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COMMUNITY IMPACT REPORT F Y 2 015-2016 • FY 2016-2017


C O M M U N I T Y I M PA C T R E P O R T FY 2 0 1 5 -2016 • FY 2016-2017

w ww.firs t5kids .org


B ACKG R OU N D & HIS T ORY

In 1998, California voters approved a $.50 tax increase on tobacco products through the passage of Proposition 10, the Children and Families First Act. Each county created a local Commission and received revenue to be used for programs for children prenatal through age 5. Governed by nine Commissioners, FIRST 5 Santa Clara County is charged with administering the funds to support programs for children prenatal through age 5 and their families. OUR MISSI O N

OUR VISION

FIRST 5 Santa Clara County supports the healthy development of children prenatal through age 5 and enriches the lives of their families and communities.

FIRST 5 Santa Clara County will be a catalyst for ensuring that the developmental needs of children prenatal through age 5 are a priority in all sectors of the community.

O U R C O R E VA L U E S C O L L A B O R AT I O N

We work cooperatively with established systems, services and the community on common goals to maximize effectiveness for children and families. I N N O VAT I O N

We apply what’s been proven to work elsewhere to find fresh solutions to the specific needs of our community. EXCELLENCE

We seek to attain the highest quality outcomes, measured against established best practices and the most credible current research. A C C O U N TA B I L I T Y

We are responsible and results-driven with the resources the public entrusts to us. RESPECT

We embrace input and assistance from all facets of the community so we can span all cultures and languages to help every child and family.

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The Commission utilizes results of on-going research and community input to develop FIRST 5’s strategic direction, such as: Investing in programs and services that increase Early Childhood Developmental Assets and Protective Factors within the Circles of Influence. FIRST 5 funds programs and services throughout Santa Clara County that positively impact the lives of all young children and their families, while striving to develop resilience and mitigate risks for those children at greatest risk of poor developmental outcomes. Focusing investments in neighborhoods that have the highest concentration of children prenatal through age 5, and where children are at the greatest risk for poor developmental outcomes. FIRST 5 utilizes the geo-map of cumulative risk factors to ensure that the Commission’s funds are invested strategically in communities that have the highest need and the greatest potential for positive impacts.

PRIORITY AREAS

The most important areas for FIRST 5 to focus on to achieve its Mission.

GOALS

What FIRST 5 aims to achieve through its investments in each Priority Area.

Developing a comprehensive System of Care that reaches the most vulnerable children. FIRST 5 has partnered with policy makers, county agencies, community based organizations, and community members to develop an integrated, sustainable and comprehensive System of Care that: • Improves coordination and integration of programs and services for children prenatal through age 5 and their families; • Sustains efforts through increased leveraging of existing resources and identification of new sources of funding; and • Aligns FIRST 5 programs with other community initiatives to achieve greater impact.

OUTCOMES

The results FIRST 5 wants to see that demonstrate progress toward achieving each goal.

S T R AT E G I E S

The general approaches FIRST 5 invests in to achieve the desired Outcomes.

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STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK

CIRCLES OF INFLUENCE

FIRST 5 is a learning organization that is grounded in evidence-based practices. As such, our strategic plan is based on knowledge gained from ongoing research and community input about our community’s strengths and needs; evidence-based practices in the fields of early childhood development and family support; and emerging trends at the local, state and national levels. The body of knowledge that has informed FIRST 5’s strategic planning includes input from over 5,000 community members and partners. Findings from an extensive research project commissioned by FIRST 5 and led by Dr. David Arredondo in 2004 – 2005¹, and findings from other published research studies. This research-based approach enables FIRST 5 to continuously build upon its knowledge of community needs and best practices, and ensures that our strategic direction remains current and relevant. Children do not develop in isolation, but rather within a set of social systems or Circles of Influence that are interconnected, dynamic, and have both an individual and collective impact on the healthy development of children. All of these social systems need to be working together to ensure that children achieve optimal physical health and acquire age- and developmentally-appropriate cognitive, social, emotional, and behavioral skills.

SOURCE: ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS MODEL ADAPTED FROM: BRONFENBRENNER, U. (1979)

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CUMULATIVE RISK FACTORS BY ZIP CODES

T O TA L R AT I N G P O I N T S 2-6

RISK FACTORS

7-9

RISK FACTORS

10-16 RISK FACTORS 17-23 RISK FACTORS 24-29 RISK FACTORS N O D ATA

P op ulation based cum ul a t i ve r i s ks were ca l cul a t ed re l a t i v e t o t h e C o u n t y a v e r a g e . T h e d a r k e r t h e re d , the g reate r the Cu mu l a t i ve R i s k. R i s k f a ct or r a t i ngs w i t h i n z i p c o d e a re a s w e re d e v e l o p e d f o r : 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Mothe r with no hig h s chool degree; Teenage mothe r; Low birth we igh t; Late en try to pre na t a l ca re; Substantiate d ch ild a bus e repor t s ; D ome stic vio len ce i nvol vi ng chi l dren; Medi-cal; Elevated blo od le vel s

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STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK

