Page 1

ave.

EARNING, PRACTISING, INSURING, DRIVING, PASSING!

LEARNING 081 89 89 TO0800 DRIVE adrianflux.co.uk ’S GUIDE Call us today for a free, no obligation quote on:

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

QR Code

THE PARENT

Authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority

Brought to you by... 38-39 FCGB_Adrian Flux_dps.indd 2

15/06/2012 19:13

Help your teenager

BECOME A SAFE DRIVER

How to best support your child and their instructor

PLUS Find the right instructor Buy a safe first car Uncover affordable insurance


LEARNING TO DRIVE – THE PARENT’S GUIDE

W E L COM E

LEARNING TO DRIVE is an exciting but nervous time for teenagers and their parents. If anything, it can be harder on mum and dad, as the chances are you’ll foot the bill for lessons, insurance and maybe even a first car. Then there’s the worry of using the family wheels for practice as your child gets to grips with the basics of driving. Even the closest parent-child relationship can be put under strain with a teenager behind the wheel and mum or dad in the passenger seat...

Any parent wants to support their child in learning to drive safely and effectively. That’s where the Learning to Drive – The Parent’s Guide comes in. We’ll show you how to help your child become a safe and responsible driver. From choosing the right instructor to making the most of practice to finding affordable insurance cover, this guide is full of practical advice. So, good luck to you and your learner driver. Here’s to making the start of their driving career a safe and happy one.

David Motton Editor

THE TEAM Publisher: James Evans Editor: David Motton Sales Director: Russell Whitehouse Commercial director: Richard Storrs Art director: Caroline Creighton-Metcalf

GET IN TOUCH

info@firstcar.co.uk 08451 308853 firstcar.co.uk

facebook.com/firstcarmag youtube.com/FirstCarUK twitter.com/firstcaruk

OUR FREE E-LEARNING RESOURCE WILL MAKE YOU A SMARTER DRIVER IN 60 MINUTES!

FIRSTCAR.CO.UK/ACADEMY

The contents of this magazine are copyright © FirstCar Ltd and may not be reproduced or transmitted, in any form in whole or in part, without written consent from the editor. Neither FirstCar Ltd nor its staff can be held responsible for the accuracy of the information herein or for any consequence arising from it. (05/18)

4

firstcar.co.uk


IN ASSOCIATION WITH

WELCOME

INSIDE 6 LEARNING

PAGE 32

WIN THIS CAR!

FirstCar has teamed up with ingenie to offer readers the chance to win a new Vauxhall Corsa worth £13,840!

GO TO: FIRSTCAR.CO.UK/WIN BU YING... HOW TO FIN D TH E RIG HT FIR ST CA R FOR YOUR CH ILD PAGE 30

Your child is about to start their driving career. We’ll help you to support them, with advice on choosing an instructor and helping with practice between lessons.

14 THE TESTS You probably took one test when you learned to drive. Now learners must pass a theory test as well as the practical test. Here’s what you need to know...

24 INSURANCE Insuring a young driver is expensive, but there are ways to make it more affordable. We’ll talk you through learner driver insurance and the advantages of telematics.

30 CAR BUYING Nobody forgets their first car. Whether you and your child plan to buy new or used, we’ll help you pick a safe and reliable first-time buy.

34 OWNING OW NI NG... SIM PL E ENANCE TIPS TO INT MA SAV E MONEY PAGE 34

Some simple DIY maintenance can save money. More importantly, regular checks will help your child to stay safe out on the road.

firstcar.co.uk

5


LEARNING TO DRIVE – THE PARENT’S GUIDE

THE ROAD TO YOUR CHILD’S

DRIVING L Your child is starting on one of the most exciting and rewarding journeys of their life. Nothing beats the thrill and freedom of having a full driving licence, but there are plenty of steps along the road first. Over the next few pages we’ll talk you through them.

4

3

1 UNDER-17 DRIVING

2

1 UNDER-17 DRIVING

6

firstcar.co.uk

Is their 17th birthday still a few months away? Or maybe it’s years off? Your child can still get behind the wheel, just not on the road. There are loads of young driver schemes all over the country from the likes of youngdriver.eu and under17carclub.co.uk which put younger teenagers in the driving seat on private land. The best schemes place a strong emphasis on road safety as well as car control. Sign up, and your child will be better prepared when they do get on the road.


IN ASSOCIATION WITH

LEARNING

G LICENCE 6 5 5 PRACTICAL TEST 3 FIND AN INSTRUCTOR 2 THEIR PROVISIONAL LICENCE Nobody can jump straight into a car on their 17th birthday without having a provisional licence first. Don’t wait until the big day – your child can apply three months before they turn 17. It’s easy to make an online application if they have a Government Gateway ID or otherwise fill out a D1 form which can be collected from the Post Office. Turn the page for more on applying for a provisional licence.

If you want to give your child the best chance of passing first time, you’ll want to find a really good instructor. Practising with relatives is important, but it’s no substitute for expert instruction from a professional. Turn to page 10 to find out more.

4 THEORY TEST

Before your child can take their practical test they have to pass the theory test. There are two parts, one with multiplechoice questions and one assessing their ability to spot hazards. Want to know more? Turn to page 14.

