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M A G A Z I N E 22 February | March 2008

Keep Your

Display Type

plus » Transparency tricks you need to know » Sort text and tables like a pro

Looking Good

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M A G A Z I N E 22

February | March 2008

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MAGAZINE

Editorial Editor in Chief Terri Stone, tstone@indesignmag.com Editorial Director David Blatner, david@indesignmag.com Senior Editor Sandee Cohen, sandee@indesignmag.com Contributing Writers Pariah S. Burke, John Cruise, Renée Dustman, Jim Felici, Jeff Gamet, Mordy Golding, Jeff Potter, Gabriel Powell, Russell Viers, Chuck Weger De s i g n & Te c h n o l o g y Design Rufus Deuchler, www.deuchler.net Jennifer Steele, Steele Design Director of Operations Cindy Samco Business Director of Advertising & Marketing Jeff Lalier Contact Information www.indesignmag.com/contact.php Subscription Information www.indesignmag.com/purchase.php Published by CreativePro.com, a division of PrintingForLess. com. Copyright ©2008 CreativePro.com. All rights reserved. Reproduction and redistribution prohibited without approval. For more information, contact permissions@indesignmag.com. InDesign Magazine is not endorsed or sponsored by Adobe Systems Incorporated, publisher of InDesign. InDesign is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. All other products and services are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners and are hereby acknowledged.

From the Editor Are there any designers who don’t love type? To my mind, a great typeface is a great work of art. And yes, I do hang type on my walls. No matter what your design style—minimalist, embellished, or anywhere in between the two—there are hundreds of typefaces to choose from. But to live up to its potential, type must be set well. That’s no easy task, and it can be especially tough when you’re setting display type. Because display type is generally larger than surrounding text, there’s less chance readers will overlook any missteps on your part. In this issue’s cover story, “Type on Display,” Jim Felici tells you how to finesse five things that influence display type’s appearance: negative space, kerning, tracking, leading, and special characters. He backs up his advice with type samples so you can see the good—and the bad—in action. Jim’s a typographic expert, and he’s a good friend, too: We’ve known each other since I was a wide-eyed assistant editor at Publish magazine in the 1990s. I’m very pleased to have him on the pages of InDesign Magazine. The other large feature in this issue is another old friend of sorts. “Transparency: No Longer the Forbidden Fruit” is an update of an excellent article by Mordy Golding that ran way, way back in issue #1.

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With the release of Adobe’s PDF Print Engine, printing transparency effects has become easier than ever. Yet since transparency continues to be an issue for many InDesign users, we asked Renée Dustman to update the original article. The result is a fresh take on a long-standing topic. In our December 2007/January 2008 issue, there was a contest for a free Pantone Goe fanbook. Out of the gobs of entries, we randomly chose one winner: Peter King from Marketing Matters in the United Kingdom. Congratulations, Peter! And here’s a tip for everyone else who likes contests: There’s a weekly giveaway at www.creativepro.com/weeklycontest/ intro. You do have to be a registered CreativePro.com member to enter, but registration is, like the prizes, free of charge. As you browse through this issue, I hope you make it to the penultimate page. That’s where you’ll find a link to the downloadable InDex, which lists issue numbers for the contents of the past 22 issues. We’ll update it after publishing every issue. Because it’s a living document, it’s easy for us to make changes, so please drop me a line with index improvement suggestions.— Terri Stone

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Finish before you start.

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M A G A Z I N E 22

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Table of Contents contents

7 Type on Display Display type can make or break a design. Follow Jim Felici’s advice and you won’t need to worry.

17 Transparency—No Longer the Forbidden Fruit Mordy Golding and Renée Dustman examine the state of InDesign transparency today. 24 InDepth: What Is JDF? Chuck Weger explains what JDF is and—most importantly—whether you need to care about yet another acronym. 28 InTime: Sorting Text and Tables Pariah S. Burke takes InDesign to Tinseltown. 36 InQuestion Sandee Cohen has the answers to your burning questions.

The first comprehensive guide to Adobe InDesign that focuses exclusively on the art of template design and production.

40 InBooks: Instant InDesign Gabriel Powell gives you tips on producing the best templates. 49 InReview: DTP Tools’ Layer Groups and Layer Comps Use layers? Then read John Cruise’s insightful reviews.

In Instant InDesign you’ll learn everything you need to know—from key design principles and basic template architecture to advanced automation techniques. With practical tips and real-world examples, you’ll discover how to translate your great ideas into industrial-strength templates.

52 InReview: Woodwing Software’s Smart Layout Jeff Potter rates an app for the newspaper market. 57 InBrief: Quick Takes on Helpful Products Jeff Gamet lets you in on new and improved products. 61 Cartoon Russell Viers needs some elbow room.

Instant InDesign® Designing templates for fast and efficient page layout Gabriel Powell * ISBN: 0-321-49571-3 • pp 328

62 Calendar and InDesign User Groups

Save 35% on Instant InDesign at

65 InDex Looking for a certain article in earlier issues? Start here!

www.adobepress.com. Simply enter coupon code PPT-PBM-1157 at checkout. contents

M A G A Z I N E 22

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MIT AD E ON

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Use this free 24-hour pass for a full access to all the videos in the Online Training Library® And make sure to view these popular video training courses on InDesign: InDesign CS3 Essential Training

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M A G A Z I N E 22

February | March 2008

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Type

By James Felici Display type does more than grab your attention—it spells out the informational hierarchy of the page. It also casts a harsh light on every typesetting gaffe you might make.

Display On

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Welcome to this article’s text type. The display type, in its role as both pitchman and navigator, delivered you here. You may have seen it first on the cover, or you may have seen it for the first time as you browsed your way onto this page, but I’ll lay odds that somehow it was the display type that put you on the path to this paragraph. of the article. Some of this type’s power to lead may be in its message, but as often as not, what carries a reader’s eye from title to text is simply visual convention: following bigger type to smaller. This is not a new invention—it’s been around as long as written language, and it says something about how we think and organize our thoughts. In magazines, especially, titles may be so ambiguous as to be meaningless to anyone except the clever writer who dreamt up that wry allusion or pun, such as “On Display.” What’s that supposed to mean, anyway? Thus a second level of display type, the subline or leader, typically takes on the role of

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Type On Display

explainer. In non-fiction books, it’s almost unheard of nowadays to have a title without a qualifying subtitle, as in “Horn of Plenty: The Untold Story of the Bugle in American History.” These conventions are powerful, and typographically trendy layouts that ignored or intentionally scrambled these visual traditions over the last 20 years have more or less faded from the scene. In this article, you’ll learn what to do and what not to keep your display type looking good.

Your life depends on this! You will pay attention! The bossy display type in this early-1950s civil defense poster is like a drill sergeant, and the open-field layout marches your eye around unquestioningly. If you end up getting blown up, it’s not because the type didn’t deliver the message.

The Look of It The goal of setting good text type is readability: creating a page that’s not only inviting to the eye but easy to read, page after page, a moving sidewalk that carries the readers’ eyes along with minimum effort. The goal of display type is more modest: Simple legibility will do. Its message is often as graphic as it is literal. And because of this decorative aspect, it invites closer visual inspection than text type. It creates a first impression that can make or break the text message that follows. In advertisements, display type announces the pitch. In books, it makes visual the organizational hierarchy of the contents. In newspapers and magazines, it’s the hook that lures you to read on. In all these senses, the word display indicates the role of the type. It says nothing about how that type looks, except that it’s always, by definition, big. Not necessarily huge, but big enough to distinguish it clearly from the text type that follows. In professional journals, for example, it’s common for the titles of articles to be set rather small, the assumption being that we’re all very sober and serious here, and we don’t

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need theatrical type to lure us into reading what any thoughtful person would never consider skipping over in the first place. In magazines with lots of ads, though, convention has it that the opening pages of articles need to announce themselves with a flourish of trumpets—bugles, even—to alert readers that they’re back on editorial terra firma. You can use any typeface to create display type, including those designed for book and newspaper text. But there’s also a special breed of typefaces designed just for the role, and these, not surprisingly, are called display faces. They’re typically heftier, more distinctive, more assertive than text faces, and the bold and extra bold versions of popular text faces are often used in this role. On the other end of the scale are display

Figures 1a and 1b: Dom Casual is a classic display face. It’s eyecatching, assertive, but ultimately a cipher: It carries no message itself, except a sense of informality. Mesquite, by contrast, is typical of a genre of types called “decorative.” Its Wild West association is unmistakable. While not all decorative faces are so allusive, as a group they lack versatility, and what will work on a wedding invitation won’t play on highway signage.

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Type On Display

There’s a wonderful sense of irony in this stridentlooking, commie-posterish announcement from Liberation, France’s left-wing daily newspaper. Just say “no” to white space. The subject of the militant call to arms? A special weekly supplement about hip trends in style, design, and travel.

faces that are very thin and spidery, that animate white space rather fill it. But in either case, they share with text faces an important characteristic: versatility. Display faces may be distinctive, eye-catching, and allusive, but they rarely evoke literal associations. Their designs allow you to use them in a wide variety of settings without delivering a message themselves. Dom Casual (Figure 1a), as informal and quirky looking as it is—vaguely reminiscent of supermarket poster type—carries no message of its own apart from “Look at me!” A typeface such as Mesquite (Figure 1b), though, unequivocally says “Wild West,” and it belongs to a subspecies of display types called decorative. Styles change, of course, and although Dom now may have a retro look, when it was designed, it was strictly contemporary. By way of definition, about the only thing you can say about display faces is that they don’t work for text. A text face can work as a display face, but not vice versa. Or at least not vice versa without complaints. An ongoing source of debate in design circles is what display faces go with which text faces. I decline to get involved. In a world where people wear stripes with plaids, eat meat sauces flavored with cough drops, and listen to hip-hop musicians sampling Bing Crosby, the only safe thing to say is that all bets are off. One such unlikely typographic marriage is Helvetica and Bodoni, popularized in the original Wired magazine logo. This curious duet, which art director John Plunkett originally joined because of their clashing, disparate natures, has now become a virtual cliché, especially twinned in two-face headlines. (See Figure 2 for an example from another magazine.)

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Figure 2: An unlikely combo that’s become commonplace: Bodoni (here, italic) and Helvetica (in this case, Thin). Once you start looking, you’ll see it everywhere.

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Type On Display

Two things to notice here: First, if the message is short, even horizontal baselines become optional. The second, and more subtle, is the superb spacing of the all-caps type, perfectly proportioned to the lightness of the face, the leading, and the openness of the layout.

Practical Matters: Managing Negative Space Display type is big, and in typesetting, size changes everything. A basic principle of typography, for example, is that as type size increases, white spaces appear to grow faster than the type itself. This means that the larger the type, the more loosely it appears to be spaced. And since most typographic problems arise from bad spacing of one sort or another, the bigger the type, the more glaring the problems. What you wouldn’t notice at 12-point smacks you in the eye at 96-point. Type that appears to be normally spaced at text size looks too loose at, say, 72 points. Not so loose as to be interesting, just too loose to look right. The solution to the appearance of slack spacing in large type is to tighten its tracking. Tracking is the measure of overall character spacing in a passage of type, and in InDesign it���s measured in increments of 1/1000 em. (An em is a relative spacing unit that’s equal to the point size of the type you’re using.) How much a passage of type needs to be tightened depends on its point size, the typeface itself, and the general effect you’re after. This is not to say that all large type needs to be tightly tracked. Intentionally loose settings in display type are quite common. The point is that to achieve normal, text-like spacing in display size, you have to tighten tracking (Figure 3). Kern First No matter how tight or loose you intend your display type to be, the spacing between characters has to be consistent. Inconsistencies in spacing draw the eye like a magnet. The way to create this consistency is

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M A G A Z I N E 22

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Figure 3: The hand-set type on this cover page is drop-dead elegant, as you’d expect from Clifford Burke, one of America’s finest letterpress printers. All the type is lightly, precisely letterspaced and floats on the open page. The title is set in Centaur; the small type in Monotype Italian Oldstyle.

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Type On Display

Modern faces require very careful spacing, a lesson utterly lost on this page. The character spacing in the headline is nearly random, and the super loose spacing and leading of the 16-point text make it look like a carton full of words, pushing at the bounds of legibility.

through kerning, the adjustment of space between particular adjacent characters. Neither the kerning information built into your fonts (applied through what InDesign calls “metrics” kerning) nor InDesign’s so-called “optical kerning” can assure that there are no tight or loose character pairs lurking somewhere in your display type. You have to make these adjustments manually, and the best time to do this is before you fiddle with the tracking. The fewer the number of words in your display type, the more crucial the kerning, because any irregularity will be that much more eye-catching. Start by looking at the pair with the loosest spacing, the most intractable pair that resists attempts at tightening, such as WY or LA. In these cases the shapes of the adjoining characters inevitably create gaps in the line. The spacing of this worst pair is the key to the rest of your kerning, and the spacing of the whole passage can only be as tight as this pair will allow. Otherwise you’ll just be dramatizing the loose spacing of the trouble-making pair (Figure 4). Once you’ve adjusted the kerning, you can adjust tracking with the confidence that InDesign will treat the spacing of all character pairs treated equally maintain your even spacing will be maintained. Kerning Tips Hand kerning is tedious, and commercial phototypesetting systems have always allowed you to make a record of your kerning adjustments for a particular typeface so you could employ them again automatically. QuarkXPress can do this, too, but InDesign doesn’t give you the option. If you’re really fastidious, the best you can do is make a log of your

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Figure 4: The perils of tight tracking, illustrated. Your eye goes immediately to the hole in this headline, where the NAZ simply defy every attempt at close kerning. Even if they’d squeezed the space between the N and A, a gap-toothed look was inevitable.

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Type On Display

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CtrlBridge

adjustments and refer to it the next time you set the same face. Bad kerning in display type really jumps out at you, so use care, and zoom in for a closer look. The coarse resolution of computer monitors makes accurate on-screen kerning difficultâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;printing proofs is a good policy. But donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t zoom in so closely that you can only see a few characters at a timeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;try for six or eight. The goal of kerning is consistent overall spacing, so you need a fairly large sample to see a broader view. How Tight Is Right? The default spacing of a typeface is defined in its font. The set width (Figure 5) of each character is the sum of the width of the visible glyph itself plus little slivers of

CtrlBridge

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Also new for CS3Ă&#x2C6;#TRL4RACK#HANGES Ă&#x2C6;SHOWSĂ&#x2C6;TRACKĂ&#x2C6;CHANGESĂ&#x2C6; INĂ&#x2C6;LAYOUT VIEWĂ&#x2C6;INĂ&#x2C6;)N$ESIGNĂ&#x2C6;ORĂ&#x2C6;)N#OPYĂ&#x2C6; More information, CS2-versions and other workďŹ&#x201A;ow solutions from Ctrl Publishing, please visit www.ctrl-ps.com

Figure 5: The blue box indicates this characterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s set width.