FIR S T 5 CO MP R E HE N S IV E , IN T E GR AT E D S YS T E M O F C A R E 1

WHO

W H AT

HOW

S AN TA C L AR A C O UN T Y C O M M UN I T Y

C H I L D R E N 0 - 5 AN D T H E I R FAM I L I E S

WEBSI TE, M EDI A, EVENTS, AND ADVOCACY

C O M M U N I T Y E N G A G E M E N T, P H Y S I C A L H E A L T H A N D F A M I LY S T R E N G T H E N I N G

STRENGTHENI NG FAM I LI ES I NI TI ATI VE, HEALTH AND WELLNESS I NI TI ATI VE, SUPERI OR COURT AND CHI LD WELFARE I NI TI ATI VE

CHILDREN 0-5 IN HIGH-RISK FAC T O R Z I P C O D ES

Q UALI TY M ATTERS...A STRONG START FOR KI DS (Quality Rating Improvement System) S C R E E N IN G & A S S E S S ME N T

C H I L D R E N AT 3 0 0 % O F F ED ER A L P O V E RT Y L E V E L

C H I L D R E N AN D FA M I L I ES W H O AR E S C R E E N E D AN D I N N EED O F O N E - O N - O N E PAR EN T I N G S K I L L S INTERVENTION

C H I L D R E N AN D FA M I L I ES T H AT R E Q UI R E I N T E N S I V E I N T ER V EN T I O N SERVICES

This comprehensive, integrated system reflects FIRST 5’s ecological, Whole-Person Care approach to strengthening families, communities, and systems by offering a continuum of services across three tiers: promotion, prevention, and early intervention. This approach enables FIRST 5 to focus on providing intensive, tailored services to children and families experiencing the highest level of need, while also working toward shifting community norms and systems that affect the health and well-being of Santa Clara County’s

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1 FIRST

KI DCONNECTI ONS NETWORK OF PROVI DERS

P R E V ENTI VE DEVELOPM ENTAL AND B E H AV IORAL HEALTH I NTERVENTI ON

IN D IV ID U A L AND FAM I LY THERAPY, TRAUM A I NFORM ED CARE

youngest children. FIRST 5’s ongoing research and evaluation measures the impact of these efforts to continuously improve the system of services and support for families in the community. Additionally, FIRST 5’s workforce development institute, the Community of Learning, builds and strengthens the capacity of service providers, community members, and systems leaders to better care for children prenatal through 5 and their families.

5 Santa Clara County (2005). Santa Clara County High-Risk Design Compendium of Relevant Research. San José, CA: High-Risk Research and Design Team.


P R I O RI T Y AR E A S A N D GOA L S

Shows the Priority Areas and Goals adopted by the Commission after its last comprehensive strategic planning process. These Priority Areas and Goals remain the foundation of FIRST 5’s strategic framework.

CHIL DRE N ’S HEA LT H

O

UN

W

O

RK

AW

CE DEVELOPM FOR

SY

ST

EMS CHANGE

EN

CHILDREN’S HEALTH

T

S

C HILD

Children ent er school fu l l y prepa red to succeed a ca demica l l y, emotiona lly, a nd social l y

HIGH QUALITY EARLY CARE & EDUCATION

M

M

UN

OR

STE

COMMUNITY & FAMILY ENGAGEMENT

H I GH QUALI TY EAR LY C AR E & ED UC ATI O N

SY

MS CHANG

E

NS & PUBLIC A W TIO AR ICA E N E DEVELOP ES ME NT S KF

ORC

Sy s te m s a re res po n s iv e t o t h e needs o f ch i l d re n & thei r f a m ilie s .

ES

C

SYSTEM S C H AN GE

EN

FAMILY SUPPORT

COMM UN IT Y & FAM ILY ENGA GE M E N T

N ei gh b o r h o o d s and co m m u n it ie s are pl a ce s w h e re c hi l dre n a re s a f e , nei gh b o r s a re c onne ct e d , a n d al l c u lt u re s a re res pe c t e d .

AR

Fa milies provide sa fe, sta ble, loving, a nd stimula ting home s .

O

C

M

M

T ICA

W

C hi l d re n a re born h e a lt h y and e x p e r i e n ce opti m a l h e a lt h and d e v e l o p m e n t .

FAMI LY S UPPORT

& PUBLIC IONS

W O RK F OR C E DE V ELOPMENT

C OMMUNI C ATI ONS & PUB LI C AWAR ENESS

F I RST 5 pa rtners a nd o t h er community se r vice providers h ave the knowledge, sk ill s a nd ca pa city t o support children p re na ta l through a ge 5 and their fa milies an d communities.

T he public i s a wa re of the importa nce of ea r l y childhood, FIRST 5’s mission, priorities , investment s , pa rtners, a nd impa c t.

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PROFILE OF CHILDREN AND FAMILIES SERVED

In FY 2015/2016

52,000 CHILDREN SERVED

25,700 PARENTS/CAREGIVERS SERVED

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In FY 2016/2017

51,500 CHILDREN SERVED

43,000

PARENTS/CAREGIVERS SERVED

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FY 2015-2016

I N I T I AT I V E

FAMILY RESOURCE CENTERS FY 15-16: $6 MILLION INVESTED FY 16-17: $6.4 MILLION INVESTED

I n F Y 20 15 / 1 6 FY 20 16 / 1 7

4,700 CHILDREN SERVED

5,900

PARENTS/CAREGIVERS SERVED

F Y 201 6- 2017

Children received health and behavioral health screenings and early intervention services.