Has your child passed the theory test? Well done, but there’s still another hoop to jump through before they have their full licence: the practical test. This takes place on the public road with an examiner in the passenger seat and will last around 40 minutes. We’ll talk you through the practical test in more detail on page 16.

6 NEXT STEPS

Passing the practical test isn’t the end of the road – it’s the beginning. Drivers never stop learning, and post-test training such as the Pass Plus scheme can really help guide young drivers through their first months on the road.

firstcar.co.uk

7


LEARNING TO DRIVE – THE PARENT’S GUIDE Drivers can learn on the road once they are 17, so long as they have a provisional licence

IT’S A FACT Once

your their licence, it’ child has s automatical ly theirs until th e age of 70. Bu they will have t to renew it ev ery 10 years. They’ll no longer rece ive a paper counte rpar the photocard t; there’s just portion of the licence. The ph oto w updated when ill be they renew.

APPLYING FOR A PROVISIONAL LICENCE 8

firstcar.co.uk


IN ASSOCIATION WITH

A

S WATERSHED MOMENTS in a teenager’s life go, the 17th birthday has to be right up there. Forget cards and presents or a night out with friends – what they’re probably more excited about is finally being able get behind the wheel of a car on the public road. To make sure their licence arrives in time for their birthday, it’s possible to apply up to three months in advance. However, regardless of when it arrives they can’t get behind the wheel until they are 17. Just as importantly, even if they’ve applied for their licence in good time but it fails to arrive before the big day, they can’t start driving until the licence turns up. However, as it should take just one week to arrive if you apply online, or three weeks by post, allowing two months should be more than enough time. Applying for a provisional driving licence is simplicity itself. Just have your child complete the relevant application form. The one they need is called a D1 form and should be available from most post offices. They’ll also need to hand over the fee. At the time of writing it’s £43, but you can check the current cost by logging on to gov.uk/driving-licence-fees. Your child doesn’t have to apply for their provisional driving licence through the post though. The online service at gov.uk/ apply-first-provisional-driving-licence is quick and easy. What’s more, it’s cheaper than a postal application, saving £9 at the time of writing. That’s not a huge amount but every penny counts when learning to drive is so expensive.

Learning to drive for

THE DISABLED Having a disability need not be a barrier to learning to drive. There are many modifications and adaptations that can make driving possible. If your child receives the higher rate mobility component of Disability Living Allowance (DLA) or the enhanced rate mobility component of Personal Independence Payment (PIP) then they can applyfor a licence at 16, not 17.

LEARNING

UNDER-17

DRIVING

Although your child can’t legally drive on public roads until they are 17, on private land they can drive at any age. As a result, in recent years there’s been an explosion in under-17 driving opportunities. By starting young they’ll have a better feel for how a car works when they reach 17, and will hopefully be better able to learn about hazard perception and the rules of the road if they can already control a car. The biggest under-17 driving scheme is Young Driver (youngdriver.eu), launched in 2009 and available at more than 50 sites across the UK. The programme’s Kim Stanton comments: “At Young Driver, we strongly believe that catching youngsters when their attitudes towards driving are still developing is the key to producing a safer driver.” Some other schemes are listed below. Bennetts, Gloucestershire, under17drivinglessons.org Castle Combe Startline, Wiltshire, castlecombecircuit.co.uk Cats Eyes Driving School, Vale of Glamorgan, catseyesdrivingschool.co.uk DriveB4Uturn17, Hampshire, Surrey, West Sussex, driveb4uturn17.co.uk Drive Safe, Lincolnshire, under17-drivinglessons.co.uk DriversGB, Birmingham, driversgb.com Driving Ambition, Northamptonshire, drivingambitionbrackley.info Flying Colours, Dorset, under17sdriving.com Mercedes-Benz Driving Academy, Surrey, tinyurl.com/clnmru9 Under 17 Car Club, Various locations, under17-carclub.co.uk Under Age Driving Scotland, Lanarkshire, underagedriving.co.uk

firstcar.co.uk

9


LEARNING TO DRIVE – THE PARENT’S GUIDE

Go by personal recommenda tion – ask other parents what they think of thei child’s instruct r or.

FIND THE PERFECT

INSTRUCTOR A

S THE PARENT of a learner driver it is really important you find the right driving instructor. To help you find the ideal person to teach your teenager, the DVSA has improved its ‘find driving schools, lessons and instructors’ service.

You can now search the database of more than 26,000 approved instructors by the grade awarded to them by the DVSA. Instructors can add links to their website or Facebook page. This will help you find more detailed information, whether the instructor provides a

photo for security, whether they provide lessons for learners with a special need, the instructor’s availability/ working pattern and the price of lessons. To find the best driving instructor for your child go to www.gov.uk/find-drivingschools-and-lessons.

ASK THESE QUESTIONS

1 2

Is the instructor fully qualified (an ADI)?

4

If we have a PDI (an instructor who is still in training) will we pay less?

5

3

If my child doesn’t get on with their instructor, can we have our money back? All of it, or just some?

10

firstcar.co.uk

Will we get the same instructor and car for each lesson?

How long is each lesson? Can we choose how long the sessions last?

6

Can we get post-test training such as nighttime driving lessons?

7 8 9

Can we change instructors if we want? Where will my child have their lessons?

