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Fish Enchantment Media Presents

Tails of Enchantment Issue 1, Jan-Mar 2013

Swiss Cheese Please Cold Water Pike La Laguna Secreta Aquatic Insects Home Water

98 PAGES INSIDE!

Inaugural Issue!


Table of Contents

DEPARTMENTS 3

Editor’s Message Matt Pelletier

5

Solunar Calendar

7

First Cast

13

Hooked Comics Will Wells

26 Index of Advertisers 29

Your Fly’s Down Juan Ramirez

31

Outdoor Events

43 Product Showcase 45

Anglers Art Joel Baca

69

Captured

81

Tipping the Scales Shawn Jones

79

Giving Back Eric Frey

85

Fish Science Kevin Terry

1

FishEnchantment.com

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Issue 1 2013


INDEX OF ADVERTISERS

FEATURES 15 Tails of Enchantment Contributors Subscribers can expect articles from these great Contributors during 2013.

33 Swiss Cheese Please Serving Swiss Cheese on ice-Drill plenty of holes until you find productive water, then drill more! -By Matt Pelletier

47

78-Casa Blanca Fly Fishing Lodge 84-Dave’s Wildlife Studio 62-Dynamic Lures 32-FE Guide Service 44-Fish Creek Spinners 32-Float-N-Fish 28-JawJacker 40-Menicucci Insurance Agency 83-Mesilla Valley Outdoor Expo 78-Muskies Inc 98-RIO Products 40-Taos Fly Shop 97-Zia Kayak Outfitters

La Laguna Secreta

Fly fishing backwaters and flats from her canoe. - By Rita Adams

57

Cold Water Pike

The rewards can be huge if you know where to look for fish during winter on Navajo Lake. - By Kris Johnson

63

Home Water

Fly fishing the Red River-Rebecca Houtman’s new home waters. -By Rebecca Houtman

93

Aquatic Insects

A simple breakdown of what kind of bugs you’re most likely to find in NM waters. - By Nick Streit

COVER :

Fo otba ll Ra i n b ow Trou t caught at Stone Lak e i n 2 0 1 2 .

Feature: Swi ss Chees e P l e as e ! PHOTO BY: Doug M anl e y

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Editor’s message Over the years I’ve always considered starting a fishing magazine dedicated to New Mexico. I’ve talked with people about it over the years but the cost of printing always made the dream untouchable. The answer to this problem was for us to produce an E-Magazine. A far better choice considering we would be able to have videos, links, and podcasts- you cant make that happen with paper! It also allows us the flexibility to produce more pages and have tons of pictures and appealing graphics this way.

Matt Pelletier Tails of Enchantment Editor & Chief/Designer matt@fishenchantment.com

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Another obstacle to overcome was the ability to consistently produce material that’s interesting for anglers to enjoy. I’m an experienced fisherman but never looked at myself as such a talented or experienced angler as some of the popular fishing personalities in our state. People may enjoy reading my articles from time to time but I certainly couldn’t entertain the magazine viewers on my own. That problem spawned the idea of bringing in others who are already active in the fishing industry and enjoy sharing their passion with others through writing. Quality material will increase viewership of the magazine and help our Contributors further promote their great companies also. At the same time subscribers will be receiving exciting, educational, and entertaining material for FREE! That was a major factor for me in the planning and development of this endeavor. It had to be something we could offer the community for free so we could reach more people and help better fishing experiences in New Mexico for all. I still need to find a way to cut the costs of production and make the time it takes to put together a quality magazine worthwhile. Advertising and creativity is going to be key here. Please support our Contributors, Advertising Partners and Sponsors which make this magazine possible; by doing so you’re helping us keep Tails of Enchantment a reality! The majority of our articles will be about NM Waters but look for the occasional Feature about adventures outside of our state. We’ll be adding more Field Editors over time but we’d like to introduce this amazing group of anglers who will help us make Tails of Enchantment awesome. Rita Adams, Van Beacham, Vince Deadmond, Bill Dunn, Eddie Flores, Bob Gerding, Buddy Hartman, Rebecca Houtman, Kris Johnson, Shawn Jones, Toner Mitchell, Matt Pelletier, Ti Piper, Juan Ramirez, Nick Streit, Kevin Terry, Frank Vilorio, Will Wells, and Bob Widgren!

I S S U E

M a t t

P e l l e t i e r

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F E A T U R E

K r i s

J o h n s o n

R e b e c c a


FISHENCHANTMENT.COM New Mexico’s Online Angling Resource & Community We will also have random featured articles from members of the forum and some surprise special guest contributors later this year. Anyone interested in submitting stories is welcome to do so. I can’t promise it will be ran but we want to give our Subscribers every chance possible to be a part of the magazine.

About Tails of Enchantment All Subscribers will be able to submit photos to Tails of Enchantment in hopes of them being featured in our “Captured” Department of the magazine. Yes, you will get photo credits in all issues your pictures are featured in so submit often. We’d love to have mug shots, creative close ups and artistic shots of fish, flies, wildlife, scenery, etc... Tails of Enchantment will be released quarterly and each “Issue’s Theme will relate to the season it’s released. Help us get this publication out to more people by forwarding it to your friends and having them subscribe as well.

PUBLISHER:

Fish Enchantment Media

EDITORS & PROOFREADERS: Matt Pelletier, Editor & Chief, Designer Felipe “Manuel” Ortega, Editor & Proofreader Will Wells. Proofreader

GRAPHICS/PRODUCTION: Matt Pelletier

ADVERTISING: Leah Pelletier, Advertising Director

CONTACT US:

Winners-JawJacker Giveaway The winners were emailed on December 23rd at 6:35 PM. As noted, be sure to send matt@fishenchantment.com an email to claim your free JawJackers within 30 days. Unclaimed prizes will be used for future giveaways. Thanks for reading, I hope you enjoy!

Matt Pelletier

matt@fishenchantment.com Tails of Enchantment is published four times a year: January; April; August; November by Fish Enchantment Media LLC. Copyright © Tails of Enchantment. All rights reserved. The usage of articles, photographs, and any reproduction of this publication is strictly prohibited.

D

C O N T R I B U T O R S

H o u t m a n

N i c k

S t r e i t

R i t a

A d a m s


SOLUNAR CALENDAR Lunar Calendar Highlights: Tw i A - ( A M A s t ro l o g i c a l Tw i light), Sunrise, Solar Noon, S u n s e t , Tw i A ( P M A s t ro l o g i c a l Tw i l i g h t ) , M o o n r i s e , Moonset, Moon Phase, and D a y L e n g t h . We t r y t o i n clude all factors anglers pay attention to when planning their next fishing trip.

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Twi A: 5:44 AM Sunrise: 7:15 AM Solar noon: 12:10 PM Sunset: 5:05 PM Twi A: 6:36 PM Moonrise: 9:29 PM Moonset: 9:39 AM Day length: 9h 50m

1

Thursday

Twi A: 5:45 AM Sunrise: 7:15 AM Solar noon: 12:10 PM Sunset: 5:06 PM Twi A: 6:36 PM Moonrise: 10:29 PM Moonset: 10:11 AM Day length: 9h 51m

2

Friday

Twi A: 5:45 AM Sunrise: 7:15 AM Solar noon: 12:11 PM Sunset: 5:07 PM Twi A: 6:37 PM Moonrise: 11:30 PM Moonset: 10:44 AM Day length: 9h 52m

3

Saturday 4

Twi A: 5:45 AM Sunrise: 7:15 AM Solar noon: 12:12 PM Sunset: 5:08 PM Twi A: 6:39 PM Moonrise: 12:33 AM Moonset: 11:54 AM Day length: 9h 53m

5

11

Twi A: 5:45 AM Sunrise: 7:15 AM Solar noon: 12:15 PM Sunset: 5:14 PM Twi A: 6:44 PM Moonrise: 7:40 AM Moonset: 6:43 PM Day length: 9h 59m

12

18

Twi A: 5:44 AM Sunrise: 7:13 AM Solar noon: 12:17 PM Sunset: 5:21 PM Twi A: 6:50 PM Moonrise: 11:48 AM Moonset: 12:54 AM Day length: 10h 8m

19

25

Twi A: 5:42 AM Sunrise: 7:10 AM Solar noon: 12:19 PM Sunset: 5:28 PM Twi A: 6:56 PM Moonrise: 5:25 PM Moonset: 6:31 AM Full Moon: 9:40 PM Day length: 10h 19m

26

Twi A: 5:45 AM Sunrise: 7:15 AM Solar noon: 12:11 PM Sunset: 5:07 PM Twi A: 6:38 PM Moonrise: none Moonset: 11:18 AM Last Qtr: 8:59 PM Day length: 9h 52m

Twi A: 5:45 AM Sunrise: 7:15 AM Solar noon: 12:12 PM Sunset: 5:09 PM Twi A: 6:39 PM Moonrise: 1:38 AM Moonset: 12:36 PM Day length: 9h 54m

6

Twi A: 5:45 AM Sunrise: 7:15 AM Solar noon: 12:13 PM Sunset: 5:10 PM Twi A: 6:40 PM Moonrise: 2:45 AM Moonset: 1:23 PM Day length: 9h 55m

7

Twi A: 5:45 AM Sunrise: 7:15 AM Solar noon: 12:13 PM Sunset: 5:11 PM Twi A: 6:41 PM Moonrise: 3:53 AM Moonset: 2:17 PM Day length: 9h 55m

8

Twi A: 5:45 AM Sunrise: 7:15 AM Solar noon: 12:14 PM Sunset: 5:12 PM Twi A: 6:42 PM Moonrise: 4:58 AM Moonset: 3:18 PM Day length: 9h 56m

9

Twi A: 5:45 AM Sunrise: 7:15 AM Solar noon: 12:14 PM Sunset: 5:13 PM Twi A: 6:42 PM Moonrise: 5:58 AM Moonset: 4:24 PM Day length: 9h 57m

10

Twi A: 5:45 AM Sunrise: 7:15 AM Solar noon: 12:14 PM Sunset: 5:14 PM Twi A: 6:43 PM Moonrise: 6:53 AM Moonset: 5:34 PM New Moon: 12:45 PM Day length: 9h 58m

Twi A: 5:45 AM Sunrise: 7:15 AM Solar noon: 12:15 PM Sunset: 5:15 PM Twi A: 6:45 PM Moonrise: 8:22 AM Moonset: 7:51 PM Day length: 10h 1m

13

Twi A: 5:45 AM Sunrise: 7:15 AM Solar noon: 12:15 PM Sunset: 5:16 PM Twi A: 6:46 PM Moonrise: 8:59 AM Moonset: 8:56 PM Day length: 10h 2m

14

Twi A: 5:45 AM Sunrise: 7:14 AM Solar noon: 12:16 PM Sunset: 5:17 PM Twi A: 6:46 PM Moonrise: 9:34 AM Moonset: 9:58 PM Day length: 10h 3m

15

Twi A: 5:45 AM Sunrise: 7:14 AM Solar noon: 12:16 PM Sunset: 5:18 PM Twi A: 6:47 PM Moonrise: 10:07 AM Moonset: 10:58 PM Day length: 10h 4m

16

Twi A: 5:45 AM Sunrise: 7:14 AM Solar noon: 12:17 PM Sunset: 5:19 PM Twi A: 6:48 PM Moonrise: 10:39 AM Moonset: 11:57 PM Day length: 10h 5m

17

Twi A: 5:45 AM Sunrise: 7:13 AM Solar noon: 12:17 PM Sunset: 5:20 PM Twi A: 6:49 PM Moonrise: 11:13 AM Moonset: none First Qtr: 4:46 PM Day length: 10h 7m

20

Twi A: 5:44 AM Sunrise: 7:12 AM Solar noon: 12:18 PM Sunset: 5:23 PM Twi A: 6:52 PM Moonrise: 1:07 PM Moonset: 2:43 AM Day length: 10h 11m

21

Twi A: 5:44 AM Sunrise: 7:12 AM Solar noon: 12:18 PM Sunset: 5:24 PM Twi A: 6:52 PM Moonrise: 1:52 PM Moonset: 3:35 AM Day length: 10h 12m

22

Twi A: 5:43 AM Sunrise: 7:11 AM Solar noon: 12:18 PM Sunset: 5:25 PM Twi A: 6:53 PM Moonrise: 2:41 PM Moonset: 4:24 AM Day length: 10h 14m

23

27

Twi A: 5:41 AM Sunrise: 7:08 AM Solar noon: 12:19 PM Sunset: 5:30 PM Twi A: 6:58 PM Moonrise: 7:23 PM Moonset: 7:41 AM Day length: 10h 22m

28

Twi A: 5:41 AM Sunrise: 7:08 AM Solar noon: 12:20 PM Sunset: 5:31 PM Twi A: 6:59 PM Moonrise: 8:23 PM Moonset: 8:14 AM Day length: 10h 23m

29

Twi A: 5:40 AM Sunrise: 7:07 AM Solar noon: 12:20 PM Sunset: 5:32 PM Twi A: 6:59 PM Moonrise: 9:24 PM Moonset: 8:47 AM Day length: 10h 25m