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In FY 15-16, with the support of FRC staff, 1,486 children received a developmental or behavioral health screening. Of those, 326 (22%) were identified with one or more areas of concern, and 183 (56%) were referred to KidConnections Network of Providers, ensuring early and appropriate treatment for potential delays. In FY 16-17, these numbers decreased slightly, with 1,183 children receiving a developmental or social emotional screening, of which 299 (25%) were identified with one or more areas of concern, and 83 (28%) of those children were referred to the KidConnections Network of Providers.

P ROG RAM S & ACTI V I TI E S • Evidence-based and Research Informed Workshops: -Positive Parenting Program (Triple P) -Abriendo Puertas/Opening doors -24/7 Dad -InsideOut Dad -SEEDS of Early Learning for Parents/ Caregivers • Strengthening Families • Sunday Friends • San José Bridge Library • Family Support Program for Incarcerated Parents/Caregivers • Gen2Gen Volunteer Program for Older Adults


GOAL

The Family Resource Center (FRC) Initiative is a place-based strategy that strengthens knowledge of child development, family resilience, and social connections.

The Initiative continued to have broad community reach.

FIRST 5 expanded its reach to serve more families in the County.

FIRST 5 Family Resource Centers served approximately 3,000 parents/caregivers and 2,500 children in FY 15-16, and 2,900 parent/ caregivers and 2,200 children in FY 16-17 through parent workshops, developmental and behavioral screenings, drop in services, and referrals to community resources. Additionally, through large and small scale community events, the FRCs served approximately 31,200 parents/caregivers and 33,300 children in FY 15-16, and 22,600 parents/caregivers and 23,000 children in FY 16-17.

In FY 15-16, FIRST 5 supported the opening of Cesar Chavez FRC at the Cesar Chavez Elementary School in the Mayfair community of East San José, and in FY 16-17, opened the Josephine Guerrero Family Resource Center at Robert Randall Elementary School in Milpitas.

Fathers/Male Caregivers learned ways to be more involved in their children’s lives. In FY 15-16, FIRST 5 launched 24/7 Dad, an evidence-informed National Fatherhood Initiative curriculum that trains fathers to be involved, responsible, and committed twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. 24/7 Dad launched in the FRC’s during Spring 2016, and 108 participants took part in workshops. In FY 16-17, 152 participants took part in the 24/7 Dad workshops. In both FY 15-16 and FY 16-17, there were marked increases in the percent who agreed or strongly agreed with key statements; the percentage of participants who knew the importance of their role as a caregiver in their child’s life increased from 52% to 93% by post assessment, and the percentage of fathers/male caregivers who intended to be more involved with their child’s life increased from 53% to 97%.

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FY 2015-2016

I N I T I AT I V E

EARLY LEARNING FY 15-16: $10.5 MILLION INVESTED FY 16-17: $6.5 MILLION INVESTED

I n FY 2 0 1 5 / 1 6

6,000 129 1,000

P ROG RAM S & ACTI V I TI E S

CHILDREN

SITES EDUCATORS

I n FY 2 0 1 6 / 1 7

8,000 155 1,000

CHILDREN

• Quality Rating and Improvement System (QRIS) • myTeachstone • SEEDS of Learning for Child Care Providers • Raising a Reader • Healthy Food in Child Care Pilot Program • Alum Rock USD: Prenatal - 3rd Grade Health and Early Learning System • DataZone

SITES EDUCATORS

F Y 201 6- 2017

The desired outcome of the QUALITY MATTERS…a STRONG START for kids initiative is that more children will have access to comprehensive, integrated, high-quality early learning opportunities, and experience the optimal health and development necessary to enter school fully prepared to succeed. As part of this initiative, FIRST 5 Santa Clara County funds quality rating, professional development activities, and systems building efforts including the Alum Rock Union Elementary School District: Prenatal – 3rd Grade Health & Early Learning System, and a variety of other efforts to strengthen the County’s early learning system. Since the beginning of the initiative, the number of sites participating in QUALITY MATTERS has steadily grown. More sites demonstrate the level of quality by receiving a tier rating.

R AT E D S I T E S 155 129 95

16

FY 12/13

12

23

FY 13/14

FY 14/15

FY 15/16

FY 16/17


GOAL

Children enter school fully prepared to succeed academically, emotionally, and socially.

Early educators received professional development support to achieve higher levels of quality. Based on their quality ratings, sites developed action plans to increase their level of overall site quality. Early educators were supported through strengthsbased coaching that supports reflection, intentionality, and implementation of best practices, specifically with regard to meeting the goals set in their Quality Improvement Plans. In FY 15-16, on-site coaching services were provided to 11 agencies in 53 classrooms, with 98 teachers representing 1,006 children.

Children were cared for and educated in high quality early learning environments.