Do we know someone who has recently passed the test and could recommend an instructor or a school?


LEARNING

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

MAKE THE MOST OF EVERY

LESSON You're paying a lot for an expert to teach your child to drive, so be sure they make the most of their time. Here's how:

● ENCOURAGE REST Try to persuade your child to get a good night’s sleep before each lesson. A big night out before a morning lesson is a bad idea – they need to be alert and sober. ● KEEP ENERGY UP It’s a good habit for your

learner to eat and drink before each lesson to boost their energy levels. ● GO LONG When booking their lessons, think about 90-minute or two-hour sessions. They’ll have more time to get into a rhythm than if the lesson lasts an hour. ●TEACHER KNOWS BEST Instructors know what they are talking about, so encourage your child to pay close attention in lessons.

TOP TIP

Help your child by allowing them to between lesson practise in s. But make sure you stay below the leve l of difficulty yo ur learner has reached w ith their instructor.

● ASK QUESTIONS Talk to your child’s instructor about how the lessons are going, and what your child is learning. That way you can better support lessons with practice in the family car.

AND THE WINNER IS... The inaugural FirstCar Awards celebrate the very best in driver training. Here are our 2018 winners: these are the companies and individuals we’d choose to teach our own children.

and career development for its instructors. reddrivingschool.com

NATIONAL DRIVING SCHOOL OF THE YEAR RED DRIVING SCHOOL RED has embraced modern technology in its teaching methods through online and mobile platforms. What’s more, RED allows learner drivers to post reviews directly to its Facebook page, and has a ‘no-quibble’ refund policy. A strong commitment to road safety is matched to a supportive approach to its learners

REGIONAL DRIVING SCHOOL OF THE YEAR DIVERSE ROAD SAFETY As a social enterprise, Diverse Road Safety takes pride in going the extra mile. In addition to its general training, Diverse Road Safety is particularly expert in helping learners with special needs. diverseroadsafety.org.uk

DRIVING INSTRUCTOR OF THE YEAR NAYESH RADIA Nayesh shows an exceptional commitment to road safety, lobbying the government on topics he feels passionately about. Many glowing testimonials are proof of Nayesh’s patient and positive approach to teaching. saferoading.com

HIGHLY COMMENDED: Let’s Instruct Driving School

HIGHLY COMMENDED: Angela Presland, Belt Up Driving School

HIGHLY COMMENDED: AA Driving School Bill Plant Driving School

firstcar.co.uk

11


LEARNING TO DRIVE – THE PARENT’S GUIDE

PARENTAL CONTROL

Unless you are a qualified ADI, then you are almost certainly not the best person to teach your child to drive. But that doesn’t mean you won’t play an important role in helping your teenager to become a safe and responsible driver. Time spent practising between professional lessons can reinforce what your child has been learning. This is best done by working as a team with the instructor, and doing your best not to pass on any bad habits you may have developed. Try following these tips:

12

firstcar.co.uk

1

Parents should read a current copy of the Highway Code and work with their child on the theory exam.

2

Plan before you set out. Choose a suitable area and route, and know what you want to achieve before you get behind the wheel.

3

Use quiet roads until your child is confident, especially in traffic.

4

Stay below the level they’ve reached with their driving instructor.

5

Avoid carrying passengers – they’re a potential distraction.

6

Work with a professional instructor who tells you what your child is being taught and what techniques are being used. Then you won’t give conflicting advice.

7

A learner driver is not ready for all the challenges of the road, so you must be aware of the hazards around you. Constantly anticipate other road users and be ready to spot trouble your child has missed.


IN ASSOCIATION WITH

LEARNING

MOTORWAYS Although motorways are statistically our safest roads, learner drivers haven’t been allowed on them. That all changed on 4 June 2018. Learners now have the green light to get to grips with motorway driving before they have passed their practical test. Will I be able to drive on the motorway with my learner? No. The new rules allow learners onto motorways, but only in cars with dual-controls and accompanied by an approved driving instructor. So you won’t be able to practise on motorways with your child between professional driving lessons.

8

Be sparing with your comments, but problems must be identified while still fresh in the memory. Confidence needs to be built first, though, so don’t forget to praise good driving.

9

Keep calm – shouting won’t help. And don’t get angry if they find constructive criticism hard to take.

10

Make learning enjoyable. You need to keep your cool so that you both enjoy the process. You and your teenager shouldn’t dread getting into the car.

Is motorway driving now compulsory for all learner drivers? There is no requirement for your child to drive

on the motorway if they don’t want to. Depending on where you live it may be impractical. It will be up to you, your child and their instructor to decide whether to drive on the motorway. Why have the changes happened? In the words of Road Safety Minister, Andrew Jones: “To allow learner drivers to take lessons on motorways will enable novice drivers to experience the broadest possible range of driving experiences in a supportive environment, helping them to be better, safer drivers.”