30

Twi A: 5:44 AM Sunrise: 7:13 AM Solar noon: 12:17 PM Sunset: 5:22 PM Twi A: 6:51 PM Moonrise: 12:26 PM Moonset: 1:49 AM Day length: 10h 9m Twi A: 5:42 AM Sunrise: 7:09 AM Solar noon: 12:19 PM Sunset: 5:29 PM Twi A: 6:57 PM Moonrise: 6:24 PM Moonset: 7:07 AM Day length: 10h 20m

5

January 2013

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Twi A: 5:43 AM Sunrise: 7:11 AM Solar noon: 12:19 PM Sunset: 5:26 PM Twi A: 6:54 PM Moonrise: 3:33 PM Moonset: 5:09 AM Day length: 10h 15m Twi A: 5:39 AM Sunrise: 7:06 AM Solar noon: 12:20 PM Sunset: 5:33 PM Twi A: 7:00 PM Moonrise: 10:26 PM Moonset: 9:20 AM Day length: 10h 27m

Issue 1 2013

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31

Twi A: 5:42 AM Sunrise: 7:10 AM Solar noon: 12:19 PM Sunset: 5:27 PM Twi A: 6:55 PM Moonrise: 4:28 PM Moonset: 5:52 AM Day length: 10h 17m


Sunday

February 2013

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday Twi A: 5:39 AM Sunrise: 7:06 AM Solar noon: 12:20 PM Sunset: 5:34 PM Twi A: 7:01 PM Moonrise: 11:30 PM Moonset: 9:56 AM Day length: 10h 29m

Saturday 1

Twi A: 5:38 AM Sunrise: 7:05 AM Solar noon: 12:20 PM Sunset: 5:35 PM Twi A: 7:02 PM Moonrise: none Moonset: 10:35 AM Day length: 10h 30m

2

Twi A: 5:38 AM Sunrise: 7:04 AM Solar noon: 12:20 PM Sunset: 5:36 PM Twi A: 7:03 PM Moonrise: 12:34 AM Moonset: 11:19 AM Last Qtr: 6:57 AM Day length: 10h 32m

3

Twi A: 5:37 AM Sunrise: 7:03 AM Solar noon: 12:20 PM Sunset: 5:37 PM Twi A: 7:04 PM Moonrise: 1:39 AM Moonset: 12:08 PM Day length: 10h 34m

4

Twi A: 5:36 AM Sunrise: 7:03 AM Solar noon: 12:20 PM Sunset: 5:38 PM Twi A: 7:05 PM Moonrise: 2:43 AM Moonset: 1:04 PM Day length: 10h 36m

5

Twi A: 5:35 AM Sunrise: 7:02 AM Solar noon: 12:21 PM Sunset: 5:39 PM Twi A: 7:06 PM Moonrise: 3:44 AM Moonset: 2:06 PM Day length: 10h 38m

6

Twi A: 5:35 AM Sunrise: 7:01 AM Solar noon: 12:21 PM Sunset: 5:40 PM Twi A: 7:07 PM Moonrise: 4:39 AM Moonset: 3:13 PM Day length: 10h 40m

7

Twi A: 5:34 AM Sunrise: 7:00 AM Solar noon: 12:21 PM Sunset: 5:41 PM Twi A: 7:07 PM Moonrise: 5:29 AM Moonset: 4:21 PM Day length: 10h 42m

8

Twi A: 5:33 AM Sunrise: 6:59 AM Solar noon: 12:21 PM Sunset: 5:42 PM Twi A: 7:08 PM Moonrise: 6:13 AM Moonset: 5:29 PM Day length: 10h 44m

9

Twi A: 5:32 AM Sunrise: 6:58 AM Solar noon: 12:21 PM Sunset: 5:43 PM Twi A: 7:09 PM Moonrise: 6:52 AM Moonset: 6:35 PM New Moon: 12:21 AM Day length: 10h 46m

10

Twi A: 5:31 AM Sunrise: 6:57 AM Solar noon: 12:21 PM Sunset: 5:44 PM Twi A: 7:10 PM Moonrise: 7:29 AM Moonset: 7:39 PM Day length: 10h 48m

11

Twi A: 5:31 AM Sunrise: 6:56 AM Solar noon: 12:21 PM Sunset: 5:45 PM Twi A: 7:11 PM Moonrise: 8:03 AM Moonset: 8:41 PM Day length: 10h 49m

12

Twi A: 5:30 AM Sunrise: 6:55 AM Solar noon: 12:21 PM Sunset: 5:46 PM Twi A: 7:12 PM Moonrise: 8:36 AM Moonset: 9:42 PM Day length: 10h 51m

13

Twi A: 5:29 AM Sunrise: 6:54 AM Solar noon: 12:21 PM Sunset: 5:47 PM Twi A: 7:13 PM Moonrise: 9:10 AM Moonset: 10:40 PM Day length: 10h 54m

14

Twi A: 5:28 AM Sunrise: 6:53 AM Solar noon: 12:21 PM Sunset: 5:48 PM Twi A: 7:14 PM Moonrise: 9:46 AM Moonset: 11:37 PM Day length: 10h 56m

15

Twi A: 5:27 AM Sunrise: 6:52 AM Solar noon: 12:21 PM Sunset: 5:49 PM Twi A: 7:14 PM Moonrise: 10:23 AM Moonset: none Day length: 10h 58m

16

Twi A: 5:26 AM Sunrise: 6:51 AM Solar noon: 12:21 PM Sunset: 5:50 PM Twi A: 7:15 PM Moonrise: 11:03 AM Moonset: 12:33 AM First Qtr: 1:32 PM Day length: 11h 0m

17

Twi A: 5:25 AM Sunrise: 6:50 AM Solar noon: 12:20 PM Sunset: 5:51 PM Twi A: 7:16 PM Moonrise: 11:47 AM Moonset: 1:26 AM Day length: 11h 2m

18

wi A: 5:24 AM Sunrise: 6:48 AM Solar noon: 12:20 PM Sunset: 5:52 PM Twi A: 7:17 PM Moonrise: 12:34 PM Moonset: 2:16 AM Day length: 11h 4m

19

Twi A: 5:23 AM Sunrise: 6:47 AM Solar noon: 12:20 PM Sunset: 5:53 PM Twi A: 7:18 PM Moonrise: 1:25 PM Moonset: 3:03 AM Day length: 11h 6m

20

Twi A: 5:22 AM Sunrise: 6:46 AM Solar noon: 12:20 PM Sunset: 5:54 PM Twi A: 7:19 PM Moonrise: 2:19 PM Moonset: 3:47 AM Day length: 11h 8m

21

Twi A: 5:20 AM Sunrise: 6:45 AM Solar noon: 12:20 PM Sunset: 5:55 PM Twi A: 7:20 PM Moonrise: 3:15 PM Moonset: 4:27 AM Day length: 11h 10m

22

Twi A: 5:19 AM Sunrise: 6:44 AM Solar noon: 12:20 PM Sunset: 5:56 PM Twi A: 7:21 PM Moonrise: 4:13 PM Moonset: 5:05 AM Day length: 11h 12m

23

Twi A: 5:18 AM Sunrise: 6:43 AM Solar noon: 12:20 PM Sunset: 5:57 PM Twi A: 7:21 PM Moonrise: 5:12 PM Moonset: 5:40 AM Day length: 11h 14m

24

Twi A: 5:17 AM Sunrise: 6:41 AM Solar noon: 12:20 PM Sunset: 5:58 PM Twi A: 7:22 PM Moonrise: 6:13 PM Moonset: 6:14 AM Full Moon: 1:27 PM Day length: 11h 17m

25

Twi A: 5:16 AM Sunrise: 6:40 AM Solar noon: 12:19 PM Sunset: 5:59 PM Twi A: 7:23 PM Moonrise: 7:15 PM Moonset: 6:48 AM Day length: 11h 19m

26

Twi A: 5:15 AM Sunrise: 6:39 AM Solar noon: 12:19 PM Sunset: 6:00 PM Twi A: 7:24 PM Moonrise: 8:18 PM Moonset: 7:22 AM Day length: 11h 21m

27

Twi A: 5:13 AM Sunrise: 6:38 AM Solar noon: 12:19 PM Sunset: 6:01 PM Twi A: 7:25 PM Moonrise: 9:22 PM Moonset: 7:58 AM Day length: 11h 23m

28

Twi A: 5:12 AM Sunrise: 6:36 AM Solar noon: 12:19 PM Sunset: 6:01 PM Twi A: 7:26 PM Moonrise: 10:27 PM Moonset: 8:36 AM Day length: 11h 25m

1

Twi A: 5:11 AM Sunrise: 6:35 AM Solar noon: 12:19 PM Sunset: 6:02 PM Twi A: 7:27 PM Moonrise: 11:32 PM Moonset: 9:18 AM Day length: 11h 27m

2

Twi A: 5:03 AM Sunrise: 6:27 AM Solar noon: 12:17 PM Sunset: 6:08 PM Twi A: 7:32 PM Moonrise: 4:07 AM Moonset: 3:13 PM Day length: 11h 40m

8

Twi A: 5:02 AM Sunrise: 6:26 AM Solar noon: 12:17 PM Sunset: 6:08 PM Twi A: 7:33 PM Moonrise: 4:47 AM Moonset: 4:18 PM Day length: 11h 43m

9

Sunday

Twi A: 5:10 AM Sunrise: 6:34 AM Solar noon: 12:19 PM Sunset: 6:03 PM Twi A: 7:27 PM Moonrise: none Moonset: 10:06 AM Day length: 11h 30m

March 2013

Monday

3

Twi A: 5:08 AM Sunrise: 6:32 AM Solar noon: 12:18 PM Sunset: 6:04 PM Twi A: 7:28 PM Moonrise: 12:36 AM Moonset: 10:59 AM Last Qtr: 2:54 PM Day length: 11h 32m

Tuesday

4

Twi A: 5:07 AM Sunrise: 6:31 AM Solar noon: 12:18 PM Sunset: 6:05 PM Twi A: 7:29 PM Moonrise: 1:36 AM Moonset: 11:58 AM Day length: 11h 34m

Wednesday

5

Twi A: 5:06 AM Sunrise: 6:30 AM Solar noon: 12:18 PM Sunset: 6:06 PM Twi A: 7:30 PM Moonrise: 2:32 AM Moonset: 1:01 PM Day length: 11h 36m

Thursday

6

Twi A: 5:04 AM Sunrise: 6:28 AM Solar noon: 12:18 PM Sunset: 6:07 PM Twi A: 7:31 PM Moonrise: 3:22 AM Moonset: 2:07 PM Day length: 11h 38m

Friday

7

Saturday

Twi A: 6:00 AM Sunrise: 7:24 AM Solar noon: 1:17 PM Sunset: 7:09 PM Twi A: 8:33 PM Moonrise: 6:24 AM Moonset: 6:22 PM Day length: 11h 45m

10

Twi A: 5:59 AM Sunrise: 7:23 AM Solar noon: 1:17 PM Sunset: 7:10 PM Twi A: 8:34 PM Moonrise: 6:59 AM Moonset: 7:24 PM New Moon: 1:52 PM Day length: 11h 47m

11

Twi A: 5:57 AM Sunrise: 7:22 AM Solar noon: 1:16 PM Sunset: 7:11 PM Twi A: 8:35 PM Moonrise: 7:33 AM Moonset: 8:26 PM Day length: 11h 49m

12

Twi A: 5:56 AM Sunrise: 7:20 AM Solar noon: 1:16 PM Sunset: 7:12 PM Twi A: 8:36 PM Moonrise: 8:07 AM Moonset: 9:25 PM Day length: 11h 52m

13

Twi A: 5:55 AM Sunrise: 7:19 AM Solar noon: 1:16 PM Sunset: 7:13 PM Twi A: 8:37 PM Moonrise: 8:42 AM Moonset: 10:24 PM Day length: 11h 54m

14

Twi A: 5:53 AM Sunrise: 7:18 AM Solar noon: 1:16 PM Sunset: 7:14 PM Twi A: 8:38 PM Moonrise: 9:19 AM Moonset: 11:21 PM Day length: 11h 56m

15

Twi A: 5:52 AM Sunrise: 7:16 AM Solar noon: 1:15 PM Sunset: 7:14 PM Twi A: 8:39 PM Moonrise: 9:59 AM Moonset: none Day length: 11h 58m

16

Twi A: 5:50 AM Sunrise: 7:15 AM Solar noon: 1:15 PM Sunset: 7:15 PM Twi A: 8:40 PM Moonrise: 10:42 AM Moonset: 12:15 AM Day length: 12h 0m

17

Twi A: 5:49 AM Sunrise: 7:13 AM Solar noon: 1:15 PM Sunset: 7:16 PM Twi A: 8:41 PM Moonrise: 11:28 AM Moonset: 1:07 AM Day length: 12h 3m

18

Twi A: 5:47 AM Sunrise: 7:12 AM Solar noon: 1:14 PM Sunset: 7:17 PM Twi A: 8:41 PM Moonrise: 12:17 PM Moonset: 1:55 AM First Qtr: 11:28 AM Day length: 12h 5m

