the mountains, love these areas because they have a personal connection to them, are the people who will help protect them.” Jacques Lakes Cabin is open for bookings from December 15 and reservations are already open. Visit www.alpineclubofcanada.ca/huts for more information.

The cabin at Jacques Lake is now open for winter use. It is a much easier route than Jasper’s other backcountry cabins, offering an introductory level winter backcountry experience. | Rogier Gruys/Parks Canada photo

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NOT IN OUR HOUSE JOHN WILMSHURST SPECIAL TO THE FITZHUGH There is a calm in the Bearcats’ game that drives their opposition crazy. Our boys are not big (at least most of them), and they are not many (only 13), but they play like a legion of behemoth monks. As they outwork teams, win puck battles, win races to cleared pucks, grind out a penalty kill, the Bearcats play with a patience and vision for the game that defeats teams twice their size and stature. Last weekend our Bantam team invited five of the best teams from their tier in central Alberta for their annual tournament. And they turned some heads. It all started early on Saturday morning against the Camrose Vikings, a classy team who would eventually skate off with the C-final trophy. Tired kids made for a slow first period and were it not for Rowan Koss’ goal at the halfway mark, I would have nothing to write. Tight going into the first intermission, Jasper put the hammer down in the second period, scoring three more unanswered goals off the sticks of Sebastian Golla, Michael Hayashi and Ty Crozier. Camrose mounted a third-period comeback, drawing to within a pair with 15 minutes left to play, but then Liam

Crozier closed the door burying a perfect pass from Tanner Carlton, his second setup for a goal in the game, giving the Bearcats a five to two lead that would hold until the final buzzer. Ty was named the Bearcats MVP for the game, and he deserved it, with a goal and some serious hustle. The puck dropped at 5 p.m. for game two for the Bearcats. This time the Edmonton Spurs filled the visitors’ bench, and I mean filled it with 19 large teenagers. But whatever confidence the Spurs had, eying our sparse team, quickly evaporated when our boys pinned them in their own zone for the opening five minutes. Reeling, the Spurs’ coaches called an early timeout to regroup. The Bearcats then proceeded to cycle the puck in the Edmonton zone for three-quarters of what remained of the period, with only the Spurs’ goalie keeping them in it. He faced a barrage of 23 shots, stopping all but two; the first a delivery by Jacob Bartziokas who went end-toend for Jasper’s first goal and then Golla with a minute to play in the frame.

The Spurs did get a goal in one of the rare moments they darkened Jasper’s defensive zone. Bearcats’ netminder, Donovan Fawcett was otherwise solid, but not busy. Edmonton could have made it interesting in the second with power play opportunities but could barely get the puck to the neutral zone, let alone pose a threat. Meanwhile, Owen Kearnan gave Jasper a two-goal lead, banging in a loose puck in a goalmouth scramble. Early in their third, the Spurs drew to within one again, but two incredible Bearcat goals sealed their fate. The first was Bartziokas’ second goal; a 200-foot clearance that slid under the Spur netminder’s stick. Minutes later it was Hayashi, standing near his own crease, launched an astonishing long-bomb towards Golla standing uncovered at centre ice. Golla grabbed the puck out of the air, dropped it to his feet and buried the ensuing breakaway. This gave Jasper another five to two lead that they would nurse to the final buzzer, propelling our home team into Sunday’s A final.

If the St. Albert Blues were looking to roll over our small-town team to take home the big prize on Sunday, the Bearcats had something else in mind. This game was tied at one, seven minutes in and after 20 minutes Jasper were clinging to a one-goal lead. But three quick goals to start the second period, two from Golla and a top-cheddar wrister from Carlton, ended the game 38 minutes before the final buzzer sounded. Those 38 minutes were filled with calm, exacting play that included powerplay opportunities for Mac Carmichael and Kalan Sawchuk, a very sweet powerplay goal by blueliner Jacob Bouchard and stifling defensive work by Dexter Fawcett. The game ended nine to one in favour of the Bearcats who collected their first-place trophy before heading home, exhausted but happy. Thanks to team manager, Ana Lea Berenguer for stellar organization, and to the many local sponsors and volunteers who generously contributed to the tournament’s success.