TEACHING GOOD HABITS Learning to drive doesn’t start when your child is 17. It doesn’t even start a few months before, if you book your son or daughter an under-17 driving course. You’re teaching children how to drive from a very early age through the example you set. If they see you checking text messages on the move, gambling at amber lights, or cutting up other drivers, can you really expect them to behave safely and responsibly when they get behind the wheel?

firstcar.co.uk

13


LEARNING TO DRIVE – THE PARENT’S GUIDE

E H T Y R O E TH T S E T

B

EFORE YOUR CHILD can take their practical test they must pass the theory test. Book via the official website at gov.uk/booktheory-test. There are third-party websites through which you can book, but they charge fees, while there’s no fee through the official site. However, thirdparty websites often offer unlimited retests for free. With a pass rate of 49% for the theory test, you’ve got a one in two chance of having to retake, so you could save cash. Just check any terms and conditions.

14

firstcar.co.uk

To take the test your child will need to go to a suitable centre where they’ll be allocated a booth with a computer, along with instructions on how to use it. They will work their way through both parts of the test (multiple-choice questions then the hazard perception section) before being given the results for both tests at the end of the session. To give your learner driver the best chance of passing, encourage them to take the theory test seriously – they won’t be able to bluff their way through it.


IN ASSOCIATION WITH

IT’S A

FACT

Un child c til April 2014 o a foreig uld enlist th your e to help n language in help of with th te from th e theor rpreter y te is d been a ate no such st . But vail he have to able – candid lp has ates be able English to or Wels speak h to get throug h.

TESTS

GREAT APPS THE OFFICIAL DSA THEORY TEST KIT Because this was created by the same people who set the theory and practical driving tests, you’re not going to find a more useful app, and at £4.99 it’s also something of a bargain. UK CAR DRIVING THEORY TEST For just over half the cost of the DVSA app (£2.99) you could choose this independent effort by Webrich Software. It’s user-friendly, interactive and your child can challenge their mates for some added fun. DRIVING TEST SUCCESS

GET SOME HELP There’s a stack of aids to help your child get through their theory test. The apps here are a good start while Focus Multimedia also does some great stuff too – there’s more on this at focusmm.co.uk. The official theory test questions aren’t published anywhere, but the DVSA does publish The Official DVSA Theory Test for Car Drivers, and a similar title for motorcyclists. These feature hundreds of official revision questions, plus case studies on every topic, along with info to help understand and remember the theory. There are loads of real-life photos and diagrams, plus links to online resources and videos where your child can learn more. Order your copy from tsoshop.co.uk.

Practise every official revision question from the DVSA. Available on iOS, Android, Kindle, BlackBerry and Windows Phone. View the full range of apps at theorytestapp.co.uk

Learners have got to spot hazards like this early

firstcar.co.uk

15


LEARNING TO DRIVE – THE PARENT’S GUIDE

THE CHECKLIST FOR PRACTICAL

T E ST S UC C E S S If your child puts a tick in all these boxes they won’t go far wrong A POSITIVE ATTITUDE

An instructor wouldn’t encourage your child to take the test if they weren’t ready, so tell them to believe in their driving abilities.

GOOD TIMEKEEPING

Allow plenty of time for your child to reach the test centre. Stress levels will go through the roof if running late.

THEIR PROVISIONAL LICENCE

How hard would you kick yourself if your child turned up without their provisional licence? Remind them to take their theory test pass certificate too.

What did NOT change in 2017 ■ The pass mark: Your child must make no more than 15 driving faults and no serious or dangerous faults, as before. ■ The skills they need:

16

firstcar.co.uk

SENSIBLE CLOTHES AND FOOTWARE

Candidates should wear comfortable clothes, and shoes which make it easy to operate the pedals safely.

BE READY TO LEARN

Just over half of practical tests end with a thumbs down from the examiner. Don’t be surprised if this happens to your child, even if they’ve been flying in lessons. They’ll be told why you have failed at the end of the test so they can do better next time. ● There are plenty more tips on preparing for the practical test at firstcar. co.uk/learn-to-drive.

The same things still count as faults, and the driving instructor will assess their driving in the same way as they would have in the past.

■ The cost: You’ll pay the same fee for the practical test as before – £62 on weekdays, and £75 during the evening, at weekends or on bank holidays.

■ The length of the test: Expect the practical test to take around 40 minutes.

■ How to book: Arrange their test online at gov.uk/bookdriving-test.


IN ASSOCIATION WITH

TESTS

The 4 BIG CHANGES

The practical test has been through a big shake-up to make it more relevant to modern driving. We explain the FOUR KEY CHANGES introduced in December 2017.

1

More independent driving: The independent driving section of the test now lasts 20 minutes rather than 10, so it’s roughly half the test. The examiner will ask your child to follow road signs to a particular destination, a series of directions, or a combination of both. It doesn’t matter if they take a wrong turn, so long as they are driving safely and legally.

2

Following directions from a sat nav: During four out of five practical tests, drivers will have to follow directions from a sat nav as part of the 20 minutes of independent driving. The examiner will set up the sat nav for the driver, and they can ask the examiner for confirmation of where they are going. If a sat nav isn’t used they’ll follow traffic signs instead.

3

The reversing revolution: Say goodbye to reversing around a corner or turning in the road. These no longer form part of the practical test, although driving instructors are still encouraged to teach them. The three reversing manoeuvres your child could be tested on are parallel parking at the side of the road, parking in a bay (either driving in and reversing out or reversing in and driving out), or pulling up on the right-hand side of the road before reversing for two car lengths and rejoining traffic. It’s worth practising these between lessons.