19

Twi A: 5:46 AM Sunrise: 7:11 AM Solar noon: 1:14 PM Sunset: 7:18 PM Twi A: 8:42 PM Moonrise: 1:08 PM Moonset: 2:40 AM Day length: 12h 7m

20

Twi A: 5:44 AM Sunrise: 7:09 AM Solar noon: 1:14 PM Sunset: 7:18 PM Twi A: 8:43 PM Moonrise: 2:03 PM Moonset: 3:21 AM Day length: 12h 9m

21

Twi A: 5:43 AM Sunrise: 7:08 AM Solar noon: 1:13 PM Sunset: 7:19 PM Twi A: 8:44 PM Moonrise: 2:59 PM Moonset: 4:00 AM Day length: 12h 12m

22

Twi A: 5:41 AM Sunrise: 7:06 AM Solar noon: 1:13 PM Sunset: 7:20 PM Twi A: 8:45 PM Moonrise: 3:58 PM Moonset: 4:36 AM Day length: 12h 14m

23

Twi A: 5:40 AM Sunrise: 7:05 AM Solar noon: 1:13 PM Sunset: 7:21 PM Twi A: 8:46 PM Moonrise: 4:58 PM Moonset: 5:11 AM Day length: 12h 16m

24

Twi A: 5:38 AM Sunrise: 7:03 AM Solar noon: 1:13 PM Sunset: 7:22 PM Twi A: 8:47 PM Moonrise: 6:00 PM Moonset: 5:45 AM Day length: 12h 18m

25

Twi A: 5:37 AM Sunrise: 7:02 AM Solar noon: 1:12 PM Sunset: 7:23 PM Twi A: 8:48 PM Moonrise: 7:03 PM Moonset: 6:19 AM Day length: 12h 20m

26

Twi A: 5:35 AM Sunrise: 7:01 AM Solar noon: 1:12 PM Sunset: 7:23 PM Twi A: 8:49 PM Moonrise: 8:08 PM Moonset: 6:55 AM Full Moon: 3:28 AM Day length: 12h 23m

27

Twi A: 5:34 AM Sunrise: 6:59 AM Solar noon: 1:12 PM Sunset: 7:24 PM Twi A: 8:50 PM Moonrise: 9:15 PM Moonset: 7:33 AM Day length: 12h 25m

28

Twi A: 5:32 AM Sunrise: 6:58 AM Solar noon: 1:11 PM Sunset: 7:25 PM Twi A: 8:51 PM Moonrise: 10:22 PM Moonset: 8:15 AM Day length: 12h 27m

29

Twi A: 5:31 AM Sunrise: 6:56 AM Solar noon: 1:11 PM Sunset: 7:26 PM Twi A: 8:52 PM Moonrise: 11:27 PM Moonset: 9:02 AM Day length: 12h 29m

30

Twi A: 5:29 AM Sunrise: 6:55 AM Solar noon: 1:11 PM Sunset: 7:27 PM Twi A: 8:53 PM Moonrise: none Moonset: 9:55 AM Day length: 12h 31m

31


FIRST CAST

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Issue 1 2013


FIRST CAST

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FIRST CAST

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COMIC STRIP

Submit your caption by sending

INTERACTIVE Will is also the creator of ROXORSOXOFFCOMICS.COM

an email to: cmxacc@gmail.com.

Will Wells aka “Roxors”

Caption Contest-Fish Buffet

Congratulations to YOUR NAME HERE for winning the Caption Contest. You have 30 days to send us your mailing address (do so the same way you made your submission) so we can ship you a nice print of your winning caption! 13

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F I S H E N C H A N T M E N T . C O M

Videos Forums Reviews ARTICLES Interviews BLOGS CONTESTS Guide Service and MORE!


Tails of Enchantment will feature articles and departments contributed from a variety of anglers and fishing personalities from New Mexico and the surrounding area. Many of them have been working within the fishing industry for longer than they would like to mention but this experience and wisdom is a huge asset to everyone willing to listen when they share. This section will give you, the reader, an idea as to what kind of articles we’ll have in the magazine by learning who will be writing them. Look for more contributors to be introduced as the magazine grows. In the credits potion of each magazine, you will find a list of the “Featured Contributors”; these are the individuals who will have articles featured within that particular issue. Every magazine will have new material from random contributors, so be sure to subscribe so you don’t miss anything! -Matt Pelletier


Rita Adams

Van Beacham

Rita Adams is a fishing guide and author based in Northern New Mexico. Daughter of fishing guide Ed Adams, Rita discovered her passion for flyfishing at a very early age. She began guiding at seventeen, and has since followed her passion all over the globe. Rita is currently managing Casa Blanca and Playa Blanca Fly Fishing Lodges on the Yucatan Peninsula, where she chases permit with every free minute.

Van Beacham is a fourth generation native New Mexican and comes from over six generations of fly fishermen. He has guided anglers of all levels from New Mexico to Wyoming since 1978 and he has a fine staff of guides anxious and willing to share their knowledge, skills and favorite locations with you. The guides are well-trained, they know when and where to fish and they can match a client’s fishing skill and desire with location to create the best opportunity for a successful trip. From sprawling private ranches with four-star accommodations, to mountain lakes and streams and wild river canyons, Van Beacham’s Solitary Angler has the fishing opportunities and the guides to make your next fishing trip an unforgettable experience.

Casa and Playa Blanca Lodges 1-877-261-8867 rita.adams@casablancafishing.com casablancafishing.com

thesolitaryangler.com

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Vince Deadmond “The Fly Fishing Hardware Guy”, is co-owner of Best Hardware in Apache Junction, AZ. He is an avid fly fisher, with fly fishing stories published on the web, in local news papers and magazines. His stories tangle family, friends, and fly lines.

Bill Dunn When he first arrived in New Mexico courtesy of Uncle Sam I was not a happy camper. Having grown up in Wisconsin, there were many places to walk or bike to for hunting and fishing. At first he didn’t like the dry climate or the distance to drive for outdoor activities. After one year Bill was hooked on the beautiful mountain streams and lakes, the mild winters and the opportunities to fish unspoiled waters by simply taking short hikes after “only a one or two or three hour drive”. The fact that there are so many options available for warm or cold water and lake or stream for fishing and that most are available year round makes New Mexico a great place for the outdoor enthusiast. Bill has been fishing New Mexico waters since the late 60s and loves all types of fishing and for all species. He did some fly fishing as a kid in Wisconsin and took it up again here. His wife Carle got interested and now some of their favorite trips are combined lake and stream (NavajoSan Juan, Heron-El Vado-Chama, etc.). Bill enjoys fishing and helping others be better anglers.


Bob Gerding

Buddy Hartman

Bob is considered the dean of fly fishing in the state of New Mexico, with more than 60 years of experience hunting and fishing New Mexico.

Born and raised in Colorado, his dad got him hooked on fishing when he was very young. One of his fondest memories is when he was about 3 years old and he caught 3 trout on a single cast. His passion for fishing grew from there. He didn’t realize what a Northern Pike was until about the age of 6 or 7 when he saw guys on TV catching 48” fish. Ever since that day, to say he has a passion for pike, is a drastic understatement. Buddy will fish for other species of fish, but that is generally only when pike are not biting, he gets asked to fish for another species, or there is no pike close enough to fish for. He has caught pike in Colorado, Arizona, Nebraska, Idaho, Washington, North Dakota, Manitoba, and most recently Saskatchewan. Buddy served the Members of Chapter 57 of Muskies, Inc. as President in Washington state from December of 2008 to August of 2010.

After over twenty years experience in retail sales for Charlie’s Sporting Goods and others in Albuquerque, NM, Bob launched Bob Gerding’s Outdoor Adventures to help clients all over the country find just the right outdoor adventure for them. As part of Outdoor Adventures, Bob created the Outdoor Adventures Hunting & Fishing Show. Bob has been the host of “New Mexico Wildlife”, (and its predecessor, “Wild New Mexico”), a television show about outdoor activities in New Mexico. He is a regular on local television and radio, including Albuquerque’s 94 Rock and the city’s CBS television affiliate. Bob is also widely known as an author of the classic “A Practical Guide to Fly Tying”. Bob also coauthored “Troubleshooting The Trout” with UNM professor Bill Black. In 2007 Bob was inducted into the Universtiy of New Mexico’s Anderson School of Business’ Hall of Fame. Bob brings a lifetime of experience to Outdoor Adventures and is eager to help people learn. bobsoutadv.com

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Rebecca Houtman

Kris Johnson

Rebecca Houtman moved to New Mexico in 2002 after completing a Masters degree in biology, focusing on aquatic macroinvertebrate and water quality relationships. Her time in New Mexico has been spent working as a science teacher, water quality chemist, managing a Pueblo’s water quality program and six years as Curator of the ABQ BioPark’s Tingley Beach and Aquatic Conservation Facility. She now lives in northern New Mexico with her husband and son at a trout hatchery. Her passion is backpacking to remote areas of New Mexico’s wilderness, fly fishing small streams for elusive trout.

Kris Johnson is an Inspector for the City of Durango, and a full time fisherman. He fished some team tournaments last year, and plans on fishing a few PRO tourneys this year with W.O.N Bass and maybe a BASS or two! Kris lives in Durango with hid wife Kristen, and two great girls, Madison(13) and Stella(10); so his hands are full! He loves to fish for Pike on his off time, and most of the winter! He is a true believer of the Dynamic Lures Line, and fish the baits almost exclusively. Kris Johnson fishes for: Dynamic Lures, St.Croix Rods, Deka Batteries, Pepper Jigs Custom Baits, HaberVision Sunglasses, Trokar Hooks, Brennan Oil, Maniac Baits, Rich’s Performance Marine, Simms, Swimbait Posse


Shawn Jones

Toner Mitchell

Being born and raised in New Mexico with a passion for fishing. Shawn grew up a multispecies angler, fishing for everything and anything he could, every chance he had. As he got older, he became dedicated to one species in particular, bass! The hunt, the fight, and the fact that you can catch them so many different ways was alluring. Shawn’s been a tournament angler for 3 years and has had decent success already. He’s cashed some checks along the way and earned a spot on the NM B.A.S.S. Federation Nation team that fished the 2012 Western Divisionals. He’s trying to work his way up the ladder and hopes to one day make a living working within the fishing industry in some shape or form.

Toner Mitchell has been the manager of The Reel Life fly shop since 2003, and has guided streams around the west and Alaska since 1992. A born New Mexican, Toner’s favorite New Mexico fishing spot is the Rio Grande gorge, though he keeps up on the Chama scene as well. Coldwater conservation efforts consume a lot of his time, as does fiction writing, his family, and blogging.

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Fly fishing/conservation blog by Toner Mitchell. www.Truchacabra.com

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Matt Pelletier Matt was born and raised in Albuquerque New Mexico and has always enjoyed the outdoors. His Father and Grandfather used to take Matt fishing for coho, kokanee, and trout when he was young. In 2001, he became a dedicated angler, fishing every chance, species, and body of water he could find. In 2004, Matt started fly fishing alot and quickly began tying his own flies that same year. In 2007, he took a shot at ice fishing and had a few great experiences, ever since he has been addicted to the hardwater season. Along with his wife, Leah/Mariposa, they created Fish Enchantment in 2005. Matt’s also dedicated to New Mexico Muskies Inc and NM Muskie fisheries. He has served as Secretary, VP, and most recently has had the privilege of serving the Members as President since June 2009. CEO of FE Media, Tails of Enchantment Editor & Chief,FE Media Videographer, and operates FE Guide Service at Bluewater Lake. Fish Enchantment Guide Service: www.feguides.com

Ti Piper Ti Piper, author, Fishing in New Mexico. Fishing Skills and Aquatic Resource Education instructor as a contractor for the NMDG&F since 1991. Married to Barbara Piper of the Watermelon Mountain Jug Band. Tries to hunt deer. Fishes Maine, New Hampshire and as much of New Mexico as possible every year. Favorite new toys: plastic jaw-gripper pliers for holding big tiger musky and a little four weight fly rod for bluegill and high country troutlets.


Juan Ramirez (Your Fly’s Down)

Nick Streit

Juan grew up in Northern New Mexico, fishing the small streams and creeks of the Sangre De Cristos. In 1997, a switch to fly-fishing was made and he has never looked back. Over the years, he has guided on the Cimarron River in New Mexico as well as the South Platte River in Colorado.

Nick Streit owns Taos Fly Shop and has been guiding with his dad since he was a teenager. When he was 17, he was on the Junior US Fly Fishing team that placed 2nd in Europe. He is the head guide and his skill at getting folks on fish makes him the most requested guide. He is also the pike specialist and has figured out how to catch them on huge dry flies. He teaches fly fishing through college courses at UNM Taos. Nick also instructs private fly casting lessons.

Juan received his first tying kit when he was 15. After a few disastrous “creations”, it was put away for a few years. In college in Durango, CO, the kit was opened and a new appreciation for the globs of fur, feathers, floss and thread was created. Now after 15 years of tying, Juan is an accomplished fly tier. Currently a part time guide and a fly tying instructor for Anglers Covey in Colorado Springs, there are not many seconds that pass without the thought of fishing or tying that go by. Juan is also a member of the Montana Fly Company design team and runs a bog about fly tying and fly fishing (hopperjuan.blogspot.com).

