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YEARBOOK EDITION

FISHER STUDENT ORGANIZATION HIGHLIGHTS

SUPERLATIVES SENIOR SPOTLIGHTS


Fisher Yearbook Staff

Caitlin Hwang Outgoing President

Devin Casey President-elect

Maggie Wehri Vice President

Lane Rudolph Ad & Sales Director

Adam Zimmerman Content Editor

Malia Funk Assistant Content Editor

Rachel Korsen Design Editor

Kaili Tao Marketing Director

Crystal Squires Secretary

Gretchen Weber Treasurer

Christian Johnson Ad & Sales Team

Chris Acosta Design Team

Robert Craig Design Team

Sam Goldberg Design Team

Michelle Li Design Team

Jay Mazzone Design Team

Amanda Frasure Marketing Team

Amanda Revesz Marketing Team

Hallie Sansbury Marketing Team

Jordan Strizak Writing Team

Camille Baker Writing Team

Ellen Dupont Writing Team

Not pictured:

Alex Fiete Writing Team

Please contact fisherinkeditors@gmail.com with suggestions or concerns for Fisher Ink. FISHER INK

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Regina Squeri Writing Team

Andrea Evans, Advisor

This newsmagazine is a product of the Fisher Ink staff. Material does not necessarily reflect the opinions or policies of Fisher College of Business administrators. All printing costs are generated from advertisements, fundraisers and sponsors. Photos used are taken by Fisher Ink staff or labeled for free and commercial reuse.

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Joey Selmants Writing Team

FISHER YEARBOOK

SPONSORED BY


Contents volume 09 | issue 03

04 21

20

05

Essentials

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The Bar has been Raised Fisher Yearbook 05 20 Dean Christine Poon is Photos, highlights and stories from Fisher student organizations. Read about moving on from OSU after five years. Fisher’s historic business fraternities and find out which organizations have just begun. Jeopardy Dream Alleviating Poverty 06 10 A Fisher student fulfills her A group of students travel to dream as a contestant on Jeopardy. Honduras to help find food security. PSE Takes Silver Chapter Zero Defeats, Zero Waste 07 12 PSE comes back from San Ohio Stadium is trying to Diego with some valuable hardware. achieve perfection in waste diversion. Inside Local Music Den Master 08 Music businesses in C-bus are 14 Fisher grad Lucas Costanzo working together to help the industry. reflects on his undergraduate thesis.

FISHER YEARBOOK

FOLLOWINGFISHER SCAN this QR code with your smartphone to check out Fisher Ink’s page and receive updates on Fisher College of Business events. @fisherink | facebook.com/fisherink

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NEWS>FAREWELLS

FROM THE DESK OF THE PRESIDENT Dear Readers, I am so happy that you decided to pick up and open this Fisher Yearbook. This keepsake that you now hold in your hands (or have open on your screen, if you’re reading this online) contains the joys, successes, and lessons that your peers here at Fisher have experienced as individuals and as powerful student organizations. Upperclassmen, this yearbook was created to help preserve your memories of some pretty awesome stuff you accomplished as an undergraduate and the people you worked with. Underclassmen, this yearbook was created to inspire your future success as you step into the shoes of your predecessors. Everyone, this yearbook was also created because yearbooks are fun and they mark our survival of a long, polar vortex, construction-filled, Gordon Gee-less year. I just want to say that I hope you stay tuned for what Fisher Ink will offer next year. This organization’s purpose is to foster a sense of community between Fisher students by keeping you informed about what the kid sitting next to you in Accounting 2200 might be doing for the business world or what you can do next week to impress a recruiter. Working with this year’s team of very hard-working and talented individuals has given me confidence that Fisher Ink will continue to publish content that is thoughtful, intriguing, and useful. Some last minute advice as summer break nears: internships are great and really do give you the experience and resume builder to stand out, but don’t beat yourself up if you don’t have one this summer. You’re still smart and talented – it just wasn’t meant to be at this moment. Take this blessing of free time to do something exciting that you won’t be able to do once you get a job. For all you know, the right opportunity might just hit you in the face while you’re out exploring. It might seem irrelevant and insignificant at first, but when you find a way to make the most of it, you will have something impressive to share at your next interview. For my fellow graduating seniors, I wish you the best of luck in the professional world that we all have been preparing to enter. Sincerely,

Caitlin Hwang Outgoing President 4

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FISHER YEARBOOK

THIS ORGANIZATION’S PURPOSE IS TO FOSTER A SENSE OF COMMUNITY BETWEEN FISHER STUDENTS BY KEEPING YOU INFORMED ABOUT WHAT THE KID NEXT TO YOU MIGHT BE DOING FOR THE BUSINESS WORLD.


THE BAR

HAS BEEN

RAISED story by malia funk

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n enormous amount of work goes into creating the environment of academic excellence, the strong sense of community, and the close connection to the business world that Fisher students enjoy each day. For five years, Dean Christine Poon stood at the helm of this ongoing operation and recently announced that this year will be her last at Fisher. When reflecting on her career, Dean Poon shared, “There is nothing that I have done that has been more fulfilling than my five years here.” As Dean Poon prepares to step down, the students of the Fisher College of Business wish to thank her for her passion, engagement, and innovation. In an interview, Dean Poon listed the various things she will miss most about Fisher. “First and foremost, I will miss interacting personally with students.” During her time at Fisher, Dean Poon hosted the Dine with the Dean series, in which ten business students were invited to the executive conference room for the opportunity to get to know her better, pick her brain, and network with one another. Dean Poon will also miss being a part of an institution focused on expanding knowledge, and the opportunity to influence the formation of new business models by educating young leaders. “I will miss pretty much every aspect of what we do here! It’s been a wonderful five years,” said Dean Poon. She explained that her decision to only serve one five-year term was made

before she even began at Fisher. Given the rapid rate of change in Fisher and higher education in general, she believes that fresh ideas need to be brought to the institution to best respond to this dynamic environment. Dean Poon’s successor will inherit

“There is nothing I have done that has been more fulfilling than my five years here.” Dean Christine Poon

the fruits of her effort to strengthen the connection between academics and the corporate world. She has worked to establish long-lasting relationships between Fisher and the business community, from local start-ups to global powerhouses. As a whole, she felt that these relationships would increase the resources available to the students, faculty, and college. An example of FISHER YEARBOOK

these goals in action is the creation of the Industry Clusters program, an indepth curriculum designed to educate students about a particular sector of business, and to give them the opportunity to work face-to-face with professionals in that industry. Although Dean Poon feels that Fisher has taken great strides during her time here, she hopes that her successor makes an even greater impact. She encourages the new dean to “Set high standards and dream big. This place is deserving of big dreams.” Poon hopes that her successor will guide Fisher as it continues to grow as a globally recognized institution of excellence. She further advises the new dean to recognize that the students of Fisher are growing dramatically in quality and will need to continue to be challenged. To assist with these aspirations, Dean Poon has pledged a $1 million donation to be used by ten of Fisher’s professors not only for research, but also towards improving the quality of teaching. Her investment is grounded in her belief that Fisher faculty can instill long lasting impressions on students, and ultimately will be the reason why students stay connected with Fisher long after graduation. Likewise, the Fisher community hopes that Dean Poon also stays connected after her term here ends, and we wish her success and happiness in whatever the future may bring. issuu.com/FisherInk

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NEWS>STUDENT SPOTLIGHT

FISHER STUDENT FULFILLS JEOPARDY DREAM story by adam zimmerman

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his past February, Maria Khrakovsky fulfilled one of her lifelong dreams: participating in the legendary game show, Jeopardy. For such an avid fan, this moment was the culmination of years of dedication and passion. Khrakovsky took part in the College Championship edition, representing Ohio State against 14 students from other prestigious schools, including Harvard and Princeton. Khrakovsky attributes her experiences in Fisher to inspiring her to finally act on her dream and to helping prepare her for success. The senior, double majoring in Accounting and French, watched the show as a child and became hooked from the start. “It is one of the more intellectual game shows. The questions are hard and the people on there are smart,” Maria remarks. Although she did not make it to the final round of competition, Khrakovsky won $5,000 6

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and, most importantly, had a memorable experience. She spent a week in Los Angeles for the taping, which included meeting the host of Jeopardy, Alex Trebek. She also formed lasting relationships with the other participants. “We were going through the process together. We did not view each other as competitors.” This wasn’t the first time Khrakovsky has worked closely with a group of high achieving individuals. Her involvement in the Undergraduate Accounting Honors program helped her gain the skills and confidence she needed to reach for her goal. “We talk about more theoretical topics, and go beyond accounting, into subjects such as finance and economics.” Impromptu class presentations and the faculty’s predilection towards the Socratic Method also helped prepare her for the quick thinking style of the competitive game show. Recalling the intricacies of the FISHER YEARBOOK

game, Khrakovsky explains, “It is not like a test and not about what you know, but rather how quickly you can recall information.” Appearing on Jeopardy is just one of many highlights that Maria Khrakovsky will recall from her time as a Fisher student. “Fisher has a great network. I received so much support from professors and classmates when I appeared on Jeopardy.” Maria believes her Fisher experience has given her the confidence she needed to step outside of her comfort zone and reach for a multitude of opportunities, like appearing on Jeopardy. “Fisher pushes me to do my best.” She encourages her classmates to challenge themselves as well, “Just go for it. Take advantage of the opportunities not only here at Fisher, but at the university in general.” Hopefully Maria’s story will be an inspiration to her classmates to do just that.