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February | March 2008

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Features as: sĂ&#x2C6;%ASYĂ&#x2C6;DRAGĂ&#x2C6;ANDĂ&#x2C6;DROPĂ&#x2C6;!DMINISTRATIONĂ&#x2C6;OFĂ&#x2C6;USERS sĂ&#x2C6;)NITIATEĂ&#x2C6;0$&Ă&#x2C6;2EVIEWĂ&#x2C6;ATĂ&#x2C6;CHECK IN sĂ&#x2C6;!UTOMATICĂ&#x2C6;TASKĂ&#x2C6;GENERATIONĂ&#x2C6;FROMĂ&#x2C6;0$&Ă&#x2C6;2EVIEW sĂ&#x2C6;4ASKĂ&#x2C6;PANELĂ&#x2C6;INĂ&#x2C6;#TRL"RIDGE sĂ&#x2C6;4ASKĂ&#x2C6;PANELĂ&#x2C6;INĂ&#x2C6;)N$ESIGN sĂ&#x2C6;.OTESĂ&#x2C6;FROMĂ&#x2C6;0$&Ă&#x2C6;2EVIEWĂ&#x2C6;PLACEDĂ&#x2C6;INĂ&#x2C6;DOCUMENT sĂ&#x2C6;4EXTĂ&#x2C6;EDITINGĂ&#x2C6;OFĂ&#x2C6;WITHĂ&#x2C6;)N#OPYĂ&#x2C6;REQUIRESĂ&#x2C6;#ROSS4ALK

Behind the clean, minimal look of this Swiss-style layout, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot going on typographically and editorially. The title (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Freedom of Styleâ&#x20AC;?) reads through into the poetic subline (â&#x20AC;&#x153;in a home rising from chaosâ&#x20AC;?). The light color of the title blends with its loose tracking, while the tracking of the subline has been tightened to match that of the leader that follows it. Despite the three sizes of type, the leading appears proportional and balanced throughout. The layout draws your eye down (alas, paying scant attention to byline and photo credit) to the captions that make up the bulk of the following article.

M A G A Z I N E 21 22

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Type On Display

Mix-and-match display type is as old as advertising itself. This 1932 ad, set in metal type, mixes script with shadowed type with pneumatic caps and ends with a Futura-like geometric. It has a bit of the circus poster to it, but it certainly sweeps your eye along. To justify the line under “JUMBO,” the text’s word spaces have been expanded, and the following line copies that spacing. The four justified lines that succeed them have had both word and character spaces stretched to create spacing that’s in keeping with the loose leading.

space of each side called side bearings. The combined widths of these side bearings defines how much space there is between adjoining characters. Side bearings don’t appear to amount to much in text-sized type, but in display sizes, they become big enough to be distractingly visible. A large drop cap beginning a paragraph, for example, appears to have an indent because its side bearing is pushing it in off the margin. Although kerning corrections are built into fonts to adjust the spacing between selected pairs of characters, the tracking of a typeface is set by default. A very good type specimen book will tell you at which size a particular typeface has been mastered; that is, the point size at which its “normal” spacing actually looks normal. And this size is surprisingly small. The majority of digital faces have been mastered at 12-point, and it’s unusual for even a display face to be mastered at greater than 18-point. Consequently, you can expect the tracking of virtually all typefaces to start looking loose by the time you hit, say, 24-point. Just how loose is a function of the typeface and how you (and your clients) feel about looseness in general. In the 1980s, for example, very tight display type was all the rage, to the point where many adjoining characters touched or overlapped. In fact, this look is making a comeback, because typography is as fadprone as any other fashion, and you can follow trends in tracking like you can follow trends in hemlines (Figure 6). Fads aside, “tight but not touching” is the contemporary rule of thumb. Basically what you’re after in display type is the look of the spacing of textsized type, which is to say, “normal.” Different faces need differing degrees of tracking adjustment. Modern faces, such as Bodoni, can’t

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Figure 6: Another sans serif (Eurostile Extended) hitched to Bodoni. Apart from the nasty kerning pileup at the end of “geometrie,” the big problem here is the badly composed justified subline. Spacing like this would jump off the page in throwaway newspaper composition, but on this magazine page it really dominates the layout, as errors in display type will tend to do.

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Type On Display

tolerate tight tracking. They’re bright and airy by nature, and they need generous intercharacter spacing to avoid looking crowded. Once neighboring serifs start to touch, things turn into a mess. Sans serif faces can tolerate more squeezing, but how much is a function of the proportions of the characters themselves. Squeeze a hulking sans too much, and it looks like a bunch of fat guys in a phone booth. For this reason, cranking down the tracking to jam type into a tight space generally isn’t a good idea. Either reduce the point size or choose another face. A Weak Link in InDesign Commercial typesetting programs developed a very clever system for automatically adjusting tracking as point size changed. This was adopted by Adobe (née Aldus) PageMaker and QuarkXPress, but not, inexplicably, by InDesign. The system lets you create a custom tracking scheme for each of your typefaces that specifies at which point sizes tracking should be adjusted and by how much. For example, you could specify that Century Schoolbook be tightened x amount starting at 18 point, y at 30 point, and z at 72 point. PageMaker took this a step farther by allowing for multiple tracking patterns for each face, so you could specify values for settings dubbed “very loose, “loose,” “normal,” “tight,” and “very tight.” After you set these values, the page-layout application adjusted a typeface’s tracking appropriately and automatically at any point size. If you wanted a different look, you could choose another track option for that face without going back to a dialog box to alter numeric values. In InDesign, you have to adjust tracking manually: Select the type, apply a tracking value. The only way to

automate the process is by creating style sheets, one for each face and one for each point-size range whose tracking you want to adjust. It’s primitive and timeconsuming, but it’s your only choice. Write a letter. Leading, Too Because the eye is so sensitive to type’s spacing at display sizes, even leading can look inconsistent, regardless of how it’s been specified. The problem arises most often when a lack of ascending or descending characters in one line makes its leading, or the leading of the following line, appear wider than it actually is. The same can happen between a line set in caps and lowercase (or all lowercase) followed by a line of all caps or all lining numerals. The leading between all of the lines may be the same, but it doesn’t look that way. And if it looks wrong, it is wrong. There’s nothing to do but tweak the spacing until it looks correct. Typesetting is all about maintaining proportions, so when you tighten tracking, keep an eye on what it’s doing to the appearance of the leading. If the leading is too slack, your display type breaks up into horizontal stripes. Conversely, because there’s a limit to how much you can tighten leading, there’s a corresponding limit to how much you can tighten tracking (Figure 7). Titling Faces Traditionally, foundries have created versions of certain typefaces specifically for use in large sizes . These are called titling faces, and until recently they were normally comprised of capitals only (so-called titling caps). A notable exception is Matthew Carter’s Big Caslon. Titling faces have different proportions than their text-sized relatives; usually they’re finer, with

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Figure 7: The subline here seems to have a striking message: Don’t read me. The tight leading and long line lengths mean it will take the jaws of life to extract the meaning from this info-slab.

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Type On Display

A quick one-two punch from an ad in Mrs. Beeton’s Cookery Book (1907). The display type carries you in a trice from product name directly to that seductive promise of no more cooking. What more do you need to know? The text type is just gravy, so to speak.

more subtle detail and closer spacing, but sometimes they’re more like a semibold and bulked up for more visual impact. One of the original ideas of Adobe’s Multiple Master fonts was to generate from within a single font a range of designs from titling down to footnote proportions. It was a good idea that not enough people stood and saluted. “Special Characters” in Display Type Typographically speaking, there have never been special characters. But computer pioneers apparently thought any character not printed on a keyboard was exotic, so they dubbed certain common and traditional characters “special.” In fact, some of these do merit special consideration in display settings. Ligatures, for example. Traditional wisdom says to avoid them in display type, but I think they’re preferable to having an f overlap the dot of an i. The catch in using ligatures is that the spacing of the merged characters defines the tracking for the rest

of the type. You can’t have the fixed spacing of the ligature draw attention to itself by being relatively tighter or looser than the surrounding text. Dashes look huge in display type, especially em dashes. They’re best avoided unless they can be artfully coaxed into ending a line. Don’t substitute an en dash or a hyphen for an em dash. Each of these characters has its own editorial meaning, and these should be respected. Normal points of ellipsis look too spacey and wide in large sizes. Instead of a normal 3-dot ellipsis (. . .) created by periods and non-breaking spaces, use the ellipsis character (…), which is more compact. On a PC, you can set it with the keystroke combination Alt-0133. On the Mac, it’s Option-;. Lastly, don’t use program-generated small caps in display type if you can avoid it. If your font doesn’t contain small capitals, most programs will simply scale down regular capitals, but as type size increases, the inconsistency between the weights of the fullsize caps and small caps becomes more and more noticeable. If you have to use fake small caps in big type, consider making them larger than normal small caps so the difference in stroke weights between them and the full-size caps isn’t so dramatic.

February | March 2008

Jim Feliciis the author of The Complete Manual of Typography (Adobe Press), which has been translated into French, Swedish, Russian, Polish, Estonian, and Chinese. He lives in southern France.

Unmet Needs Advancing technology has had the perverse effect of making good display type harder to set. Once upon a time, in the days of handset type, it was clear what a display type was: It was one of the big ones in the type cabinet. Someone had cut it specifically for use at large sizes, and had adjusted its spacing, proportions, and weight accordingly. Display type set itself.

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But with the advent of phototype and then digital type, you could scale a single set of characters to any size. Now any type, regardless of it suitability, could be used in display roles. Page-layout apps introduced tracking controls to compensate at least for the spacing problems that arose, but InDesign handle tracking poorly. However, the key to setting good display type is not in the technology. It’s in taking the time and care to fuss over the minutiae, to labor over the negative spaces, not just the characters and the lines they form. You are, after all, putting yourself on display.

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By Mordy Golding and Renée Dustman

E R P R C N T A SA N Y

No Longer the Forbidden Fruit

Now your designs can reap the rewards of transparency effects without fear of repercussion. Long, long ago, Adobe gave us transparency in InDesign version 2, and it was good. Not great, but at least a step in the right direction. Designers reveled in the ability to add drop shadows and feathered edges to objects directly in InDesign. It wasn’t until those early adopters tried to print documents with those new effects—and often failed—that they realized transparency could be problematic. With each subsequent version of InDesign, Adobe has added ways to enhance documents with transparency, making it even more enticing. The Flattener Preview panel debuted in the first Creative Suite. In CS2, Adobe improved compatibility with

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native Photoshop and Illustrator files. And in CS3, there are a host of new effects, such as gradient and directional feathers and inner and outer glows. (You’ll find these and more on the Effects panel, known as the Transparency palette in earlier versions). There’s one thing that hasn’t changed, however, and that’s the need to flatten transparency for output to a PostScript device. Until the day comes when flattening is no longer required (in fact, that day is here in some spots already, as we explain in the sidebar “Workflow Of The Future”), it’s essential for everyone involved to understand why flattening may be necessary and how it doesn’t have to spoil the good looks of your original documents.

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TRANSPARENCY

Figure 1: Transparency is behind the simplest effects, such as the drop shadow in this layout.

Flattening Isn’t a Four-Letter Word Anyone who has used transparency in InDesign knows what it can do for a layout. Transparency breathes life into a design; it adds shadow and light, depth and dimension (Figure 1). By definition, transparency admits the passage of light and permits a clear view of objects beyond. The term flattening is rather obscure, however. To better understand the purpose of flattening, let’s start with a simple fact: Transparency requires flattening when saving or exporting to a format that

Workflow of the Future doesn’t support it (such as PDF 1.3, EPS and DCS) or printing to a PostScript raster image processor (RIP). Here’s another fact: Once you’ve flattened transparency, it’s no longer “live”—you can’t edit it. Many issues surround transparency because sometimes the flattening process produces unwanted artifacts that don’t appear in the original art. After flattening, parts of lines or other vector objects might rasterize; portions of text might look chunky or pixilated; there might be noticeable shifts in color between raster and vector elements (called stitching); or you might get unwanted white boxes surrounding transparent elements. These ill affects of flattening are all unacceptable, but they’re also explainable and preventable. At this point, you may be thinking, “I just won’t use transparency in my documents. Then I won’t have to worry about the affects of flattening.” Easier said than done. You might, for example, place a native .ai Illustrator or .psd Photoshop file that contains live transparency into your document. And if you avoid transparency entirely, you’ll miss out on opportunities to take your designs to the next level.

Tip

Always ask your print shop what PostScript level they’re using to output an InDesign document before you submit it. Some shops prefer that you submit InDesign files as PDF/X files, which are flattened; while others may prefer you to submit an unflattened InDesign or PDF 1.4 (or later) file.

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Imagine a time when flattening transparency in PDF files is no longer necessary for print. The inherent issues associated with flattening are nothing more than distant memories, and designers and print vendors work harmoniously in a PDF workflow. For some, this is a dream already come true thanks to Adobe’s latest PDF raster image processor (RIP) technology. The Adobe PDF Print Engine is a relatively new printing platform being incorporated by OEMs (original equipment manufacturers) into printing products, such as RIPs, previewing and proofing software, and workflow systems. The Adobe PDF Print Engine allows PDF documents to remain unconverted and independent of printing devices throughout the print workflow. There’s no need to flatten transparency at any stage—previewing, proofing, or printing. The Adobe PDF Print Engine uses JDF (Job Definition Format) to capture and control process information. (For more on JDF, see the article on page 24.) This makes it possible to decide at the last minute where to print a job, eliminating scheduling delays or the need to rework the file to accommodate a different device. The RIP applies trapping and other settings specified in the JDF file, and the PDF file remains flexible throughout the process. This may sound too good to be true, but Sells Printing Company in New Berlin, Wisconsin, offers proof. Sells staff have been working closely with Adobe InDesign since prior to version 1.0’s release. When Sells decided to upgrade to the Kodak Prinergy 4.0, the Adobe PDF Print Engine came as part of the package deal. Sells has been using the new workflow system since August 2007 and now prefers it to a standard PostScript workflow. “We liked the results more and more,” says James Wamser, Adobe certified instructor and print specialist at Sells, “and now we love it.” In both new and traditional PDF workflows, Wamser says they encourage their customers to submit InDesign CS3 files as PDF/X-4 standard PDF files. Sells recommends that customers using InDesign CS2 create Adobe PDF 1.4-compatible files for the live transparency component. In any case, it’s important to ask your printer how they prefer you to submit PDF files. Wamser also recommends sending test files.