s e c a g n i Serv on the court this Jasper ballers hit out indoor volleyball weekend at the first ason. tournament of the se

rs at Saturday ’s There were 35 playe teams were drawn tournament and six ning of the night. randomly at the begin named The The winners were , rs Marc Chalifoux Nomads with playe , es olm H losi, A.J. Luke Eady, John Pe . am gh in nnor Cunn Kevin Valdes and Co t en m na the tour And prizes for e Spice Joint, Th m were donated fro

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• T H U R S D AY, DE C EMB ER 5 , 2019

es, Earl’s, Ransom, Translucid Adventur Jasper Pizza Place, Tan on the Run, Brewery and Jasper Famoso, Wild Rose Brew Pub. ld on Mondays Indoor volleyball is he 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. at and Saturdays from High School. Jasper Junior/Senior fee and all ages There is a $2 drop in me. and skill levels welco Volleyball League r pe Join the Jas more information, Facebook group for dates. league events and up


CAREERS

is currently accepting applications for the following positions:

................ is

now hiring ................

Full and part-time

LINE COOKS & PREP COOKS Accommodation available

.................

To

Apply ..................

DISHWASHER LINE COOKS LINE SUPERVISOR ACCOMMODATION AVAILABLE! Excellent work environment.

Apply in person or email terry@jasperbrewingco.ca

Email jnpark@famoso.ca or apply in person at 607 PATRICA STREET

is now interviewing for FULLTIME & PART TIME, DAY/NIGHT

LINE COOKS/ PREP COOKS starting at $17/hr

FULLTIME & PART TIME, DAY/NIGHT

KITCHEN HELPER/ DISHWASHER starting at $15

Also interested in individuals looking to move up within and challenge for sous chef roles. Very competitive wages, come up to Earls to apply in person.

Earls Restaurant Jasper 2nd Floor, 600 Patricia Street

BUSINESS DIRECTORY

JASPER

MAN-LIFT AND TRAILER RENTALS

DR. MONIKA BRAUN* DR. JENNIFER LANGFIELD* DR. RANDI YEE Optometrists

HINTON OPTOMETRY CLINIC: 158 Athabasca Avenue, Hinton

PO Box 2498 Jasper, AB T0E 1E0

For appointments call 780-865-3915 or 1-800-323-9891 Hours: Mon & Wed: 8am - 5pm, Tues: 10am – 8pm, Thurs: 9am - 6pm, Fri: 8am – noon / 1pm - 4pm Eyewear and Sunglasses also available at Rocky Mountain Eye Wear, Parks West Mall, Hinton

780-931-2241 • 780-883-0362

Toll-free: 1-888-852-5929

on our website new! Shop & book BUY LOCALLY!

Rick & Laurie Buck, CTC

OWNER/MANAGER laurie@buckarootravel.com, www.buckarootravel.com OWNER/MANAGER

J A S P ER , A B

• T H U R S D AY, DE C EMB ER 5 , 2019

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The sounds of Christmas Oh, the voices ring out for Christmas here in Jasper.

Jasper Community Choir is presenting its second Christmas concert this Sunday, this year called Almost Christmas. Last year’s Christmas concert, Because It’s Christmas, had “overwhelming” support from the community with the church full of locals keen to get in the festive spirit. And this year’s concert takes place on Sunday, December 9, from 7 p.m. at Jasper United Church with admission by donation. Jasper Community Choir, led director Jane Kristenson, has been running since November 2017 and has 32 members aged 20 to 76. The choir rehearses on Monday evenings at Jasper United Church from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

TRUTHS SHARED AT NIGHT OF LIES

JACLYN DACYK SPECIAL TO THE FITZHUGH

Jasper’s locals spent Monday night at the third annual Night of Lies event at 4Peaks Nightclub, presented by Rockaboo Mountain Adventures. Night of Lies started off modestly but has since evolved into an event of national proportions. The event’s focus is to share different sorts of past experiences mostly to do with extreme sports. It was a great way to kick off December and celebrate our little mountain town at this well organized social gathering. Doors opened just before 7 p.m. and the venue was full shortly after that. There were six speakers - five planned and one last minute, mostly being Jasperites, with some guests from Bow Valley who have been taking part in the event in their area longer than Jasper has held its own. The intriguing event was led by Max Darrah and Bob Covey on stage, kicking off with a true rock climber, Brandon Pullan, who has years of experience attending the event. Pullan resides in Bow Valley and is the editor of Gripped Magazine. He explained: “The whole point of this is to heckle and boo people while telling whatever sort of crazy stories.” And the event has come a long way since originating in a basement in Banff years earlier. Pullan shared more than a few stories of climbing in the Rockies, some with good outcomes and some with interesting outcomes; such as ending up needing to swing 70 metres over ice and snow while rock climbing due to winds being so high. He had a request from his audience for support on “if any climbers can help me find the loosest, worst lines around”. With the venue being jam-packed and with the help of the Jasper Events