PSE TAKES TOP SILVER CHAPTER story by maggie wehri

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he Ohio State’s Gamma Nu Chapter, Pi Sigma Epsilon, made chapter history this past spring when they took home a record six rewards at the PSE national case competition in San Diego, California. PSE received recognition including Top Silver Chapter, 1st place in the Case Study Competition, 1st place in the NEF Marketing Challenge, a Future Leader Award, and two 2nd place awards for both Top Market Research Project and Top Sales Project. PSE funded a total of 19 delegates to attend the professional business fraternity annual event at the Towne and Country Resort and Convention Center. Led by fourth years and other executive

board members, PSE orchestrated their presentations showcasing the Chapter’s 2012-2013 projects and special accomplishments among other top professional fraternities in the countries. PSE signed deals with some of the top companies in the country, which include Manufacturers’ Agents National Association, Homage, Nike, PromoWest Productions and Superfly Marketing Group. Each member of PSE was delegated to a specific case and collaborated with company partners to achieve goals such as improving social media presence, enhancing campus awareness, planning large sponsor events, and identifying and testing target markets. FISHER YEARBOOK

Lauren Pilz, Vice President of Public Relations, states, “we take on projects to benefit our chapter internally. The fact that we were able to successfully gain national recognition is what was really exciting and awesome.” Pilz attributes much of their success to being cohesive as a team. “Being friends in a tight knit organization like this provides the perfect atmosphere when it’s time to get down to business.” For the upcoming national competition this April, PSE qualifies as finalists in 11 different award categories, which happens to be a personal best for the Gamma Nu Chapter. Clearly, living by their motto of “play hard, work harder” is paying off. issuu.com/FisherInk

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FEATURE>COMMUNITY

INSIDE

Local Music

story by alex fiete and gina squeri

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isher Ink is partnering with Joey Hendrickson, a local singer, songwriter, and founder of the Columbus Songwriters Association, to promote and share insight of the emerging developments in Columbus’ rising local music scene. With the growing popularity of the Columbus music industry, a local movement has commenced to promote the music industry. Many organizations, including CD 102.5, are supporting Columbus’ rising music industry by featuring local artists. Derek DuPont, a Promotions/Marketing Intern at the station, explains,

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“CD 102.5 hosts numerous contests, allowing local musicians to earn spots to play side-by-side with popular local acts or big name artists.” Programs on the channel, such as Front Stage with Tom Butler and 5 Spot with Leslie James, offer local musicians opportunities to receive airplay and feature the five most requested songs of the day, respectively. DuPont shares how the “Local Movement”, complemented by new approaches from music organizations, local venues, and radio stations alike, is forcing talent to now reconsider whether to relocate or stay in Columbus. In the past, talented

FISHER YEARBOOK


Columbus Music

Major Bands Coming to Columbus (from April-August 2014)

Average Ticket Prices in Columbus (based on Katy Perry 2014 tour prices)

Nashville Bridgestone Arena: $156.17

CHVRCHES Bombay Bicycle Club Bastille The Naked and Famous Neon Trees The 1975 Panic! at the Disco ... and many more!

Atlanta Phillips Arena: $149.20 Raleigh PNC Arena: $144.15 Columbus Nationwide Arena: $118.60

musicians living in a city like Columbus might have moved to Nashville, Los Angeles, or New York City, to find an industry in which he or she can grow and become successful. Now by promoting musician growth and providing tools for such growth, Columbus is seeking to become a city that can not only compete with these big names, but also provide more exposure to budding artists. Brothers Drake is just one example of a local venue that promotes local talent by booking a local artist in a time slot next to a national act, in the hopes of expanding the local artist’s audience. Bravo Artist, a promotion company based in Columbus, is another key player adding value to the skyrocketing local music industry. Its mission is to connect audiences with local bands by booking and promoting shows, all while keeping costs low for both artists and concertgoers. In the words of Ben Leubitz, co-owner and concert promoter, “Promoters don’t just promote the show like a lot of people simply think. Promoters and promotion companies are the life force that make the concerts happen, especially when venues need help from more than their in-house talent buyers.” To help connect local artists to venues, Bravo Artist provides a variety of services, such as ticketing, designing the artwork for advertisements, booking local and regional artists to open for touring bands, and event production. “In order for us to be successful as a business, we need to work hand-in-hand with local bands and musicians. If they don’t grow, neither do we,” Leubitz says. “Creating opportunities for local acts is a large part of our role, whether that be gaining their support slots for shows, building shows around them, introducing them to promoters in other markets, or just giving them advice on how to grow as a band.” Columbus is quickly moving towards a future where its music industry is no longer underestimated. Entities ranging from promotion companies like Bravo Artist to venues like Brothers Drake to radio stations such as CD 102.5 have set the stage for Columbus to become a target market for budding artists. Leubitz

proudly states, “If you are looking to make it in the industry I would tell you to consider staying in town instead of moving to Nashville, New York City, or Los Angeles.”

“In order for us to be successfull... we need to work hand-in-hand with local bands” issuu.com/FisherInk FISHER YEARBOOK

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LIFE>ENVIRONMENT

Alleviating Poverty with Aquaponics Several Fisher students traveled to Honduras to help search for a creative solution to the problem of food security. story by maggie wehri

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aced with the challenges of agricultural hardship and poverty, Siete de Mayo is one of many communities in Central America looking for a solution. In the fall of 2012, senior students from the College of Engineering

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encountered a senior capstone project and quickly realized that implementing Aquaponics in Honduras possessed the potential of a successful and meaningful business opportunity. Fisher students Kathleen Dickey, Nathan Roberto, and FISHER YEARBOOK

Brandy Alexander were looking to gain experience in social work and seized the chance to assist with this humanitarian project. Using a combination of aquaculture and hydroculture, Aquaponics is a


PROBLEM-SOLVING PROCESS

creative solution to the problem of food security in Siete de Mayo, Honduras. “Aquaponics is a sustainable food system that uses a grow bed and a fish tank in a symbiotic relationship,” Roberto explains. “The water from the tank provides nutrients and nourishes the plants while the plants cleanse the water before it is returned to the tank.” Aquaponics is a perfect fit for the Siete de Mayo community for a number of reasons. First, it provides a reliable yearround food source, requiring less energy and input than conventional farming methods. Second, the system will reduce each family’s food costs, allowing Hondurans to allocate their funds toward education and other necessities. Lastly, it promotes a healthy diet of fish and produce, which will help alleviate cases of malnutrition in the community.

The pilot Aquaponic system, installed last May, was such a success that many Siete de Mayo families now want systems of their own. In preparation for this potential customer base, Dickey, Roberto and Alexander conducted market research to determine the expectations of customers, costs of implementing each system and appropriate repayment schedule for families interested in the system. “To make Aquaponics as affordable as possible for families,” says Dickey, “We’ve been in contact with our incountry partners to establish maximum payments families can pay.” An Aquaponic system retails for about $400 U.S. dollars, and a given family will be able to pay off the system in approximately two years. With strong local and political support, the future of FISHER YEARBOOK

the Aquaponic system in Honduras looks bright. “As the popularity of this system grows, more and more families will purchase Aquaponics, alleviating poverty one community at a time.” As their role in the project comes to a close, Dickey reminisces about her experience, “I really appreciate that we were able to benefit the lives of other people in a less fortunate country. This was an eye-opening experience. We basically had to rebuild how people think about their lives, and this change impacted them in many ways.” The team will be passing the baton to future Fisher students later this summer after hopefully establishing four more Aquaponics systems. The team hopes Aquaponics will continue to spread and improve lives across Central America and other poverty stricken areas around the world. issuu.com/FisherInk

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LIFE>ENVIROMENT

Zero Defeats, Zero Waste story by maggie wehri

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FISHER YEARBOOK


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ome of Buckeye football and “The Best Damn Band in the Land”, Ohio Stadium is one of the largest stadiums in collegiate football to achieve a zerowaste designation. In fact, OSU reached a season high average this year of 90.5% of its waste being diverted from landfills through recycling and composting methods. In autumn of 2010, Ohio Stadium committed to produce zero waste, which involves diverting 90% or more of game day materials from landfills. To facilitate this task, all trashcans were removed and replaced with new recycling or composting bins. In turn, this created 75 zero waste stations consisting of recycling, composting and trash cans within and around the stadium. Becoming zero waste is not an easy task. The day after each football game, the stadium is cleaned from top to bottom. Because fans leave behind about 50% of waste at their seats, the National Reserve Officers Training Corps lends a helping hand to speed up the process. The collected trash is first sorted into recycle and compost piles. The compost waste is taken to Price Farms Organics, where OSU students remove contaminants from the compost. From this stage, the compost is covered with coffee grounds and manure, which is mixed

four to six times, introducing oxygen to begin the aerobic process. Price Farms Organics then heats the mixture to 140 degrees, which is required to compost any compostable material. Meanwhile, the recycling materials are taken to Southeastern Correctional Institution, where inmates sort through and separate the materials into piles of metal, plastic, cardboard, wrappers, liners and landfill. Each of these materials are then weighed and sent to the recycling market, where they will eventually be made into new products. To ensure the successfulness of the zero waste initiative, OSU works directly with vendors to minimize packaging and eliminate waste at its source. As a result, vendors are using packaging alternatives that contain a percentage of recycled material. Leftover food is collected and donated to the Mid Ohio Foodbank, rather than being thrown away. In addition, Levy Restaurants, OSU’s chosen food partner, demonstrate their sustainable efforts by using eco-friendly serving ware and local food sourcing. The zero waste initiative at Ohio Stadium is the largest of its kind and is already showing massive success in its first three years of practice. Efforts like this are contributing toward the university’s mission to reduce its Buckeye footprint.