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Tip

TRANSPARENCY Behind the Scenes InDesign uses its own flattening technology to convert transparency to a form PostScript understands. It does this by cutting apart overlapping areas of transparent objects—including text and graphics that interact with transparency—and rendering them opaque. For example, where two transparent objects overlap, the flattening process breaks the art into several distinct pieces: the two objects and all the areas that overlap (Figures 2 and 3). Although this creates an opportunity for error, you can achieve perfect results every time with the correct flattener settings and careful page layout.

Figure 2: Artwork with transparency applied.

Figure 3: Flattening cuts apart the affected areas and renders them opaque.

Predetermine Results The Transparency Flattener in InDesign determines how the application will flatten transparency. It’s a tool of power—and possible peril. Always discuss flattening with your print vendor, and don’t take on this task unless given consent and the proper specifications. Choose Edit > Transparency Flattener Presets to take a closer look. Select a preset in the Presets window to view its settings in the Preset Settings window (Figure 4). There are three default presets: ❱❱ Low Resolution: Rasterization occurs when necessary and at a suitable resolution for desktop printing. InDesign converts to outlines strokes and text that interact with transparency. ❱❱ Medium Resolution: Rasterization occurs when necessary and at a suitable resolution for laser printing. InDesign clips complex regions. ❱❱ High Resolution: InDesign rasterizes vector objects only if absolutely essential and at a resolution suitable for offset printing.

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Adobe recommends working with native file formats to preserve any live transparency in files you place in InDesign. This workflow not only lets you continue editing transparency effects in placed graphics, it can also improve final results.

You can’t edit these default presets, but you can create your own when necessary. Simply click the New button (Figure 5) to access the following six options: ❱❱ Raster/Vector Balance: This slider controls how liberal InDesign is about rasterizing complex regions (where there are many overlapping objects affected by transparency). A number closer to 0 gives InDesign more freedom to rasterize at will, resulting in faster print times. A number closer to 100 restricts rasterization but increases print time. Set at 100, InDesign doesn’t rasterize objects simply for performance reasons. In cases where files are

Figure 4: You can choose one of three default Transparency Flattener presets or create your own.

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Figure 5: When you create a new Transparency Flattener preset, you can specify how InDesign flattens transparency.

taking extremely long to print (or crashing the RIP altogether), however, consider adjusting this slider to a slightly lower setting. Note that InDesign also rasterizes regions when there is no way to preserve their appearance in vector form—such as when a photo with a soft drop shadow overlaps a background. The drop shadow is a raster effect and the background is a vector object. The only way to preserve the effect in PostScript is to rasterize the background with the drop shadow. ❱❱ Line Art and Text Resolution: InDesign either converts to outlines or rasterizes line art and text affected by transparency. To ensure quality output, set the appropriate resolution for the intended output device. The High Resolution preset, for example, specifies a resolution setting of 1200 ppi—appropriate for commercial printing. ❱❱ Gradient and Mesh Resolution: InDesign uses this setting to rasterize elements that can afford to be set at a lower resolution. Gradients and meshes (the resolution of drop shadows and glow effects) are continuous tone, so they don’t require a resolution as

high as line art or text. In fact, anything twice the line screen for the intended device is probably getting thrown out anyway. The High Resolution preset uses a value of 300 ppi—typical for commercial printing. ❱❱ Convert All Text to Outlines: Rasterized text can look a bit chunkier than regular vector text. To compensate, you can turn on this option to convert all text to outlines, giving a consistent, chunkier look to all of your text—not just the text that interacts with transparency. ❱❱ Convert All Strokes to Outlines: Similar to the previous setting, this compensates for disparity between vector and rasterized strokes by converting all strokes to outlines. ❱❱ Clip Complex Regions: Raster images are always rectangular in shape, which means it’s possible for innocent bystanders to become rasterized simply because they intercept a complex area. More often than not, this results in stitching or noticeable white boxes and color shifts (primarily when output on a medium-resolution device). The Clip Complex Regions option limits this by creating a clipping mask around rasterized complex regions, so the rectangular-shaped raster is masked by the vector outline of the object. This makes for even more complex files and can result in longer print times. Once you’ve finished tweaking these flattening options, name your new preset and click OK. The new preset displays in the Transparency Flattener Presets dialog box. Or, you can load external preset files, which some print shops supply. The presets in this dialog box are also in the Preset pop-up list on the Advanced panel, in both the Print and Export To PDF dialog boxes.

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The best way to preserve the appearance of text is to position it on its own layer above all other layers. This prevents the text from being converted to outlines or rasterized during flattening.

Seeing Is Believing The easiest way to tell if there’s transparency in an InDesign document is to look at the Pages panel. Pages with transparency effects display a small checkerboard pattern icon just below their page icons (Figure 6). (Versions earlier than CS3 display a checkerboard pattern on the page icons.) That’s great, but how do you know if a layout has complex regions or text that will be rasterized? InDesign has something called the Flattener Preview panel. Simply choose Window > Output > Flattener Preview and you can see how InDesign will flatten transparency in your document. This preview palette is more than just a handy way of seeing what InDesign is doing. It’s also a tool you can use to help make adjustments to your files or your flattener settings for better results—all before you spend time and money printing film or plates. You can

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Figure 6: Pages with transparency on them display a small checkerboard pattern icon just below their corresponding page icons in the Pages panel.

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TRANSPARENCY

Figure 7: Use the Flattener Preview panel to see where you might need to adjust your layout to prevent unwanted flattening.

preview the following in the Flattener Preview panel: â?ąâ?ą Rasterized Complex Regions â?ąâ?ą Transparent Objects â?ąâ?ą All Affected Objects â?ąâ?ą Affected Graphics â?ąâ?ą Outlined Strokes â?ąâ?ą Outlined Text â?ąâ?ą Raster-fill Text and Strokes â?ąâ?ą All Rasterized Regions For example, choosing Transparent Objects from the Highlight list shows you the location of all transparent objects on the active page or spread. To see which elements will be affected by transparency, choose All Affected Objects from the Highlight list, and then choose the preset you want InDesign to use to output the file from the Preset list (Figure 7). If you choose All Rasterized Regions and see that certain text is affected by a nearby or overlapping transparent object, you can make an adjustment in your layout to avoid the text from being rasterized or converted to outlines (Figure 8). And if you see that InDesign is being too liberal about rasterizing complex regions, you can make an adjustment to the Raster/

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Tip Figure 8: You can preview whether text will be rasterized or converted to outlines and then do something about it.

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Other useful tools are Overprint Preview (View menu) and Separations Preview panel (Window > Output > Separations Preview). Both enable you to proof documents onscreen to see if flattening will have an adverse effect on the colors in your document.



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TRANSPARENCY Vector Balance setting in a the custom preset that will be used to output the file. Choose Transparency Flattener Presets from the Flattener Preview panel menu to make quick and easy adjustments to a custom presets. Know Thy Print Standards As we mentioned earlier, the PostScript level and PDF compatibility of the intended output device play a huge part in how transparency is handled in your InDesign documents. All PDFs are not created equal! If you intend to export your InDesign document to PDF, make sure that you select the correct standard and/or compatibility option in the Export To PDF

The Perfect Complement to InDesign Magazine!

Tip

Before printing or exporting an InDesign document, look at the Edit > Transparency Blend Space menu and make sure the correct blend space is selected.

dialog box (Figure 9). PDF/X-4:2007 is the latest standard and Acrobat 8 (PDF 1.7) is the latest format (available only in CS3). PDF/X-4 supports transparency in addition to everything its predecessors support, such as spot color and color management. Acrobat 5 (PDF 1.4) and later also supports transparency. However, not every print shop has upgraded its equipment to these latest standards and formats, which is why we’re having this conversation in the first place. Ask your print shop for the preferred standard and format. And In the End Designing with transparency lets you create layouts that used to be difficult to implement, allowing you to save valuable time while being even more creative. Now that you know how transparency works and what’s necessary to use it in your workflow, give it a try. You’ll be happy you did.

MORDY GOLDING is the author of Real World Adobe Illustrator CS3 and SAMS Teach Yourself Adobe Creative Suite 3 All in One. You can find Mordy online at his blog or at www.mogo-media.com. RENÉE DUSTMAN is a freelance writer and graphic designer and the former editor in chief of Inside Adobe InDesign.

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Figure 9: The Standard and Compatibility options play a major role in how transparency is handled in your documents.

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INDESIGN CS3 EXTENSIBLE BY DESIGN ©

Adobe InDesign software provides third-party developers with unprecedented power, enabling them to create plug-ins that can be integrated seamlessly into the application. In fact, all of its type, color, printing, and other features are provided through plug-ins to this core application. Virtually every aspect of the program is a plug-in, giving third-party developers extraordinary freedom in customizing InDesign and adding functionality.

Auto Fit Plug-in Typefi AutoFit enables ‘soft-bottom’ text frames—frames that automatically expand or shrink to fit their content—and dynamic relationships between InDesign objects. With ‘soft-bottom’ text frames and AutoFit object relationships, designers can build complex dependencies and intelligence directly into their layouts.

Typefi provides automation solutions for advertising, marketing communications and publishing industries. We develop and distribute Typefi Publish, a suite of applications that automates composition, layout and pagination across the whole organization. We also provide world leading professional services in implementing and supporting a fully automated publishing and production process.

Read more about Typefi at: www.typefi.com

Adobe invites you to view the growing spectrum of plug-ins available to enhance and extend your InDesign experience at: http://store.adobe.com/products/plugins/indesign/main.html Adobe Systems Incorporated 345 Park Avenue San Jose, CA 95110-2704 USA www.adobe.com Adobe, the Adobe logo, and InDesign are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/or other countries. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. © 2007 Adobe Systems Incorporated. All rights reserved.

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InDepth: JDF

JDF: What Is It, and Why Should You Care? Could the Job Definition Format be your ticket to faster, higher quality output?

by Chuck Weger Unless you’re deeply involved in the prepress and printing industries, you might not have heard of JDF. In fact, if you search for JDF on the Internet, you’ll probably come across the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation first. Surprisingly, that’s not the topic of this article. Instead, I’ll be discussing the Job Definition Format, a prepress and printing industry standard. The JDF standard was created by a group called CIP4 (International Cooperation for Integration of Processes in Prepress, Press, and Postpress—get ready for an article loaded with acronyms). The CIP4 (formerly CIP3, and don’t ask why) group includes Heidelberg, Komori, Agfa, Xerox, Adobe, and a host of other vendor and printing companies. These organizations got together late in the 20th century to define a new standard that would combine shop floor automation ideas with front end (i.e., designeroriented) production information. According to Adobe, JDF is “an enabling technology to speed production, increase reliability, and enhance the quality and flexibility of printed output.” And who could argue against faster, higher quality output? Well, the reality is not quite that simple. Walking Five Miles Uphill in the Snow for Metadata Those of you old enough to remember the Real Graphic Arts Industry (before PostScript and the Mac changed everything) will recall Customer Service Reps

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(CSRs). A CSR typically spent hours on the phone with clients, making sure that the client really did want that job to print with five spot colors and a varnish, and that the trim and bleed specs were correct. The CSR then filled in a “job jacket” (a piece of paper or large envelope) with the production specs for the job. The job jacket accompanied the job around the plant, from CSR to prepress to printing to bindery (making a short stop in Poughkeepsie to take on additional coal). The full-time CSR is mostly gone now, but the requirement to get the job printed and bound correctly lives on. Of course, what the CSR was doing was defining metadata for the job. Fast forward to 2007, where everyone by now is familiar with the concept of metadata, or “data about data.” The prepress and printing specs for a job are not the data for the job; the job data consists (in this case) of the PDF file(s). The job specifications are metadata. This metadata can be communicated in a variety of ways: you could send a sheet of instructions along with the job, you could phone the specs in, you could go in person and talk to the printer, or (if you’re Vulcan) you could use a mind meld. But in the new world of JDF, you could send those job specs as JDF, bundled right alongside the PDF file. Then the job specs flow right into the printer’s manufacturing systems, without any data entry errors along the way.

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InDepth: JDF

You might be asking, “So what?” And you’d be right. Sending the job specs wrapped up in JDF doesn’t really buy you anything unless your printer can make use of it. That means the printer has to have relatively recent equipment, and has to be using the JDF capabilities of that equipment. It also probably doesn’t make sense if you’re doing a particular job once, because setting up the JDF information takes time. But if you frequently do the same type of job, and especially if you have several job types that you use a lot, using JDF might help you and your printer be more efficient. One advantage of JDF for printers is that the JDF standard is vendor-neutral, meaning that (in theory) well-formed JDF will work with various shop floor automation systems, RIPs, presses, and bindery equipment from many different manufacturers. Here on the design end, we have it a bit simpler since we only have one vendor (Adobe) to worry about, but in the print shop there could still be dozens of different manufacturers represented. The theory is that job specs can be taken directly from the JDF information and used to drive shop floor equipment, or to drive the printer’s MIS (Management Information System— had enough acronyms yet?).

says “Create JDF File Using Acrobat” (Figure 1). After InDesign finishes exporting the PDF, it launches Acrobat and brings up the JDF Job Definitions dialog box (Figure 2). Here, you can pick an existing job definition or create a new one. The more you can re-use existing definitions, the simpler your life will be. There are hundreds of options in this dialog box, and there aren’t enough electrons to show them all in this article. But here’s a brief tour. A JDF job definition contains references to the files to be printed, and instructions and information about those files for your printer. Figure 3 on the next page Figure 1: This screenshot shows the one stop you’ll make in InDesign when using JDF. The rest takes place post-PDF creation.

shows the create/edit JDF definition dialog. Here’s where the main job specs, such as job number, print run, etc. are recorded. On the left side are the sections and files in the job. (A section is a group of files with a common page size and paper specification.) The right side changes depending upon what’s selected on the left, just like the preference panes in many applications. For example, clicking on a section gives information about that section, including the media (paper, usually) on which the section will be printed (note that different sections can use different media types, so you could do a cover separately on card stock, for example). A further click on the “Media Manager” button takes you to a dialog box where you can choose from a list of media or create your own

JDF and InDesign: Just Friends So, how do you use JDF in InDesign? Actually, you don’t. All the metadata entry is handled after InDesign exports the PDF. It’s easy to set up: just go to File > Export, click Save and, in the Advanced section of the resulting dialog box, check the box at the bottom that

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Figure 2: The JDF Job Definitions dialog box looks simple at this stage, but there are a lot of choices to be made.