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From left: Doug Olthof, Mike Gurnham, Wendy Hall, Brandon Pullan, Anne Gibson and Estelle Blanchette told stories at the third annual Night of Lies on Monday night. | J.Dacyk photos

team ran by Jordan Tucker and Elsa Begrand, the turnout was astonishing not to mention the good cause. Max Darrah, owner and guide at Rockaboo, said: “Ticket sales are being 100 per cent donated to the Canadian Cancer Institute, particularly for lung cancer, to honor Carol Davey’s personal battle - as well as 4Peaks donating $1 from every drink sold during the event.” He added that proceeds support a different charitable cause each year. The second speaker to take stage, Mike Gurnham, reminisced on his ten day bike tour covering 2,200 kilometres of mountain and city terrain across Japan at the 2019 Japanese Odyssey.

• T H U R S D AY, DE C EMB ER 5 , 2019

Gurnham was biking up to 260 kilometres a day and running off next to no sleep usually catching some shut-eye in a public washroom or a bus stop. Gurnham told the ups and downs of his journey and how the ending was “the most anti-climatic thing ever”. Wendy Hall shared funny stories of hitchhiking, living in Jasper since 1995 and the situations she had ended up in along the journeys - bringing lots of laughs to the crowd. Estelle Blanchette from Jasper Food Tours, shared a more R-Rated story and had the audience feeling like they were at a comedy show. There was a last minute surprise by

an audience member, then Anne Gibson finished the night off with a sentimental touch. Gibson expressed personal struggles, keeping the tone humorous but touching, as she shared her story that brought her to a current 14 years of sobriety. The audience stayed present and intrigued by the stories and it was yet another successful turnout.


THURSDAY

FRIDAY

5

4:30PM DRAWING CLUB WITH KRISTY-LEA Jasper Community Habitat for the Arts 500 Robson St.

6-8PM FAMILY PAINT NIGHT Jasper Community Habitat for the Arts 500 Robson St.

6:30-8PM PAINT NIGHT

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12-6PM RAIL TRIP TO MCBRIDE VIA Rail Jasper Train Station, 607 Connaught Dr.

3:30-6:30PM BABYSITTER TRAINING GPRC Jasper, 631 Patricia St.

7PM WORLD TREE LIGHTING Robson Park

Folding Mountain Brewing 225 Folding Mountain Village

7-9PM FESTIVAL OF TREES: WINE AND CHEESE RECEPTION Jasper Museum, 400 Bonhomme St.

7PM JPCC CHRISTMAS PARTY

SATURDAY

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11AM-2PM PAWS AND PENCILS CAT CAFE Jasper Community Habitat for the Arts, 500 Robson St.

12-4PM CHRISTMAS CRAFT FAIR McCready Centre, 701 Turret St.

SUNDAY

8

DECEMBER 6 - 12

12:30-4PM PUBLIC SKATING

FROZEN II IN 3D

Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

FRIDAY TO SATURDAY & MONDAY TO WEDNESDAY 7:30PM ONLY

7PM ALMOST CHRISTMAS CONCERT

SUNDAY & THURDSAY 7:00PM ONLY MATINESS SATURDAY & SUNDAY 1:30PM ONLY

Jasper United Church 701 Turret St.

12:30-2:30PM ATOM: JASPER BEARS vs MASKWACIS

G

Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

LAST CHRISTMAS

Fairmont Jasper Park Lodge 1 Old Lodge Rd. 2-4PM

7:30-11PM WREATHS & WINE Elysion Florals, 614 Connaught Dr.