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Taos Fly Shop 308-C Paseo del Pueblo sur 5015 NDCBU Taos, NM 87571 575.751.1312 www.taosflyshop.com

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Kevin Terr y

Frank Vilorio

Kevin Terry was born and raised in the heart of the Sangre De Cristo Mountains otherwise known as Taos, NM. His addiction to fly fishing was developed at a very early age with the aid of his trout bum father, and an open tab at the local fly shop. As addictions typically go, Kevin was consumed by the need to catch trout. The pursuit was tireless and the addition of the driver’s license at the age of 15, facilitated even more aquatic adventures throughout the west. When due to graduate High School, he was slapped in the face with the “Real World” scenario by Dad claiming that it was time to get a job or go to college. Well, a little research and some insider info from the biology teacher at Taos High led him to Oregon State University which has a tremendous fisheries science program and incidentally a 30 minute drive to several top notch Steelhead streams. Upon graduation, Kevin returned to the Southwest and took a job with the Colorado State University Larval Fish Laboratory. This work was focused on protecting the endangered Colorado Pikeminnow. For the past six years, Kevin has been the fisheries biologist for the Jicarilla Apache Game and Fish Department where his work has been a mixture of recreational game fish management and native fish restoration and protection. Kevin and his wife Stephanie now reside in Pagosa Springs, Colorado where as you have probably guessed, the fishing is excellent.

“Elephant Butte Lake was his back yard so he took advantage and fished it regularly as a kid”. As he grew older, he fell more in love with fishing, it became his passion. Stripers were introduced to the Lake in 1972. With time, Frank learned the lake and how to catch and keep bait alive. He learned how to target areas in reference to the species of fish he wanted to catch. Time and patience showed him what works. In 1994, Frank bought his first fishing boat, applied for a guide license and started fishing professionally. He spends over 280 days a year on the water and his skills are “top notch” now. Frank runs a 24 ft. LTS Triton Center Console fishing boat to catch Stripers, White Bass, Walleye and other species. His passion has been working with kids all ages, even the old ones, 70-80 years old. Fishing has no age limit. www.stripersnewmexico.com frankvilorio@sbcglobal.net


Bob Widgren

Eddie Flores

My first experience with fly rods was to refinish an old bamboo rod that I found in my father-inlaw’s garage. I was fascinated by the delicate little fly rod and proceeded to dissect the poor thing. Needless to say, the surgery was a success but the patient died.

Eddie Flores is a self taught carp man, who gained interest in these mysterious golden ghosts after entering a regional tournament. This experience helped him realize how addicting carp fishing can be and the only way to catch carp would be to find more effective techniques.

My partner (wife of 27 years) and I started our small little rod company in 1980 and eventually grew into building approximately 600 rods a year. During this time we managed to open a retail fly shop in Albuquerque, NM. The fly shop & rod building kept us quite busy over the years and now we are getting ready to put serial number 5000 on a new fly rod. flyrodcrafters.com

Through research, there was a realization that carping was popular worldwide, in particular its birthplace, the UK. The use of the internet introduced Eddie to different techniques, baits, and equipment that were quite different from what was mostly being used by individuals here in the states. This aided him in developing specific fishing techniques and baits for regional waters to help improve catch rates during different times of the year.

My philosophy in rod building is something I call ‘simple elegance’. A rod can be quite beautiful without a lot of bells and whistles if the custom rod builder pays attention to the many little details. Attention to detail is what sets a ‘custom rod’ apart from a ‘run-of-the-mill’ massed produced fly rod. Attention to detail is also what sets a ‘great’ rod company apart from a mediocre one.

Trial, error and determination allowed him to win twice in his age division and become grand champion (total weight) in the Carp Round up. This led to him opening his own Carp, Buffalo and Catfish bait company named Tres Flores Baits. His baits have been fished all over the US including the prestigious Carp World Championships held in 2011 on the St. Laurence River in Upper New York State.

Born - Cleveland OH-Graduated Sandia HS, ABQ Graduated UNM, ABQ-Retired US Army, Chief Warrant Officer W4-Formed Los Pinos Custom Rods, ABQ 1980. 25

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Will Wells

Felipe “Manuel� Ortega

Will Wells is an avid outdoor adventurist, a writer, and a cartoonist. Born in New Mexico, he has developed a deep passion for the state, and the rest of the southwest. He owns the Roxorsoxoff Comics blog, co-operates the SWDR4x4 outdoor adventure blog, and is currently creating the Hooked! comic blog for Fish Enchantment. Always eager for the next outdoor adventure, Will continues to look towards the road less traveled, and to blog about it later.

Born and raised in northern Taos County, majority of his free time was spent enjoying the outdoors with a fishing rod in his hand. His grandfather taught him to fish at an early age and the obsession grew from there. Manuel spent majority of his time fishing the Rio Costilla Park and considers the fishery his home turf. In time, he found himself exploring many fisheries in South Central Colorado and North Central New Mexico. In 2007, Manuel began to expand on his obsession by fishing from a kayak. In no time at all, he was catching Trout, Kokanee Salmon, Pike, Perch and Tiger Muskie from his kayak in New Mexico and Colorado, while loving every minute of it. Manuel has been a moderator, site administrator and regular contributor for Fish Enchantment since 2010. Recently announced as a 2013 Hobie Fishing Team member, his hope is to help expand the interest in kayak fishing in his home state of New Mexico.

roxorsoxoffcomics.com swdr4x4.com

The Tails of Enchantment Family wants to wish you a happy and safe new year. Remember to know the weather and make sure kids under 12 always wear a lifevest when boating or playing near a river. Enjoy the outdoors but leave no trace and stay safe! HAPPY NEW YEAR!!


Follow Fish Enchantment of Facebook! www.facebook.com/fishenchantment Receive the most recent and updated information from Fish Enchantment when you Like our Facebook page.


w w w . j a w j a c k e r f i s h i n g . c o m

Catch more fish this year!


Your Fly’s Down

INTERACTIVE

Tie in your 6” brown Ice Thread Start by adding a good layer of thread on the hook. It should be as the rib. Bring your thread to tapered from thicker at the front the front of the fly. and thinner at the back. Make sure the color of the thread is showing

Juan Ramirez Tails of Enchantment Contributor Member of the Montana Fly Company design team

Grab a single feather to use as the tail and the abdominal back.

Measure your tail and tie in at the front of the fly.

Catch the tail with your wire. You will wrap down the back as you wrap the rib towards the front of the fly.

Once you have wrapped the tail and back down, tie down the Ice Thread to secure it.

Gather about 16 strands of Flouro Fibre together and tie in as the wingcase.

Using your thread to build up the thorax, pull over your wingcase and tie down close to the eye. Make sure you have not crowded the eye.

Runs a blog about fly tying and fly fishing. (hopperjuan.blogspot.com)

-Juan’s 719 Baetis NymphDesigned by Juan Ramirez

-Materials neededHook: TMC 200R size 16-22 Thread:

UTC Cream or color to match insect.

Rib: Ice Thread, Brown Tail, back & wingcase: Hen Back feather, Brown Legs: Flouro Fibre, Brown

-Video Tutorial Linkhttp://www.youtube.com/ watch?feature=player_ embedded&v=QNOdrFi_8LE

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Once you have made 2 wraps of thread to tie down the Flouro Fibre. Separate the fibers so you have half on one side and half on the other.

Bring half of the fibers on the nearside and fold back to form legs. Wrap down with 2 more wraps of thread. Repeat on the other side. You should have equal amount of legs on both sides as shown.

Gather the long Flouro Fibre legs and measure a little longer than the wingcase and then cut both bunches to form the legs.

Here is the finished product. Note the equal amount of legs on both sides as well as the proportions.

By using the UTC thread for this pattern, you will have a flat, wide thread to finish the head off nicely. Make several more wraps to tie down and cover up all of the materials. Make at least a three-wrap whip finish.

Note the color of the abdomen and the thorax. These colors can change to match the insect. Note the rib spacing and the nice head along with the splayed legs.

INTERACTIVE

Sumbit a pattern you would like Juan to share by sending an email to: Juan@anglerscovey.com

Juan’s 719 Beatis Nymph. The 719 Baetis was created to give me a realistic baetis nymph to offer fish when they are keyed in to these small mayflies. A lot of the small mayflies and even some of the smaller stoneflies I noticed in samples, were very lightly colored on the bottom and having a very dark colored top, providing a sharp contrast in coloration. I always carry a few markers with me to color any patterns that I have to make them darker. I can change the color of this fly as needed. I always tie this pattern in a cream color as I can make it darker, but if tied with a darker color, I cannot make it lighter. Again, don’t be afraid to tie these in a bigger size to imitate the small Golden Stoneflies found in most rivers.


2013 Outdoor Events January 11-13, 2013 Mesilla Valley Outdoor Expo The premier outdoors fishing/ hunting expo in Las Cruces. If you have any questions or would like to reserve a booth contact Patrick Drake 575-526-0112 www.meetinlascruces.com

January 21, 2013 JDGF Ice Fishing Derby Whether you’re after quantity or quality this event is always a blast! Feel free to call us at 575759-3255 with any questions. Everyone who enters the Derby will receive a T-shirt and a ticket that will be used for door prize drawings.

August 21,22 2013

April 1st 2013 2013 Fishing Licenses It’s not an April Fools joke, don’t forget to get your 2013 Fishing License.

www.jicarillahunt.com

Get your Licenses Online now. www.wildlife.state.nm.us

February 8-10, 2013

May 10-11, 2013

Gerding’s Hunting Fishing Expo

Northern NM Hunting & Fishing Conservation Expo

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Friday Noon to 6:00 Saturday -9:00 to 6:00 Sunday – 9:00 to 5:00 Tickets available at the door Children under 12: FREE http://bobsoutdoorshow.com

February 18, 2013

Event will be at the Red River, New Mexico Conference Center. The goal of this event is to promote Hunting, fishing, hiking, camping, as well as a host of other outdoor activities. www.redriverhuntingandfishingevent.com

Eagle Nest Lake Ice Fishing Tournament

NM Outdoors Expo The New Mexico Outdoor EXPO is fun for the whole family. Children and adults will enjoy firearm and archery target shooting, casting, fly tying, fishing for huge catfish, free exhibits, a climbing wall and much more. www.wildlife.state.nm.us

September 22-30, 2013 Eagle Nest Fish Fest It’s a whopper! Held on the beautiful Eagle Nest Lake! The fishing tournament is sponsored & hosted by the Eagle Nest Marina. On the 22nd the Chamber sponsors a fish fry and the Laguna Vista Saloon hosts a Worm Eating Contest on the 29th! It’s a fun event for families and everyone!

Think trout, salmon, and perch! Lots of prizes! Call Dos Amigos Anglers for info. 575-377-6226 www.dosamigosanglers.net

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Fish Enchantment Guide Service Bluewater Lake| feguides.com |505-433-7393

FLOAT ‘N FISH Fly Shop & Guide Service 888-475-5770 www.sanjuanfloatnfish.com

We carry a huge variety of flies for anglers fishing for trout, pike, bass, carp, tarpon, bonefish... ANYTHING WITH FINS!


Swiss Cheese Please

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Matt Pelletier

When I fire up the gas auger, I plan on making Swiss cheese of an area before I even consider picking up a rod. Whether I’m fishing open water or vertically through ice, I’m usually fishing with a run and gun mentality. I like starting with reaction baits and covering as much water as possible before backtracking and thoroughly fishing waters that were productive but this time with small baits and with finesse. When fishing open water I tend to fan cast an area and work my bait aggressively before slowing down and hitting the same water from different casting angles. If you just throw out a bobber with bait and sit waiting for the fish to come to you, there’s a good chance you’ll be fishing more than catching. Sure there’s nothing wrong with relaxing in some shade, drowning a worm, but by moving and covering water you give yourself a better chance of catching a lot of fish.


Swiss Cheese Please! When Winter settles in over New Mexico, many of our lakes freeze over but the fish are still spread out and easy to catch. Obviously you can’t work the banks, fan casting to open water anymore but you should still apply those same run and gun strategies during the hard water season. Before you hike your gear out onto the ice, there are a couple there are a couple things to consider.

SafetyFirst and foremost is safety! Ice fishing is an “at your own risk” recreational activity. No matter how thick the ice is, there’s always a chance you could fall in. An undetected weak spot can be your worse nightmare so do your best to stay far away from any visible pressure ridges, weak spots, and open water. Wear precautionary safety equipment, always fish with a buddy, and stay alert while on the ice.