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InDepth: JDF

Figure 4: Create your own media specifications here.

specification (Figure 4). If you’re the kind of person who likes to browse through paper samples, you’ll love this dialog. Back in the main JDF definition dialog box, clicking on the Customer Info tab takes you to a section where you can tell your service provider who to contact for different aspects of the job. You can define the life story of each person involved in the job by clicking the Edit button, which takes you to Figure 3: In the General tab of this dialog box, you’ll see the main job specs. On the left side shows the sections and files in the job.

the Contact Information dialog. The coolest thing about this dialog is that it has a section entitled “Communication Channels.” This is apparently the Grown-up way of saying “phone number.” Once you have all the JDF information, you can submit the job along with the JDF metadata, then sit back and relax while automation takes over in the World of Tomorrow. Just the Beginning There’s lots more to discover in the various JDF dialogs, and much more to say about JDF itself. You can find out more than you ever wanted to know about JDF at the Adobe site and at the official JDF site run by CIP4. Of course, if you’re thinking of using JDF (and you must be if you’ve gotten this far in

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the article), the very first thing you should do is contact your printer or service provider, and discuss it with them. If you routinely print certain types of jobs, you might want to create several JDF files that match those job types and use them as templates. Whenever you can use a template in any situation, there’s the potential for reducing errors (since you don’t have to create all the JDF metadata from scratch). Bottom line: If your printer or service provider has JDF workflows in their shops, there may be some benefit (either temporal or economic) to your using it as well. It could help streamline your job submission, and it might (depending on what management system the printer uses) provide you with easier access to job status information. At the very least, you get to use new acronyms!

Chuck Weger is a consultant specializing in automated publishing workflows. Once upon a time in 1991 he came up with the concept of Preflight. That was too complicated, so now he just sits back and plays the noseflute.

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USER GROUP

Ten Steps for Building Your InDesign Expertise

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InTime: Sorting Text & Tables

InTime: Sorting Text and Tables The glitter and gloss of Oscar night masks the sweat and tears of designers who lay out all those Academy Award nominees’ and winners’ lists later that night. Unfortunately, InDesign and InCopy aren’t stars at sorting paragraph or tabular text. But fear not: This edition of InTime explains how your design can win the coveted Best Dressed List or Table award.

PARIAH S. Burke On February 24, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will announce the winners of the 80th Annual Academy Awards. Afterward, the lists and tables will fly: Nominees versus Winners, Best Dressed and Worst Dressed, Best and Worst Plastic Surgery, and on and on. Anyone covering the event in print may want to sort those lists and tables in different ways. While InDesign holds awards for Best Text Formatting and Best Table Support in a Page-Layout Application, neither InDesign nor InCopy are even nominated in the Best Achievement in Sorting Text and Tables category. If you need to sort text in a list or table, you won’t find help on the menu bars or panels of InDesign or InCopy. But there are three strategies you can use to build prize-winning lists.

In version CS3 it’s installed by default. In InDesign CS3, go to Window > Automation > Scripts to open the Script panel. In InCopy CS3 Scripts is on the Window menu itself. On the Script panel click the spinning arrow beside the Application folder to see its contents, then Samples, and finally JavaScript. Therein you’ll find SortParagraphs.jsx (Figure 1). There are also AppleScript and Visual Basic Script versions of

Simple Alphabetic Sorting of Paragraph Text Rated: G: The InDesign Magazine Article Rating Association has determined that this section is suitable for viewers of all ages. For basic alphabetical sorting of paragraph text—bulleted lists, numbered lists, or just plain paragraphs—InDesign and InCopy do offer a solution, but it’s hidden. Instead of a menu command, InDesign and InCopy ship with a script to sort paragraphs of text alphabetically. Figure 1: The SortParagraphs.jsx script in the InCopy CS3 Scripts panel, as you see here.

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InTime: Sorting Text & Tables Figure 3: The Sort Text dialog in Microsoft Word 2004 on Mac OS X.

SortParagraphs, but I prefer to stick with the JavaScript version because it’s cross-platform. InDesign and InCopy CS2 also come with the SortParagraphs.jsx, but it isn’t installed by default. Do a search for “SortParagraphs” on the product installation disks, or download them as part of a group of free InDesign and InCopy CS2 scripts on the Adobe site. Once you have the scripts, drop them into the Presets/Scripts folder under your InDesign CS2 and/or InCopy CS2 installation folders. To sort your list, simply highlight a selection of paragraphs and double-click SortParagraphs.jsx on the Scripts panel. The paragraphs will be reordered alphabetically based on the first few characters in each. The script also works on bulleted lists and numbered lists, but at the time of this writing there’s a bug when running the SortParagraphs.jsx script on a numbered list (Figure 2). In InDesign CS3, a numbered list automatically sets the properties of the first item to begin numbering at 1 (or A, I, etc.). When the script reorders the list, if the previously first item is not the first alphabetically, the SortParagraphs.jsx script does not remove the begin numbering at 1 flag. What you

wind up with is two number 1 items in the list—the item that was previously number 1 and the one that, alphabetically, is correctly number 1. You can manually fix the numbering, but my advice is to disable automatic paragraph numbering prior to running the SortParagraphs.jsx script, and then reenable it on the sorted list afterward. Better Sorting of Paragraph or Tabular Text Rated PG-13: This section may contain instructional language parents may find inappropriate for viewers under the age of 13. The free SortParagraphs.jsx script is very simple: It re-orders paragraph text alphabetically in ascending (A–Z) order based on the first few glyphs in each paragraph. It can’t sort by descending (Z–A) order, nor can it sort table rows in any order. It’s also little help when you’re trying to sort a list of dates, such as a list of celebrities ordered by their rehab entry dates or lengths of stay. That’s why InDesign and InCopy always lose out to Microsoft Word for the Academy’s Best Achievement in Sorting Text and Tables Oscar. You can begin a list in Word and then import the .DOC or .RTF file into InDesign or InCopy, but if you already have the text in InDesign, go for the copy and paste method. After copying formatted Figure 2: A flaw in the SortParagraphs.jsx can leave a sorted numbered list with two number 1 items.

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and/or styled text from InDesign, pasting it into Word preserves the local formatting and any paragraph and character styles. The style appearances may change in Word, but text is still tagged with, or linked to, the same style names and will re-adopt the formatting of those styles when returned to InDesign or InCopy. Tables created in InDesign or InCopy will paste into Word as tables, but tables copied from Word and pasted in InDesign or InCopy will land as tabdelimited text. You must take the extra steps of converting the text back to a table (Table > Convert Text to Table) in InDesign or InCopy, and then reapplying any table or cell styles. Once in Word, highlight the text you need sorted and then choose Sort from the Table menu (depending on your version of Word, the Sort command may be in a different location, but it’s in there). Note: Even if you aren’t working with a table, you still want the Sort command from the Table menu. The Sort Text dialog appears (Figure 3) and automatically chooses to sort by Paragraphs. Now you have three choices for the type of content, which changes what rules Word uses to sort

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InTime: Sorting Text & Tables

the highlighted text. Your options are Text, for most standard copy; Number; and Date, which recognizes most common date formats and sorts first by year, then by month, then day. Finally, choose whether to sort in Ascending or Descending order. If your selected text includes the header row or list title that should not be included in the sort, choose the Header Row radio button at the bottom of the dialog; otherwise, leave the default No Header Row selected. Click OK and your text sorts as specified. Now just copy and paste back into InDesign or InCopy. That method assumes you want to sort the list based on whatever appears at the beginning of each line. What if the sort key isn’t the first word in the line? That’s where Word gives its real Oscarwinning performance. Let’s say you received a list of all the Academy Award nominees and winner for the Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role category (Figure 4). Doing a simple sort in Word or using InDesign’s SortParagraphs.jsx script will order the list by first name, which is just plain unacceptable behavior. (Unless your last name is Spears, you know to avoid unacceptable behavior in public or print.) There are five distinct pieces of information in each line—whether the actress won, her first name, last name, the film in which she appeared, and the studio that released the film. Here’s how to sort it: 1. The first task is to semi-automatically separate the names from the rest of the information in the line. Get the text in Word and go to Edit > Replace (SHIFT+CMD+H/SHIFT+CTRL+H). In the Find and Replace dialog box that appears, enter in (that’s

Figure 4: A list of the winner and nominees in the 2006 Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role Academy award category.

Figure 5: Word’s Find and Replace dialog (in Word XP on Windows) ready to separate the names in the list from the film and studio information.

“in” with a space before and after) in the Find What field, and ^tin (“in” with a space after but not before) in the Replace With field. The ^t is Word’s code for a tab (Figure 5). Click Replace All and Word replaces the space after each actress’s last name with a tab while leaving all other text as is. 2. With each name now separated from the film and studio information by a tab, highlight the entire list

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again and choose the Table > Convert > Text to Table command. Choose tabs as the delimiter, and Word creates a two-column table from your tabdelimited text (Figure 6, next page). 3. Position the cursor at the top of the first column. When your cursor is in the correct position it changes from an I-beam to a down-pointing black arrow. Now you can click to select just that column.

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4. Return to the Find and Replace dialog and tell Word to replace a space with a tab and the Find What Text (^t^&). Because you invoked Find and Replace with text highlighted, Word affects only that highlighted column. Word will ask you if you want to check the remainder of the document: Decline. The result is a first column with tabseparated first and last names. (Watch out for middle names, initials, and suffixes, such as Jr. or III; you don’t want tabs in those). To see arrows indicating the placement of tabs (Figure 7), show invisible characters, known as formatting marks on the View tab of Word’s Options in Windows and nonprinting characters on the View tab of Word’s Preferences on the Mac. 5. To sort the rows by last name, select the entire table, then choose the Table to Text command from the Table > Convert menu. Word prompts you for the column separator to use: Leave it at the default Tab option so that Word transforms the two-column tabular text to three-column tab delimited text. 6. Highlight the tab-delimited text again and convert it back to a table, which now has three columns (Figure 8). 7. Select the table and choose the Sort command from the Table menu to open the Sort Text dialog. Change it to sort on the last names in Column B (by Text, Ascending), and set the second row of sort options to sort by first name, Column A (by Text, Ascending). That way, if the list has two identical last names in Column B, Word uses the first name

Figure 6: The list is now a two-column table.

Figure 7: First and last names are now separated by tabs.

Figure 8: The three-column table properly separates first and last names as well as the non-sort text.

in Column A to determine which should be listed first. Click OK and Word sorts the list by last name. 8. Lastly, convert the table back into tab delimited

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text, and then invoke Find and Replace to replace tabs (^t) with space; this will strip out all the tabs, rejoining the first and last names and the names

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Figure 9: A now properly sorted list of Best Actress nominees, ready to go.

and the rest of the list information (Figure 9). The sorted list is now ready to copy and paste back into InDesign or InCopy. 9. To use an actual table instead of tabbed text, simply omit the last step of converting the table back to text. 10. To achieve more advanced sorting, or to filter robust tabular data to specific bits of information, means following Billy Bob Thornton’s example and straying a bit off the beaten path.

Excel as frightening as asking Sweeney Todd for a shave, fear not; I’ll walk you right past Fleet Street without stopping. First, prepare your data as a table or tab-delimited text. If you’re accessing the information from a database, export it to an Excel .XLS spreadsheet file or to tab delimited text .TAB or .TXT files. If you have paragraph text, use InDesign’s or InCopy’s Find/Change or Word’s Find and Replace as I did above to convert any connective text into tabs. No need to convert the text into tables; tab delimited is fine.

Ultimate Control Over Sorting Tabular Text Unrated (Director’s Cut): This section is not rated by the IMARA and may be disturbing to younger viewers. If your list or table needs are more complex, if you need to cull multiple lists or tables from a single set of data and order, separate, and use them in different ways—let’s say, to produce lists of nominees and winners in each Academy Awards category from the complete list of all categories, nominees, and winners—you simply couldn’t do it with the features available in Word’s Sort Text dialog. The path to ultimate control over sorting and filtering text lies within Microsoft Excel. If you find the idea of using

Figure 10: Raw tab delimited data pasted in Excel automatically fills columns and rows (header row emboldened for easy reference).

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Copy the text and paste it into a new Excel spreadsheet. (Don’t highlight any cells, just click in the top-left, A1, cell of the spreadsheet and paste.) The text automatically converts to tabular data, with tabs becoming column breaks and returns transforming into row breaks (Figure 10). To get what you see in this figure, I took the extra step of adding the column headings as the first tabdelimited line of my pasted text, something I highly recommend you also do. To resize the columns to fit the data they contain, double-click on the narrow space between columns, or click in the top left corner between the A column header and 1 row header to select the entire spreadsheet, and then choose Format > Column > AutoFit Selection, which will resize all columns to the width of their widest cells. You can sort data by any one, two, or three columns. Choose Sort from the Data menu to bring up the Sort dialog

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(Figure 11). As you can see, the options are very similar to those in Microsoft Word. Choose the first column to sort by, then the second, and the third, and whether each should be ascending or descending order. If your spreadsheet has a header row, activate that option at the bottom of the Sort dialog and the Sort By dropdown fields will list the actual column labels rather than Column A and so on. To sort the list Figure 11 (below): The Excel 2004 Sort dialog on Mac OS X.

Figure 12 (above): With AutoFilter enabled, it becomes a snap to limit the display to only desired information.

by award category and nominee name within each category, but always sorting the winner to the top of the category, replicate my settings of sorting first on Category, then Status, and finally Nominee. Be sure to set Status to Descending (thus placing “Winner” ahead of the poor “Nominee”) while setting the other two to sort by Ascending order. In Excel, you can also filter or limit the list by any column. Let’s say that you want to include a list of categories and nominees in which one studio’s films won or were nominated—Warner Bros., for instance. Try this: 1. Select the entire spreadsheet again by clicking the corner at the intersection of the horizontal and vertical labels.