TAKING OUT THE TRASH HOME OPPONENT GAME DATE

% TRASH

% RECYCLE

% COMPOST

% DIVERTED FROM LANDFILL

Buffalo 8/31/13 San Diego State 9/7/13 Florida A&M 9/21/13 Wisconsin 9/28/13 Iowa 10/19/13 Penn State 10/26/13 Indiana 11/23/13

0.30

4.76

3.57

96.5

0.35

6.23

5.02

97.0

0.24

3.09

5.09

97.1

0.11

2.51

4.65

98.5

4.36

2.45

3.09

56.0

0.28

2.65

5.11

96.5

0.14

2.10

4.75

98.1

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FEATURE>FISHER ALUM

DEN

MAS

TER

Fisher graduate Lucas Costanzo reflects on his experience participating in, and eventually coming in first in the Denman Undergraduate Research Forum last year. story by adam zimmerman

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H FISHER YEARBOOK

ave you ever wondered why some people impulsively purchase items from late night infomercials and others are able to resist? Last spring, Fisher student Lucas Costanzo conducted an extensive research project to help try to solve this mystery. The project,


“Let’s Talk Money: Impulsivity, Social Influence, and Consumers’ Saving Behavior” was a yearlong venture that ultimately earned him a first place finish at the Denman Undergraduate Research Forum. Drawing on research in consumer psychology and decision-making, Costanzo’s research sought to answer two critical questions on both spending and saving behaviors among college students: whether impulsivity affects attitudes and behavior towards spending and saving (study 1) and whether high and low impulsive individuals respond differently to various sources and appeals in persuasive saving messages (study 2). He conducted two experiments to test his hypotheses, with over four hundred and sixty participants. Study 1 results confirmed that compared to low impulsive individuals, high impulsive individuals spend more and save less. Study 2 revealed that high impulsive individuals would be more willing to change their saving behavior if the message were from a charismatic source (such as a famed football coach) and is framed using a promotion appeal. On the other hand, low

impulsive individuals are more persuaded if the message is from an expert source (such as a financial advisor) and is framed using a prevention (or risk averse) appeal. These insights are of interest to consumer behavior researchers, policy makers, and financial institutions that may want to encourage saving behaviors. “I realized [the research project] was an opportunity that not many students get in a basic undergraduate marketing experience,” says Lucas. He was first introduced to undergraduate research while working as a teaching assistant with professor Shashi Matta. Matta would later serve as Costanzo’s faculty mentor during his research project and helped him prepare for the Denman forum competition. Matta explains, “The Denman An undergraduate research thesis is an incredibly strong learning experience for students. I have mentored one student each year, for the past six years, and Lucas has been a standout. —Professor Shashi Matta

FISHER YEARBOOK

forum is an excellent showcase of some of the best research talent at The Ohio State University. Mentoring Lucas and working on this research project with him has been a terrific experience.” The annual Denman Undergraduate Research Forum is currently held at the Recreation Physical and Activity Center at Ohio State. For the past two decades, this event has given hundreds of undergraduates each year the opportunity to submit an abstract and present their research. Costanzo expressed how the project helped build his confidence and presentational skills, both of which have helped him stand out in the work place. “An undergraduate research thesis is an incredibly strong learning experience for students. I have mentored one student each year, for the past six years, and Lucas has been a standout,” says Matta. Now a graduate, Costanzo advises students to pursue leadership roles in student organizations and look for research opportunities with a professor whom you can maintain a good relationship. Costanzo, a marketing major, now works at Nationwide Insurance as a marketing leadership rotational program associate. issuu.com/FisherInk

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FEATURE>FISHER ALUM

Fisher Ink Alumni: Where Are They Now... We all have dreams and aspirations. For many the journey of these dreams becoming fulfilled begins after graduation. Fisher Ink decided to catch up and check in with some of our own graduated staff members who are excelling in the business world. stories by ellen dupont

CARA LAVIOLA

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ara Laviola graduated in 2012 with two honor degrees, a B.S. in Business Administration with a specialization in Marketing and a B.A. in English. Laviola was very involved during her time as a Buckeye. Some of her favorite memories include being CoEditor-In-Chief of Fisher Ink, “ A lot of work was put into establishing a style guide and improving Fisher Ink’s overall design, and I’m so excited and proud to see that Fisher Ink has only gotten better.” Laviola got involved early

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with Fisher Ink, Alpha Kappa Psi Business Fraternity and the Undergraduate Advising Office. “I loved my time at Fisher,” Laviola said. Her hard work and determination during her undergraduate years at Fisher truly paid dividends. Currently Laviola is a Senior Writer in the Brand Identity & Creative Services department at Nationwide Insurance. Laviola credits her success in the workplace to the many skills she learned while working as a member of Fisher Ink.“It FISHER YEARBOOK

inspired me to be creative in a business world where creativity is becoming more and more valued. In addition it taught me the importance of collaboration and helped me develop an ability to stay level-headed under pressure.” When asked about advice for graduating seniors Laviola said, “Never underestimate the importance of communication and transparency in whatever you decide to do, and look at every interaction as an opportunity to build trust.”


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major in Management Information Systems (MIS) and Finance with a minor in Studio Arts, Genie Lee graduated in the Spring of 2013. Currently Lee works at Epic, a software leader in the field of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) as part of the Technical Services team. She works closely with hospital systems to help them successfully utilize Epic’s software. “Everyday I go to my office located in the Wild, Wild West because every building at Epic is differently themed,” Lee said. There are offices that are Video

Games, Dungeons & Dragons, Heaven, NYC, and even a Harry Potter office in progress. Lee truly enjoys her workplace atmosphere, explaining, “It is set up so that I feel really comfortable to work hard and try to be successful.” Reminiscing on her years spent with Fisher Ink, Lee enjoyed the brainstorming session at the beginning of every issue. She also believed Fisher Ink helped with the development of her project management skills. “The long term project of a magazine reflects a lot of real-world project situations today,” Lee explained.

The only things Lee wishes she had focused more on are team and culture building in her past leadership roles. “Coming to Epic, I realized that one of the greatest strengths of an organization is having a strong identity and culture.” As an experienced graduate and now businesswoman Lee offers this advice to upcoming graduates: “Try your best to work for a place that aligns with your values and beliefs. I’m incredibly grateful everyday to wake up and consider my workplace a comfortable and enjoyable place to spend my time.”

GENIE LEE If you are interested in working for Epic contact Genie Lee at lee.3618@osu.edu

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FEATURE>PERSPECTIVE

GREEN BUSINESS story by adam zimmerman

Business Administration 2798 offers an opportunity for students to travel and study the green business practices abroad.

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or most students, spring break is a time for rest, relaxation, and endless Netflix streaming. For me, spending my spring break studying abroad in Costa Rica not only provided a diversion from the classroom, but also opened up a world of knowledge, and made for an unforgettable adventure. Green Business: Costa Rica, a course that consists of a short-term study abroad to Costa Rica, focuses on “green business”. In addition to the adventure in Costa Rica, our class worked on group consulting projects, challenging us to find sustainable solutions for selected clients. On the first day of class, Professor Tim Sword mentioned a main objective of the course, which is to “Highlight The Ohio State University as a dynamic generator of Green Business resources for private industry by investigating and reporting on sustainable programs and initiatives found throughout campus.” Mr. Sword is passionate about learning through experience and personal interaction. Therefore, most of our classes met outside the classroom, at locations ranging from Chadwick

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Arboretum & Learning Gardens to Quasar Anaerobic Digestion Facility to the Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center, allowing us to engage with professionals. Exploring Costa Rica gave our class the opportunity to see sustainable practices in action. My class engaged in a variety of ecotourism activities, such as zip lining through the rain forest, which brought to life the greenery of Costa Rica. We took a journey through Finca Corsicana (the world’s largest organic pineapple farm), the Doka Coffee Estate, and the Zurqui Banana Farm. All of these experiences showed us the importance that agriculture and the environment hold in the country’s economy. The business component of the trip involved class visits to The International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), Bridgestone, ZETA Industrial Park, and Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica, a public university. At IBM, we learned of its efforts to become carbon neutral, coinciding with Costa Rica’s goal to become the first carbon neutral country in the world. Bridgestone informed FISHER YEARBOOK

us about the green movement in the tire industry and the company’s social responsibility efforts, which include making playgrounds out of used tires. The university visit guided us through Costa Rica’s wastewater treatment issues and highlighted the future need for new sources of energy, potentially plasma. In totality, these visits gave us a tangible look at how public and private organizations are working towards solutions that not only take into account economic factors, but also social and environmental ones. Throughout the projects and trip to Costa Rica, our class worked together to ask questions, seek out answers, and take action. We were motivated to escape our “comfort zone” by our brilliant tour guide, Fabricio, who told us that doing so is where the magic happens. These elements made the class different from any other course I have taken. This spring break presented me with a learning experience in Costa Rica that was challenging and rewarding, making for a memory that I will always hold dearly.