7-10PM SEASONAL WREATH WORKSHOP

FRIDAY TO SATURDAY & MONDAY TO WEDNESDAY 7:30PM ONLY

CREATE~N~TAKE: FROSTY INSPIRED CREATIONS

Jasper Community Habitat for the Arts 500 Robson St.

THURSDAY 8:45PM ONLY MATINESS SATURDAY 1:30PM ONLY

2:45-4:45PM PEEWEE: JASPER BEARS vs LEDUC 3A

Elysion Florals, 614 Connaught Dr.

PG

Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

3D MOVIES SUBJECT TO A $3 SURCHARGE WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY WILL BE IN 2D

8:30-10PM PUBLIC SKATING

SUPER SAVER TUESDAY $8

Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

NOVEMBER 21 – DECEMBER 14, 2019 FESTIVAL OF TREES JASPER MUSEUM, 400 Bonhomme St.

MONDAY

TUESDAY

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6:30-7:30PM CHRISTMAS SING-ALONG Jasper Activity Centre 305 Bonhomme St.

WEDNESDAY TWIN SCREEN CINEMA CENTRE

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10:30PM MUSEUM COFFEE HOUR Alpine Summit Seniors Lodge, 509 Turret St.

7PM MACRAME PLANT HANGER

24-HR INFO LINE 780-852-4749 • ACROSS FROM THE TRAIN STATION PROGRAM SUBJECT TO UNAVOIDABLE CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE

1-3PM INTERNATIONAL MOUNTAIN DAY FILM

If you would like to publicize your listed event in the

Habitat for the Arts 500 Robson St.

FITZ-

Habitat for the Arts 500 Robson St.

NOVEMBER 21 – DECEMBER 14, 2019 FESTIVAL OF TREES JASPER MUSEUM, 400 Bonhomme St.

THURSDAY

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FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

7PM MACRAME PLANT HANGER

10-12PM SKATE WITH SANTA AND JASPER THE BEAR

8:30-10:30AM NOVICE: JASPER vs HINTON

12:30-2:30PM ATOM: JASPER BEARS vs EDSON

10:45AM12:15PM

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1:30-3PM PUBLIC SKATING Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

6:45PM JASPER FILM CLUB: PARASITE

Habitat for the Arts 500 Robson St.

Chaba Theatre 604 Connaught Dr.

7-8:30PM JASPERVILLE TREE Elysion Florals, 614 Connaught Dr.

DE

7-9PM JASPER UNITED CHRISTMAS TEA

CHR C 14 Coco’sISTMAS C6-9PM Cafe, RAFT 608 Pa FAIR tricia S t.

McCready Centre 701 Turret St.

Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

TUESDAY

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6-8PM MACRAME OWL DECORATION

Habitat for the Arts 500 Robson St.

Jasper Park Lodge

20% DISCOUNT

PEEWEE GIRLS EXHIBITION:

2:45-4:45PM PEEWEE: JASPER BEARS vs DRAYTON VALLEY 2

Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

5:30PM COMMUNITY SENIORS DINNER Alpine Summit (reservations required)

WEDNESDAY

JASPER GRIZZLIES vs GRANDE CACHE

To book your ad, contact Ann at 780-883-0334 or advertising@fitzhugh.ca.

12:30-2:30PM PEEWEE: JASPER BEARS vs DRAYTON VALLEY 2 Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

DEC

SATURDA1Y4 10PM LIVE & LOU NIGHT D 4 Pe aks, 612 Pat

17 18

ROTARY’S COMMUNITY SENIORS LUNCH

we are offering a

Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

Jasper Arena 303 Bonhomme St.

NOVEMBER 21 – DECEMBER 14, 2019 FESTIVAL OF TREES JASPER MUSEUM, 400 Bonhomme St.

MONDAY

HUGH

15

ricia St.

11AM-3PM WINTER MARKET Jasper Museum 400 Bonhomme St.