TOP TIP

Book your ch ild’s test at gov.uk/book-d rivin and avoid adm g-test in It will only take fees. you a few minutes.

4

‘Show me’ while driving: Every test includes ‘show me, tell me’ questions as before. The difference is the ‘show me’ question (asking your child to show how they would carry out a safety task) will be asked while they are driving. They could have to show they can wash the windscreen using the car’s controls and wipers, for example.

firstcar.co.uk

17


LEARNING TO DRIVE – THE PARENT’S GUIDE

HOW TO HELP WITH TEST NERVES...

There’s no point in pretending your child won’t be nervous as their tests loom. But there are steps you can both take to prevent nerves taking over.

1: AVOID PEER PRESSURE

If having friends asking about their driving test will make your child nervous, encourage them to keep the test date to themself.

2: PRACTISE, PRACTISE, PRACTISE

Talk to your instructor and your child about the manoeuvres they have been practising, in particular the

20

firstcar.co.uk

skills they need to improve upon. Then make time so they can practise with you in the passenger seat. Getting a manoeuvre right time after time without the safety net of dual-controls will really help their confidence.

3: REMEMBER, WORRY MAKES IT WORSE

The trouble with worry is that it interferes with concentration. The mind focuses on what might go wrong instead of what needs to be done next. Encourage your child to block negative thoughts and give driving their full attention every time they get behind the wheel.

4: THINK SUCCESSFUL THOUGHTS The instructor wouldn’t put your teenager in for their test if they didn’t think they were ready. Encourage your child to remember all the times they have successfully tackled tough manoeuvres. If they’ve done these things well before, they can do them again.

5: GO EASY ON THEM

However well they are driving in lessons, your child could still fail. Make sure they understand this isn’t the end of the world. In fact, it will probably make them a better driver in the long run.


IN ASSOCIATION WITH

TESTS

... AND SUPPORT THEM IF THEY FAIL

TOP TIP

The Theory from Drivin Test App g allows your Test Success child to prac tise every officia l 20 question from 18 revision the DVSA. It’ great for prac s tis move. Ther ing on the e’s m theorytestap ore at p.co.uk

1 GIVE THEM HELP

If your child didn’t pass their theory test, help them come back stronger by using learning aids such as apps to improve their knowledge. If they’ve failed the practical, discuss what went wrong and help them improve on any areas of weakness.

2 GET THEM BACK BEHIND THE WHEEL

Failing the practical test can be a real blow to a young driver’s confidence, and they may be tempted to take a break from learning. Don’t let them take more than a few days off. They shouldn’t be allowed to get rusty, or to put off facing their nerves indefinitely. Be supportive, understanding and encouraging. It will give them a lift to know you are in their corner.

3 THE LONGER THEY LEARN, THE BETTER THEY WILL BECOME

Anyone who passes first time is very proud of the fact. But did you know there’s plenty of evidence that people who fail their first practical test actually go on to be better, safer drivers? That’s because the extra practice and instruction will improve their skills, and delay the moment at which they are exposed to the risks of independent driving. So failing may seem like a big deal at the time, but help your child understand that, statistically, it’s going to make them a safer driver.

4 BOOK THE NEXT TEST SOON

Instructors don’t set their pupils up to fail, so if they felt your child was good enough before they should be ready for a re-test. Allow time to work on weaknesses but book another test soon.

firstcar.co.uk

21


LEARNING TO DRIVE – THE PARENT’S GUIDE

HALF PRICE DRIVING LESSONS FOR FIRSTCAR ACADEMY GRADUATES In association with

E

VERYONE WANTS TO drive well. The sooner your child gets to grips with driving, the sooner they’ll pass their test. And once they have their licence, if they continue to develop their skills the better their chances of avoiding an accident in those difficult first months of independent driving. Whether your child is about to start learning, cramming hard for their theory or practical test, or they have just passed but want to keep improving, the FirstCar Academy can help. It’s not like being at school or college. The FirstCar Academy is a free e-learning resource. Young drivers sign up online at firstcar.co.uk/academy, where they will find 14 videos split across three modules, which they can watch whenever and wherever they like.

22

At the end of each module your child will need to answer a question to unlock the next module’s videos. They earn a certificate once the final module has been completed, with a pass, merit or distinction. As well as their certificate, all graduates automatically benefit from a wide range of discounts and prize draws. AA Driving School are offering half-price

supported by

driving lessons when a graduate books an initial six hours’ tuition, saving £36! There’s also a monthly prize draw to win £200 worth of vouchers plus other great prizes, and an annual prize draw to win a new Ford Fiesta for a year. Plus there’s £1000 in cash to win too! So why not ask your child to sign up to the FirstCar Academy today?

WHY JOIN THE FIRSTCAR ACADEMY? ■ It’s free and designed to make young drivers smarter ■ It takes less than 60 minutes ■ Graduates unlock great benefits and rewards

■ Save £36 when booking your first 6 hours of lessons with the AA Driving School ■ Win a car for a year ■ £1000 cash ■ Lots of monthly prizes

*FirstCar reserves the right to offer a prize of equivalent value to the car or the equivalent in cash to a winner who does not meet the leasing criteria. For the full terms and conditions go to www.firstcar.co.uk/academy


R

BROUGHT TO YOU BY FIRSTCAR

LEARNING

WHAT IS TAUGHT AT THE FIRSTCAR ACADEMY? The 14 videos are split into three modules, covering a variety of road safety topics.