RETROFISHER

Before the career portal, before buckeyelink and before schedulizer, students still found their way to interviews and classes...but how? story by camille baker

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an you imagine a time when Fisher students couldn’t simply submit their resume virtually via Fisher Connect? How would you connect with employers if you didn’t have an email account? Well, you could take your resume to the nearest facsimile machine, which is exactly what students had to do in the days before widespread internet access. Mark Wilson, Director of Recruiter Relations & Technology in the Career Management Office shares, “I remember when students would schedule their interviews and then turn in a paper copy of their resumes. Then, at the end of the day, we would fax the resumes and schedules to the recruiters. No internet!” As if the competition for internships and career positions isn’t steep enough nowadays, be grateful you weren’t around when interviews ran on a bid system. “Students would have a set number of points to bid for interviews on campus. They would then bid for an interview slot on a schedule,” says Wilson. If a student didn’t bid appropriately, then he or she might not receive any interviews even though the

candidate may be highly qualified. Fast forward to today, where students are using the advances in technology to their advantage in the job search process. The career fair application used for the Fisher Spring Internship and Job Fair is a prime example of this. “The app allows students to use filters to better search the opportunities that fit their specialization, provides them with company information to prepare for their contact with employers, provides them with announcements the day of, and more,” says Emelie Moeller, Logistics Management student and Career Events Intern. According to Moeller, this app is tailored to the characteristics of today’s Fisher students. “Many of the Fisher students are technologically proficient and with the high presence of smart phones, the career fair app was the perfect aid to advance their career fair experience.” These technology changes aren’t just making the interview process more userfriendly for the student, they are making it easier for companies to interview and

hire Fisher students. Fifteen years ago, Fisher celebrated reaching new recruiting heights. The 1999 Annual Report for FCOB boasts 563 undergraduate interviews conducted on campus for internships and 2,192 for career positions. On the most recent Annual Report (2013), FCOB reported 1,688 and 3,125 undergraduate interviews for internships and career positions, respectively. The number of internship interviews tripled, and the number of career position interviews increased by 42%! In addition to such growth, 78 of the Fortune 500 companies recruited here at Fisher and hiring more students than ever before. The bottom line is, each year Fisher raises the bar. The success of students reflects how companies hold Fisher graduates in high regard. It appears that the technology used for career services is improving at a quick pace, in concordance with students. As Fisher students, we have the unique opportunity to be an integral part of Fisher’s growth, which is sure to continue for years to come.

INTERVIEW IMPROVEMENT 3,125 2013

2,192 1,688

1999

563 Internship Interviews

Career Interviews


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HONORS GROUPS CLASS OF 2014

Honors Accounting

Honors Cohort

Honors Contract FISHER YEARBOOK

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W E N

BREAKING

FASHION FORWARD A manda Botha and Anna Busi, the founders of Fashion Forward, created this organization because they felt that there was a lack of representation of opportunities within retail at Fisher. “There are many retail companies that recruit directly at Fisher, but there’s no central organization for students who are interested in the analytical side of business and the

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creativity in Fashion & Retail,” explains Botha. As its mission states, Fashion Forward will serve to further expose students to the ins and outs of the retail industry while offering them the opportunity to network and build connections with other students, industry recruiters, and professionals. The leaders of Fashion Forward


NEW GROUND FRESH FACES Fisher welcomed 6 student organizations this year, including brand new groups like Fashion Forward and the revival of Out in Business.

FISHER GREEK Phi Chi Theta Tracy Emery & Emily Hagenmaier @OSUFF

DIVERSITY

“Fashion Forward” coming soon

have high hopes for the future of the organization. “We really want to help students find their niche in the retail industry whether it’s merchandising, inventory management, trend forecasting, etc. We are catering to a niche market and we are doing so in a new and trendy way.” As part of their plans for next year, there will be an emphasis on learning about local retail businesses in the Columbus area and recent innovations in the industry. As all student organizations understand, there are always new challenges to face. Fashion Forward needed help keeping up with its rapidly growing network. Retail companies such as Macy’s and Nordstrom reached out immediately

after its establishment, desiring to work with the organization. Luckily, it was able to overcome this challenge with help from peers at Fisher. “We have recruited a few amazing students at Fisher to help us build on the structure of our organization and the relations we have with the industry. We have been extremely fortunate to have the support of Fisher staff and students helping us to start this organization.” A challenge that Fashion Forward foresees is a divided target market for membership between the Business program and the Fashion and Retail Studies program. It plans to address this issue by investigating the most effective and mutually beneficial way to involve students from both groups. FISHER YEARBOOK

ASCEND OSU Chapter Man Sze Yu Fisher Students with Disabilities Association Christian Bonner Out in Business Michael Inman

SPECIAL INTEREST Big Data & Analytics Association Jimmy Mace & Matt Sweet Collegiate DECA Courtney Olesh, Michael Bacha, Samarth Malhotra, Paula Crisp & Erica Clouse Fashion Forward Amanda Botha & Anna Busi

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STUDENT ORGANIZATION HIGHLIGHTS We invited Fisher student organizations to speak about their struggles and successes during the 2013-14 academic year. This is what they had to say...

@OSUFisherUBC

GOVERNMENT

UNDERGRADUATE BUSINESS COUNCIL

T

he Undergraduate Business Council (UBC) acts as the umbrella organization for Fisher student organizations. This year it focused on realigning Undergraduate Business Council at the 2013 Fisher Fall Frenzy. its mission to serve as the representative group for the undergraduate business community. It did this by and recruited new members at the frenzy, located on forming task forces that worked on various projects the Fisher Courtyard. Meanwhile, the mixer, which to enhance the overall Fisher experience. In addition, was held at the Blackwell, allowed students to interact UBC hosted an array of events at Fisher, including with Fisher faculty and staff. UBC connects all Fisher Fisher Fall Frenzy, the Student, Staff, and Faculty Mixer, and Reading Day Study Events. Undergraduate organizations together and hopes to continue its organizations explained the importance of involvement impactful work in the future.

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facebook.com/PhiChiThetaOSU

FISHER GREEK

NEW

PHI CHI THETA ΦXΘ

P

hi Chi Theta (PCT) – Zeta Nu Chapter is a professional business fraternity, which just completed its inaugural year at Fisher. The founding presidents, Tracy Emery and Emily Hagenmaier, started this chapter to address a shortage of opportunities for motivated and qualified Fisher students seeking to join a professional business fraternity. PCT’s mission is to promote higher business education and training for its members, encourage cooperation among people preparing for such careers, and stimulate the spirit of sacrifice and unselfish devotion to the attainment of such ends.

Phi Chi Theta members at initiation for this academic year. PCT is Fisher’s newest professional business fraternity and is for highly motivated and qualified Fisher students. As a new organization, PCT encountered challenges such as fundraising, developing connections with sponsors, and organizing professional events. However, during the spring semester, they managed to partner with the Asian Festival, fundraise with Yankee Candle, host a fundraising soccer tournament, and bring in three professional speakers. They increased membership by partnering with FCP for an information session, and hope to continue utilizing Fisher’s resources

to expand further next year. Looking towards the future, PCT hopes to develop new events to establish presence on campus and partner with philanthropies. Those looking to be apart of a rapidly expanding organization, built on an active network of alumni and current students, should consider rushing for this fraternity. Emily explained that there are currently “many opportunities to take on leadership roles with many opportunities to collaborate with others.”

Looking toward the future, pct hopes to develop new events to establish presence on campus and partner with philanthropies. FISHER YEARBOOK

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@AKPSIMU

akpsiohiostate.com

FISHER GREEK

ALPHA KAPPA PSI AKψ

T

he Mu chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi (AKPsi) went to their first case competition this past year, thanks to a sponsorship from Target. With the largest recruitment turnout in history, AKPsi participated in its first service trip to Misericordia and launched its new website, www.akpsiohiostate.com. Looking to the future, AKPsi is opening up a new executive board position, Vice President of Marketing, and hopes to drive more members to join their organization. Alpha

AKPsi members during this academic year. In a year of firsts, AKPsi launched its new website and introduced the VP of Marketing position. Kappa Psi reached its goal in developing a professional brand image and increasing standards management with the creation of this position.

bap.osu.edu

FISHER GREEK

BETA ALPHA PSI BAψ

B

eta Alpha Psi, Fisher’s financial services honorary completed numerous hours in community and professional service, allowing BAP to obtain superior status from the international honorary. Currently, BAP is wrapping up its chapter requirements while welcoming 23 new members into the honorary and participating in BuckeyeThon. The organization maintains its focus on personal professional development while bringing in informal

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BAP members form human-sized Greek letters before participating in Ohio State’s Buckeyethon. networking opportunities. Looking toward the future, BAP strives to increase their pledge class size of both honors and non-honors students.