FY 15/16 ( n=129)

67

BRONZE

SILVER

GOLD

21

29

PLATINUM

Of the 129 early care and education sites that had been rated as of the end of FY 15-16, the majority (65%) achieved high quality ratings (Gold and Platinum). This is similar to the FY 16-17, in which 62% of the 155 sites achieved high quality ratings (Gold and Platinum).

18

15 GOLD

1

62

SILVER

4

BRONZE

18

2

17

1

8

8

6

7

R AT E D S I T E S

PLATINUM

FY 16/17 (n=155)

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EARLY LEARNING FY 15-16: $10.5 MILLION INVESTED FY 16-17: $6.5 MILLION INVESTED

SEEDS providers changed their environments to better support child development.

S E E D S O F E A RLY L I T E R A CY

F Y 201 6- 2017

24%

59%

59%

38%

36% 5% POST

PRE

FY 15/16

EXEMPLARY

POST

FY 16/17

ABOVE AVERAGE

BASIC

FAIR

SELF-REPORTED KNOWLEDGE

96% 87%

87%

45% 35%

Emotional Support

Classroom Organization

PRE-K

45%

39%

32%

27%

Instructional Support

97%

92%

92%

Engaged Support Learning

Emotional and Behavioral Support TODDLER

CLASS Domain

14

5% 35%

33% 21% PRE

myTeachstone helped providers learn more about the importance of teacher-child interactions. myTeachstone is an online professional development platform for early educators to enhance knowledge and skills related to effective adult-child interactions as measured by Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS). In FY 16-17, 100 family child care providers participated and completed 1,665 total hours of online instruction. When asked about their level of understanding about the importance of teacher-child interactions, the percentage of teachers who said “high” or “very high” increased from 31% to 98% on a retrospective survey. Their self-reported knowledge of each seven CLASS domains increased dramatically.

40%

8%

SEEDS of Learning is a nationally recognized professional development program for parents and educators of young children. The program is designed to help the children in their care develop the early literacy skills and the social/emotional foundation they need to be ready for kindergarten. SEEDS served 39 providers representing 246 children in FY 15-16 (Phase 4) and 87 providers representing 589 children in FY 16-17 (Phase 5). In FY 15-16, the percentage of providers whose classroom early literacy practices were rated as Above Average or Exemplary more than doubled, from 46% at pre assessment to 95% at post assessment. A similar trend was found in FY 16-17, with 64% being rated at pre as Above Average or Exemplary, followed by 94% at post assessment. Children made statistically significant gains in their early literacy skills such as picture naming, letter and sound recognition and ability to write their names.

9% 27%

FY 2015-2016

I N I T I AT I V E

Responsive Caregiving

INFANT


GOAL

Children enter school fully prepared to succeed academically, emotionally, and socially.

iPinwheel was launched in FY 16-17 to collect more comprehensive child and provider level data.

FIRST 5 joined the DataZone warehousing platform in FY 16-17.

FIRST 5 is dedicated to creating a comprehensive integrated early learning data system to promote continuous quality improvement practices and streamline program operations and reporting within the early childhood education field. Programs participating in QUALITY MATTERS will gain access to a data system, iPinwheel, which enhances student information management, tracking of program implementation, and understanding of program quality.

FIRST 5 and Santa Clara County Office of Education (SCCOE) will expand coordination of a robust data warehouse solution called DataZone in order to understand and promote positive outcomes of children. DataZone is the educational hub for the Silicon Valley Regional Data Trust (SVRDT), a formal partnership between the SCCOE and the University of California, Santa Cruz. School districts and other social and education services will be able to share data to inform regional policy, research and practice to support better outcomes for children and families. DataZone produces dashboards to support robust implementation plans to address achievement gaps.

Raising a Reader helped children and families develop a love of reading together. In partnership with Silicon Valley Community Foundation (SVCF), FIRST 5 serves as a Raising A Reader (RAR) affiliate and a unifying leader for 18 RAR affiliates in Santa Clara County. FIRST 5 also expanded the RAR program to rated Family Child Care Home (FCCH) providers participating in QUALITY MATTERS. By the end of FY 16-17, he majority of FCCH providers received training and incorporated the RAR program resulting in 173 children having greater access to culturally and linguistically appropriate books to bring home to share with their families. Pre-post assessments showed that families who were in RAR for more than 7 months read with their children for greater durations of time.

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FY 2015-2016

I N I T I AT I V E

HEALTH AND WELLNESS FY 15-16: $19.3 MILLION INVESTED FY 16-17: $20.6 MILLION INVESTED

I n F Y 20 15 / 1 6 FY 20 16 / 1 7

P ROG RAM S & ACTI V I T I E S • Baby Gateway • Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) • Lactation Promotion • Health Insurance Enrollment • Vision, Hearing and Oral Health Screening • Oral Health Education and Treatment • 10 Steps/Sugar Savvy Parenting Education • Universal Developmental Screening • KidConnections Network

71,562 CHILDREN SERVED

50,910 PARENTS/CAREGIVERS SERVED

Children’s oral health improved through connections to pediatric dental clinics

19,458

8,179 3,643 FILLINGS

SEDATIONS

9,986

FILLINGS

ROOT CANALS

11,529

CROWNS

F Y 201 6- 2017

FIRST 5 invests in three pediatric dental clinics in San Jose, Sunnyvale, and Gilroy. These clinics served over 23,000 children in FY 15-16 and FY 16-17. This resulted in children receiving over 110,000 early intervention dental procedures in FY 15-16 and FY 16-17.