LEVEL ONE ■ Passengers ■ Seatbelts LEVEL TWO ■ Learning to drive ■ Highway Code ■ Probationary period ■ Hazards ■ Car maintenance

“Using this platform has made me think about how I drive and how to be a better, safer and more considerate driver.” Chloe, Year 13

LEVEL THREE ■ Insurance ■ Attitude ■ Motorways

■ Speed ■ Distractions ■ Drink and drugs ■ Journey planning

GRADUATE BENEFITS AND REWARDS* Half price

driving lessons with the AA, saving £36

£1000 CASH

WIN a brand-new Ford Fiesta for a year

Monthly prize draw to WIN £200 worth of Amazon and gaming vouchers!

Lots of other monthly prizes too!

.U K/AC A D G O T O F IR STC A R.CO

E M Y TODAY...


LEARNING TO DRIVE – THE PARENT’S GUIDE

HOW LEARNER DRIVER

INSURANCE WORKS

What is learner driver insurance? Learner driver insurance covers a young driver to practise in someone else’s car, most likely their parents’. Instead of being added to your insurance and bumping up your premium, they have their own policy.

How long does cover last? It varies. Some insurers will ask learners to sign up for at least 30 days, others offer daily policies or will even cover youngsters for just a few hours.

24

firstcar.co.uk

Why do they need it?

Well, insurance is a legal requirement, so they need to be covered one way or the other. Plus there are advantages to having a learner driver policy. Adding a learner as a named driver to your car insurance can be expensive compared with arranging separate cover. What’s more, if they do have a mishap, they can claim on their own policy, not yours, which should help keep the peace if they have a prang in the family car.

“If they have a mishap they can claim on their own policy, not yours, which should keep the peace if they have a prang”


INSURANCE

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Let’s face it – driving lessons aren’t cheap. If you want to maximise your child’s time behind the wheel without maxing out the cost you’ll need to get them some practice in between lessons. That way their confidence and experience will improve much faster. But they’ll have to have insurance!

How much does it cost? Learners should find cover for around £70 month, or less than £2 per day.

Any restrictions?

Kids won’t be able to borrow their rich uncle’s Range Rover – policies place restrictions on the insurance group and the total value of the car they drive. Typically the highest insurance group allowed will be around group 30-35, and the maximum value of the car somewhere in the region of £20,000-£30,000.

Anything else I should know? Policies usually cover learners to drive in one specific vehicle – expect to take out another policy if they want to practise in a second car. There may also be restrictions on the age of whoever is supervising and their driving experience, so an older brother or sister may not have been behind the wheel for long enough. Also, if a young driver has already made a claim due to a crash while learning, they may not be eligible for cover.

TOP TIP

Try to get your much practice child as as at least once a you can, wee or three times k. Two is ev better. It’ll build en thei confidence an r d skills.

firstcar.co.uk

25


LEARNING TO DRIVE – THE PARENT’S GUIDE

TELEMATICS INSURANCE EXPLAINED

Black box cover could make insurance more affordable – and improve your child’s driving too! Insurance is one of the most painful things about being a young driver – or a young driver’s parent, if you’re paying the premium. According to the GoCompare website, the average annual motor insurance bill for an 18-year-old driver is £2100. Telematics (or ‘black box’) insurance is one way to reduce the price of cover and encourage good driving habits at the same time. What is telematics insurance? If you and your child opt for a telematics policy, a ‘black box’ is fitted to their car. This combines a GPS unit, a motion sensor and a SIM card to transmit data. It detects where the car is, how fast it is being driven, and how violently the car is accelerating, braking and cornering. How is the data used? The information the black box collects is fed back to the insurer, and used to reassess the young driver’s premium at regular intervals.

26

firstcar.co.uk

Obeying the speed limit, avoiding harsh acceleration and braking, and driving at low-risk times of day can all contribute to a reduced bill. In some cases there are other forms of reward or special offers for safe and responsible driving. This could mean extra miles are added to a limited mileage policy, or the driver receives vouchers and free gifts. Can youngsters check how well they are driving? Yes. Telematics insurance providers usually have a portal or app through which drivers can see if their driving is up to standard. By checking back regularly they can tell if they are improving or slipping into bad habits. Are parents also able to see driving scores? Typically any named driver will have access to the feedback scores, so if you are named on the policy you’ll be able to see how well your child is doing. Some insurers have found that simply knowing that mum or dad can see their

TOP TIP

Insuring your son or daughter to dr ive car is one way the family to cover, but with get them thei car and policy r own they build a No Clai ’ll ms Discount. feedback improves young people’s driving. Can I have a telematics policy with my child as the named driver? There are plenty of telematics insurance providers who insure older drivers as well as youngsters. But don’t be tempted to name yourself as the main driver unless you really are going to do most of the miles. If your insurer finds out that you’ve fibbed about who is really the main user of the car, then you’ve committed fraud. It could invalidate your insurance cover. Also, if your child isn’t the main driver on the policy then they won’t build up their own No Claims Discount. So in the long run it’s best