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dspohiostate.org

FISHER GREEK

DELTA SIGMA PI ΔΣ Π

D

elta Sigma Pi (DSP) is a business fraternity that has been on campus at Ohio State for over 90 years. The fraternity prepares and develops its members for the professional world through an array of activities, such as hosting speakers from leading companies, travelling to conferences, and networking at professional events. DSP held several events for members and Fisher students in general this year, including a Battle of the Bands fundraiser and the first annual Integrate Conference, which featured TED-talk style discussions about business topics that are often overlooked in Fisher courses. DSP also held its Annual Kory Kirkpatrick 3 on 3 Basketball Tournament held in

Carol Cristobek from Ashland explains a purchasing activity she brought to PSMA’s first meeting of the year in September. Kory’s memory. The tournament raises money for Smiles Forever, a scholarship fund that helps students from Kory’s hometown of Marion, OH. On the scholastic side of things, 5 DSP members received Fisher’s prestigious Pace Setters award for excellence inside and outside of Fisher classroom. The fraternity continues to grow, as it accepted one of its largest pledge classes in recent years.

“PSE at Ohio State”

@PSEOSU

pseosu.com

FISHER GREEK

PI SIGMA EPSILON ΣΠE

P

i Sigma Epsilon (PSE) achieved many goals, including hosting its first annual speaker’s competition, obtaining a Nike market research project, hitting record sales with Summit Street Apparel project, and competing in Fisher Greek Week. Being the highest fundraiser for Fisher organizations in Buckeyethon with $5,808.35, PSE is stronger than ever. PSE plans to attend a national case competition in Miami, FL seeking to win top gold chapter and competing for top project manager, top service project, top management team, top marketing project, top professional development program, top PR strategy, president award, Whan Challenger Award, first place in recruitment fair challenge, first place in case competition and national merit student scholarships.

PSE members at the 2013 National Convention in San Diego. President, Megan Wandtke, “Gamma Nu will be hosting three on campus events over the next year, each involving different aspects of our pillars: a tailgate with alumni, a bowling networking event with recruiters and a new service event. PSE will also be enhancing our professional development opportunities through workshops that illustrate the use of linkedin/ prezi, resume formatting, and professional business attire.”

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facebook.com/AccountingAssociationFCOB

acctassn.org.ohio-state.edu

SPECIALIZATIONS

ACCOUNTING ASSOCIATION

T

he Accounting Association (AA), which provides career resources for students with an interest in the field of accounting, hosted the Accounting Career Fair in the fall, which totaled 38 employers and over 400 students. AA also initiated a sponsorship program with seven sponsors, adding additional revenue for events. During meetings, AA provided great opportunities for students to learn about the professional world, hosting companies such as Ernst & Young, PwC, KPMG, Cargill, Kroger, and Cardinal Health. The 2013 Fisher Fashion Show, put together by AA, Delta Sigma Pi, and Fisher Direct, added another dimension of career advice. The event

Accounting Association members after a National Association of State Boards of Accountancy (NASBA) Center for Public Trust meeting. provided fashion dos and don’ts for students as they prepared for interviews. Professionals from Pursuit and The Limited, along with student models, were incorporated into the event.

@OSU_HRA

groups.cob.ohio-state.edu/hra

SPECIALIZATIONS

HUMAN RESOURCES ASSOCIATION

various incentive programs for their members, which encourage them to attend meetings, and recruit others to attend with them.

Meet the Pres: President

T

he Human Resources Association was able to add new members by reaching out to classmates who were otherwise unfamiliar with the organization this year. Due to losing nearly half of their executive team to early graduations, the HRA was forced to adapt. Their team was able to remain positive throughout the entire process, and overcame the challenge, even adding new members to their roster during spring semester. Looking towards the future, the HRA hopes to expand their reach and increase awareness in the fall. Some ways they are considering doing that is through

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Jessica Phelan

Year / Major Senior / Human Resources

Future plans After graduating from Ohio State I would like to work as an HR Generalist in Consumer Products. In the future I would also like to work for an international company and learn more about HR on an international scale.

FISHER YEARBOOK


@OhioStateAMA

facebook.com/OSUAMA

SPECIALIZATIONS

AMERICAN MARKETING ASSOCIATION

T

he highlight of the year for the American Marketing Association (AMA) is not what most would expect. When one of its weekly meeting speakers canceled at the last minute, the AMA executive board needed to be quick on its feet. Instead of canceling the meeting, it put together an impromptu case competition for its members. The case, which was based off the National AMA’s case competition, involved creating a campaign for the Take 5 candy bar in a mere 30 minutes. AMA was proud to share that its members demonstrated a lot of creativity in explaining their ideas for commercials and coming up with innovative slogans. This case competition allowed AMA to

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Superlatives

OSU American Marketing Association prepares for a meeting. help its members bridge the gap between class lectures and realworld business. It’s not surprising that after this success, AMA is looking forward to hosting its own Fisher-wide case competition. Another experience to remember from this past semester was when AMA invited alumni to speak at one of its meetings. These graduates ranged from one to three years into the professional world, holding positions in various companies and industries, including Nationwide, Limited Brands and Alliance Data. The alumni speeches acted as an open forum for members to ask questions about the business

MOST INSPIRING PROFESSOR Susan Clark

FISHER YEARBOOK

world and how they landed their jobs or internships. Additionally, this was a great experience that showed underclassmen how AMA can aid their internship search and upperclassmen how life may be after college. To tackle the challenge of membership attendance, AMA differentiated itself by being nonexclusive and laid-back, which allowed it to reach its goal of attracting 20 new members this year. When asked about a phrase that describes AMA, it quoted Dale Carnegie, who shared, “People rarely succeed unless they have fun in what they are doing.”

MAC OR PC? 1. PC (52%) 2.Mac (48%) issuu.com/FisherInk

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@OSUBOMS

facebook.com/groups/31382042461

SPECIALIZATIONS

BUCKEYE OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT SOCIETY

B

OMS has been at the top of their game this past year. One of their goals that they achieved this year was the implementation of the BOMS Scholarship program, which awards four scholarships to members who are heavily involved in BOMS and embrace operations management outside of the classroom. Another achievement was a successful project with PAD pizza by the BOMS Consulting team, led by Anthony Danadio. The team worked throughout the year to help the PAD reduce pizza delivery time. They used this opportunity to apply concepts learned in the classroom while giving back to an Ohio State organization. One major point of pride for

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BOMS Annual Golf Outing takes place on Saturday April 19th BOMS this year was the success of their CFO, Ryan Barta, who co-led the proposal for the iPad project within the Ohio State Marching Band. Ryan used his operations expertise to cut printing costs by approximately $24,000, and increase the efficiency of learning. He was featured in many popular publications, including The Wall Street Journal, BusinessWeek, ESPN, The Today Show, Washington Post, The Columbus Dispatch, Huffington Post, Inside Edition, Chronicle for Higher Education, All Sides with Ann Fisher, and Local Network TV Stations. Ryan was also a speaker at Ohio State’s TEDX conference

FAVORITE GE CLASS Theatre 2100

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this spring, and was featured on the 2014 Apple iPad Air Commercial. Another highlight for BOMS this year was the implementation of their first Leadership Summit, which was hosted by Dow Chemical Company. This two-day workshop focused on personal and professional growth for their members and provided an excellent networking opportunity. BOMS is also proud to congratulate two of its officers – Matt Arthur and Rachel Mitcham – for being recognized as 2014 Fisher Pace Setters, continuing the tradition that many previous BOMS officers have held in receiving this coveted award.

FAVORITE CORE CLASS Logistics


facebook.com/OSUPSMA

osupsma.wordpress.com

SPECIALIZATIONS

PURCHASING AND SUPPLY MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION

O

ne of the Purchasing and Supply Management Association (PMSA) highlights for the year was their successful fundraising event last semester at Carol Cristobek from Ashland explains a purchasing activity she Buffalo Wild Wings which included all of their friends brought to PSMA’s first meeting of the year in September. and family. Although PSMA initially had difficulty drawing attention to their website and Facebook pages, professionals at their weekly meetings from Fortune their social media is now much more active, increasing 500 companies like Wal-Mart and Limited Brands at communication with members and fans. PSMA hosted almost every meeting.

facebook.com/pages/The-Logistics-Association/246102277083

@TLAOSU

@TLAOSU

osutla.com

SPECIALIZATIONS

THE LOGISTICS ASSOCIATION

T

his year, The Logistics Association hosted a career fair that reached new heights, connecting thirtynine employers with over 200 students, a growth that reflects the growing demand in the logistics industry. Forty-five Fisher undergraduate and graduate students gathered for TLA’s Third Annual Simulation Case Competition, which rewarded a total of $3,900 in cash prizes. For this competition, TLA secured sponsorships from both Dow Chemical and General Electric, and they introduced the Integrated Logistics Award. Along with their annual events, TLA has also

TLA at its Third Annual Fisher Simulation Case Competition.

expanded their efforts. Now you connect with TLA via their newly launched website osutla.com, as well as their new Instagram. Pioneer interns Levi Palmer and Andrew Ginther successfully led projects and will both be moving on to larger roles within the organization. Be on the lookout for The Logistics Association as they continue to grow their presence in the Fisher!