FY 15/16 - FY 16/17

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GOAL

Children are born healthy and experience optimal health and development.

Children and families have increased access to healthy alternatives to sugar sweetened beverages In partnership with the Public Health Department and Santa Clara Valley Water District, water bottle filling stations have been installed throughout Santa Clara County in schools and public spaces to increase access to drinking water and promote water consumption over sugar-sweetened beverages. 21 water bottle filling stations were installed, in FY 15-16 and FY 16-17, bringing the total number of water bottle filling stations installed through the partnership with the Santa Clara Valley Water District and the Santa Clara County Public Health Department to 87.

Drug-exposed infants and infants with complex medical needs received quality, state-of-theart medical care in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) In FY 15-16 and FY 16/17, 366 infants born at Valley Medical Center (VMC) were admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). These babies had access to state-of-the-art, life-saving medical equipment funded by FIRST 5 as well as family support staff. 52 of these infants were born substance exposed and received appropriate treatment. Methamphetamine was the most common substance to which mothers and babies were exposed.

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FY 2015-2016

I N I T I AT I V E

HEALTH AND WELLNESS FY 15-16: $19.3 MILLION INVESTED FY 16-17: $20.6 MILLION INVESTED

I n F Y 20 15 / 1 6 FY 20 16 / 1 7

71,562 CHILDREN SERVED

50,910 PARENTS/CAREGIVERS SERVED

F Y 201 6- 2017

The KidConnections Network (KCN) provided services to children and their families in communities with the greatest needs.

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In FY 15/16, 58% of children newly enrolled into KCN were from the zip code areas identified to have 17-29 cumulative risk factors, and increased to 71% in FY 16/17. After an average of six months of services, children illustrated improvements in their behavioral and developmental health. Specifically, across all 5 domains of the Ages and Stages Questionnaire- Third Edition and across all 7 domains of the Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths- Early Childhood (CANS-EC) assessment.

P ROG RAM S & ACTI V I T I E S • Baby Gateway • Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) • Lactation Promotion • Health Insurance Enrollment • Vision, Hearing and Oral Health Screening • Oral Health Education and Treatment • 10 Steps/Sugar Savvy Parenting Education • Universal Developmental Screening • KidConnections Network


GOAL

Children are born healthy and experience optimal health and development.

Newborn babies were connected to a medical home. The Baby Gateway program is operated by the Healthier Kids Foundation and enrolls eligible newborns into Medi-Cal coverage before they leave the hospital, assigns them to a primary care provider, and educates mothers on well-baby care and what to do if their baby becomes ill. The goal of Baby Gateway is to reinforce the importance of primary care during the baby’s first year of life and beyond and to reduce unnecessary emergency room visits for illnesses best treated in the pediatrician’s office. Over ninety-eight percent of the 5,422 newborns in the Baby Gateway program in FY 15-16 and FY 16-17 were connected to a medical home before leaving the hospital.

Through the promotion of Universal Developmental Screening Initiative, more children engaged in routine physical and developmental health screenings and connected to early intervention services.

H E A LT H S CRE E N I N G S

In FY 15/16 and FY 16/17, with a combined effort from community partners, early learning sites, Family Resource Centers and Pediatric clinics, 66,306 screenings were conducted in the area of vision, hearing, oral health, developmental and behavioral health. Of which an average of 18% (do we have this number) of children were identified to have a potential concern and connected to early intervention services that would have otherwise gone on further undetected increasing the child’s risk of poor academic and health outcomes.

FY 15/16 - FY 16/17

DEVELOPMENTAL

25,240

VISION

BEHAVIORAL

ORAL

HEARING

16,274 5,744 8,299 10,493

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FY 2015-2016

I N I T I AT I V E

SUPERIOR COURT AND CHILD WELFARE FY 15-16: $1.6 MILLION INVESTED FY 16-17: $1.6 MILLION INVESTED

I n F Y 20 15 / 1 6 FY 20 16 / 1 7

P ROG RAM S & ACTI V I T I E S

1,170

• Public Health Nurses • Family Law Treatment Court Resource Specialists • Court Care Coordinator/PEI Therapist

F Y 201 6- 2017

CHILDREN SERVED

20

FIRST 5 Santa Clara County funds Public Health Nurses, Resource Specialist, Court Care Coordinator and specialty services to children and families who are involved with the Family Court, Dependency Court, Juvenile Justice and Child Welfare systems. The outcome of these efforts are to ensure families have the knowledge, skills, resources and access to essential services that they need to promote their children’s optimal health and development.


GOAL

Families provide safe, stable, and loving homes.