Where to drillNow you need to find fish, it’s relaxing being outside enjoying the great outdoors but catching fish makes it much more exciting and warms up the blood a bit! The better you know a body of water and the habits of each species you’re targeting, the better your chances are at having an epic day on the ice. Doing some research via web articles and magazines is a great start but you’ll learn much more by getting out and experiencing it first hand. 35

This Eagle Nest rainbow ate a 3 inch chartruese plastic tube within 20 seconds of jiggin a new hole. Photo By; Leah Pelletier

If you caught fish in a body of water just before the ice developed, there’s a good chance you can still catch fish in the same spots through the ice. Start by drilling holes near underwater structures, drop-offs and weed lines near your favorite spot. After you drill a hole, kneel down and look to see what’s beneath the ice. Get as close to the water as possible and use your hands to help block any light from penetrating the hole so you can see better. The more often you familiarize yourself with what’s below the ice, the easier it will be to build a mental map of the area you’re fishing. Plus, you’d be surprised how often you’ll look down and see a fish. If you aren’t familiar with the body of water, try to use the shorelines structure for a reference as to what might be underwater. Being

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willing to explore and drill a lot of holes is the only surefire way to breakdown a new body of water. I get excited when I’m heading out to a lake for the first time. It can be challenging, but it’s an awesome feeling when everything comes together and those adventures turn out successful. As I write this, I have been thinking back on some of the trips where I’ve caught my biggest fish and I realized something. So many of those adventures were successful for one reason: our sense of exploration and willingness to drill a lot of holes.

TeamworkFar too often, I see people drill one or two holes, sit down and fish the same spot all day. I’m not saying you can’t catch fish this way but being active on the ice has big rewards. I’ve caught some of

Issue 1 2013


my biggest trout just seconds after dropping my lure into a hole I had just walked up to. When I fire up the gas auger, I plan on making Swiss cheese of an area before I even consider picking up a rod. To speed up the search process on a new body of water, we’ll team up and map the area before fishing. One of us takes the auger and starts punching holes while the other follows with sonar or a rod with a heavy lure for gauging depth. The angler checking water depths also has to talk to the auger operator so he knows what direction he should walk before he starts drilling again. “If we find a flat, sandy bottom without any cover or structure in sight, we’ll

move greater distance before drilling our next hole. If we find a ledge, big clumps of weeds or structure of some sort, we start drilling holes less than 10’ away from each other. Once we feel we’ve established a productive pattern, we’ll start spreading out and expanding our map of the area.

When to moveIf you drop your lure down the hole and catch a fish immediately but nothing else bites for another 20 minutes; move to another hole. If you have a license that validates you using 2 poles but your second rod hasn’t produced anything for 20 minutes; again move to another hole.

I’m like a gypsy on ice and rarely spend more than 15 minutes jigging a hole unless I keep getting bites. I also keep a second rod out and use it as a dead stick rig with micro jigs or small lures tipped with bait. To ensure I catch more fish with that rod, I use a rig called the JawJacker, which automatically sets the hook when a fish bites and I’m off jigging or drilling other holes. I can’t even count how many times I’ve seen one particular hole produce fish all day, while the 3 holes within 10’ of it never see a single bite! With that in mind, I bounce from hole to hole trying to develop a pattern to build on. Baits like Dynamic Lures HD Ice, or a Swedish Pimple can be good for covering water fast. Fish the bait erratically just off the bottom and start moving it a foot or so from the bottom every minute or so. I’ll work each hole from bottom to top a couple of times


Swiss Cheese Please! Photo By: Matt Pelletier

and if I don’t get bit I move to the next hole. I’ll fish every hole until I find a pattern that tells me where the fish are, what structure and depths they’re relating to and why. It usually boils down to a particular food source the fish are after but sometimes it has to do with oxygen content.

What’s that smellOn the shoulders of winter, you’ll notice the fish tend to be active and evenly distributed throughout the entire water column of shallow lakes. During the heart of winter, there are many factors that dictate where the fish go. They still have to feed through the winter but decreasing oxygen levels often rot vegetation, which depletes food resources and habitat. This makes life very stressful for fish in some waters. If you drill a hole and immediate-

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ly notice a foul odor resembling sulfur, there’s a good chance the vegetation in the lake is rotting and the oxygen levels are declining. During conditions like this you’ll want to drill a lot of holes and cover water but be sure to focus your attention on the top of the water column. Fish are forced to move higher and higher following suitable oxygen so they can survive. Shallow fertile bodies of water like Stone, Dulce, and Enbom are more likely to suffer winter kills due to rapid PH swings and oxygen depletion. When a lake has reached this point, there can be random pockets of water that hold more oxygen than others. If you can find the spots which are rich with oxygen, you’ll catch more fish. To do that you’ll have to make swiss cheese of the ice! I always like to say I’m punching holes so the fish can get more oxygen and survive the winter.

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Every detail mattersPaying attention to the conditions and presentation that lead up to each bite can go a long way. How did the fish hit the bait? Was it a hard take or just a nip? Did he hit it on the fall or the lift? Where in the water column did the bite occur? Asking yourself these type of questions will help you develop a productive pattern on any body of water. Pay attention to the fish, they’re talking, you just have to know how to recognize when they speak. At the end of each day ask yourself a question, “What did I learn today and how can I apply what I learned to my next trip?”.

MobilityIf you plan on covering a lot of ground, you’re going to need a means of hauling all your gear around. Here in New Mexico it’s

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Photo By: Kevin Long

A JawJacker is a must have gadget when ice fishing. Especially if you want to spread out and cover a lot of water with multiple rods. The device is simple, compact and sets up within seconds. It’s fully adjustable and works with almost any ice rod. Set this rig up with your favorite jig or bait and walk away. If a fish so much as sniffs your offering, the JawJacker will set and fish on! As long as its not a windy day you can hear the JawJacker pop from quite a distance when a fish takes. The sound is like that of a toaster popping, when your bread’s ready. I fished without a device like this for years and I wish I knew about it sooner. Last year they sold out from coast to coast so be sure to order yours now. I guarantee it will increase your catch ratio, like it did mine.

Where your drilling holes is important... Above you’ll see an overview map with simple topographical features. The blue dots indicate likely spots to drill holes if you already know the lakes structure. If it’s unfamiliar waters, you’ll want to start drilling your line near shore and in a zigzag pattern and finish it in deep water. A “line” is a sequential set of holes you plan on fishing. Think of it like a path you plan on trolling once you are ready to fish. On a typical day, we’ll drill 60-100 holes, depending on how much we move and how many fish we’re catching. The red dots represent ideal topographical locations to find fish feeding. Notice all the red in and around structure? Some of my biggest Trout caught while ice fishing came in less than 5 feet of water so don’t avoid shallow water!

I love JawJackers so much that you’ll never find me on the ice without one. If our state allowed more than 2 rods per angler, I’d have one of these bad boys rigged with every legal rod, except one for jigging!

www.jawjackerfishing.com


Swiss Cheese Please! Photo By: Eric Romero

rare that we’re able to take a four wheeler or snowmobile on the ice, so we have to make due with sleds. Even a concrete mixing bin works wonders for when we don’t have a lot of people with us. I put my auger, bucket, lunch box and anything else I need inside before I head out on the ice and won’t come back until dark! I carry all my tackle inside a bucket that has a swiveling cushioned lid for me to sit on, once I start getting tired from walking from hole to hole. Sometimes I sit on the bucket while it’s still inside my sled, push my sled from hole

to hole and fish that way. Staying mobile in comfort and style! If you tend to go fishing with a large group of people, you might consider something a bit larger. To build my “party sled”, I used 2” studs and 1/4” plywood for the frame and body. Then I bought some old snow boards from a used sporting goods store, cut them in half and mounted them to the sled. Get out there and enjoy the hard water, you just might fall in love with it like I did!

-Matt Pelletier


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Swiss Cheese Please! Photo By: Matt Pelletier

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Open ice allows wind to push water and create current below the ice. I can’t say I never fish open water but I will say it’s not safe at all to be anywhere near holes like these. Once, the ice opened up, the wind pushed such a current, that our jigs were more than 30’ away from the holes we were fishing! It made for some interesting fishing and we got off the ice without anyone falling through. Rad Smith with a nice Brown from our 2010 trip to Eleven Mile Lake in Colorado. Photo By: Matt Pelletier

Matt Pelletier with a Pike from our 2010 trip to this awesome lake. Photo By: Rad Smith

Doug Manley with a nice Rainbow caught during the same trip. Photo By: Matt Pelletier


Product Showcase Dynamic Lures-HD Ice Last year, Dynamic Lures surprised fish and hard water anglers across the nation when the HD Ice came out. Its slim 2” profile and erratic action made it irresistible to anything within proximity. We caught fish all over Colorado and New Mexico with last year’s models but the introduction of 8 new colors and a subtle rattle built in, means the fish are in for another big surprise! Fish these baits with a jigging motion and you’ll feel how they vibrate on the way up, as it darts away from your hole. Watch as the bait falls and you’ll notice it wobbles, as it slowly descends and realigns with the pivot point (your rod tip). Dynamiclures.com

JawJacker Enterprise-JawJacker Every once in a while, something new takes the industry by storm and that’s exactly what the JawJacker has done for hard water anglers. The JawJacker is a must have gadget, that’s sure to increase your catch ratio out on the ice. Last year, the JawJacker sold out nationwide, so they tripled their order this year in hopes that more anglers get the chance to experience fishing with one. JawJacker.com

Redington Sonic-Pro waders For those of you who stick to open water in the winter but need a way to stay dry should check out the new Redington SonicPro Waders. They offer 4 styles, including one for women and each come in a wide variety of sizes. With standard features like “No Sew” Sonic Weld double taped seams, and Laser cut exterior pockets with YKK zippers, you get the best bang for your buck with Sonic-Pro Waders from Redington. Redington.com

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Get Noise on the Line Alternative Lures that catch fish!

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Joel Baca has great touch with pen, paint, airbrush, carving, cutting hair... you name it! He has amazing natural talent when it come to anything artistic. Joel has always had a passion for art and carving but there’s nothing he enjoys more then casting a fly to a rising Trout.

Lilyskull Carving $400

Big Cutthroat Carving $150

Brownie $300

joelbacaartworks.com


Rita Adams

La Laguna Se 47

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ecreta

Photo by: Rita Adams


La Laguna Secreta I was born and raised in northern New Mexico, the daughter of a fly-fishing guide. Daddy’s little girl, I followed in his footsteps. For fifteen years, I lived my dream job as a guide. I worked in one of the most beautiful places on the planet, on rivers like the Rio Grande, the Cimarron, the Costilla, and the Red. I loved that life. I met interesting people, fostered unique friendships, and built a business for myself. I couldn’t imagine a better life, but fate had big changes in store. For the past year and a half I have lived on a private tropical island called Punta Pájaros. Home to Casa and Playa Blanca fishing lodges, serviced by air charter from Cancún, the island is a narrow expanse of jungle and sand, twenty-five miles long. Healthy populations of some of the most soughtafter game fish in the world surround the island: permit, bonefish, tarpon, and snook. Punta Pájaros is an angler’s

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paradise, absolute heaven to a girl like me, who has little need for the amenities of city life and is wholly and irreversibly immersed in the world of fly-fishing. Punta Pájaros is a remote island that operates off-grid. We are as far away from civilization as it is possible to get. No TV, no restaurants, no supermarkets or shopping malls. Supplies are trucked twice weekly to the end of the road and then brought in by boat. We eat fish caught daily from the sea and drink coconut water freshly culled from the palms. The margaritas are strong, the beer is

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cold, and no meal is complete without fresh tortillas, limes, and four different varieties of homemade hot sauce. The landscape is breathtaking but also brutal. The sea is postcard Caribbean, a living jewel in every imaginable shade of blue. It is always humid and often Hades hot. The coastlines vary from creamy sand coves to rocky points of sharp limestone imbedded with coral. The jungle is an impenetrable mesh of thorny vines, coconut and thatch palms. To the east, the island is protected from the open sea by the world’s second largest barrier reef, the Mesoamerican. To the west lies a watery mangrove maze.

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In all the wanderlust of my youth, I have never encountered a place as wild as this. Some of the creatures in our midst are out of myth. A resident population of jaguars is captured on film by a series of infrared game cams placed throughout the island. At first we knew of only one cat. Then in late August of 2011, we captured images of a second hunting with the first. Just recently we have confirmed that the two produced a litter of at least two kittens. I have come face to face with one of the adults, who in broad daylight seemed to show no fear.

Saltwater fly-fishing is a far cry from my small-stream roots.The rods are heavier, the flies much bigger, and the wind stouter. A fifteen-mile-per-hour wind is average. The fish themselves are brawling beasts that take hundred-yard runs and test the most carefully tied knots. This is a visual game where sighting your quarry is the primary goal; hooking and landing them is secondary. I’ve learned to look for visual cues: the sickle-shaped fins of permit, the dark forks of tarpon tails, the ghosting shadows of bonefish, the hovering menace of barracuda. It is absolutely addicting, heart-pounding, adrenalizing fun.

Angler’s paradise it may be, but running this island and the two fishing lodges on it requires a great deal of manpower and comes with its own unique set of challenges. A fulltime staff of maintenance men deals with the constant mechanical failures brought on by the salt-rich and humid environment, gardeners keep the ever-invading jungle at bay, hotel staff and guides attend to guests, and boatmen fish and transport supplies and staff. We currently have fifty-two human souls on premises, guests excluded.

Photo by: Don Jones


La Laguna Secreta The isolation is a very definite challenge for most employees. The condition known as “island fever” is an inevitable reality here, one that generally sets in after about a month and a half of straight duty, and for which the only cure is getting off island. Telling signs are irritability and a deteriorating attitude, often accompanied by insurmountable health or family problems necessitating a swift departure. These problems usually clear up after about a week spent away. We do our best to ensure a steady staff rotation to keep everyone gainfully employed and sane, an intricate juggling act. My fiancé John and I are the exception to that rule. We spend nine-plus months a year here, and we rarely, if ever, leave.