IN ASSOCIATION WITH

for them to be the main driver, even if the car is also sometimes used by a parent. What are the drawbacks of telematics insurance? Some policies set curfews that restrict young drivers from getting behind the wheel at night. Whether that’s a good or bad thing depends on your point of view. A teenager may be frustrated they can’t give their mates a lift home from the pub, but a parent may be relieved... Also, just as good driving

can be rewarded with a lower premium, so poor driving can lead to a higher insurance cost – even if the young driver hasn’t had an accident. That’s not universal, though. Some companies are all carrot and no stick, and don’t increase premiums for aggressive driving unless it has led to a claim. Will my child face any restrictions? We’ve mentioned curfews, which are actually quite rare. Mileage limits are a lot more

INSURANCE

common. Generally these are set when the policy is taken out, and can be extended at extra cost. Some insurers offer bonus mileage as a reward for safe and careful driving. Is telematics right for me and my young driver? In most cases, yes. You should be able to find a better price by choosing a telematics policy rather than conventional insurance cover. And it encourages safe driving, too.

firstcar.co.uk

27


LEARNING TO DRIVE – THE PARENT’S GUIDE OM FR 2,750 1 £

NISSAN MICRA

EURO NCAP SAFETY RATING FIVE STARS (2017) AUTONOMOUS EMERGENCY BRAKING STANDARD INSURANCE FROM GROUP 1 As the winner of our Car of the Year award at the inaugural FirstCar Awards, there’s no better first car for young drivers than the Nissan Micra. It’s affordable to buy, cheap to fuel and insure, and very safe. Prices start from just £12,750, meaning the most affordable Micra undercuts the cheapest Ford Fiesta and Volkswagen Polo by some margin. At the time of writing there are PCP deals available with a monthly cost of £149. There’s plenty of scope to personalise the look of the car, inside and out.

BEST NEW CARS

Here’s our pick of the safest and most affordable small cars FORD FIESTA

FR £13,OM 695

EURO NCAP SAFETY RATING FIVE STARS (2017) AUTONOMOUS EMERGENCY BRAKING OPTIONAL (£ VARIES) INSURANCE FROM GROUP 2 The Fiesta runs the Micra close. It’s a brilliant supermini and a first car any youngster would be proud to own. It costs more to buy than the Micra and even entry-level models can’t quite match the Nissan’s rock-bottom insurance grouping. But it’s safe, practical, easy to drive and great fun.

OM FR9325 £

30

VOLKSWAGEN UP!

EURO NCAP SAFETY RATING FIVE STARS (2011) AUTONOMOUS EMERGENCY BRAKING OPTIONAL (£380) INSURANCE FROM GROUP 1 The Up! has been around many years now, but it’s still our favourite city car and a great first car for young drivers. You might expect to pay a premium for a VW, but it’s actually very competitively priced. There’s a choice of efficient petrol engines and very low insurance groupings, and autonomous emergency braking is an option.

GO TO: firstcar.co.uk/buy-a-new-car for more...


IN ASSOCIATION WITH

BUYING

FORD FIESTA (08-17)

EURO NCAP SAFETY RATING FIVE STARS (2012) WARRANTY DIRECT RELIABILITY INDEX/REPAIR COST 26/£199.41 INSURANCE FROM GROUP 3 We can’t think of a better used car for new drivers than the previous generation Ford Fiesta. It’s highly rated by the safety experts at Euro NCAP, who awarded the car the maximum five stars in 2012. The Fiesta is reliable, too. The independent warranty provider, Warranty Direct, compiles the Reliability Index (www.reliabilityindex.com) based on the cars it covers. The lower the index score, the more reliable the car – the Fiesta scores 26. The average repair cost is also low, sneaking under £200.

OM FR 750 £1

BEST USED CARS FR £99OM 5

Get your child on the road for less with the right used car CITROEN C1 (05-14)

EURO NCAP SAFETY RATING THREE STARS (2012) WARRANTY DIRECT RELIABILITY INDEX/ REPAIR COST 15/£256.08 INSURANCE FROM GROUP 2 The C1 is tiny, easy to park, and a doddle to drive. It’s also very affordable to buy and run, and rarely goes wrong. Its crash test rating could be better, though.

KIA PICANTO (11-17)

EURO NCAP SAFETY RATING FOUR STARS (2011) WARRANTY DIRECT RELIABILITY INDEX/REPAIR COST 19/£163.65 INSURANCE FROM GROUP 3 There’s a choice of three and five-door versions of the Picanto. Whichever you and your young driver choose, the Picanto is well equipped and inexpensive to buy. FR £29OM 00 VOLKSWAGEN POLO (09-17)

OM FR 150 2 £

EURO NCAP SAFETY RATING FIVE STARS (2009) WARRANTY DIRECT RELIABILITY INDEX/ REPAIR COST 24/£184.27 INSURANCE FROM GROUP 3 A used VW Polo may cost more than the equivalent Fiesta, but it’s still a cracking used car. Safety standards are high, reliability is a strong point, and there are plenty to choose from.

GO TO: firstcar.co.uk/buy-a-used-car forfirstcar.co.uk more...