Families were strengthened through Resource Specialists in the Family Law Treatment Court. Resource Specialists strengthen parent-child relationships and promote family cohesion by helping parents maintain their sobriety and by connecting them to supervised visitation services. In FY 15-16, 1,719 drug tests were provided to 70 parents/caregivers, with a 92% compliance rate, and in FY 16-17, 1,474 drug tests were provided to 56 parents/caregivers, with a 93% compliance rate. In FY 15-16, 70% of parents/caregivers had an increase in visitation time with their children or went from supervised to unsupervised visitation time; this percentage increased to 92% in FY 16-17. Finally, 20 parents/caregivers in FY 15-16 and 17 parents/caregivers in FY 16-17 graduated from the Family Law Treatment Court Program.

Public Health Nursing Home Visitation services improved child and family outcomes. In FY 15/16 and FY 16/17, 804 children received home visitation services by a Public Health Nurse (PHN). All children served were given a physical and developmental health screening, in which approximately 40% of them were identified as having a developmental concern or delay across one of the five domains of Ages and Stages Questionnaire- Third Edition (ASQ-3), which is well above the national average of approximately 15% (Rice, et al. 1999). Results from the screening and assessment allow the PNH to link and connect each child and their family an array of community and early intervention services such as KidConnections, WIC, Early Start, medical and dental homes. Based on the Omaha Knowledge/ Behavior/Status (K/B/S) Rating System, after 3 months of PHN home visitation services, families demonstrated significant improvements in Knowledge, Behavior, Status across all Omaha problem areas.

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FY 2015-2016

I N I T I AT I V E

COMMUNITY OF LEARNING FY 15-16: $300,000 INVESTED FY 16-17: $400,000 INVESTED

I n F Y 20 15 / 1 6 FY 20 16 / 1 7

1,566

P ROG RAM S & ACTI V I T I E S • Strengthening Families • Touchpoints • Triple P • Ages and Stages

F Y 201 6- 2017

PROVIDERS SERVED

22

The Community of Learning (COL) provides child-focused and family-centered professional development opportunities to a multidisciplinary workforce serving children prenatal through age 5 and their families. Through the investment in evidence-based and research-informed professional development and learning opportunities, such as Brazelton Touchpoints Approach, Triple P Positive Parenting Program, and Strengthening Families Approach: Five Protective Factors, the COL is working toward the outcome of developing and strengthening a highly qualified workforce that provides the highest quality services to children, families, and communities.


GOAL

FIRST 5 partners have the knowledge, skills, and capacity to support children prenatal through age 5 and their families and communities.

FIRST 5 partners received support to provide early childhood promotion, prevention, and early intervention services. In FY 15-16, COL offered 51 research-informed and evidence-based professional development opportunities (21 unique opportunities) to 680 unduplicated community partners. During FY 16-17, 886 unduplicated partners participated in 41 professional development activities (28 unique opportunities). In FY 16-17, across all workshops, participants viewed these professional development opportunities as high quality (95%) and informative (97%).

More FIRST 5 partners accessed high quality continuing education opportunities. FIRST 5 Partners received statewide endorsements to provide high quality early childhood mental health. FIRST 5 supports its partners to become endorsed through the California Center for Infant-Family and Early Childhood Mental Health (IFECMH) in order to provide high quality IFECMH services. Since FY 15-16, endorsements have been as follows: Advanced Transdisciplinary Mental Health Practitioner (11 individuals), Transdisciplinary Mental Health Practitioner (77), Mental Health Specialist (64), and Reflective Practice Facilitators I, and Reflective Practice Facilitators II & Reflective Practice Mentors (42).

FIRST 5 invests in quality services by ensuring that partners maintain the appropriate professional licenses to serve children and families. As a licensed continuing education provider through the Board of Behavioral Sciences and the Board of Registered Nurses, FIRST 5 provided 1,353 hours in FY 16-17 of free continuing education credits to partners and community members licensed in marriage and family therapy, educational psychology, professional clinical counseling, clinical social work, or registered nurses. This total is nearly twice the number of continuing education units offered in FY 15-16 (682 hours).

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FY 2015-2016

I N I T I AT I V E

COMMUNICATIONS FY 15-16: $725,000 INVESTED FY 16-17: $725,000 INVESTED

I n F Y 20 15 / 1 6 FY 20 16 / 1 7

311,500 POTTER THE OTTER BOOKS DISTRIBUTED IN ENGLISH, SPANISH AND CHINESE

P ROG RAM S & ACTI V I T I E S • Potter the Otter • Public Awareness Campaigns • Podcasts • Kit for New Parents • School Readiness Handbook • Community Events • Happy 5 Radio Program

F Y 201 6- 2017

FIRST 5 leads countywide outreach and education efforts to ensure the entire community, regardless of socio-economic, cultural, and linguistic background, has access to the latest information on key issues impacting the healthy development of young children. By utilizing the Kit for New Parents, School Readiness Handbook, Potter the Otter and related theme-based campaigns, FIRST 5 website, social media, and podcasts, FIRST 5 disseminates information about the developmental needs of children to a broad audience.

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GOAL

The public is aware of the importance of early childhood, FIRST 5’s mission, priorities, investments, partners, and impact.