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2. Choose Data > Filter > AutoFilter, which is a toggle command; to turn it off select Data > Filter > AutoFilter again. AutoFilter changes the cells in your header row from simple text to dynamic dropdown menus (Figure 12). Click the down arrow in any Excel column header to see a list populated by all the values appearing within that column. Clicking any value—“Warner Bros.” from the Studio column in this case—filters the list to show only rows wherein the value of the Studio column is “Warner Bros.” You can also choose “(All)” from the same column header to unfilter the list and show all rows again, “(Top 10…)” to find the top or bottom ten number or date results—it does nothing for a text list like this) or “(Custom…)” to define a custom formula that matches rows. With the list now filtered to show only Warner Bros.

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movies that made it at least to the nominees list, set your sort criteria—maybe Status (descending), Film (ascending), and Category (ascending) to sort winners to the top—then group results by film and award category. When your list is exactly as you need it, click and drag across the displayed rows or columns and copy with CMD+C/CTRL+C. The list is now ready to paste into InDesign or InCopy as tab delimited text, or even as a table into Word for further sorting and text replacement. 3. Continue using autofilters and different sort options to cull all the needed lists or tables from the full data set. You can see in Figure 13 on the next page how easily I plucked the awards and nominations won by “The Departed” just by selecting that title in the Film column’s filter menu. Although InDesign and InCopy are young, nimble,

and sexy, they aren’t the perfect fit for every role that comes up. Sometimes what you really need is a seasoned character actor like Word or Excel to play a pivotal supporting role in making the list or table truly resonate with the audience. For list and table management, I give them two thumbs up. Back to you, Joan and Melissa.

Pariah S. Burke is a design and publishing workflow expert bringing creative efficiency into studios, agencies, and publications around the world as principal of workflow:Creative. He is the author of Mastering InDesign CS3 for Print Design and Production (Sybex, 2007); the former technical lead for InDesign, InCopy, Illustrator, and Acrobat to Adobe’s technical support team; a freelance graphic designer; and the publisher of the Web sites Quark VS InDesign. com and Designorati. When not traveling, Pariah lives in Portland, Oregon, where he writes (a lot) and creates (many) publications and projects to empower creative professionals.

Corrections Sometimes in the fast paced world of writing about software for magazines a mistake (or two) slips through. Last month it was my turn to err. In last month’s InTime I wrote that the hyphenation zone was the “desired vertical distance between hyphens.” That’s incorrect. It’s actually the desired amount of white space at the end of an unjustified line of text before hyphenation begins. The lower the hyphenation zone setting, the smaller the ragged edge white space but the more likely hyphenation will occur. I also incorrectly stated that, despite directives to the contrary, InDesign will hyphenate a word if the column is too narrow to fit the single word. I goofed. InDesign used to do it that way, but now will in fact overset the text— the too-wide word as well as everything after it.

Figure 13: Martin Scorsese’s “The Departed” captured these Oscars and nominations at the 79th Annual Academy Awards last year.

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InQuestion: Sandee Cohen

Spot Colors vs. CMYK, Stashing Panels, Spot Colors Listed as CMYK? Jumping Frames, Q Finding the Reflect Tool By Sandee Cohen

InQuestion is a regular column devoted to answering subscribers’ questions about working with InDesign.

Figure 1: The two icons next to a spot color display different information. The rectangle with the circle in it indicates that the color is a spot color and will separate on its own plate. The CMYK icon next to it simply indicates that CMYK colors were used to define the spot color. It doesn’t mean that the color will separate onto the process plates.

I have a spot color in my InDesign document, but the Swatches panel shows it as CMYK. I know it’s a spot color as it is listed in the Separations panel correctly. But why is there a CMYK icon next to the name? ­—Confused by the Process

A

In this case there’s nothing wrong with the spot color; you’re confusing the color mode (which is correctly defined as spot) with the preview display (which is defined as CMYK). The CMYK icon is there to let you know what color mode is being used to display the color in the document. As you know, spot colors don’t separate onto the process (CMYK) color plates—they separate onto their own spot color plate. But there has to be some way to display the color on screen. The CMYK preview icon simply says that the color is displayed using process colors. The preview icon also indicates that if the spot color is converted to process, then the

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CMYK preview colors will be used for that conversion (Figure 1).

Stashing Panels (Palettes)

Q

I just started getting InDesign Magazine, and I keep hoping you’ll tell me how to stash my palettes in CS3. I want to move my palettes to my other monitor and have it dock to the right side of that screen, as I did in CS2. —Michele Lindhout

A

Yes, there have been some changes in the onscreen elements in InDesign. First, Adobe changed the name from palettes to panels. One of the Adobe guys told me the logic behind the name change, but about halfway into the description my head began to hurt and I had to lie down. Suffice it to say that InDesign and Illustrator call the onscreen elements panels, and Photoshop calls them palettes. This causes authors and trainers much confusion, especially when we have to switch from one application to another. Next, you can stash (the official term is dock) the small panels to the left or right of your primary monitor: the one that holds your menus. The

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exception is the Control panel, which can only be docked to the top or bottom of the primary monitor. You can drag any of your panels to a secondary monitor, but they won’t snap to the sides of that monitor screen. We’ll have to wait for a future version of InDesign for that feature. Instead, you can lay the panels out as one huge panel quilt.

Your email:

Options for Text in a Button

Q

I’ve just started working with the interactive buttons in InDesign document for export to PDF files. I know you can double-click a button with the Selection tool to open the Button Options dialog box. But if I have text in the button, all that does is switch to the Type tool and place an insertion point in the button. Is there some way to get to the button options without having to go to the menu? —Buttoned Up

A

Simple: Hold the Option/Alt key as you double click. Instead of the insertion point, you’ll get to the Button Options. You can use the same technique on ordinary text frames. Instead of the insertion point, you’ll get the Text Frame Options.

Faking a Bold?

Q

I know there is a Skew (false italic) setting for text that doesn’t come in an italic style. Can I do something similar to make a font bold? —Pamela Hostman

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InQuestion: Sandee Cohen

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I’ll tell you how to do it, but we have to be careful. The typography police are always on the lookout for fake bold or fake italic text. And I don’t want to get arrested for bolding without a license. You can appply a stroke to make text appear bolder than the surrounding characters. Simply select the text and use the Stroke panel to apply a very small (maybe .25 point) stroke to the text. I don’t recommend it as a general practice, but it does work (Figure 2).

Figure 2: The bold text for this 12-point Herculanum type was created with a .25-point stroke. The italic was created with a 15-degree skew (false italic). The typography police chose not to arrest me for these examples.

There’s something wrong with my copy of InDesign. Every time I move a frame or draw a new frame, the frames jump from one place to another. Nothing moves smoothly. What’s wrong? —Jumping Jack Flash

Figure 3: The buttons in the Control panel let you Flip Horizontal (center) or Flip Vertical (right). Notice how the preview letter P changes according to the transformation applied.

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How do you flip items vertically or horizontally? Illustrator has a terrific Reflect tool, but I don’t see it in InDesign. —Illustrator Babe

A

Q

A

Q

There’s no Reflect tool in InDesign, but there are two handy reflect buttons in the Control panel. Select an object and click Reflect Horizontal or Reflect Vertical to flip the item as desired (Figure 3). The preview indicator shows you how the item has been transformed. Unlike Illustrator, which doesn’t let you easily restore an object back to its original orientation, InDesign remembers the transformations and lets you click to undo the changes.

Jumping Frames

It sounds like you have the setting for Snap to Document Grid (under View > Grids and Guides) turned on. So, even though you don’t see the Document Grid, your frames are snapping to the invisible grid. But the bigger question is why the setting for Snap to Document Grid is on in the first place. The default keyboard shortcut for Snap to Document Grid is Cmd/Ctrl-Shift- ‘ (apostrophe). You might have tried to type a quote and inadvertently turned on the Snap to Document Grid.

Where’s the Reflect Tool?

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Sandee Cohen is the only third-party author to have written educational materials for all versions of InDesign. Her latest books are the InDesign CS3 Visual QuickStart Guide and Real World Creative Suite 2.

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InBooks: Instant InDesign

Instant InDesign With templates, you can set up InDesign to do a lot of the work. Here’s how to finalize a template.

by gabriel Powell When you start a document based on a template, the new document is an exact duplicate of that template. Everything, including any problems and inconsistencies, are carried over to each new document based on the template. Therefore, it’s critical that you clean up your template and specify its various default settings before using it in a live production workflow. No matter how careful you are when constructing a template, you will always make a few unintentional mistakes during the process. This important step ensures that your template is shipshape, efficient, and easy to use. Each time you use the template to create a new document, you’ll be able to start working immediately without having to sort anything out first, such as deleting unnecessary objects, fixing font problems, or looking for missing links. Cleaning Up the Template Your ultimate goal in this step is to get rid of unnecessary elements and prevent printing problems from occurring. Here are some common gotchas to look for. At least some or all of them will apply to your template, depending on its level of complexity. This Excerpted from Instant InDesign: Designing Templates for Fast and Efficient Page Layout by Gabriel Powell. Copyright © 2008. Used with permission of Pearson Education, Inc. and Adobe Press.

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process should be quick and painless if you paid close attention to accuracy and detail while constructing your template: Eliminate sample layout elements. Any sample elements left over from the mock-up layout should be removed unless they serve a specific purpose. Basically, if a designer has to delete an element before he or she can begin using your template, it’s creating unnecessary work and should be deleted. However, there is an exception. If a frame is holding useful placeholder text, it may be better to keep it on the page. In most cases, though, it’s faster to apply paragraph and character styles than it is to select and replace text. Delete extra pages. If there are extra pages in the document, get rid of them. Keep only the pages or spreads that are necessary for starting a new document. For example, a brochure template will begin with two pages—one for each side. Also, remove any superfluous master pages that won’t ever be used. Clean up the pasteboard. Remove objects from the pasteboard unless they have been strategically placed to be used during production. Even if you think an object has good reason for being there, consider adding it to an object library instead.

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InBooks: Instant InDesign Figure 1: The Find Font dialog lists all the fonts in use. To the right of each item is an icon that displays the type of font it is or its current condition. If a font is missing, a yellow caution symbol is displayed.

Figure 2: All files placed in a document are listed in the Links panel. If a graphic has been modified, is missing, or is embedded, an icon will appear on the right side of the link to display its status.

Remove excessive style sheets. It’s easy to create more style sheets than you actually need. Try to minimize the number of style sheets in your template by creating them for just the elements that frequently repeat throughout the design. If a style sheet will hardly ever be used, consider deleting it. With a smaller list of style sheets to choose from, your template will be easier to use and you’ll be far more productive. Clear overrides from default style sheets. While building your template, you might have unintentionally overridden the default paragraph style or default graphics frame style by changing a setting while nothing was selected. For instance, after changing the type size and selecting a new font, you realize that you forgot to select some text first. Since nothing was selected when you changed the formatting, you inadvertently overrode the default paragraph style. From now on, that formatting will be initially applied to all new text that you type. It can be quite an inconvenience to those using your template if you save it without clearing the overrides. If a style sheet has been overridden, it will display a plus sign (+) next to its name. To clear the overrides, hold Alt/Option as you click the style. Note: If you plan on creating a style guide, be sure to save a copy of the template with all of its sample elements intact, so you can use them to make the guide.

Check font usage. Look for missing fonts or any extra fonts in use that shouldn’t be. An easy way to do this is to use the Find Font command by choosing Type > Find Font. If a font is used anywhere in the template, in­cluding master pages and the pasteboard, it will be listed (Figure 1). If an extra font is being used, select it in the list and click Find First to locate it. Once located, choose Done to close the dialog, and then apply the correct font or delete the text that uses the font to fix the issue. Most likely you accidentally created an extra text frame on the page or somewhere on the pasteboard that is using the unwanted font. If there is a missing font, install it or replace the text using the font with the appropriate one. Continue this procedure until all the font problems are found and resolved. Remove extra layers. Look for any unnecessary layers you might have created and delete them.

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Clean up the list of swatches. Make sure every swatch has been given a useful name based on its function in the template. Also, if a swatch exists within the Swatches panel that will rarely if ever be used, delete it. Most likely you’ll want to delete cyan, magenta, yellow, red, green, and blue. They are InDesign’s default swatches and probably don’t serve a purpose in your template. It’s easy to accumulate a lot of swatches, but try to keep the list as small as possible. This makes it easier for designers to find a specific color when they need it. At times, they might have to create a new one, but that is far easier than scrolling through an endless list of swatches. Also, if any spot colors exist within the template, convert them to process colors unless you are actually planning to print with them. Check the links. Check the list of imported graphics in the Links panel to make sure there are no missing or modified links (Figure 2). If a linked file is missing,

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InBooks: Instant InDesign Note: You can use InDesign’s preflight utility to check for issues with both fonts and linked graphics at the same time by choosing File > Preflight.

you won’t be able to print successfully, because the original file was moved to a different location after you imported it. To fix the connection, select the link, choose Relink from the Links panel menu, and then locate the file. If a linked file shows that it has been modified, the version of the file on disk is more recent than the version in your document. Select the link and choose Update Link from the Links panel menu to fix it. You might choose to embed some graphics, such as a company logo, into the template document to break their connection to the original file. InDesign will no longer try to manage them. Keep in mind that whenever you embed a file, the size of your template file also increases. So, try to keep the number of embedded graphics to a minimum. Check the resolution of imported images. When you resize raster im­ages, you also change their resolution. If the resolution becomes to low for your intended output device, the image will lose detail and appear jagged on the printed page. If your template contains any images, such as background art and logos, it’s important to check their resolution. You can do this by opening the Info panel and selecting an image (Figure 3). The image’s resolution is displayed as both actual pixels per inch

Figure 3:The results of a scaled image are shown in the Info panel. As you scale down an image, its resolution increases. As you scale up an image, its resolution decreases.