Jasper Arena schedules subject to change

J A S P ER , A B

• T H U R S D AY, DE C EMB ER 5 , 2019

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JASPER SENIORS COMMUNITY EVENTS/ACTIVITIES CALENDAR DECEMBER SUNDAY

MONDAY

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8

TUESDAY

2

1-3pm Coffee Connection, COS

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1-3pm Coffee Connection, COS 1:30pm Seniors Society Business Meeting, Sr. Lounge 6:30-7:30pm Community Christmas SingAlong, Activity Centre

WEDNESDAY

3

1pm Seniors Curling 1-2pm Seniors Exercise, Seton Healthcare 1-3pm Community Coffee Connection, COS 1:30pm Cards, Sr. Lounge

10:30am 10 Museum Coffee hour, Alpine Summit 1pm Seniors Curling 1-2pm Seniors Exercise, Seton Healthcare 1-3pm Community Coffee Connection, COS 1:30pm Cards, Sr. Lounge

4

10:30am Knitting, Library 1-3pm Community Coffee Connection, COS 1-5pm Mixed Bridge, Sr. Lounge

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10am Coffee with COS, Pine Grove Manor 10:30am Knitting, Library 1-3pm Community Coffee Connection, COS 1-5pm Mixed Bridge, Sr. Lounge

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

8am-4pm 5 Seniors Bus Trip to Hinton 1pm Seniors Curling 1-2pm Seniors Exercise, Seton Healthcare 1-3pm World Cafe, COS 1:30pm Sr. Reading, Library

1pm Seniors Bus to Jasper shops/apts. 1-3pm Coffee Connection, COS 7pm Bridge, Pine Grove 7pm World Tree Lighting at Robson Park

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1pm Seniors Curling 1-2pm Seniors Exercise, Seton Healthcare 1-3pm World Cafe, COS 1:30pm Sr. Reading, Library 7pm United Church Tea & Bazaar

SATURDAY

6

13

1pm Seniors Bus to Jasper shops/apts. 1-3pm Coffee Connection, COS 7pm Bridge, Pine Grove

7

14

5:30pm Community Seniors Dinner, Alpine Summit (reservations required)

To book a trip on the

Italic events at Seniors’ lounge, Jasper Activity Centre Gray events at Jasper Library & Cultural Centre Compiled by COS with the Seniors Society. COS is located at 627 Patricia. Open M-F, 9:00 am - 4:30 pm. 780-852-2100 OR community@town.jasper.ab.ca.

EVERGREENS SENIORS BUS, call 780-931-9800.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR COMMUNITY LISTINGS Lions Club

Meets every third Tuesday of the month at the Anglican Church Hall at 7 p.m. Contact 780-852-7273 for more info.

Town Council Meetings Meetings on the first and third Tuesday of each month at 1:30 p.m. in the basement of the Jasper Municipal Library.

West Yellowhead Constituency

COMMUNITY SERVICES Thrift Shop Hours The Jasper Thrift Shop is open on Monday and Wednesday from 7 to 9 p.m. and Thursdays from 1 to 3 p.m. Located in the 700 Block on Geikie Street in the United Church basement.

Skills for Success Do you need help with reading, writing, speaking English or basic computer skills? We can help! Call 780.852.4418 for more information. Program is FREE. Open Mon to Fri from 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Closed at lunch.

Al-Anon Al-Anon Family Group help friends and families of alcoholics - meetings Friday at 7 p.m. at the hospital in the Cavell room. For more info please call 780-852-4518 or 780-852-4578.

Habitat for the Arts Engage, explore, experience all things art. What do you want to do? For more info stop by Wednesdays 12 p.m.-8 p.m. 780.883.ARTS (2787)

Jasper Office Hours: Constituency Staff will be available the first Wednesday of every month from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Jasper Public Library: 400 Geikie Street, Jasper. For more information or to make an appointment please call 1- 800-661-6517.

Royal Canadian Legion 401 Geikie St. Open Tues. to Sat. at 4 p.m. Children welcome until 8 p.m. Free pool, shuffle Board & darts available. 780-852-3740. Food service now available. Check our menu online; www.jasperlegion.ca.

Community Outreach Services

Satellite Office Hours in Jasper

Free, confidential, non-judgmental support and referral. Make an appointment or drop in. The coffee is always on. M – F, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 627 Patricia Street. 780-852-2100.

Jasper Alberta Supports Come in: Community Outreach Services (627 Patricia Street, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.) Call: 780-852-6292 Call: 1-877-644-9992 (toll-free/after hours) Click: myalbertasupports.ca Services & Programs: Seniors, Disabilities, Homelessness, Income Support, and more......