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Photo by: Don Jones For us, the only cure for island fever is exploration, with fishing rod in hand. This is how we recharge our batteries.We take off into the backcountry in an old Coleman canoe equipped with two paddles and a push pole. One of us stands on the seat in the back and poles the canoe, while the other braces up in the front with a fly rod, scanning for fish. What we call the backcountry is the endless maze of mangrove-dotted lagoons known as Santa Rosa, which lies between the island and the mainland. The clear water is home to bonefish, tarpon, snook, and barracuda, also with prolific bird life, stingrays, saltwater crocodiles, and caimans.

La Laguna Secreta

Photo by: Don Jones


Photo by: Nathan Trich


When we first started these explorations, the locals here were dumbfounded. We were labeled “locos” and offered predictions of hopeless disorientation and attack by crocodiles or jaguars. Or perhaps we might be consumed whole by hordes of mosquitoes, or sink into waist-deep mud.

machete and carved a trail to the water’s edge, then dragged the canoe through it and set out, careful to avoid touching the leaves of the ubiquitous black Poisonwood tree, a close cousin of poison ivy.

We found our “secret lagoon” by driving down the sandy strip of the only road on the island. John drove while I perched precariously on the rim of the pickup and looked over the jungle for a place where the water came fairly close to the road.

It became apparent almost immediately that we had found a very special place. Mexico is not known for large bonefish, but the ones we found here were extremely thick bodied and sizable. Not only were they big, they were exceptionally stupid. They followed the canoe curiously and acted like they had never before seen flies or fishermen.

After only a few tries we found a spot where the jungle was not impenetrable. We took a

When we threw the fly too close to them, they would initially spook, then circle back and at-

tack. They took multiple runs and went well into backing, and they were plentiful. As we got deeper into the mangroves, we started to see baby tarpon and snook. Their dark silhouettes cruised along the edges of the mangroves, and any fly that landed remotely near was crushed.

La Laguna Secreta

Photo by: Rita Adams 55

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That first day and for many to come, we felt like true explorers, the Luis and Clarkette of the Yucatán. I have never been happier than when I’ve found myself on an untraveled road in a new place, and all of this day we both wore ear-toear grins. Our laughter competed with the raucous calls of water birds, unused to and offended by our presence. When we became concerned about getting lost, we turned back. While crossing the open water of the big lagoon, John spied a long dark shadow under the water, some seven feet long. Despite its size, our fishaddled brains could only conceive of tarpon, so we dug out the paddles and raced towards it at top speed to get in range.

I was readying the rod when it surfaced. It was the first of many encounters with saltwater crocodiles. I’m not sure who was more freaked out by the experience, but both parties departed at top speed. The local species is called the Morelet’s crocodile. It can reach up to fifteen feet long and well over a thousand pounds. They thrive in the backcountry here, and I have come to know them well. They are not known for aggression like their African cousins, and I must admit I have never seen any evidence to the contrary. Just the same, they have my full respect and attention, especially when we are navigating their home waters in a canoe that they could upend in

a heartbeat. When we got back to camp, we didn’t mention the big, dumb fish. We did mention the crocodile, the biting bugs, and the deep, sucking mud, just in case anyone tried to follow us back there. We needn’t have worried. The locals know there must be fish in “la laguna secreta” because we keep going back. But they still think we’re loco, nutcases with a weird sense of fun. Maybe they’re right, but I wouldn’t have it any other way. Days like these put smiles on our faces and happiness in our hearts. We have since explored deep into the Santa Rosa Lagoon system, but we have yet to find the end. I doubt we ever will. -Rita Adams


Cold Wate Kris Johnson

I remember pike fishing in Minnesota and Wisconsin when I was just a young fisherman. My grandparents would take me on summer fishing trips through out the 50 states and we spent a good portion of that time chasing the “Great Northern Pike”. I learned a lot in those early years, from bait fishing, to how to affectively fish artificial baits. Over the last 10 years I have spent many hours on Nava-

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jo Lake as well as Vallecito Lake throwing a bunch of different large swimbaits, rubber baits and numerous other lures trying to find the next “special” lure for Pike. This is a battle of attrition! Throwing half pound lures on 8 foot rods for hours on end can make a fisherman question his sanity, and his ability to find and catch fish. I have gone DAYS without a bite or follow. Learning where they want to be throughout the

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Swimbaits are the answer to cold water Pike fishing!

er year has taken time and patience. In the winter, the pike tend to be shallow and feeding with little to no fishing pressure. In the summer they become slow and lethargic, not wanting to chase anything very far. Lots of boat and fishing traffic causes the pike to cruise off shore structure looking for their next meal. But when you put all the variables in the right order, you strike it rich. The pay off for hours of casting usually results in a true trophy catch. I

will not say that fishing large sized baits will yield many fish even on the best of days, but the quality is hard to beat. I have had many days where 5-7 fish over 15 pounds is not uncommon, but again, not the norm. This is a test of will and stamina!


Cold Water I would like to talk a little about what I mean by “Large” baits. I first started fishing pike with Jerkbaits. I liked the Rapala Husky Jerk in the HJ-14 size. I choose colors that looked like the forage fish in the lake. I liked the chrome/black combo, the Tennessee Shad color, and the Gold and Black colors as well. This was the first step in learning bigger baits. My next step was to go to a bigger rod for the bigger lures. After you get into the 1 oz lure weight, you’ll need to step up your equipment. Now 15 to 20 pound test is the norm and 8 foot rods and baitcasters are usually the tackle needed to throw these baits. At this time, I am fishing the St.Croix MOJO BASS rod in both the 7 foot 9 inch heavy model, and the 8 foot Med Heavy model and a Shimano Cardiff round reel. I wanted to step up to even

larger baits. I went to some A.C. plugs and then to the SPRO BBZ-1. Throwing these larger baits can wear a guy out pretty fast. I did catch fish on them after some practice, so my interest remained. I then tried out a few other baits until I met the owner of Dynamic Lures. Brian Alano and I became quick friends. He was making some unique lures over in Grand Junction and needed someone with some swimbait experience to help with product development and new ideas. The next few years were spent testing and modifying some of the early versions of the Dynamo. This was his first jointed hard swimbait that he started selling. It has become a standard for many Pike fisherman in the four corners area and

all over the U.S. The trick to this bait is the segments and the action. Of course the colors matter a lot, and I think that Dynamic makes some of the best colors out there. We tried to make a hard bait that had a lot of “built in action”. When you throw this bait in the water and give it a quick tug, it turns into a live fish moving back and forth like a wounded trout or perch. We knew we were onto something then. I spent many hours watching how fish followed this bait, and learned some little things that we later incorporated into the newest version. I would fish ice cold days in the middle of winter looking for structure, making countless casts into seemingly PERFECT structure and weed beds. After a full winter I felt like I had figured out some things.

Above- Pike are known to demolish big swimbaits, like this one did with this FX Fury Perch pattern from Dynamic Lures. Left:Kris Johnson with a beast Christmas day Northern Pike caught with a big swimbait.


Pike are ambush fish and love to hide and wait till some unsuspecting trout swims by.. and.. you know the rest! I used that info to start fishing angles, different speeds of retrieve and started putting better fish in the boat. The next step was to pattern these new findings and look for new spots. It has seemed over the years that the pike at Navajo like sticks and flats in the winter. Finding these areas is not hard, but getting them to commit is! Again, time on the water and fishing multiple spots while putting my ever increasing knowledge to the test kept me coming back for more. And believe me… it’s cold on the lake in December. We actually fish about 4 winter pike tournaments every winter at Navajo. I fished one this winter that we had found some fish on the edges of the drop offs, where a shallow flat went from 10 feet to about 50 feet in a very short distance. We had used some different baits to try

to get them to eat. I could meter them, but they wouldn’t eat. I fished a Dynamo with some lead strips on the belly to get it down a bit more and it worked ok. We then tried the new FX Fury soft rubber swimbait by Dynamic. It sinks so we thought that it would work a little bit better in that deeper water. Boy did it!!! I had two fish, back to back, that went over 15 pounds in pre-fish. I knew I had the combination right when they inhale a swimbait down their throat. I fished that tournament with Brian Sims of Durango and we won with over150 inches of fish for 4 fish!! We would fish the shallow side, casting to deep water for about an hour, then sit in deep water and cast to shallow water. It seemed that every time we switched our angles and presentation, we caught a nice fish. I would have loved to see underwater in that area, as we caught about 30 fish there. Most were on the

smaller side, but we did manage one of the bigger fish of the tournament at just under 18 pounds. I can honestly say that a lot of hard work went into that one. The last day of that tournament it snowed ALL day, and I had about 4 inches of snow on my boat by day’s end. This too made me question just what I was doing on the lake, not home next to the fireplace. Like I said, this is a battle of will and sanity! Over the next two years I have learned that pike are not easy to catch. Swimbait fishing isn’t easy either, nor is it for the faint at heart. It’s the little things that make the difference. Pay attention to the graph, water temps, and how the fish are relating to the bottom. A fish on the bottom is there for a reason. It is looking to ambush some pray. A fish suspended is looking to heard bait fish and eat. So, a fish on the bottom requires a lure closer to the


Cold Water bottom, where as the fish mid depth requires a less deep presentation. This is key for the proper lure selection. There is a lot that goes into swimbait fishing, But the pay off is worth the effort. Swimbaits are not going to be the solve all, nor will they catch fish everywhere…all the time, but when you find fish willing to eat a big bait, you’ll be hooked like me! -Kris Johnson Sponsors: Dynamic Lures-St. Croix Rods-Deka BatteriesPepper Jigs Custom Baits-Haber Vision Sunglasses-Trokar HooksBrennan Oil-Maniac Baits-Rich’s Performance Marine-SimmsSwimbait Posse

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DynamicLures.com


HOME WATER


Rebecca Houtman

The Red River is a tributary of the Rio Grande, with headwaters high in the Wheeler Peak Wilderness Area of the Carson National Forest. The Lower Red River runs in a deep, basalt lined canyon known as the Red River Box, from just below Questa to the confluence with the Rio Grande. This section has a number of springs feeding it, in addition to the effluent from the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish Red River Hatchery, the largest rainbow trout hatchery in the state. Upstream of the hatchery, the river runs about 10cfs this time of year while below the hatchery runs 30-50 cfs. USGS river gauges are a good source to check before fishing this section. I’ve fished this section of the Red River a handful of times, throughout the year, and haven’t been skunked yet. In 2007 I started dating a Red River Hatchery employee and fished the river behind his house. I worked at Tingley Beach in Albuquerque and he would pull up in the stocking truck filled with trout. A few extra fish in the truck was his courting strategy and it definitely worked on me. We married in 2012, now the hatchery is my home and the Red River is my home river. Now that I can just about cast to it from our back porch, fishing it a handful of times each month is the goal.


HOME WATER

This river section holds my favorite fishing memories. One summer day, fishing from the hatchery to about a mile upstream, I caught a brown, rainbow, and cuttbow in one afternoon – my personal best for trout variety to this day. Another time, on a freezing cold winter day with snow still on the ground, my friend Catherine and I climbed down into the gorge on La Junta trail trying to impress upon Van Beacham that we were flyfishing guide material for the Solitary Angler. When asked if

he took other prospects (read as “male prospects”) down that one mile, switch back trail to show their worth, he gave a sly grin and confirmed our suspicions. Catherine and I hiked down that trail without a whimper and had one of the best fishing days of our lives. Granted though, we would have been skunked without Van guiding us. Cuttbows come into this river from the Rio Grande during the cold months hold over through winter because of the warmer

temperatures emanating from the springs.The cuttbows winter in the deep pockets and pools gouged out behind large basalt boulders. Getting down to and bumping the fish on the head to get their attention proved to require a tactic Catherine and I never would have imagined, but Van had perfected. After rigging up our fly rods using a technique we had never seen before, we were in fish within minutes. By the end of the afternoon we caught a dozen or so 20+ inch cuttbows on our fly rods. Neither of us has made


it back to that section since but I intend to visit it every winter now that it’s just a few miles away from my new home. My son, Jared, and I had heard about the brown trout spawning run up this river, coming in from the Rio Grande, but hadn’t tried it until this year. It was the first cold and cloudy day after the leaves had fallen. Our plan was to hike down the La Junta trail to the Red River and Rio Grande confluence and then fish our way home to the hatchery. It just so happened

that Van Beacham called as we were walking out the door. Thank goodness for that call! After hearing our excursion intention, he explained that we were tackling “mission impossible”. That section, from the confluence to the hatchery, is 4.5 miles, which previously appeared to be very do-able on the map, has a terrain of basalt boulders would prove to take many more hours than my son and I had daylight to conquer. Van suggested we start at the hatchery parking lot and fish downstream for a few miles,

describing that section as the best fall fishing opportunity in the state. A little discouraged that the trip we planned was canceled, we moped down the trail that ran along the north side of the river. My son is a spin rod angler and I prefer a fly rod. We both rigged up with streamers and searched the gravel bars looking for redds along the well worn trail for about a mile. The water was clear enough for sight fishing, but fish were not present. Maybe we were