Parents and families gained access to child development information. In FY 15-16, 5,490 School Readiness Handbooks were distributed, followed by 5,880 handbooks in FY 16-17, helping parents become more knowledgeable about how to prepare their preschool-aged children to succeed in kindergarten and beyond. In FY 15-16, 2,458 Kits for New Parents were distributed, followed by nearly 5,200 kits in FY 16-17. These kits, which are available in six languages, include information, advice, and useful tips for new parents, and help spread information about nutrition, safety, quality childcare, health, and early learning.

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FY 2015-2016

SU STAI N I N G F I R S T 5 ’ S INV ES TM ENTS

COMMUNITY INVESTMENT AND LEVERAGED FUNDS

COMMUNITY INVESTMENT (FY 16/17)

LEVERAGED FUNDS (FY 16/17)

Other Revenue Foundation Grants $924,680

Prop 10 Revenue $15,961,426

Leveraged Funds $18,881,186

Federal MediCal/Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment $11,600,000

Federal: MAA $1,000,000

First 5 CA Grants $2,651,437

State Grants $2,705,069

F Y 201 6- 2017

LEVERAGING FIRST 5 INVESTMENTS

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FIRST 5 has successfully leveraged its resources for many years. In FY 2016-17, FIRST 5 more than doubled its $16 million Community Investment by leveraging an additional $18.9 million in federal, state, and local dollars. This means that for every dollar spent, FIRST 5 leveraged an additional $1.18 from other programs.


L E VE RA G E F UN DIN G

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FY 2015-2016

C O M M UN I T Y PAR T NERS FIRST 5 would like to thank the following partners for their continued partnership and commitment to providing the highest-quality service for children and families in Santa Clara County.

4 Ur Children Family Daycare A to Z Learning ABC Daycare o Celia Fernandez Abelicia’s Advent Group Ministries Aisha’s Family Child Care Alex Family Day Care Alum Rock Counseling Center Alum Rock Union Elementary School District

Cecy’s Day Care, Inc. Celia’s Family Child Care Chely’s Day Care Children’s Health Council City of San José City of San José, City Council City of San José, Mayor’s Office

Angelita’s Day Care

City of San José, San José Public Library

Angels Family Child Care Angeltree Children’s House Anita’s Family Day Care

Claudia’s Day Care Colleen’s Day Care Comfort Dental Anesthesia Group

Arminda Fernandez

Community Child Care Council of Santa Clara County

Asha’s Daycare

Community Health Awareness Council

Associated Students, San José State University

Community Solutions

Bay Area Quality Early Learning Partnership Bee’s Knees Childcare Belen’s Childcare Home Betty’s Butterflies Bhavani Daycare Blanca’s Day Care Blossom Daycare Bonnie’s House Play School

F Y 201 6- 2017

Cathy Andrade, Early Learning Consultant

Ana’s Family Day Care Angelito’s Day Care

Bright Explorers Preschool Bright Kids Child Care Bright Stars Child Care Busy Bees Family Daycare California Department of Education California Young World Campbell Union School District Cardoza’s Daycare

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Catholic Charities of Santa Clara County

Carolina Naranjo

Continuing Child Development, Inc. County of Santa Clara, Behavioral Health Services County of Santa Clara, Board of Supervisors County of Santa Clara, Office of Immigrant Relations County of Santa Clara, Office of the Sheriff County of Santa Clara, Probation Department County of Santa Clara, Public Health Department County of Santa Clara, Office of Supportive Housing County of Santa Clara, Office of the County Executive County of Santa Clara, Office of Women’s Policy County of Santa Clara, Public Health Department


County of Santa Clara, Office of Supportive Housing

Franklin-McKinley School District

County of Santa Clara, Office of the County Executive

Fremont Union High School District

County of Santa Clara, Office of Women’s Policy

Gabriela Lara

Freday’s Daycare Fun 2 Learn Family Daycare

County of Santa Clara, Public Health Department

Gaby’s Creative Minds

County of Santa Clara, Reentry Services

Gardner Family Care Corporation

County of Santa Clara, Social Services Agency

Gardner Family Health Network

Cupertino Union School District Daisy’s Day Care David and Lucile Packard Foundation De Anza Community College Child Development Center Diana’s Day Care Dolly’s Nursery School Dulce Hogar Spanish Immersion Family Daycare E=MC2 Daycare Eagle’s Nest DayCare of Santa Clara, LLC Early Discoveries Learning Home East Side Union High School District Educare of California at Silicon Valley Elba’s Child Care Elidas Daycare Eliza’s Family Child Care Elmwood Correctional Complex Esther Lechuga Family Childcare - Maria Rodriguez Family Day Care - Gloria Alvarez Family Day Care Home - Laura Torres Felas Daycare First 5 Association First 5 California First Steps Family Day Care

Gaby’s Nursery School

Gateway Preschool Academy Gilroy Unified School District Gladiz’s Day Care Go Kids Inc., Estrella Family Services Graceful Learning Child Development Day Care Grail Family Services Grail Family Services State Preschool Healthier Kids Foundation Hispanic Foundation of Silicon Valley Interface Children and Family Services Inc. International Children Assistance Network Jafy Family Daycare Jardin De Los Rosas Javi’s Little Friends Daycare Jazmine’s Child Care Joanna’s Daycare Juanita’s Daycare Inc. Juarez Day Care Karen Webster Day Care Kathy’s Day Care Keiki Company Preschool Kid Ink Kid Kwest Learning Center Kid Zone Preschool

First Steps Learning Home

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FY 2015-2016 F Y 201 6- 2017

C O MM UN I T Y PAR T NERS

co nt ’d Kidango, Inc.