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New Location for MLA office Jasper Public Library, 500 Robson Street. First Wednesday of every month from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. L’ACFA régionale de Jasper Follow the activities organized by the ACFA (Association canadiennefrançaise de l’Alberta) on our web and Facebook pages. Join the francophones of Jasper! Suivez les activités organisées par l’ACFA (Association canadiennefrançaise de l’Alberta) sur notre site Internet et notre page Facebook. Joignez-vous à la communauté francophone de Jasper! For more informations/pour plus d’informations : 780-852-7476, www.acfa.ab.ca/jasper www.facebook.com/ACFA Jasper.

J A S P ER , A B

ASK (Advocates for Special Kids) Meetings first Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Community Outreach office. Jasper Food Bank Help is available from the Jasper Food Bank Thurs nights. Drop in at St. Mary and St. George Anglican Church at the corner of Miette and Geikie St. Open from 6 to 6:30pm. 12 Step Meetings Alcoholics Anonymous - meetings Monday and Saturday at 8 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meetings Thursdays at 8 p.m. All meetings are held at the hospital in the Cavell room. For more information or to talk to someone regarding alcohol, drugs or gambling problems please call 780-852-2909. Jasper Theatre Arts Collective Are you interested in theatre arts? Get involved here in Jasper! We meet Tuesday nights 7 p.m. at the Jasper Legion. Follow us on Facebook (Jasper Theatre Arts Collective). STI Screening Free, Confidential and NONJudgemental STI testing. Please contact Jasper Community Health Services to make an appointment at 780-852-4759.

• T H U R S D AY, DE C EMB ER 5 , 2019

Jasper Victim Services Confidential advice and referrals for victims of crime and trauma. Information is available about restitution, financial benefits, victim impact statements, court process and counseling services. Located in the RCMP Detachment at 600 Bonhomme St., or call 780-852-2275. Jasper Social Dance Community Salsa dancing club meets in the old classroom at the Legion every Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. for a 45-minute class on the basics. The Improvers class for past participants starts at 8:15 p.m. $5 cash to join a class. Basic introduction to finding the beat, basic step and partner hold will be led by other dancers who were beginners like you not so long ago. The vibe will be welcoming and relaxed. No partners needed. All ages encouraged to join. Everyone takes turns dancing together. Jasper Prenatal Classes Wednesdays 6:30-8:30 p.m., September 18 and 25, October 2, 9 and 16. For more info or to register call Jasper Community Health Services at 780-852-4759. Parent Link Centre 627 Patricia St. – Open playroom, crafts, children’s yoga, infant massage and MORE (all FREE). Like us on Facebook “Parent Link Jasper”or call 780-852-6535. Jasper Municipal Library Open Mon-Thurs 10am-8pm, Fri-Sat 10am-5pm. Office services, free wifi, activities & programming for all ages. Call 780-852-3652, check out our website at www.jasperlibrary.ab.ca or find us on Facebook.

Pick-up broomball league Every Friday at 7 p.m. at the Pat. Circle Arena. Bring $5 and a helmet. Knee pads are helpful to have but not necessary. Rules and how to play will be explained at the beginning of each session so folks are welcomed to come play regardless of experience or whether they’ve even heard of the game before. Pickleball anyone? Saturdays at 10 am at the High School gym, entrance by the skatepark. Paddles & balls available. $3 drop-in fee. Jasper Volleyball League Indoor volleyball, Mondays and Saturdays from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. at the high school. $2 drop in fee. All ages and skill levels welcome. Join our Facebook Group for more information, league events & updates. Adult badminton Drop-in adult badminton is held every Wednesday from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Jasper Junior Senior High School gym. Drop-in fee is $3.00 and rackets are available. Clean gym shoes only.