31


LEARNING TO DRIVE – THE PARENT’S GUIDE

WIN

THIS CAR! FirstCar has teamed up with ingenie, the young driver insurance brand, to offer FirstCar readers the chance to win this brilliant new Vauxhall Corsa 1.4i 75PS ecoFLEX Energy 3dr worth £13,840! ingenie is on the side of young drivers, using black box technology to reward safe driving with more affordable insurance premiums. Drive well, pay less!

TO BE IN WITH A CHANCE OF WINNING, VISIT... Terms and conditions: This competition is run by First Car Limited and Ingenie Services Limited. Entries must be received by midnight on 14 July 2018. The winner will be randomly selected by the promoter from the correct entries received once the prize draw finishes. For full terms and conditions see firstcar.co.uk/win.

32

firstcar.co.uk


WIN A NEW CAR!

Vauxhall Corsa 1.4i 75PS ecoFLEX Energy 3dr ■ 1 6” alloy wheels ■ L  ED daytime running lights ■ Bluetooth connectivity ■ Touchscreen infotainment system ■ Electrically heated front seats ■ Digital radio with six speakers ■ Worth £13,840

firstcar.co.uk/win IN ASSOCIATION WITH:

i 1.4 A RS H CO ORT L H L W 4 0N WIT HARGY X 8 , IO U E VA EN 1 3 CIAT nie £ S S O n ge i A IN

T H I S COU YO U R C HL D B E I L D! Congratulatio

ns to 17-yea winner of a brand new Va r-old Katie Lewis, uxhall Corsa previous co in our mpe keys to her ne tition! Katie collected the w Jane Pohlm car from ingenie’s Laur ann last Aug aus t. Ka “I am shocke d and overw tie said: helmed to have won the car. wait to drive I can’t it!”

33


MAINTENANCE

THE PARENT’S GUIDE

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

Maintenance

BA S I C S

A few minutes each week can save you and your child cash

Y

OUR CHILD’S CAR is a complicated piece of machinery and there are lots of things that they won’t be able to do when it comes to maintenance. However, there are also loads of things that they can do, especially if you have time to give them some tips. Encouraging a young driver to look after their car will reduce the chances of a breakdown. What’s more, if you can tackle basic work between you instead of taking the car to a garage you could save yourselves a packet.

POWER STEERING FLUID Most cars have power steering; read the manual to see where the fluid reservoir is, then help your child to check the level. This should never drop. If it does, there’s a problem to address.

BRAKE FLUID Show your child how to check the level in the braking system reservoir. Expect the level to drop a little as the brakes wear, but never below the minimum level marked on the side of the reservoir.

LIGHTS Try to persuade your child to check their lights are working every week. With your help it’ll take just a couple of minutes. Check brake lights, indicators, headlights, tail lights and number plate bulbs.

TYRES Accelerating, braking and cornering all depend on those four patches of rubber in contact with the ground. Encourage regular checks to make sure the tyres have plenty of tread left and are inflated correctly.

34

firstcar.co.uk

WIPERS AND WASHERS If the wiper blades fail your child could struggle to see the road. So encourage them to replace the wiper blades every 12 months or so, and use quality screenwash to clean the windscreen.

BATTERY Batteries tend to be maintenance-free, but if the battery is struggling to turn the engine over, suggest that your child replaces it. Fail to do so and when it packs in altogether it will leave them stranded.

ENGINE OIL Emphasise the importance of regularly checking oil levels. Warn your child against waiting for the oil light on the dash to illuminate – by the time it comes on the damage may already have been done.

ENGINE COOLANT To stop an engine overheating the radiator must be filled with coolant. An engine shouldn’t use coolant; if the level drops there’s a problem. Every few years the coolant should be replaced.


ADVERTISING FEATURE

ON THE ROAD TO

SUCCESS WITH RED DRIVING SCHOOL

Choosing the right driving school will give your child’s life behind the wheel the best possible start Finding the right driving school for your learner driver isn’t easy. Any parent wants the highest standard of tuition, friendly and approachable instructors, and great value for money. But how do you know which school to trust? Choosing a FirstCar award winner has to be a good place to start. RED Driving School was named the National Driving School of the Year at the FirstCar Awards 2018. Our judging panel of motoring journalists and senior figures in the driver training industry picked RED as the standout school from a strong field. The judges were impressed with RED’s supportive approach to learner drivers and strong commitment to road safety. It’s refreshing that RED is honest and open enough to allow young drivers to post reviews directly to its Facebook page. What’s more, the school has embraced mobile

technology and the internet in its teaching methods, so that learning with RED goes well beyond the time spent at the wheel. Here’s just some of the reasons to choose RED Driving School: ● National Driving School of the Year at the FirstCar Awards 2018 ● Your child can improve their chances of passing the driving test by 14% by using RED’s award-winning Road Brain Trainer. This interactive e-learning programme is free for all RED students ● Learners can manage their account 24/7 using MyRED ● Female instructors and automatic cars are available ● Lapsed learners and short notice test bookings welcome ● Pass Plus and motorway lessons ● Introductory offers and course discounts

VISIT REDDRIVINGSCHOOL.COM OR CALL US 0330 332 2680 TO FIND OUT MORE!


Parent's Guide 2018  

Learning To Drive - The Parent's Guide 2018 in Association with Adrian Flux.

Parent's Guide 2018  

Learning To Drive - The Parent's Guide 2018 in Association with Adrian Flux.

Advertisement