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groups.cob.ohio-state.edu/ibc

facebook.com/groups/214382098574825

SPECIALIZATIONS

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS CLUB

T

he IBC, or the International Business Club, is dedicated to preparing students for the global business environment. It promotes the integration of cultures and international issues into the Fisher student experience. It has been a great and eventful year for this club – speakers from the Ohio State University staff and faculty, from companies like P&G, and from translating firms have all shared their wisdom and experience. Members also learned about a new program for sustainability in emerging Markets, a foreign policy simulation facilitated by the Columbus Council on World Affairs, a case challenge on the water crisis in developing nations,

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International Business Club members dine at an Ethiopian restaurant. and participated in a discussion on sustainability with the head of the Sustainability Cluster at Fisher and director of EEDS, Dr. Neil Drobny. Students were also presented with many networking opportunities, including partnering with universities around the world such as ESALQ, Brazil. IBC hopes in the near future to become a channel, a source of information, and a place for students to learn more about how to be international leaders and global students. It is a safe and fun environment where students can freely express their opinions and learn about their role in this

DREAM COMPANY Google

FISHER YEARBOOK

ever more connected world. The IBC have greatly increased their membership overall this year, and welcome students in any year to join. This club also emphasizes the importance of studying abroad and encourages its members to experience different countries and cultures first hand. Members can receive help in planning such trips as well as guidance through the application process, and much more. IBC hopes that through these efforts, the study abroad program at Fisher will become accessible to more and more students.

FAVORITE OSU ATHLETE Aaron Craft


@UFA_OSU

SPECIALIZATIONS

UNDERGRADUATE FINANCE ASSOCIATION

Project. UFA members continue to thrive in one of their most well-known events, the Stock Market Challenge.

UFA 5.1K WHAT

T

his year, the Undergraduate Finance Association (UFA) continued to connect recruiters from top companies with Fisher students. With Finance being such a broad field, UFA has a knack for showing students interested in finance the variety of jobs that is available to them upon graduation. Through the use of student run panels, they provided insight into investment banking and consulting. Seeking continuous improvement, UFA is now becoming more involved with the community. This spring, in partnership with Alpha Kappa Psi, they are hosting the 1st annual 5.1k to benefit the Wounded Warrior

NEW

UFA is partnering with AKPSi to benefit the Wounded Warrior Project with a 5.1K run/walk. The extra 0.1K is a nod to how service members go the extra distance.

WHEN / WHERE April 13, check-in at 8:45 / RPAC Pavilion

REGISTRATION $15 includes WWP bracelet, WWP sticker, WWP magnet, water bottle and snack

SIGN-UP AT ufa51k.webs.com

facebook.com/BDAAOSU

SPECIALIZATIONS

BIG DATA AND ANALYTICS ASSOCIATION

B

ig Data and Analytics Association (BDAA) was founded in order to help students refine their critical thinking skills by providing professional speakers, modeling techniques, and current trends in the dynamic field of big data. Founders, Jimmy Mace and Matt Sweet, believe that the analytical skills their organization provides are necessary in order to be successful in the workforce. BDAA’s biggest challenge this year was marketing. As a new organization, it faced difficulties in reaching a wide audience due to the lack of available capital. BDAA’s presidents began by recruiting members from the Analytics cluster. Next, they focused on reaching out to engineering students.

BDAA founders Matt Sweet (left) and Jimmy Mace (right). In the future, BDAA will partner with the Ohio Union, as well as use social media, to increase brand awareness and membership. It will also host a fall kick-off event with music, food, and games. BDAA also aims to offer various workshops, case competitions, and provide a field trip to see how a Fortune 500 company captures and utilizes data. It is important to BDAA that members receive hands-on learning experiences rather than listening or watching. Co-president, Jimmy Mace, believes “we have the most unique organization on campus. Through our collaboration with Fisher faculty, we stay on top of current trends and adapt to the dynamic marketplace.”

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facebook.com/ascend.osu

ascendosu.org.ohio-state.edu

DIVERSITY

ASCENDOSU

NEW

A

scendOSU, a new addition to Fisher student organizations, is an Asian business association that promotes and fosters leadership skills. As they worked to establish themselves this year, AscendOSU’s founders faced challenges such as allocating tasks, attracting student involvement in its social and professional events, and securing sponsors; however, it managed to increase membership by 500% by holding a successful case competition and by attending the Ascend Midwest Student Leadership Conference in Chicago, Illinois. AscendOSU met with accounting firms as well as other Ascend chapters at this conference. One member described her experience with AscendOSU as rewarding, in that she met many friendly people and discovered new talents, such as a

A new Fisher organization, AscendOSU hopes it can help pan-Asian students to be more confident and active in Fisher activities. knack for publicity. In the future, AscendOSU hopes to hold International Business Etiquette Dialogue and Career Workshops, in addition to expanding its case competition.

cbsa.org.ohio-state.edu

DIVERSITY

COUNCIL OF BLACK STUDENTS IN ADMINISTRATION

T

he Council of Black Students in Administration (CBSA) represents one of a few collegiate chapters of the National Black MBA Association. CBSA encourages the cultivation of professional, academic, and social skills in Fisher’s undergraduate business students. During the autumn semester, CBSA members attended the National Black MBA Association Conference in Houston, Texas, free of charge. These members had the opportunity to

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Members of Council of Black Students in Administration pose with NBA all-star Earvin “Magic” Johnson. hear from various speakers and representatives from companies such as Coca-Cola and Microsoft. CBSA members also gave back to the community this year by volunteering on Martin Luther King Day.

FISHER YEARBOOK


absa.osu.edu

DIVERSITY

ASIAN BUSINESS STUDENT ASSOCIATION

T

he Asian Business Student Association (ABSA), a diverse community interested in the growth and development of business in Asia, hosted several cultural events this year celebrating Diwali and Chinese New Year. These events had a turn out of approximately 60 and 90 people, respectively. In addition, ABSA tested new, creative social events, such as a Thanksgiving dinner and a speed dating outing to increase camaraderie. The annual business trip to the Harvard Asia Business Conference was a defining experience. The event revolved around Asia, promoting conversation on healthcare, innovation and design, and e-commerce within Asia.

ABSA members in front of the Paul Revere statue in the Boston Freedom Trail. As a way to attract new members, ABSA is planning on going to a shooting range next year in addition to taking a trip to Harvard University in Cambrige, Mass. Vivian Wu, one of the ABSA members who attended, enjoyed the panel discussion on the Silicon Valley in Asia, explaining, “The speakers discussed how Asia climbed out of the shadow to move up the value chain significantly over the past two decades and start its own entrepreneurial hub.” Speakers included the Political Counselor of eBay, who highlighted the political and legal issues that surround e-business transactions, and a Regional Manager of Samsung, who spoke about the development of Samsung and

Apple corporations, while analyzing the differences of cell phone needs between Asia and America. The trip provided Fan Yang, ABSA President, an opportunity to improve his abilities. He explains, “I got the chance to apply leadership skills outside school and unite us a team. Indeed, the Harvard Conference was a great experience for us not only to learn real world business cases from successful business leaders worldwide, but also to meet excellent people and make new friends.”

I GOT THE CHANCE TO APPLY LEADERSHIP SKILLS OUTSIDE SCHOOL AND UNITE US AS A TEAM. THE HARVARD CONFERENCE WAS A GREAT EXPERIENCE FOR US TO MEET EXCELLENT PEOPLE AND MAKE NEW FRIENDS. FISHER YEARBOOK

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@NABAOSU

facebook.com/National-Association-of-Black -Accountants-at-The-Ohio-State-University

DIVERSITY

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BLACK ACCOUNTANTS

T

his academic year, The National Association of Black Accountants (NABA) provided its members with unique networking opportunities. Fourteen students traveled to the NABA Regional Conference in Detroit, Michigan, while another eight participated in the National Black MBA Conference in Atlanta, Georgia. Sophomore Raquel May had an eye-opening experience at the NABA Regional Conference, explaining, “Having the one-onone time to talk to recruiters at the Career Expo was much appreciated. It was much more attractive than the loud, crowded career fairs I am used to.” NABA’s productivity during the year allowed it to reach many goals,

NABA members prepare for their 2013 Ernst & Young conference. This year NABA raised more than $4,000 in its first sponsorship proposal, and as an organization spent more than 80 hours in community service activities. including raising $4,000 in its first sponsorship proposal. These funds were allocated to the organization’s first t-shirt, polo’s, name badges and social events. Members also gave back to the community, contributing more than 80 hours of volunteer service. In addition, membership retention was a priority. The “Freshman Success Series” was implemented to provide tutoring of all subjects to minority freshman. “Freshmen are able to receive guidance and fellowship with student leaders while also creating relationships with their peers,”

explains NABA President, Mariah Scott. Looking to the future, NABA plans to incorporate initiatives to help members in interview scenarios, through means such as mock peer interviews using behavioral based questions. It will also work to create events that take its members to newer heights. Scott explains, “Our goal is to make sure that we do not limit ourselves to what we are used to seeing from recruiters, but to reach out to companies that may not normally recruit in Fisher to come to our events.”