(the resolution of the native image file) and effective pixels per inch (the resolution of the image after it has been resized). Look for potential transparency problems. If your template uses any transparent effects, such as drop shadows and gradient feathers, use the Flattener Preview panel to locate and preview which areas of the document will be flattened when printing the file (Figure 4). Fix any issues you run into to prevent them from reoccurring in every new document based on the template. A common problem occurs when type is too close to transparent ob­jects, because it might interact with the objects in unexpected ways. For example, a single character may be converted to an outline, resulting in

a thicker stroke width, while the other characters in the same line of text print normally. To overcome this, move the text frame to the top of the stacking order or relocate it to a higher layer in the Layers panel, as long as the design permits. Also, if your template contains spot color objects that use a blending mode, be prepared for unexpected results and avoid the following blending modes: Difference, Exclusion, Hue, Saturation, Color, and Luminosity. For a complete reference and troubleshooting guide on how transparency affects output, see the documents “Achieving Reliable Print Output with Transparency” and “A Designer’s Guide to Transparency for Print Output” on the Adobe Web site.

Figure 4: Using the Flattener Preview panel to discover any possible rasterized regions (A). The Gradient Feather effect was used to fade the bottom of this frame into the headline below it (B). Since the headline is behind the transparent object in the stacking order, the type will be rasterized wherever the top frame overlaps it (C).

Note: It’s possible to override the default character style if one has been specified. However, it’s not possible to override the default text frame style or table style.

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InBooks: Instant InDesign Figure 5: This template page contains several placeholder frames. If the frame edges were not visible, it would be difficult to see that the placeholder text frames for the headline and body text don’t adhere to the five-column grid.

Specifying the Default Settings Default settings determine the initial behavior of a document and the objects it contains. You can specify default settings at the application level, docu­ment level, or object level. If you change a setting when no documents are open, your changes are applied at the application level, which means that all new documents will use those default settings. If you change a setting when a document is open, your changes affect that document only. If you change object-level settings when no objects are selected, your changes specify the defaults for all new objects you create within that document. Keep in mind that if the default settings at the application level are different from those at the document level, the document’s settings will always override the application’s settings when the document is open. So, when designers start a new document based on your template, they will automatically be using the default settings you’ve defined instead of their own. By specifying the defaults in your template, you’re enforcing standards, ensuring consistency, and setting other designers up for increased productivity. To specify the default settings for your template, deselect all the objects on the page by choosing Tip: Choose View > Overprint Preview to get a better idea of how spot inks that overprint or interact with transparent objects will appear in the final printed document. Just make sure to turn Overprint Preview off when you’re done using it.

Edit > Deselect All, and then change InDesign’s various settings found in the menus, dialogs, and panels. Here’s a list of suggested settings to specify as defaults in your templates. They are all optional and should be set up as necessary: Show frame edges. Viewing the frame edges on a page can be as irritating as it is useful. With templates, it’s especially helpful to see them, because you can clearly see where the placeholder text and graphics frames sit on the page (Figure 5). When other designers use your template, they’ll find it much easier to select and modify the various elements as they produce a document. Show guides and grids. From the moment you start a new document based on a template, you want to see the layout grid so you know immediately where to start placing the various elements onto the page. Choose View > Grids & Guides > Show Guides if they aren’t already visible. If your tem­plate uses the baseline grid or document grid, make them visible as well. Choose View > Grids & Guides, and then choose Show Baseline Grid or Show Document Grid as necessary. Ruler guide color. You can change the default ruler guide color so that each new guide you create uses that color. This can be useful to keep the guides you create separate from those already coming from a master page. With no ruler guides selected, choose Layout > Ruler Guides, and then select a color from the Color menu.

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Unlock guides. It’s best not to lock all the guides in your template. When they are locked, you won’t be able to select or move any guides on the page, which is especially frustrating when you try to modify the location of a guide you’ve just created and can’t. If the guides are currently locked, choose View > Grids & Guides > Lock Guides to disable the option. If you need to lock a few guides, place them on a separate layer and lock just that layer. Lock column guides. Make sure the column guides are locked to prevent them from being accidentally

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relocated. Choose View > Grids & Guides > Lock Column Guides to enable the option. Show hidden characters. If the nonprinting characters such as spaces, tabs, forced line breaks, and paragraph returns are currently hidden, you might choose to make them visible. They are especially useful when applying paragraph styles, because you can see where each paragraph begins and ends. When applying paragraph styles that contain nested styles, viewing the nonprinting characters also makes it easy to ensure the correct char­acter is being used to end each nested style (Figure 6). Choose Type > Show Hidden Characters to view the nonprinting characters. Show text threads. If your template will be used to create documents that contain many linked text frames, you might find it useful to make the Figure 6: When the nonprinting characters are hidden (A), it can difficult to spot potential problems, such as extra paragraph returns and spaces. With the nonprinting characters visible, you can easily see that the last paragraph in this list needs a tab after the bullet character instead of two spaces to make the nested style work (B).

threads visible. This makes it easier to identify which frames are part of a story and is especially useful for newspaper and magazine templates (Figure 7). Choose View > Show Text Threads to make the threads visible. When you select a text frame, a visual thread indicates the frames it is linked to; other­wise, nothing is displayed when no text frames are selected.

Figure 7: By making the text threads visible, you can easily track a story when it jumps from one page to another in a document.

Normal view mode. Make sure your template is in Normal view mode; otherwise, you won’t be able to see the frame edges, layout grid, nonprint­ing characters, text threads, or objects on the pasteboard. Choose View > Screen Mode > Normal or use the Normal Mode button at the bottom of the toolbox. Enable or Disable Layout Adjustment. You might have used the layout adjustment feature while building your template, so it’s likely still enabled. Decide whether or not you want to keep it enabled by default, choose Layout > Layout Adjustment, and then enable or disable the feature as needed. Keeping Layout Adjustment enabled can result in unexpected modifications to a layout, such as when a new master page is applied. However, if well planned, this feature can be a powerful production tool. If you decide to keep it enabled, make sure you communicate that to other designers who will be using your template so they are aware that it’s enabled. Layers panel settings. Double-check the Layers panel to make sure the layers are locked or unlocked

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InBooks: Instant InDesign

and visible or not as required by your tem­plate. Also, if there are multiple layers, select the layer that you want to designate as the default layer. Default master pages. If your template contains multiple master pages, apply the primarily used master page(s) to each document page as needed. You will then be set up with the correct layout grid and placeholder frames the moment you start a new document. Also, override any elements you need immediate access to so you don’t have to repeat the override process each time you start a new document. Default style sheets. By setting specific paragraph styles, object styles, and table styles as defaults in your template, you can control the formatting that is initially applied to text, objects, and tables as you create them. With paragraph styles, you can either edit the [Basic Paragraph] style or specify a new default style. To edit the [Basic Paragraph] style, double-click it and modify its formatting options as needed. To specify a new default style, deselect everything on the page and then click a style other than [Basic Paragraph]. You can also specify a default character style, but it’s

Note: The [Basic Graphics Frame] style is only applied to paths and unassigned frames. There is no default object style applied to frames created with the Rectangle Frame Tool, which are often referred to as graphics frames.

best not to, because it will be applied to all the text you type or import and conflict with the formatting already applied by the paragraph style. So, make sure that [None] is selected in the Character Styles panel. There are two default object styles: [Basic Graphics Frame] and [Basic Text Frame] (Figure 8). You can either edit the current default object styles or reassign new defaults. To edit them, double-click each style and modify their formatting options as necessary. To reassign the default style for text frames, choose Default Text Frame Style from the Object Styles panel menu, and then select an object style. To reassign the default style for unassigned frames, choose Default Graphic Frame Style from the Object Styles panel menu, and then select an object style. To specify a default cell style, you have to make it part of the default table style’s definition. You can’t just select a cell style when no table is selected. Even if you do, the cell style won’t be initially applied to the tables you create. Document window size, page number, and magnification level. Each time you start a new document based on your template, the size of the document window, last page you were on, and level of magnification will be the same as when you last saved the template. So, if you are on page 3, zoomed in on a particular object, and the document window is quite small when you save the template, each new document you create based on it will start the same way. To make your template more straightforward, adjust the document window to an optimal size,

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Figure 8: The default object styles can be identified by the icon to the right of their name. The Text Frame icon marks the default style for text frames. The Graphics Frame icon marks the default style for unassigned frames.

activate the first page, and then fit the page or spread into the window. To resize the document window, drag the size box at the bottom right of the window. To activate a page, double-click its icon in the Pages panel. To fit either the page or spread into the document window, choose View > Fit Page in Window or View > Fit Spread in Window. Measurement system. If your template has been created for a specific team of designers, and you know what measurement system they prefer to use, specify that measurement system. If you’re not sure which measurement system to use, choose the system that is most appropriate for the major­ity of designers who will be using the template. Right-click/ Control-click a ruler and choose the desired system from the context menu. By right-clicking/Controlclicking at the intersection of the horizontal and vertical rulers, you can change the system for both rulers at the same time. Testing Your Template When everything is finalized, you can save your template into the template file format and put it to the test. Think of this step as the final quality inspection of your page production machine. You want to make

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InBooks: Instant InDesign

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sure all of its parts are functioning properly and ready to go. Thorough testing ensures that prob­lems are addressed ahead of time, preventing costly mistakes later on. It also helps you discover better ways to streamline production tasks, making your template even more efficient. To test your template, simply walk through a live production scenario. Start a new document based on your template and create a sample layout. As you work, you’ll naturally run into elements that need to be fixed or improved. Here are some testing principles that will guide you through the process:

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Use goal-oriented tasks. It’s important to produce actual pages while testing your template to fully optimize it for the publications it’s going to create. This helps you determine how much time it takes to complete a series of tasks and provides you with the information you need to come up with better solutions.

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Use representative content. Whenever possible, use text and graphics from an actual project to test your template. Include a complete range of possible Tip: Keep the original template file open as you build and test a sample layout. When changes need to be made, you can quickly switch to the original template, make the necessary changes, and then go back to testing the sample file.

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InBooks: Instant InDesign

variations in image size, image resolution, and text length. This gives you a real production experience and ensures that your template will function as anticipated.

that your template reproduces the design as intended. It’s not uncommon, for example, to apply a paragraph style, only to find that it applies the wrong formatting.

Test for speed. As you walk through a production scenario, continually look for areas of performance improvement. Does your template require too many steps to produce a layout? Can one or two steps be eliminated or automated somehow? Can the template be organized more efficiently? In many cases, you can substantially increase productivity by combining various InDesign features to produce pages in fewer steps. For example, you can set up nested styles to apply paragraph and character styles in just one click. You can also set up an object style to apply a para­graph style at the same time you apply the object style. If that paragraph style contains a nested style, you are combining even more steps into one automated solution.

Test for ease-of-use. Your template’s success also depends on its level of organization and userfriendliness. Unclear naming conventions, overlap­ ping frames, and excessive color swatches, paragraph styles and master pages all make for an unwieldy template that is difficult to use. Consequently, this contributes to a counterproductive template.

Test for accuracy. While testing for speed, it’s a good idea to test for ac­curacy as well. This ensures

Consider your initial goals. Continually ask yourself if the template meets your initial goals or not. This keeps you heading in the right direction, ensur­ing that your final template is fully optimized for its intended purpose. Look for conflicting InDesign features. While testing, you might discover that using one particular feature is preventing you from using another feature. If so, you may be forced to make a compromise. Refer back to your initial objectives and create the most

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Note: Some duplicate fields are found in different sections of the File Info dialog. If you enter information into one field, that information will automatically be copied into each duplicate field.

optimal solution that considers all aspects of your project. Don’t be surprised if you find yourself continually updating a template as you test it. No template is ever complete on your first attempt. There are always at least a few small details that are overlooked. Template design is a process where you design, test, and evaluate new possibilities. This process may need to be repeated until your template is ready for implementation.

Excerpted from Instant InDesign: Designing Templates for Fast and Efficient Page Layout by Gabriel Powell.

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InReview: Layer and Layout Tools

By John Cruise LAYER GROUPS 1.0 AND LAYER COMPS 1.0 DTP Tools www.dtptools.com $40/plug-in, and $70 for the Layer Tools bundle that includes both. Mac and Windows; CS, CS2, and CS3 Rating:

InDesign plug-ins usually fall into one of two general categories. They’re either revolutionary and indispensable for many users; or they’re evolutionary and useful for some users. Layer Groups and Layer Comps, a pair of new plug-ins from DTP Tools, fall into the second category. These plug-ins add several handy layer-related features to InDesign CS, CS2, and CS3, but they don’t have the clout or pizzazz of other plug-ins from DTP Tools—specifically, Cross References and Page Control, which lets you create layouts with different page sizes. Still, Layer Groups and Layer Comps—especially when used together—are particularly helpful for InDesign users who create complex, multilayered layouts.

paragraph, table, cell, and object styles in InDesign CS3. (The ability to create layer groups is also available in Photoshop.) For example, if you create multilingual documents using overlapping text frames (one text frame for each language), you could create a separate layer for each language, and then create a layer group that contains all the languages. Similarly, if multiple reviewers added annotations to an InDesign layout, you could assign a layer to each reviewer, and then create a layer group that contained all the annotation layers (Figure 1).

Layer Groups Layer Groups does what its name suggests. It lets you create groups of layers in much the same way you can create groups of character,

Ratings Key

Not worth it even if it’s free

Not recommended

Average

Exceptionally good A must-have

Figure 1: The Layer Groups panel includes two layer groups (Annotations and Languages) and three layers that aren’t part of a group (Artwork, Guides, and Background). The Layer Comps panel shows four custom layer comps. In the example to the right, I’ve selected the layer comp named “English Text Version”. The Layer Groups panel shows the state of the layers for the selected layer comp.

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InReview: Layer and Layout Tools Figure 3: When you create a layer group, you can specify options for all of the layers in the group.