Mi Casita de Espanol

Kiddy Explorers Day Care

Mi Escuelita

Kidoz Daycare

Mila’s Day Care

Kids Landing DayCare

Milpitas Child Care and Learning Center

Kool School Daycare

Milpitas Helping Hand Child Care

La Esquelita

Milpitas Unified School District

Lara’s Family Day Care

Mimis Place

Leah Z. Asuncion

Mind Builder Center

Ledezma’s Day Care

Miny’s Child Care

Lila’s Child Care

Miss Theresa’s Place

Little Angels Little Fingers Family Child Care

Mission College Child Development Center

Little Flowers Day Care

Molina’s Family Daycare

Little Foot Academy

Mommy’s Day Care

Little Giants Montessori Daycare

Morales Day Care

Little Leaguers Academy

Moreland Elementary School District

Little Scholars Academy

Morgan Hill Unified School District

Little Steps Day Care

Mountain View Whisman School District

Little Steps Playschool

Mt. Other Home Day Care

Little Teddy Bears Day Care

My Little Bunnies

Little Treasures Family Child Care

Nancy Pena, Behavioral Health Consulting

Lizbeth Daycare

Nasinet Paulos

Lopez Day Care

Natural Foundations Preschool

Lorena Wright

Nena’s Child Care, Inc.

Lourdes Little Ones Daycare

Optimal Solutions Consulting

Love and Laughter Play School

Paquenos Angelitos Family DayCare

Lulu’s Family Daycare

Parents Helping Parents

Lupe’s Carousel Child Care

Park Ave Preschool

Lupita’s Day Care

Partners in Play

Maabla Family Child Care

Pereyra Family Day Care

Magic Learning Home Day Care

Play Garden Preschool

Making Friends Preschool

Prevent Child Abuse California

Manitas Creativas

Rebekah Children’s Services

Maria Andrade

Regents of University of California, Berkeley

Maria’s Family Child Care Medina’s Family Day Care

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Rising Stars Family Daycare Rita Ramos

Sunnyvale Child Care and Learning Center

Rosa Couarrubias

Sunnyvale School District

Rosalina’s Day Care INC

Superior Court of California, County of Santa Clara

Rosa’s Day Care Ruby’s Friends Day Care Sacred Heart Community Service San Francisco Bay Area Planning and Urban Research Association

Sweet Home 2 Home Sweet Home Day Care Tender Loving Child Care Teresa’s Family Daycare

San José Day Nursery

The Health Trust

San José Unified School District

The Sandlot

San José Unified School District Early Education

The WestEd Excellence in Early Education Institute

San José Unified School District Young Families

Tikiland

San Juan Bautista (SJB) Child Development Centers

Titis Day Care

Sandra Mendoza Day Care

Uplift Family Services

Santa Clara County Dental Society

Valley Medical Center Foundation

Santa Clara County Behavioral Health Services

Vargas Family Day Care

Santa Clara County Health System Santa Clara County Office of Education Santa Clara Unified Family Child Education Services Santa Clara Unified School District

Tiny Champs Daycare United Way Silicon Valley

Victoria’s Daycare Vidyarambh Preschool VIVA Strategy + Communications West Valley College Child Development Center

Seedlings Family Daycare

West Valley Mission Community College District

Silicon Valley Community Foundation

Western Dental and Orthodontics

Silicon Valley Council of Nonprofits

Wise and Wonderful Daycare

Smile Day Care

Wonder Years Child Care

SOMOS Mayfair

Zaidee Tumangan Family Day Care

Start Bright Family Childcare Step by Step Learning Garden Sunday Friends Sunlight Giving Sunny Day Care Department

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400 0 Moorpark Av e . , Sui te 200 San J osĂŠ , CA 95 11 7 P 408 .26 0.3 70 0 F 408 .29 6.5 64 2 ww w.f irst5 k ids.org


FIRST 5 COMMISSION

Ken Yeager, Commission Chair Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors Dr. Antonia Charles, Commission Vice-Chair The Health & Hospital of Santa Clara County Laura Jones, Commissioner Represents Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, District 4 Robert Menicocci, Commissioner Santa Clara County Social Services Agency Carmen Montano, Commissioner Represents Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, District 3

FIRST 5 Sa nt a C la r a C o unt y 4000 M oor pa r k Avenue, Sui t e 2 0 0 San J os e, CA 9 5 1 1 7 P 408.2 6 0 .3 7 0 0 www.f i r s t 5 ki ds .org

Dr. Leticia Pelayo, Commissioner Represents Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, District 1 Rachel Samoff, Commissioner Represents Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, District 5 Corazon Basa Cortes Tomalinas, Commissioner Represents Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, District 2 Kathy Wahl, Commissioner Santa Clara County Local Planning Council

Community Impact Report FY 15/17  

Community Impact Report.

Community Impact Report FY 15/17  

Community Impact Report.

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