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FISHER BUSINESS STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES ASSOCIATION

NEW

T

he Fisher Business Students with Disabilities Association(FBSWDA) is designed to meet the needs of Fisher students with regards to professional development, networking, and enhancement of future career goals. The organization promotes and develops the professional skills of its members and encourages and assists minority students in entering business professions. In addition, FBSWDA provides opportunities for members with

DIVERSITY learning disabilities to fulfill their civic responsibility. As a new Fisher organization, FBSWDA faced challenges such as reaching its target population and creating an environment in which members could speak openly about their needs. This year, FBSWDA doubled its membership and participated in 200 FBSWDA founder Christian hours of community Bonner. service. In the future, this organization looks to continue expanding, perhaps to a national level. Founder, Christian Bonner, described the organization with the words “adversity” and “perseverance.” Bonner explains, “I believe these values can shape you and give priceless self-esteem.”

@HBSA_OSU

facebook.com/hbsaohiostate

DIVERSITY

HISPANIC BUSINESS STUDENT ASSOCIATION

T

his year the Hispanic Business Student Association (HBSA) sent 5 members to its National Conference, and 4 more to its regional conference. Both of these events were great opportunities for the members to network with professionals and students from around the country. Best of all, it was free of cost to the participating students. HBSA is a diverse and energetic organization that has outstanding members with limitless potential. It achieved several goals this year, such as increasing membership and improving member engagement. One passionate new member drove by himself all the

Members of HBSA with their advisor and Latino Student Association members during their Thanksgiving Dinner. way to Washington D.C. and paid out of pocket to join them at their National ALPFA Conference. Looking into the future, they plan to end this semester on a high note with a smooth transition to new leadership, a few events with professionals, and fun socials. HSBA is working very hard to kick off next school year with its 12th Annual Soccer Classic. HBSA continues to grow by engaging with each other and building camaraderie.

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DIVERSITY

NEW

OUT IN BUSINESS

O

ut in Business made a return to the Fisher student organization family in October 2013. A group of students were motivated to restructure, rebrand and spark new life into Out in Business, which aims to provide a safe space for LGBTQ students. Members have the opportunity to develop relationships with various LGBTQ Columbus professionals at corporate mixers. For example, members are notified of local corporate networking such as events often hosted by JPMorgan Chase’s affinity organization. Out in Business also looks to collaborate with other minority organizations at Fisher to create an interconnection between them. Great success was reached in

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Out in Business was inactive until its reformation in October of 2013. the return of Out in Business. As one member states, “What began as an idea has quickly taken shape into an established executive board, five organization initiatives, and

a growing membership base.” It hopes to expand its presence on campus and increase awareness of the LGBTQ presence in the business world.

Founding Freshman “I met our Vice President of Culture-Changing Initiatives at a LGBTQ mixer in the beginning of the year hosted by the Multicultural Center in the Ohio Union. We became friends almost immediately because of our similar interests in student leadership and the arts. When I finally decided to bring Out in Business back and told him about it he informed me that he was in that organization last year and would definitely be willing to help bring it back! He has been instrumental to the organization’s growth and development so far! Who knew Ohio State was so small?” —Michael Inman, President

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@UBWAOSU

ubwa.org.ohio-state.edu

DIVERSITY

“Undergraduate Business Women’s Association”

UNDERGRADUATE BUSINESS WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION

T

he Undergraduate Business Women’s Association (UBWA) pursued a new direction for the long-term, known as the “LeanIn” movement. President Hayley Dougherty, explains, “Historically, our theme has been about ‘equality’ and ‘the glass ceiling’. However, that message has become outdated as men join the movement to support women in the workplace.” UBWA is setting its goal to help women with the real issues that female leaders across the globe face in today’s business world. In addition to changing the theme of UBWA, other areas of the organization were revamped, including the selection of speakers, social and community service events, and approaches to recruiting

Undergraduate Business Women’s Association was involved in several events this year, including representation at this year’s Buckeyethon. UBWA’s slogan is short and sweet to represent the women’s movement in business: “Empowering.” and member relations. For example, members were exposed to career paths outside of the “traditional” route of climbing the corporate ladder. Because the organizational foundation was reconstructed, UBWA increased its membership by more than tenfold and built a

better community, allowing for closer friendships and networks with business leaders. UBWA hopes to continue moving toward its new vision. Dougherty continues, “Today, women are their own biggest obstacles, so we want to be an organization of empowerment and leadership.”

today, women are their own biggest obstacles, so we want to be an organization of empowerment and leadership. FISHER YEARBOOK

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businessbuildersclub.org

facebook.com/BusinessBuilders

SPECIAL INTEREST

BUSINESS BUILDERS CLUB

T

he Business Builder’s Club (BBC) has always been at the top of its game. This year was no exception. It held a number of notable events, including the Alleviating Poverty Through Entrepreneurship (APTE) Summit, three pitch events, and bringing in the founder of reddit to speak to over 800 students on campus. Every year, the BBC adds new value to its APTE summit. This years additions included a design studio, business plan competition, and several pop-up networking events. The membership of the organization is the highest it has been in the last three or more years. Putting on another huge APTE Summit and bringing in high-caliber BBC alumni round off the list of some of BBC’s top accomplishments. Due to transitions in both leadership and funding, its impactful events posed as challenges for the group this year, but the BBC was able to pull through and have a successful year. As for the future, the organization plans on bringing in more high-

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BBC members listen to a speaker during one of its meetings. This year BBC brought in highcaliber BBC alumni, including a former early Facebook employee, Chris Pan, Trend Nation founder Brad Howard and JackThreads founder Jason Ross. Below, BBC also hosted an event featuring Reddit founder Alexis Ohanian. caliber speakers and creating a new signature event, as well as re-launching its website and launching a club branding guide. Goals achieved this year relate to membership, student-involvement,

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collaboration, and fostering relationships with its impressive alumni base. One member sums up, “BBC is the most prolific and fun business club on campus that isn’t just for business students.”


bciosu.com

SPECIAL INTEREST

BUCKEYE CAPITAL INVESTORS

B

uckeye Capital Investors (BCI) was featured in Forbes Magazine for its accomplishments in the Michigan Interactive Investors Stock Pitch competition and in the Rutgers LIBOR Stock Pitch competition. These opportunities not only gave members a positive experience, but also helped students learn more about investing from a first-person viewpoint. BCI pointed out that one of its biggest challenges was to maintain structure while still holding an open-forum discussion. With a new set of leaders and growing membership, BCI, which focuses on

Buckeye Capital Investors members at a meeting. This year students were sent to stock pitch competitions at the University of Michigan and Rutgers University. the investment world, looks to expand on this year’s success. Next year, BCI plans to add an investment committee that will manage a student-run portfolio while sourcing ideas from group presentations.

SPECIAL INTEREST

BUCKEYE UNDERGRADUATE CONSULTING CLUB

T

he Buckeye Undergraduate Consulting Club (BUCC) seeks to develop highly motivated students into strategic thinkers and leaders, capable of approaching and solving complex problems. The Consulting Education Program (CEP), designed for underclassmen, enables students to leverage their existing knowledge from the classroom to further explore real world business problems. This year, BUCC admitted two small CEP classes to participate in workshops with professionals, a case competition, and the planning of a wine tasting event. BUCC also raised $5,000 for the oncology and hematology

BUCC members at its wine mixer. floor at Nationwide Children’s Hospital through BuckeyeThon. In the future, BUCC hopes to stabilize its program and establish relationships with Fortune 500 companies, startups, and other ventures that will provide the best development to members.

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facebook.com/ccigosu

ccig.osu.edu

SPECIAL INTEREST

COMMON CENTS INVESTMENT GROUP

C

ommon Cents Investment Group (CCIG) covers mutual funds, the stock market, and more for both novice and sophisticated investors. This year consisted of knowledgeable guest speakers, such as Luv Sharma, Christian Gabis, Professor Matt Sheridan, and Marty Murer. The organization retained most of its membership and continues to find ways to engage its members in meetings. Common Cents’ goals for

Common Cents Investment Group meeting from the 2013-14 year. CCIG goes by the slogan “Investing its time in investments.” next year include developing innovative investment strategies, hosting exciting speakers, and having members attend an investment conference.