The Layer Groups panel (Window > Layer Groups) is almost identical to InDesign’s Layers panel (Figure 2). The only major differences are the New Group and Delete Unused Groups commands in the Layer Groups’ panel menu and the New Group button at the bottom of the panel. Each time you create a new group, you’re Figure 2: The Layer Groups panel (immediately below) and its accompanying menu are similar to InDesign’s Layers panel (bottom).

asked to name it. Each new group is listed in the panel, and you can drag the individual layers you want to include into the group. (A folder icon distinguishes layer groups from individual layers.) Clicking the small triangle to the left of a layer group name alternately shows and hides the names of the layers in the group. Like the Layers panel, you can rearrange the layer and group names in the Layer Groups panel—and the overall stacking order in the layout—by clicking and dragging layers and groups up or down, and you can drag layers into and out of groups. Once you’ve created a group, you can click the Show/Hide and Lock/Unlock boxes to the left of the group name in the Layer Groups panel to change the visibility and edit status of all layers in the group. You can double-click a group name or select a group and then choose Group Options from the Layer Groups panel menu to change other settings for all layers in the selected group (Figure 3). You can change the settings for individual layers by double-clicking the layer name to display the Layer Options dialog box or by selecting a layer and then choosing Layer Options from the panel menu. Layer Comps The up side of using layer groups is that they help you organize and manage documents that contain multiple layers. The down side of having lots of layers is complexity. The more layers you have in a document, the more of a chore layer management becomes. That’s where layer comps come in. The Layer Comps plug-in lets you save a snapshot of the

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current status of the Layer Groups panel—or the Layers panel if the Layer Groups plug-in is not running—and then return to that state whenever you want with a single click. You can use layer comps to create, manage, and view multiple versions of a layout in a single InDesign file. Layer Comps are similar to InDesign’s Workspace feature, but instead of letting you save panel arrangements, Layer Comps let you save layer configurations. (Note: The Layer Comps panel in InDesign is similar to the Layer Comps panel in Photoshop.) Let’s get back to the example of a multilingual document. For text-editing purposes, you might want to arrange the Layer Groups panel so that all annotation layers are hidden and only the English Text layer is displayed. By saving this configuration as a layer comp, you can return to this work environment at any time. In addition to the multilingual document scenario, layer comps are useful for publications that print different content in multiple regions or versions, and they’re also handy for creating alternate versions of a layout to show a client. I’m sure there are many other practical uses for layer comps, as well as layer groups. (I never cease to be amazed at the clever ways creative thinkers use even the simplest features.)

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InReview: Layer and Layout Tools Figure 6: In this example, the show/hide, lock/unlock settings in the Layer Groups panel are the result of choosing the layer comp named “Chinese Text Version.”

The Layer Comps panel and its accompanying menu (Window > Layer Comps; Figure 4) let you create new layer comps and quickly switch among multiple layer comps. When you create a new layer comp, the current status of the Layer Groups panel is saved. Each time you display a layer comp, the Layer Figure 4: The Layer Comps panel lets you create and modify layer comps and switch among them.

Figure 5: When you create a layer comp, you have the option to enable or disable several settings for the selected layers.

Groups panel returns to its saved state. If you change any options in the Layer Groups panel while a layer comp is displayed, you must then choose Update Layer Comp from the Layer Comps panel menu to save the changes you made (in the Layer Groups panel) to the layer comp. Each time you create a new layer comp, the Create New Layer Comp dialog box lets you enable or disable several settings for the included layers (Figure 5). Clicking the box to the left of a layer comp name applies that layer comp (Figure 6); clicking a layer comp name selects it without applying it so you can do such things as update, duplicate, or delete it or change any of its settings. In addition to user-defined layer comps, the Layer Comps panel also includes Last Document State. When you select this option, the Layer Groups panel returns to the state it was in before you selected a layer comp. The Layer Comps panel menu includes commands for working with the selected layer comp—Duplicate, Delete, Update, and Layer Comp Options—and for switching among layer comps. The Print Layer command lets you print individual layer comps, and the Export Layer Comps command lets you save layer comps in any of several file formats, including InDesign CS3 document, PDF, and JPEG.

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Note for InDesign users who share documents: The Layer Groups and Layer Comps plug-ins are not required to open InDesign documents that contain layer groups and/or layer comps. If you open an InDesign document that includes layer groups and/ or layer comps when the plug-ins are not present, the Layer Groups and Layer Comps panels are not available, layer groups and layer comps are ignored, and only individual layers are displayed in the Layers panel. To Buy or not to Buy Both Layer Groups and Layer Comps are solid performers. The plug-in designers did a nice job

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“…thoughtful, articulate and wellprepared…brilliant…an invaluable resource…inspirational…shows you the how as well as the why…amazing… everything you need to know to be a proficient user…mind-blowing… a must for all graphic designers… phenomenal…an intelligent, elegant source of information.”*

InReview: Layer and Layout Tools

integrating the two panels and other controls into InDesign’s UI. Most of the features are self-explanatory and easy to use, so the lack of documentation isn’t a major problem; however, some of Layer Comps’ features are somewhat tricky, and the plug-in would benefit from some documentation. The value of Layer Groups and Layer Comps depends on how well they fit into your workflow and how much time they’ll save. If you seldom if ever use InDesign’s Layers panel and don’t plan to, these plug-ins aren’t for you. But if you work with complex, multilayered InDesign layouts, Layer Groups and Layer Comps can make your work much easier. Although Layer Groups and Layer Comps can be purchased separately for $40 each, they work better in tandem. I suggest the Layer Tools bundle, which is $70. If you’re not sure about what you need and where to start, try the demo version of Layer Groups. If you like it and think you might benefit even more from additional layer-management features, add the demo version of Layer Comps. Demo downloads are available at www.dtptools.com/downloads.asp.

John Cruise is an Adobe Certified InDesign Expert who has coauthored several books about page layout software, including The InDesign Bible and Adobe InDesign CS3 How-Tos: 100 Essential Techniques. He teaches InDesign to college students and corporate clients in Denver and is a regular contributor to InDesign Magazine and Mac\Life.

Smart Layout CS3 WoodWing Software www.woodwing.com $649 Rating: Mac and Windows

★★★★★

By Jeff potter At first, Smart Layout made me feel… well, frankly, a little dumb. Part of the Smart Newspaper suite of plug-ins and enterprise-level content and asset management solutions from WoodWing Software, the very first plugin developer and system integrator for InDesign, Smart Layout does add some complexity to your InDesign work environment. I couldn’t make heads or tails of it at first, nor could I see the benefits. Smart Layout doesn’t add a single feature to your final layout that you can’t get right out of the box in InDesign. But I’ve come to see that the point of Smart Layout is to save time. If your InDesign use concentrates on intensive publication layouts—especially newspapers—where the page geometry gets complex, you’ll quickly come to appreciate Smart Layout’s different approach. To understand what Smart Layout offers, you have to look at your two options for creating a page in InDesign: defining frames (a.k.a. boxes) as multicolumn and making liberal use of text wraps, or threading text through a series of one-column frames.

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gold standard of “The podcast tutorials.”

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Hosted by designer, writer, trainer, presenter, and Adobe Certified Expert Michael Murphy – “a veteran art director with an encyclopedic knowledge of Adobe’s InDesign”** – The InDesigner is a free video podcast dedicated to empowering designers to embrace concepts and features in the application that will transform how they work.

information. instruction. insight.

theindesigner www.theindesigner.com * excerpted from reviews posted on the iTunes Store ** (The Top 40 Tech Podcasts, .net magazine, February 2007)

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InReview: Layer and Layout Tools

The multiple-column approach simplifies the number of objects on a page, but it becomes terribly easy to get stuck in convoluted workarounds. Most professional composition artists instead much prefer the single-column threaded-frame approach, spurning Figure 1: Using a new tool (see the red rectangle below), you can create a new Smart Layout Item on the page, automatically drawing around other ads and other elements already on the page. This new object is a quicker, cleaner alternative to creating geometry with single-column linked text frames or a multicolumn frame with text flow controlled by text wraps of other objects.

text wraps unless an object needs to interrupt text flow. But when you factor in headlines, pull quotes, cutlines, cutoff rules, and a few columns of text, you’re looking at an increasingly fragile house of cards that can mess you up if you have to add something to your page quickly or move the whole bunch of objects to another part of the document. That leaves an opening for Smart Layout, which creates a third paradigm combining aspects of the first two.

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A New Object in Town Smart Layout operates on the principle that making one aspect of the InDesign page more complicated— the frames—can, in turn, make the process of actually composing your pages way more simple. Think of the plug-in as a way to create text frames that are adaptable—really adaptable. Smart Layout adds an icon to the Tools palette (Figure 1). You use this new tool to draw a Smart Layout Item, which, at its most basic level, functions almost identically to a multi-column text frame. Furthermore, you can add strokes, fills, and object styles to Smart Layout items as you would any native InDesign object; you can also adjust frame-based attributes like insets and baseline grid. You can add Smart Layout objects to standard InDesign libraries. You’ll immediately notice that as you draw the item on the page over other objects, Smart Layout automatically snaps around those other objects, creating a polygon with an offset that runs around these items. As you draw the object, Smart Layout adds or subtracts the number of columns in the frame to match the underlying grid (a behavior that can be controlled, like most of the workings of the plugin, through four new panes in the Preferences menu [Figure 2, next page]). This fluidity completely eliminates the need to draw boxes and thread text, so you’ll find it a surprisingly quick tool in the early phases of your design. Another benefit: Because you’re dealing with only one object, there’s less clutter on your pages and your pasteboard.

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InReview: Layer and Layout Tools

Add other objects like pull quotes, photos, or cutlines on top of a Smart Layout item, even with InDesign’s native tools, and those automatically become Smart Layout components in their own right, moving along with the original in a behavior that brings to mind a Paleolithic QuarkXPress’s parent and child boxes. This arrangement goes beyond simple grouping, associating the elements and allowing for subsequent adjustments. An added bonus: Your Smart Layout item’s shape shifting eliminates a work environment of many

superimposed text frames—often the consequence of a frenzied production process, especially in newspapers—and makes it simpler to find and select the objects on the page. Shaping the Frame The real beauty of WoodWing’s Smart Layout lies in its flexibility to alter frame geometry in a way that saves time and energy. You can modify this randomly shaped frame in a variety of ways: Pull down the hollow frame handle

and adjust one column’s height. Pull down the solid frame handle, centered on multiple, evened-off columns, and you can adjust the height of all the columns at once (Figure 3, next page). Contemplate the usual manipulations on a series of text frames of a typical 5-column news story. You need more text at the end, so you adjust the height of the first three columns. You need to even off the last two columns, so you adjust the height. I found that being able to control aspects of multiple columns at once, considerably speeded up

C Figure 2: The Smart Layout plug-in adds a number of new preferences (A), menu items (B), and panels (C).

B A

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InReview: Layer and Layout Tools

my entire layout process—not only because of the time savings, but also because I wasn’t distracted from the big picture by the normal fussiness of adjusting a complicated news page. One of the most valuable time savers of Smart Layout is the Square Off command, found in a submenu of InDesign’s Object menu. If you want to, say, even off the last two columns of a news story, select this menu and watch the geometry adjust automatically. Smart Layout can also be used with InCopy for users with other WoodWing enterprise publishing systems, and the plug-in supports the use of XML tags as part of this workflow. What Doesn’t Click Do you write headlines on the fly? Then you’ll be interested in the plug-in’s CopyFit function, accessed either from a submenu of the Object menu or as its own panel. The command adjusts the type specs within your comfort zone, modified in a new Preferences pane. That’s in theory, anyway. A week or two into using the plug-in, more often than not I’d get an error, “CopyFit failed to change text attribute to fit text into the frame,” so I stopped using it. It would be more immediately useful if the plug-in could make the text fill the frame, period, without the preferences that constrain its use. Some potential Smart Layout users might balk at installing a plug-in that creates a document print shops can’t open or print without a “reader” plug-in,

Figure 3: The solid handles control the height of groups of columns at once; the hollow handles control the height of individual columns.

provided free from WoodWing’s Web site. But that fear is misplaced; nowadays, most of us can opt for a PDF workflow, which eliminates the need to ask printers to interrupt their workflows with a reader plug-in. Smart Layout’s biggest liability is its $649 price tag—very far out of reach for cash-strapped and understaffed small publications like community newspapers that so desperately need all the time they can squeeze from a production process. “We do target Smart Layout toward designintensive publishing groups, but we do have a lot of clients who are single users,” explains Patrick Becker, senior vice president for business development for the Netherlands-based WoodWing. While maintaining that the plug-in’s time savings can justify its cost, Becker attributed the high price to the weak dollar.

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Perhaps a light version of the plug-in, stripped of its enterprise-level features, or an annual subscription license model more viable for publications on severe budgets, could become profitable ways for WoodWing to bring this worthy software to new markets.

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Quickly Addictive This is one of those plug-ins that is totally useless if you don’t need it, and you’ll soon know either way if you give it a try. WoodWing offers a fully functional 30-day demo version. If you do need it, you may become very attached to it very quickly. I had to work on site at another newspaper and immediately mourned the absence of Smart Layout—after only several weeks of having access to its features on another computer. When you go to click an icon that’s disappeared from your toolbar out of gut instinct, that’s the best testimonial possible—and the reason that any publication with multi-column layouts and willing to invest in its technology should very seriously consider this software.

Jeff Potter edits and publishes the Shelburne Falls Independent in Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts, every two weeks; he also serves as managing editor of the monthly Commons newspaper in Brattleboro, Vermont. He paginates both newspapers with InDesign, brute force, and adrenaline.

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UI"OOVBM"SU%JSFDUPST*OWJUBUJPOBM.BTUFS$MBTT "QSJM.BZ t4BO+PTF $BMJGPSOJB Join top designers, illustrators, art directors and photographers during Adobeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 3-day, hands on instructional course. t-FBSOGSPN"EPCF4FOJPS$SFBUJWF%JSFDUPS 3VTTFMM#SPXO BMPOHXJUI$ISJT0SXJH 5FSSZ8IJUF  "EBN1SBUU .JDIBFM/JOOFTTBOE$PMJO'MFNJOH t&YQFSJNFOUXJUIOFX"EPCFUFDIOPMPHJFT  DSFBUFETQFDJmDBMMZGPSEFTJHOFST t/FUXPSLXJUIMFBEJOHDSFBUJWFQSPGFTTJPOBMT  JOBOJOUJNBUFBOEJOTQJSJOHFOWJSPONFOU Make like a monster on Wednesday, April 30, 2008 at the one-day workshops. Join Chris Orwig in Flash for Visual Artists and Terry White in Acrobat and Photoshop for the Creative Designer for $150. Choose one workshop or drift between the classes. The recorded presentations will be available to seminar participants after the conference. More details here

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M A G A Z I N E 22

February | March 2008

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InBrief: Helpful Products

Quick Takes on Helpful Products Help for dealing with files that aren’t in the right formats; updates to old favorites; and a script typeface with a great personality.