HOME WATER

too early? So we swam the streamers through the deep pools hoping for interest. No fish. We were still a little hellbent at this point to prove Van wrong – we were going to make it to the confluence that day so we wanted to fish fast. After the first mile, the trail was less worn. The path was tighter and the brush much thicker. This was my kind of trail. I like the backcountry and the further the hike the better. Fishing miles from the nearest road and far off the beaten path, knowing the likelihood of seeing another person is slim to none, is my preference for angling adventures. On the second mile we saw a pair of hikers with their dogs. There’s no comparison to peacefully fishing, thinking like a fish, your mind is completely

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NMDGF Red River Hatchery

in the river, and a furry mammal that at first impression is certainly a cougar, to get your heart up in your throat! Shortly afterwards we ran into one of Van’s guides on his day off. After some conversation we learned he was having great success with a tiny gray nymph and small, non-descript dry fly. When I looked out on the river, the little flies were hovering over the surface. Being a cold and cloudy day, it didn’t dawn on us that the warm, spring-fed river would be supporting a hatch that afternoon. Sure enough, when I switched to the closest match to the hatch that I had, a 6 inch brown was on the end of my rod within a few casts. Just as the fishing day was improving, my son started crashing. The sun had come out and the afternoon was warming up. Son was sitting on the bank

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soaking in the New Mexico rays while reminiscing about fishing with his dad. His dad lives in Tennessee, has a nice bass boat and the son has been missing him a lot lately. Warm water fishing in lakes with his dad is one of his favorite things to do. Fishing off trails with mom in small rivers and streams usually comes with the caveat that he just wants to make sure I get home alive. I’ve seen this look on the son before – he was done fishing for the day and would be my “body guard” from here on out. Body guard to protect me from what, is something I haven’t figured out yet. Spending time with him is something I’m always grateful for so he can call it what ever he likes – I’ll take it. There’s something about spending time outside with your kids. No electronics, no

Issue 1 2013


distractions, just time to talk. Time to share stories. Time to talk about a whole lot of nothing, which can make for a perfect day. So I fished the remainder of the section we could access on my own while the son gave me advice, on life and fishing, from the sidelines. The water was clear and 5-7” browns were abundant, feeding from the pockets behind large rocks. Their bite was very light on the fly and sight fishing ended up being the best tactic. The hatchery stocks the river with rainbow trout during the summer months but not in the fall or winter. I didn’t see or catch any rainbows this time around. The river gets a lot of pressure from anglers throughout the year and witnessed by the hundreds of rainbows hanging off stringers passing by our back porch in the summer, into early fall. When we got back to the house, I jettisoned Jared and kept walking and fished upstream of the hatchery. The river runs slower

upstream of the hatchery. On this day it was recording 9cfs on the USGS gauge and the temperature was 45 degrees. Downstream of the hatchery was reading 35cfs and the temperature was 53oF. I like the slowness in this section of the Lower Red. There are more good holes to fish and the trout will hang out on the edges of the riffles too, so the river can essentially be fished bank to bank with strikes throughout. Walking along this section, you can almost smell the fishiness of it. The banks are covered with willows and a number of paths cut down to the water giving views of honey holes you know with every inch of your gut are holding fish. The willows also allow this section to be fished by many anglers at the same time while still feeling solitude. I didn’t see anyone fishing on this particular Saturday, which is rare, but small browns were abundant and even biting on the worst of casts. I lost the dry fly I’d been fishing with most of the day on a willow tree and switched to a tiny

nymph that my eyes couldn’t focus on better than a blur while threading. Eventually the line went through the eyelet and I went on to bring in a handful of small browns in the few minutes before the sun went down. The evenings are getting down-right cold here now and I’m looking forward to winter fishing opportunities of this gem of a river. Read soon, the La Junta trail and Red River/Rio Grande confluence will have my boot prints on them and my camera phone will be holding more pictures of big, beautiful cuttbows.

-Rebecca Houtman For information about fishing on the Red River, check out these books: Fly-Fishers Guide to New Mexico by Van Beacham. 2010. Fly-Fishing Northern New Mexico by Craig Martin. 1991.


Captured

INTERACTIVE

Sumbit your photos by sending an email to matt@fishenchantment.com. Photos could end up in our Catch Exposure Department or on the Tails of Enchantment Cover!

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Fog lifting from the Rio Chama River below El-Vado Lake on a white winter morning. Photo By: Matt Pelletier


Captured Not sure what happened here but this guy washed up on shore at Quemado Lake Photo By: Matt Pelletier

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My friend Doug Manley’s dog “Buddy” would take

the rope from me every time started pulling my sled!

Photo By: Matt Pelletier

I


Captured Leah Pelletier with a 31x19 inch 12 1/2 pound Walleye she caught on a trip we took to Santa Rosa Lake in February of 2011. Photo By: Matt Pelletier

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Sunset over Bartlett Lake at Vermejo Park Ranch during our stay for their winter adventure at the Costilla Lodge. Photo By: Matt Pelletier


Captured

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Make sure to stop fishing, even if it’s just for a moment, and enjoy the breathtaking views surrounding you. This colorful sunset capped a great day of ice fishing with friends at Eagle Nest Lake. Photo By: Matt Pelletier


Captured FE Member Rad SMith took this awesome picture of a Snake River CUthroat he caught at Antero Lake in 2011 Photo By: Rad Smith

Sam Juan Rainbow caught during winter of 2012. Photo By: Eric Peterson


Casa & Playa blanca fl y fishing lodges Isla Pun ta pテ)ar o s, Q uintan a ro o

World class flats fishing since 1988 """#$%&%'(%)$%*+&,+)-#$./!!

+)*.0$%&%'(%)$%*+&,+)-#$./!

1.((!2344!!5678869:5677:8!


Giving Back

NMDGF Stocking the Future Photos By: NM Game & Fish File Photos

Volunteers make the journey down the Rio Grande Gorge to release a fish never caught.

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Quandary... How do you get several thousand Rio Grande cutthroat trout into an area two miles from any road and that is only accessible by steep trails dropping almost one thousand feet in elevation?

Solution...

By loading the fish in backpacks and using dedicated volunteers to hike the fish down to the water. Since the 1970’s, the New Mexico Department of Game and Fish and several volunteers have stocked the Rio Grande by backpacking trout down the numerous trails located in the upper gorge area near Questa, NM. The volunteers have included angling groups such as Trout Unlimited and New Mexico Trout, students from Rivers and Birds, Rocky Mountain Youth Corps, local anglers, Carson National Forest, Bureau of Land Management, and many others. The fish are typically loaded into plastic bags or water containers filled with 25-50 pounds of water which are strapped to a frame backpack. The fish are then hiked down one of the many trails ranging in distance from half to one and a half miles. “Once the volunteers reach the Rio Grande, they search for a quiet riffle with some gravel for the juvenile fish to hide. The containers are placed into the water for 15 to 20 minutes to allow the water temperature in the container to reach the temperature of the river

called “tempering”. Once the fish are tempered, they are released to their new home. The small fingerling fish will then spend the next few years feeding on bugs and hiding from larger fish with hopes to grow up and become available for anglers to catch. Traditionally the program involved stocking brown trout fry during the cold months of January and February, but in 2007 the stocking program was halted due to disease concerns from the brown trout egg source. About the same time, the NM Game and Fish Seven Springs Fish Hatchery was extremely successful at producing a surplus of Rio Grande cutthroat trout. The Rio Grande cutthroat trout is the New Mexico state fish and one of two native trout to New Mexico. The primary purpose of Seven Springs Hatchery is to propagate Rio Grande cutthroat trout for restoration projects, but the hatchery was producing more than was needed

for restoration stocking. So, in 2008 we thought “what a grand idea, let’s stock the Rio Grande in the Rio Grande”. The idea has proven to be a success. In addition to brown trout and rainbow trout, anglers can now hike into the Rio Grande gorge and catch a native New Mexico trout. Since 2008, NM Game and Fish, along with several volunteers, have stocked about 270,000 Rio Grande cutthroat trout fry and fingerlings from the John Dunn Bridge upstream to the New Mexico/Colorado State line. The NM Game and Fish plans to continue the program for years to come, and the next stocking event will occur in March or April 2013. If anybody is interested in hiking some native trout into the Rio Grande gorge or if anybody would like more information please contact Eric Frey by telephone 575-445-2311 or by email eric.frey@state.nm.us.

-Eric Frey


Tipping the Scales

INTERACTIVE

Sumbit your suggestions for Topics you would like to see in Fine Tuned by sending an email to matt@fishenchantment.com.

The thought of fishing during the winter months does not always bring a smile to a fisherman’s face. In fact, many see winter as the end of the season rather than the begging of a new one that presents great opportunity. To those of us in the know, who have been chomping at the bit to take advantage, we know the winter is the start of something good. Winter time fishing can be hot as a fire cracker and could quite possibly be some of the best action you see all season. If you are prepared and have done a little homework on your target species, the dividends could be huge. Most fish at this time of year are concentrated in somewhat predictable areas and the chance at the biggest fish of your season or quite possibly your life, is always there. Being prepared for the elements at this time of year is priority #1. Water proof outerwear and dressing in layers is a must. Being prepared for the worst conditions you might encounter is a good way to go. Though most outings will not present the harshest conditions mother nature has to offer, it’s always good to be prepared, just in case. Dressing in layers will make your day on the water or ice more comfortable. Believe it or not, there will be days that you will need sunscreen and find yourself peeling off the layers. When it comes to shopping for outerwear, instead of looking for gear that is labeled “Winter Fishing” (which is priced according to niche), consider looking at you local skiing or snowboarding shop or that section at your local sporting goods store. By doing this, you can put together a

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really nice and functional setup for half the price of a single price of a single piece of a similar “winter fishing suit”. A good pair of waterproof, insulated boots will go a long way to keep you comfortable and dry. Cold hands and feet hurt and they are usually the first thing to feel the elements. Another obvious but often overlooked item is a pack of hand/foot/ body warmers. Here in the Southwest, we are fortunate to have open water as well as ice during the winter. This gives you, as an angler, the great opportunity to take advantage of each. During the winter months, most fish will be heavily concentrated in relatively small and predictable areas, on and around typical structure elements. Most fish, with the exception of trout, should be holding a little deeper than most people are used to fishing. They can most likely be found in and around the 15’-30’ mark and in some cases out to 50’-60’. One thing is for sure though, once you find the schools, you can really hammer down. For Perch and Bluegills, main lake basin, deep flats (keying in on transitions from sand or mud to rock or gravel), and hold over weed beds, can harbor some of the best action. When it comes to Crappie, Bass and Walleye, deep flats and points that have a river or creek channels intersecting them (or in close proximity) are usually good spots to start your search, as they usually hold fish this time of year. Main lake points that drop into deep water, adjacent to spawning flats and coves can be killer spots. If you find bait fish in or around any of these spots on your sonar, there are bound to be game fish present and they are worth some extra attention. The

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fish should be in very early pre-spawn and steadily moving closer to spawning flats and coves as the water warms. The colder the water is, the deeper they will be. Again, once you find them, you can hammer them every time and follow them until spring. Trout are by far one of the most popular fish in our state with most fishermen, with most fisherman. They are very active during the winter months. This combined with the fact that they are very plentiful and super aggressive, makes them an ideal and attractive quarry. Unlike other species that prefer deeper haunts in the winter, trout are apex predators that can be found shallow throughout the winter months, especially under the ice. If you haven’t experienced it, there is little else that can get the heart pumping and warm you up like a feisty trout on light line, paired with a 2’ pole. The gear is relatively inexpensive and can be awesome fun for you and your family. Add to that the fact that the ice is a great opportunity for those without a boat, to get out on the water. The spots that you always wanted to fish in the summer, are now beneath your feet. Trout are very willing participants in that they will eat simple jigs tipped with earth worms, meal worms, or wax worms. Jammin Jigs carry a great selection of ice jigs that will get the job done. A slow, incremental rise and fall presentation will usually produce. For the times that a more aggressive approach is needed, check out the HD Ice from Dynamic Lures. It will definitely get the job done for you. When fishing for trout, you rarely have to fish deeper than 15’ in most situations to have some success. As far as your connection to your

Issue 1 2013


quarry, there are some really good lines out there these days that will give you every advantage you need on the water, whether hard or open. From hi-tech fluorocarbon, to manageable mono, to spider web thin super line, to tough copolymer, there is a line out there that will fit your fancy. When it comes to line size, 4# - 10#, depending on the size of fish you expect, is a good range. The water is cold and most likely fairly clear, so the lightest you can get away with is the best way to go. No matter what your species is, chances are they are biting when you would rather be around the fire. If you prepare yourself for the elements and research your target species a little, you can throw cabin fever to the curb and have some of the hottest action of the year. Keep your season going and take advantage of the fish in a barrel. It can be great fun and as I said before, the biggest fish of your season or your life could be waiting for your light line. Fish are getting ready to go through the rigors of spawning and big fish need to eat more than little fish to survive. Give winter fishing a try and hopefully you will be as fired up as I am for it.