@FCP_OSU

facebook.com/fishercitizenshipprogram

SPECIAL INTEREST

FISHER CITIZENSHIP PROGRAM

T

he Fisher Citizenship Program (FCP) is a diverse, interactive program offered to all Fisher freshmen and transfer student. The organization fosters student involvement, core values, and a strong connection to Fisher by providing various events throughout the year. The events provided are broken into 4 main categories, Business Basics, Global Connection, Career Exploration, and Civic Responsibility. Each student wishing to graduate from the program must complete the FCP requirements.

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Fisher Citizenship Program mixer. This year, FCP provided Q&As with panels from companies like PWC and Unilever. They also hosted a business etiquette dinner, Mocha Mondays with your mentor, an event in which students made shoes for African children and much more.

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facebook.com/FisherCARES

groups.cob.ohio-state.edu/fisher-cares

SPECIAL INTEREST

FISHER CARES

F

isherCARES is always looking for new ways to engage its members. This year, it revamped the way it conducts meetings by introducing monthly in-house service meetings during which students performed volunteering activities, and listened to speakers from local nonprofit organizations. Another highlight of this year was its spring break trip. Ten students traveled to the Natural Tunnel State Park in Duffield, Virginia to dedicate their break to a week of service. This was FisherCARES’s first time

Valentine’s Day cards made by FisherCARES members for children at the DMC Hospital. At its first service meeting this year, FisherCARES made Halloween Door Hangers for Residents at Heartland Manor Nursing Home (below). coordinating a trip under Buck-ISERV and it proved to be a success. FisherCARES also partnered with Fisher Serves, the student service organization for Fisher’s Graduate School, to hold its first annual Fisher Canned Food Drive. Together, the two teams surpassed their goal by collecting a combined total of 1,018 cans to be donated to Mid-Ohio Foodbank. An added

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bonus for FisherCARES was that it earned bragging rights for getting the undergraduate students to donate more cans than the graduate students. Unfortunately, several volunteering events were put on-hold because of the cold weather, no thanks to the polar vortex. FisherCARES hopes that next year’s winter will be more accommodating to its mission to serve. Another challenge that FisherCARES continues to address is finding transportation to bring members to volunteering sites. FisherCARES is working to form a partnership with Pi Sigma Epsilon and Delta Sigma Pi, two of Fisher’s very own business fraternities. This future collaboration is intended to help provide avenues for more ambitious volunteers for FisherCARES’s in exchange for new volunteering opportunities for other organization’s members. issuu.com/FisherInk

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@FISHERINK

facebook.com/FisherInk

SPECIAL INTEREST

FISHER INK

I

f music production doesn’t work out for Daft Punk, they could have a career in fortune telling. That is, if their 2001 hit “Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger” was about Fisher Ink’s performance during the 2013-14 school year. Fisher Ink members worked harder than ever this year to secure corporate sponsorships. As an entirely student-run magazine, members turn to none other than their Advertising and Sales team to generate revenue to pay for their issues. Sophomore Harry Pan initiated contact with Ernst & Young (E&Y), which opened the doors to various lucrative opportunities. This year Fisher Ink hosted the iSpy EY, a scavengerhunt-style game that consisted

F

Superlatives

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Fisher Ink members who worked on the Yearbook Edition pose after a meeting. of five hidden golden tickets in Schoenbaum Hall. While the lucky finders didn’t get a trip to a chocolate factory, they were given free iPad Minis. The staff is always trying to better itself with a wealth of young, talented and diverse members. The approximately 40-person staff consists of nearly as many majors, ranging from Finance to Journalism, English and Visual Communication and Design. More than half the members are underclassmen, with some even serving on the executive board. Freshmen find ways to contibute and get involved as early as their

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first week as official members. Freshman Sam Goldberg has been with Fisher Ink since the fall involvement fair. “It’s a fun collaboration of students from different backgrounds,” said Goldberg, who is a member of the design team. Fisher Ink’s main focus this year has been it’s annual Yearbook Edition, in your hands right now, and its first annual Fisher Festival. The issue was Fisher Ink’s largest ever at 48 pages, and the festival featured live music, interactive games and the distribution of the yearbook to thousands of Ohio State students. Fisher Ink’s motto is “for the students, by the students,” and its work is never over.

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jam.osu.edu

SPECIAL INTEREST

JUST A MINUTE

J

ust a Minute (JAM), open to all majors, is an impromptu public speaking club, geared towards improving communication and interview skills. Members are assigned a random topic, and then have thirty seconds to think about it, followed by a oneminute speech on the topic. The speech concludes with feedback from the rest of the organization. JAM works with other student organizations and classes by providing workshops to teach informal public speaking. The 10 Commandments workshop teaches guidelines that can improve public speaking,

Just a Minute members after a meeting. JAM helps students with speeches, presentations and interview perparation. while giving participants the chance to practice each of the commandments. Its elevator pitch workshop is another resource for professional development that is useful for students preparing for the career fairs.

@OSUNetImpact

facebook.com/OSUNetImpact

SPECIAL INTEREST

NET IMPACT

for environmental and social change projects here on campus. Look for them next year as they continue to advocate “Empowerment for a Sustainable Future”.

We want YOU!

I

Ohio State’s Net Impact is looking for students interested in the following areas:

t’s safe to say that Net Impact had a successful year. The organization helped develop a green comic book series called Earth Team Green with Arley Owens from the Association of Ohio Recyclers. In addition to receiving more funding that opened the door to unique opportunities for their members, they received recognition from Net Impact’s central office. Besides trying to save the environment one project at a time, Net Impact experimented with different meeting structures to provide the most value to their members, and create a sense of community. This chapter of Net Impact exists to bring together leaders with a passion

Corporate social responsibility Social entrepreneurship Non-profit management International development Environmental sustainability

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facebook.com/DECAOSU

SPECIAL INTEREST

OSU COLLEGIATE DECA

Big Ten DECA

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Michigan State University Rutgers University University of Illinois University of Iowa

NEW

OSU’s Collegiate DECA will be joining 200 chapters across the United States including these BIG Ten teams

n 2013, the Ohio State chapter of Collegiate DECA (Distributive Education Clubs of America) was founded. Collegiate DECA conferences present students with unique access to internships, scholarships, competition, and professional networking. The student driven organization is centered on providing experience and development through competition. Through these competitions, DECA members gain professional know-how while working alongside peers and business professionals in the community. As a new organization this year, Collegiate DECA’s first and foremost goal involved expanding membership. Social media has been a crucial mechanism in recruiting Fisher students. It is also

University of Michigan University of Minnesota University of Wisconsin

looking into DECA case competitions, where members would be able to travel to events in New York and Orlando. The five founders (Courtney Olesh, Paula Crisp, Samarth Malhotra, Michael Bacha, and Erica Clouse), four of whom are freshman, were challenged in starting DECA at OSU due to their limited time at Fisher. They were so passionate about their experience in high school that they wanted to create a chance for students to continue such development in college.

groups.cob.ohio-state.edu/pdp

facebook.com/FisherPDP

SPECIAL INTEREST

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

T

he Professional Development Program (PDP) is the organization to join if you are looking to make strides in your professional growth. This year PDP held an etiquette dinner to educate members on proper table manners in the presence of business professionals – something that all Fisher students should experience at least once. PDP is also proud to share that its members received internship and job offers from big-name companies such as Ernst & Young, Abbott, Deloitte, and Cardinal Health. In addition, PDP increased its membership by 25%

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The Professional Development Program sets up shop at the 2013 OSU involvement fair. from last year and hopes to continue growing by bringing more recruiters to its meetings early on next fall. If you’re looking for some guidance on your path to becoming a business professional, check out the Professional Development Program.

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@SCNO_OSU

facebook.com/SCNOatOSU

SPECIAL INTEREST

STUDENTS CONSULTING FOR NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

S

tudents Consulting for Nonprofit Organizations (SCNO) offers strategic consulting to nonprofit organizations free of charge thus creating a mutual relationship between both sides. The nonprofits can gain value from the students input and the students are able to apply their experiences from the classroom and internships to real-world issues nonprofits confront. During the fall cycle, SCNO worked with eight clients and hosted its fifth annual case competition, working with a total of eleven nonprofits to help solve their business problems. Speaking of her experience with one of these collaborations, Vice President of Marketing, Lauren Landsman explains, “In my first project cycle with SCNO, my team was consulting for Food for Good Thought, a gluten-free bakery in Clintonville that provides nonprofit job training and vocational services for individuals with autism.” Landsman’s team suggested that the bakery restructure it’s Board of Directors, and additionally that it

SCNO members spell out their name at the winter activity fair. add a marketing plan for attracting both donors and corporate sponsors. Landsman continues, “Upon completion of the project for the Food for Good Thought

bakery, our client was so pleased with our suggestions that she hired me as a part-time Marketing Intern. It was simply an awesome experience.”

Cool story, bro As a sophomore in my first project cycle with SCNO, my team was consulting for Food for Good Thought. Upon completion of the project, our client was so pleased with our suggestions that she hired me as a part-time Marketing Intern to help implement some of the SCNO recommendations for the following semester. It was awesome to confirm that SCNO’s non-profit clients take our advice seriously and to see how our hard work actively makes a difference in the community. —Lauren Landsman, VP of Marketing

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Fisher Ink Yearbook 2014