Publisher

InDesign

By Jeff Gamet Clients don’t always give us art or copy in the format we need, so this time around I’ll look at tools that transmogrify those client files into something you can use. I also have a cool tool for Leopard users, a barcode utility, and some yummy font eye candy. PUB2ID 1.5 Markzware, $199 www.markzware.com InDesign may be the page-layout app of choice, but sometimes you still have to work with someone else’s Microsoft Publisher files. Markzware feels your pain, so it whipped up PUB2ID 1.5 to help. This InDesign CS2 and CS3 plug-in handles the dirty work of converting Publisher files into InDesign documents, complete with proper page size, positioning, color models, fonts, styles, text attributes, tables, layers, word wrap, and linked text boxes. The plug-in extracts embedded images, too, potentially saving you from extra calls to your clients for graphics.

February | March 2008

Sometimes the only images clients can give you are embedded in other documents like PowerPoint files. Other times, Mac-based designers are stuck with Windows Zip archives saved as EXE files. File Juicer for Mac OS X can extract those images and convert Windows self-extracting Zip archives into Maccompatible files, and then some. It can pull image

Importing Microsoft Word documents into InDesign is better than it used to be, but if your client didn’t consistently use styles, you’re in for lots of cleanup work. Enter qXport 3: This handy

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File Juicer echo one, $17.95 www.echoone.com

Below: echo one’s File Juicer

qXport 3 Bitmix, $99 www.bitmix.de

Above: Markzware’sPUB2ID 1.5

app for Mac OS X and Windows SE or higher converts Word files into InDesign or XML documents while maintaining as many of the original document’s attributes as possible. qXport 3 converts paragraph styles, character styles, text colors, headers and footers, lists, symbols, tabbed tables, and index marks. qXport 3 recognizes files all the way back to Word 97/98, so it doesn’t matter how up to date (or not) your client’s software is.

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InBrief: Helpful Products

Below: DTP Tools’ David Blatner’s InDesign Tips and Flash files from almost any document, recover text items together or separately. Select once, and let images from erased memory cards, recover text from the plug-in do the rest for you. damaged files, and more. Pro Complete Family Pack Font - Macintosh & Windows... http://www.fonts.com/findfonts/_tryfont.htm?Pid=427607&Product... Joanna® Joanna Pro LikeFindsLike Fonts.com, $42/$277 (complete family) Rorohiko, free www.fonts.com www.rorohiko.com Joanna is a simple yet rich font family with an Selecting multiple similar items on a page or spread interesting history: It wasAbout designed bySpecials Eric Gill Useful in Links Find Fonts Font Packs Font Services Fonts in InDesign doesn’t have to require Shift-clicking over 1931 and used exclusively by his printing firm until and over. LikeFindsLike from Rorohiko is a free plug-in J.M. Dent & Sons snatched up the company and its by keyword orLater, name for InDesign CS, CS2, and CS3 that finds those similar search associated fonts in 1937. Monotype released frames based on the current frame selection. It’s this pleasing book type family to the public. Joanna PRODUCT ETAILS graphic and configurable, so you can choose toDselect Pro improves on the original by adding the power of Joanna® Pro Complete Family OpenType to a family that includes romanPack and italic CS, CS2, or CS3. It also includes an option to share tips Below: Rorohiko’s Like Finds Like designs with Semi Bold, Bold, and Extra Bold weights. you like with friends and the ability to scroll through (32 Votes) Product Details Try Font Character Map Waterfall tips. It even sports an option to update over the Web, Fonts in this product: Displayed Monotype Imaging $277.00 USD so you always see something fresh. David Blatner’s InDesign Tips Joanna® Pro Bold Joanna® Pro Bold Italic DTP Tools, free Joanna® Pro ExtraBold Try www.dtptools.com this font now! Simply choose the font, colors and size. Then enter your text and click the "Change Sample BigPicture 3 Text" button. Your text will appear Joanna® Pro Italic below. Badia Software, $119 Joanna® Pro Regular Joanna® Pro Semibold Select Font: Joanna® Pro Semibold www.badiasoftware.com How many InDesign features could there be that we Joanna® Pro SemiBold Italic Joanna Proknow already? If David Blatner’s latest InDesign don’t Related products: Since tracking all of the images in a project can plug-in is any indication, plenty. The InDesign Tips Joanna® Pro Bold get confusing, it makes sense to ask for a little help, plug-in, co-developed with DTP Tools, displays a Joanna® Pro Bold Italic Text Color: Background: Font Size: and Badia Software’s BigPicture 3 is up to the job. different tip or trick each time you launch InDesign Joanna® Pro ExtraBold #000000 #FFFFFF 100 Joanna® Pro Italic This InDesign CS3 plug-in lists all of your project What do the numbers above mean? Show/hide explanation. Joanna® Pro Regular images, displays image metadata and thumbnails, Below: Eric Gill’s Joanna Pro Joanna® Pro Semibold Joanna® Pro SemiBold Italic and notes where the image is in your document. It automatically links images when it finds them, and updates modified images while maintaining scaling Character sets may differ between platforms. and cropping more. The plug-in requires Mac OS What is the difference between PostScript, TrueType and OpenType? Learn more here!

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InBrief: Helpful Products Right: Rand Holub’s Feel Script

X 10.4.2 or later because it also supports Tiger and Leopard’s Spotlight feature. FlightCheck Professional 6.10 Markzware, $499 www.markzware.com Doing a job right the first time is always faster than fixing it later. Markzware’s FlightCheck Pro has been instrumental in finding those little problems—such Below: Badia’s Big Picture

Feel Script Veer, $99 www.veer.com The art of calligraphy has found a new life in the digital age thanks to the efforts of Alejandro Paul’s interpretation of Rand Holub’s handiwork. Holub’s distinct artistic lettering appeared in Macy’s as well as logo designs starting in the mid-1930s. Older mechanical and digital type technologies didn’t lend themselves to properly interpreting his work, but Alejandro was able to pull off the trick with his Feel Script OpenType font. It includes alternates, ligatures, and swashes that breath new life into Holub’s hand-drawn vision.

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February | March 2008

F Script

as missing fonts, or low-resolution graphics—before they become a problem, and this new version makes a good thing even better. Now it handles font path reporting more effectively. Version 6.10 also adds the ability to download Ground Control settings based on final output devices or file specifications, and improves the PDF Ground Controls. If you’re already using FlightCheck Professional 6, the update is free.

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SneakPeek Pro Code Line Communications, $14.95 www.code-line.com

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© Alejandro Paul, Sudtipos

If you made the switch to Mac OS X 10.5 or later, you really need to take advantage of Quick Look. This killer feature lets you quickly view documents without having to launch any applications, which is a huge time-saver when scanning through folders full of similar documents. Unfortunately, Quick Look can’t display InDesign documents without a little help from Sneakpeek Pro. This Quick Look plug-in lets you view InDesign, Illustrator, and EPS documents, and even lists the fonts, colors, and images the document uses.

Jeff Gamet is a consultant and speaker on graphic-design technologies and Mac OS X. He is a contributing writer for Design Tools Monthly and Layers magazine, and the author of The Designer’s Guide to Mac OS X. For a free issue of Design Tools Monthly, visit www.design-tools.com.

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Stop wasting your time chasing paper facts ............... PaperSpecs is the first online community specifically designed for paper specifiers

............... ... and spend your time doing what you do best. Join PaperSpecs now and get immediately access to: • In depth information on over 4,200 papers from more than 70 paper mills • Sample sheets you can order right here - online • The latest mill promotions and swatchbooks at your fingertips • Knowledge-building online Webinars on sustainability, paper basics and much more • How-to articles and Paper Facts Join now and receive a copy of our acclaimed “19 Ways to Cut Your Paper Costs” absolutely free.

Start Your FREE Trial PaperSpecs

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February | March 2008

1-866-279-5973

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Limited I’m really frustrated with Creative Suite 3’s Limitations!

Like InDesign only letting you zoom in 4000 percent or out to 5 percent

What do you mean?!?

And a maximum document size of 18 feet by 18 feet... what’s up with that?

And Photoshop only letting you create a document that’s a measly 4 GIG?

What about Acrobat 8 letting you create a PDF that is 15 MILLION INCHES X 15 MILLION INCHES?

EXACTLY!!! I’m glad I’m not the only one frustrated by these limitations...

by Russell Viers with Scott Citron Another cartoon from Yabb-Adobe-Doo.com contents

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Calendar

The InDesign Conference Toronto, Canada April 29–30 www.mogo-media.com

The InDesign conference, The pixel conference, The vector Conference Miami, FL February 26–March 1, 2008 www.mogo-media.com If you use InDesign, you need to come to The InDesign Conference. Conferences on Photoshop, Illustrator, Flash, and Acrobat PDF are also taking place at the same time.

Whether you couldn’t attend an earlier conference in the States or you’ve been pining for this excellent conference to make its way north, this is your chance to watch and listen as the brightest InDesign minds share their knowledge.

WOLDA rewards the best logos and trademarks designed throughout the world. Winning logos will be showcased online and published in a printed annual. ADIM 11 April 30–May 3, 2008 San Jose, CA www.adimconference.com Trust me when I say you ain’t lived until you’ve been to ADIM (the Art Directors’ Invitational Masters Class). Although given this year’s monster movie theme, you might not live if you do attend. Bwah-ha-ha!

HOW Promotion Design Awards Deadline: March 28, 2008 www.howdesign.com/competitions There’s a category for every design occasion, so send in your best wedding invitations, client promotions, pro-bono work and more.

Do You have a conference, contest, or event for our calendar? E-mail information to editor@indesignmag.com at least two months prior to event.

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February | March 2008

Wolda, the worldwide logo design annual Deadline: May 20, 2008 www.wolda.org

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HOW Design Conference Boston, MA May 18–21, 2008 www.howconference.com With more than 50 sessions in a variety of tracks (Creativity & Inspiration, Design Disciplines, Career Development, and more), there’ll be plenty to keep you busy. Note: The money-saving Early Bird deadline is March 28.

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InDesign User Groups

Canada Africa Europe United States

Caribbean

InDesign User Group Meetings Click the name of a chapter to go to its Web site. Please see your chapter Web site or contact the chairperson for meeting dates and locations. For more information about InDesign User Groups, see www.indesignusergroup.com.

Australia

Asia

United States Atlanta Paul Olmeda atlanta@indesignusergroup.com

Dallas A.J. Wood dallas@indesignusergroup.com

Madison Cathy Palmer madison@indesignusergroup.com

Reno Jim Cooper reno@indesignusergroup.com

Bay Area Mark Atchley sanfrancisco@indesignusergroup.com

Denver* Erica Gamet and Brian Reyman denver@indesignusergroup.com

Milwaukee Terry Rydberg milwaukee@indesignusergroup.com

Rochester Rebecca Shick rochester@indesignusergroup.com

Boston Meg Young boston@indesignusergroup.com

Des Moines Brian Cupp desmoines@indesignusergroup.com

Minneapolis Keith Gilbert minneapolis@indesignusergroup.com

Seattle Steve Laskevitch seattle@indesignusergroup.com

Central New Jersey Alison Cattelona centralnj@indesignusergroup.com

Detroit Donna Gniewek detroit@indesignusergroup.com

New York City Scott Citron newyorkcity@indesignusergroup.com

Tampa Sarah Greenlee Schweiger tampa@indesignusergroup.com

Chicago Jim Maivald chicago@indesignusergroup.com

Indianapolis Debbie Conway indianapolis@indesignusergroup.com

Orlando Edward Feldman orlando@indesignusergroup.com

Washington, D.C. Ken Chaletzky washingtondc@indesignusergroup.com

Cleveland Mari Hulick cleveland@indesignusergroup.com

Los Angeles John Lopez losangeles@indesignusergroup.com

Portland Paul Erdman portland@indesignusergroup.com

* See also www.idugdenver.net

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InDesign User Groups

Canada Africa Europe United States

Caribbean

InDesign User Group Meetings Click the name of a chapter to go to its Web site. Please see your chapter Web site or contact the chairperson for meeting dates and locations. For more information about InDesign User Groups, see www.indesignusergroup.com.

Africa

Canada

Johannesburg Carla Scholtz johannesburg@indesignusergroup.com

Ottawa Craig Boassaly ottawa@indesignusergroup.com

Munich Wolf Eigner munich@indesignusergroup.com

Asia

Toronto Jason Lisi toronto@indesignusergroup.com

London, UK Tony Harmer london@indesignusergroup.com

Caribbean/Central America

Switzerland Haeme Ulrich switzerland@indesignusergroup.com

Nagoya http://study-room.info/id/ Australia Brisbane Eliot Harper brisbane@indesignusergroup.com

Puerto Rico José M. Ramos puertorico@indesignusergroup.com

Australia

Asia

Europe Melbourne Tricia Ho melbourne@indesignusergroup.com Sydney Eliot Harper sydney@indesignusergroup.com

Italy Rufus Deuchler rufus@deuchler.net Switzerland Sekretariat InDesign-User-Group sekretariat@indesign-konferenz.ch

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February | March 2008

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InDex

The InDex Can’t find that article you saw in an earlier issue? Wondering whether we covered that obscure plug-in? Never fear, the InDex is here.

The first issue of InDesign Magazine was published in July 2004. Since then, we’ve cranked out more than a thousand pages on hundreds of related topics. While it’s possible to use Acrobat to simultaneously search all past issues of the magazine for one word or phrase, many readers have clamored for a formal index. The only other issue index we’ve compiled was in 2005. With only six issues under our belts, we could squeeze the index into a regular issue. But with 22

issues to account for, that’s no longer sensible. Instead, the InDex will live as a PDF you can download for free from our Web site. We’ll update it soon after every issue ships to you, our readers. If you come across a topic you want to know more about, but it’s in an issue you don’t have, you’re not out of luck. We sell individual back issues at www. indesignmag.com/backissues.php. Download the InDesign Magazine InDex here. If the topic you’re looking for isn’t in the InDex, you have one more way to search: that PDF trick I mentioned. To make it work, all of your magazine issue PDFs must be in one folder. Open any issue in Acrobat, then hit ShiftCommand-F (Shift-Control-F on Windows). In the Search window that appears, be sure that you click the radio button that says “All PDF Documents in”, and in the dropdown menu below that, choose the folder in which you placed your magazine issues. You’re on your way to finding anything in any PDF!

Index for issues 1 through 22, July 2004 through February 2008

MAGAZINE

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Tell a friend! Tired of your coworkers always asking you for help with InDesign? Tell ‘em to get their own subscription to this magazine for a special price. Once they go to www.indesignmag.com/purchase. php and enter the discount code “friend” to receive a 1-year subscription for $39, or a 2-year subscription for $69.

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