By: Shawn Jones

Photo by: Bob Felsch

Photo by: Lane Coale

Background Photo: Eagle Nest Lake iced over. Taken by: Shawn Jones


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Outdoor Enthusiasts Don’t Miss this Event! January 11-13, 2013 Food, Tackle, Boats, ATV’s, Campers, Hunting Equipment, Guns, Guides, Seminars, Educational Activities, Tons of Raffles, Door prizes, and Fun for all ages! Contact Patrick Drake if you are interested in operating a booth for this event. Show Manager, Patrick Drake: (575)-526-0112 83

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Fish Science

A Trout is a Tro

Photo by: Stephanie Terry 85

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rout is a Trout? Exploring the taxonomy of New Mexico’s trout species

We are fortunate in New Mexico to have a diversity of trout fishing opportunities from the highest elevation snow pack driven systems to lower elevation spring creek or dam driven tailwater fisheries. We also have lakes, both high and low, big and small, and to our great satisfaction, many of them are inhabited by trout of various species. While most of us know the phenotypic (physical appearance) of these fishes and can easily call out the brookie or brown or rainbow in the net, it is less common for an angler to know the evolutionary history of these fish and how they relate to each other genetically, ecologically, and how they each arrived in New Mexico. The intention of this article is to tell the taxonomic story of our beloved trout species in New Mexico.


Fish Science To begin with, we have to revisit the classroom so to speak, and review the classification system utilized to organize all of the living organisms on the planet. This is a robust catalog to say the least, and we will focus on the lower end of the ladder where our trout species begin to separate from one another. However, for the big picture, let’s take a second to go over the entire scheme.At the top we have the Kingdom and at the bottom we have Species or even more in depth sub-species. Along the way we have phylum, class, order, family, genus, and finally species. The way I remember the order of this system is through the mnemonic, “King Phillip Came Over For Good Spaghetti”. Of course you may want to substitute the S word of Spaghetti for another more memorable S word. Anyhow, when we get to it, we the ever

vain Homo sapiens really relate to trout in the first two levels of organization (Kingdom,Phylum) and then break away in the third tier level of Class. While we group out with Mammalia at this juncture, the Trout we so love group out in the Class Actinopterygii. This class of fishes encompasses nearly 99 percent of the over 30,000 species of fish and is defined by the presence of fin rays. Sparing you some of the details with the hope of avoiding reader fatigue and subsequent office napping, we will move on a couple of steps to the level of Family. This is where the trout, charr, and salmon species separate out into the family of salmonidae. Salmonidae are a family of fish which includes whitefish, graylings, salmon, and their relatives. This family will encompass every fish in New Mexico that we as

anglers consider trout. The most distinctive feature that we can observe on our catch is the presence of the adipose fin located between the dorsal fin and the caudal fin (tail).This fin is an evolutionary relict and serves no purpose for these fishes. Another feature is the presence of soft fin rays as opposed to the spiny rays that you will see in the fins of fishes like Bass and Sunfish. When we break down the Family Salmonidae, we find three distinct sub-families. The sub family relevant to us is that of salmoninae, where all of our trout species group out and b e g i n t o s e p a ra t e.

Photo by: Kevin Terry 87

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A Trout is a Trout is a Trout? There are 5 different Genera in this sub family of fishes and three of these are represented in the Land of Enchantment. However, there is only one genus of trout native to the great state. An interesting note not relevant to New Mexico but of interest to sport anglers worldwide is the genus Hucho. There are five species in this genus and they are native to Asia. They are the Taimen and many an adventurous angler has travelled to

places like Mongolia in hopes of capturing one of these tremendous predators. It is fascinating to think that these great fish are quite closely related to our own trout species.

Now, to get to our little aquatic gems, we will delve into the three genera within the subfamily Salmoninae that occur in New Mexico. These three groups are Oncorhynchus, Salvelinus, and Salmo. First and foremost, we will begin with our one native trout, the Rio Grande Cutthroat Trout. This is a subspecies of the larger group of inland Cutthroats of North America. The scientific name for the Rio Grande cutthroat is the Oncorhynchus clarki virginalis. This is actually the first trout to be discovered by Europeans, when in 1541, during the expedition led by Francisco de Coronado to find the mythical seven cities of gold, they stumbled upon this beautiful fish in the Pecos River near present day Santa Fe, NM. Today, this


Fish Science

A Trout is a Trout is a Trout? species is rare in New Mexico and occupies only a fraction of its historic range. Reasons for decline are numerous and comprehensive but a few key factors include the introduction of nonnative trout, land use practices, including water development and livestock grazing, and more recently global climate change. There are still viable populations of Rio Grande within the historic range that are protected by barriers in mostly pristine lakes and streams in both southern Colorado and New Mexico. Both state agencies and many other federal, tribal, and NGO agencies have been working together to secure more habitat for these fish as well as continuing the march to restore the Rio Grande Cutthroat into suitable waters throughout the historic range. This work is very difficult and one of the major roadblocks, as we will come to find out, has to do with the other trout species that now reside in our waters. Next we have the Rainbow Trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. This fish is probably the worlds best known trout species and is the most commonly cultured sport fish in the United States. They do well in a variety of environments including hatchery settings and they are highly variable in appearance and life strategies. Since the Rainbow Trout is in the genus Oncorhynchus, they are very closely related to all of the cutthroat 89

as well as the pacific salmon like kings, silvers, and sockeye, amongst others. There are two primary life forms. The landlocked forms live entirely in fresh water in streams and lakes, while the anadromous form called steelhead employ a life history strategy similar to the pacific salmon in which they spend a portion of their lives in saltwater before returning to freshwater streams to reproduce. The Rainbow is relatively easy to raise in captivity, which accompanied by the huge demand from anglers and commercial interests has led to an intense stocking program that has been in place for over a hundred years. These fish, therefore, have been stocked in almost every suitable river and lake in New Mexico in the past. Presently, the Rainbow is still the primary sport fish stocked in New Mexico, however, new management practices have focused on keeping the Rainbow Trout away from areas with populations of Rio Grande Cutthroat trout.

in New Mexico because there are so few populations of pure Rio Grande Cutts left. The Rainbow Trout is native to the pacific states from Alaska to California. The next Trout we will discuss is actually not a trout at all, even though the name Brook Trout is common throughout the world. These fish of the genus Salvelinus are actually Char species. The fish in this genus are native throughout the northern latitudes of North America including the Great lakes states, the Pacific northwest states and the northeastern states, as well as the vast majority of Canada. This group of fish has an affinity to cold water compared to other trout, and therefore in places where they have been transplanted, the most successful populations are found in high elevation lakes and streams with predictable cold water. We have two species of Salvelinus fishes in New Mexico. The first is the Brook Trout, Salvelinus fontinalis which is the most “Trout Like” of the char.

The reason for this separation is due to the ability of the Rainbow Trout to hybridize or breed with the Native Rio Grande Cutthroat and create a viable offspring commonly known as cuttbows. While the cuttbow is a fish with merits of its own, especially from an anglers perspective, they can be devastating to the native trout by breeding out the genetics that make them unique. This is specifically important

They are the most “warm water” adapted of the group. Many of our high elevation lakes and streams have self sustaining populations of Brook Trout. Again, this species has had an impact on the native Rio Grande Cutthroat due to their ability to outcompete the natives for habitat and prey. The other Salvelinus fish that we have in New Mexico is the Lake Trout ,Salvelinus namay-

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cush. The Lake Trout is a tremendous predator and they are very popular amongst anglers. They are the largest char and the third largest species within the salmonidae family. They are longer lived than other salmonids and are highly piscivorous or fish eating. They can cross with Brook Trout, especially in a hatchery environment, to create a “splake�. Another very interesting anomaly to note is that in very rare natural settings the Brook Trout of the genus Salvelinus can cross with the Brown Trout of the genus Salmo creating a ferocious sterile hybrid know as the tiger trout. The ability to cross fish from two different genera is extremely rare in nature. This hybrid can be created with fairly good success in a hatchery environment and states, like Utah, have programs to produce and stock these great sport fish. The last group that we will discuss is the genus Salmo. These Atlantic based fishes are native to Europe and in the case of Atlantic salmon the northeastern sates. Relevant to New Mexico is the Brown Trout, which has a wide distribution in

Photo by: Kevin Terry


Fish Science

A Trout is a Trout is a Trout? our states waters. In fact, many New Mexico anglers believe falsely that the Brown Trout is native, simply because it is so well dispersed and the species has the capacity to create self sustaining wild populations that have in some cases lasted several human generations. It is also common in New Mexico to hear Brown Trout referred to as German Browns. This common name has also survived generations and reflects the true origin of our fish because the first Brown Trout brought to the United States were from German strains that arrived in the late eighteen hundreds. The brown Trout is by far the most successful of the “immigrant� trout due to their capacity to thrive in quite diverse habitats and their ability to outcompete both the native and other nonnative trout. They are less frequently cultured and stocked these days because they are canny predatory fish thought to be more difficult to catch than other trout species. However, in New Mexico, they are prized sport fish that test even the most skilled angler. The Brown Trout and its ability to thrive almost anywhere in New Mexico has also had a negative impact on our true native.

information is vital for conservative management into the future and absolutely essential to our effort to maintain diversity and native fish communities while at the same time retaining a sport fishing component less natural. The purpose of this article and those to come is to bridge a gap in the scientific world of large words, often in Latin, and our angling community of equal complexity and interest in our fishes. It is the hope of the author, that articles in this column will fish out those key nuggets of info buried in the texts of research publications, and cast them out to you, in hopes that it will benefit you as an angler and general fish enthusiast. So, please help guide this development through feedback and questions so that we can truly give you something for the arsenal.

-Kevin Terry

To fully understand and appreciate the taxonomic history of our trout could encompass a career or more. There are many great people that continue this work daily and they will continue to tease out the details. This 91

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Photo by: Kevin Terry


Nick Streit Fly selection can be a tough nut to crack for the begging fly angler. It seems that now-a-days, every other fish bum with a pick-up truck and yellow lab has got a few flies named after them. And with fly companies competing to introduce the latest and greatest fly patterns every year, there are now literally thousands of different patterns to choose from. Gone are the days when all a fly fisher need were a few Grey hackles, Renegades, Adams’ or Prince nymphs. And while the old standards will catch plenty of fish, there are new flies out there that can sometimes work better. But to understand which fly you should have at the end of your line, you should have a basic understanding of what the fish are looking for. Knowing what bugs are hatching, and which ones the trout are eating, will help you when choosing a fly from your box. From a simplistic point of view, there are several different groups of insects that trout fisherman should be able to identify. While my run down of these bugs may not hold up in an entomology class, I think it’s a good start.

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All Photos by: Nick Streit except, Mayfly at left/Jared Blaschke, and background/Matt Pelletier


As far as a bugs go, a Mayfly is a handsome insect. As an adult, they have tall wings and a long three-forked tail. The mayfly nymph will spend a year or so crawling around in the rocks of the stream bed. When the feeling is right, they will emerge to the surface, shuck their nymph exoskeleton and hatch into adults. The adult will then sit atop the surface of the water as it dries of its wings and prepares for its first flight. At this time, the Mayfly is in the Dunn stage and it will resemble a small sailboat afloat on the currents of the stream. During the emergence and the Dunn stage, trout will feed on the insect both underwater and on the surface. Mayflies come in different shapes and sizes. Blue Winged Olives (BWO), Pale Morning Dunn’s (PMD), Tricos and Drakes are all different types of mayflies. Once you have identified that the bug on the water is a mayfly, try to match the size and color to something in your fly box. And it’s important to take note of what stage of the hatching insect trout are feeding on. There are two main types of Stoneflies that anglers should be aware of. The Salmon Fly is the common term for the large (2 inches long!) prehistoric looking creature that is found on some of our waters in the spring. The other is the Yellow Sally, and is a much smaller and lighter colored version. While certain aspects of their life cycles are similar to

Mayflies, trout get most excited about eating adult stones when they return to the water to lay their eggs. A Stimulator is a great Stonefly pattern, and if you match size and color, you should be able to fool a few trout. Caddis adults will look like small moths as they fly around the brush alongside the stream. On the water, their profile is commonly described as tent like, and they have two long antennae. Fish are happy to eat caddis nymphs or dries, and the biggest Caddis hatches will happen in the spring. As with Stoneflies, Caddis will also be vulnerable to trout when they return to the water as egg layers. Terrestrials are bugs like Grasshoppers, Ants and Crickets, and are great sources of trout food, especially when other bugs are not hatching. Not much mystery here, if a Terrestrial falls into the stream, a fish will eat it, and fishing with one is always a good idea in the warm months. Midges are very small insects that are usually only relevant in cold tail waters or lakes, or when fishing in the wintertime. For anglers fishing the Taos area, Midges rarely are a factor. Local Fly Shops will always be the best source of information on current hatches and best flies to imitate them. -Nick Streit

Photo by: Matt Pelletier 95

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C A D D I S


Photo by: Nick Streit

Adult Stonefly Adult Damsel and Hatched Nymph

Photo by: Matt Pelletier


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