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• T H U R S D AY, DE C EMB ER 5 , 2019

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Jasper Bantam Bearcats extended their winning streak to five on Friday when they beat the Ft. Saskatchewan Rangers at home. | F.Dragon photos

THE BEARCATS’ HONOUR ROLL JOHN WILMSHURST SPECIAL TO THE FITZHUGH

Last Friday evening, before the puck dropped on the Bearcats’ annual tournament, the Ft. Saskatchewan Rangers came for a visit for some Northern Alberta Interlock league play. Our boys have been on a roll recently, on a four-game winning streak and a four and two record; good for second place in the league. This is good enough to make the honour roll. It usually takes five minutes for either team to find the net in these games, but about two minutes in and 30 seconds after I proudly announced that stat to the few who still listen to me in the stands, Grade 10 honour student Sebastian Golla walked into the Rangers’ zone and sniped Jasper’s first goal, low glove. I guess that’s why he’s on the honour roll and I’m not. The first period saw a lot of fast, back and forth action from these wellmatched teams, but there was no more scoring until a minute to play when Ft. Saskatchewan equalized, beating Jasper netminder Donovan Fawcett, who is at the top of his class on weekends, if not during the week, on a partial break. After the first period, the Bearcats and Rangers were knotted at one.

Again, about two minutes into the second, Tanner Carlton, who is a scholar in the rink, perfectly tipped a Dexter Fawcett point shot over a sprawling Ft. Saskatchewan netminder. Dexter is a hard worker on the ice, and obviously in the classroom as well, making the list of academic achievement in his Grade 9 class. Two to one Jasper, and despite dominating the play, Jasper could not solve the Ranger goaltender again in the second, despite some aggressive pinching by blueliner Jacob Bouchard, who just

missed scoring, and the honour roll, by inches. Down a goal, Ft. Saskatchewan tied it up late in the second period. After 40 minutes of play, nothing was solved. In the third period it was again Jasper’s defensive play that moved to the head of the class. Honour student Jacob Bartziokas had an apparent goal called back in the early going and then had some great looks, stepping in from the blueline or on a Bobby Orr rush.

ATOMS COME OUT ON TOP TINA GIBBONS SPECIAL TO THE FITZHUGH

The Jasper Atom Bears had their first road trip of the season and came out on top. First stop was Riviere Qui Bar against the CR Knights and the final score of this game was ten to two with hat tricks for #7 Max Lescard and #20 Ethan Gibbons. There was a beautiful play between cousins #4 Dustin and #6 Mathew Derksen resulting in a goal for Mathew and an assist for Dustin, giving Dustin three points in the game. A third goal scorer in the cousin circle was #14 Carson Miller. This defenseman is unstoppable when he gets the puck, he flies down the ice. Game 2 in Athabasca was a little more challenging for the team but a goal by #4 Dustin Derksen in the first 25 seconds set the tone. The team is really progressing in their ability to play as a team and set up some nice plays. This could be seen in a team effort by #9 Louis Campeau and #5 William Strugnall and #20 Ethan Gibbons which resulted in the first goal of the third period.

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J A S P ER , A B

The goal was followed by a nice pass from #77 Grayden Henderson to #4 Dustin Derksen for the successful shot and there was one final breakaway by #14 Carson Miller, making the final score eight to four.

Ethan Gibbons sinks a goal against the CR Knights. | Supplied photo

• T H U R S D AY, DE C EMB ER 5 , 2019

JBart was shut out this night but it looks like he has been reading up on the offensive game. It was up to Golla to give Jasper their third lead of the game, again with a clean look from the left dot, and then Grade 9 academic achiever and clearly Jasper’s best on-ice student of the game, Michael Hayashi, wristed one in from the point to give his Bearcats a twogoal cushion. Carlton set up Jasper’s next two markers, feeding Golla and then Liam Crozier who is also on the Jasper High School’s principal’s list for academic excellence. Rowan Koss and Mac Carmichael put on a late game charge for the Bearcats, but the game would end six to two in favour of Jasper, extending their winning streak to five. The high school honour roll won’t appear in the paper this year, so if you want to check out all the kids who are doing well in school, you’ll have to get ahold of a December newsletter. The Bearcats are idle this weekend but continue their studies in Devon on Dec 14. That, you can read about here.

SCOREBOARD

Jasper Bantam Bearcats 6 vs Ft. Saskatchewan Rangers 2 Jasper Atom Bears 10 vs CR Knights 2 Jasper Atom Bears 8 vs Athabasca 4 Jasper Peewee Bears 2 vs Drayton Valley 3 Jasper Peewee Bears 3 vs Mayerthorpe 7

Profile for Jasper Fitzhugh Newspaper

The Jasper Fitzhugh - Thursday, December 5, 2019  

The Jasper Fitzhugh - Thursday, December 5, 2019  

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