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TrainingZone aining ainin gZo TRAIN SMART. RACE FAST.

TECHNIQUE

STRIDE AHEAD

CONTENTS

THIS MONTH

RUN RIGHT FOR IRONMAN

BIKE SHORTER, BIKE SMARTER

IRONMAN 2014: START HERE!

Two very different techniques that will help you conquer the big one

Pro coach Mat Steinmetz on his go-to winter turbo session

Phil Mosley’s six-week plan to kickstart your long-haul training

SWIM BETTER IN FOUR STEPS

GET STRONG FOR TRIATHLON

TURN FASTER IN THE POOL

The simple rules you need to remember to boost your speed

The eight home strength moves that will help you perform better

The quickest and most efficient way to start a new swim lap MARCH 2014

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T C E J B O OF E DESIR Fuji

NORCOM STRAIGHT 1.1

FAST AND FIT-FRIENDLY, THIS SUPER BIKE SHOULD SUIT ANY TRIATHLON SET-UP www.larcdistributors.co.za

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armrest positions and three choices of extension type for bike fitting harmony. It’s also adaptable to pocket depth, with the five-bike range starting at £2,000 (about R36 525). The top-end 1.1 frame features ultra-high modulous C10 carbon and with tube profiles wind-tunnel honed, shifting courtesy of DuraAce Di2 – complete with a big 54/42T chainset – and in-house brand Oval providing slick 81mm deep full carbon clincher wheels, the Norcom Straight’s speed shouldn’t be hampered by Fuji’s fit-all focus.

Words Tom Ballard Photos Simon Lees

he Norcom Straight is Fuji’s flagship triathlon bike and is named, oddly enough, after a Strava segment near to the company’s offices in Philadephia. Rather than claims of ultimate aerodynamics, Fuji have instead focused on making it the most adjustable super bike on the market. The Norcom Straight comes in five sizes (49-57cm), has 135mm of cockpit height range and a seatpost that allows a 74-81 degree seat angle. The integrated stem comes in six lengths with four angle options, 60

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UPTOSPEED

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TrainingZone HOW TO

Boost your strength and stability in 30 minutes

Use Phil Mosley’s quick home routine to avoid injury and perform better in tri training

BALL PLANK 1 SWISS Increases core stability around your trunk, to help reduce

inefficient movements during swimming, cycling and running. Directions Lean with your forearms on the ball, keeping your back flat or maintaining its natural curve, with your legs straight. Breathe naturally while bracing your stomach muscles to keep the position on the ball. To make it harder, bring your knees alternately up to the ball. Routine Start by holding for 20secs, increasing to 1min as you improve over time. Rest for half the time you work. Repeat three times.

PLANK 5 SIDE This increases strength and stability, particularly around the

sides of your trunk, and helps you hold your run and swim form. Directions Lie straight on your side on a mat. Place your forearm under your shoulder, perpendicular to your body. Stack your legs, straight, one on top of the other. Raise your body by straightening your waist. Routine Hold the position for 30secs to 1min, for two or three reps. Repeat with opposite side. You can make it harder by slowly straightening and lowering your upper arm. 66

MARCH 2014

BOX SQUAT 2 SINGLE-LEG Increases your strength and balance, especially in your gluteals,

hamstrings, and quadriceps. Directions Stand with one foot on the floor, the other extended in front of you. Maintain a tall posture and move down, bending your knee so there is brief contact with the box (or sofa, or bed), then come back up. The downward motion is controlled, the upwards motion is quick. Routine Six to 12 reps on each leg, repeated three times. Over time, you can make this more challenging by holding dumbbells.

BALL HAMSTRING CURL 6 SWISS This improves the strength of your hamstrings and glutes –

muscle groups that are prone to fatigue and injury in triathletes. Directions Start with your back flat, legs fully extended and heels on the Swiss ball. Roll the ball towards you with your hamstrings in a controlled manner, then roll it away from you. Don’t let your body sag. Routine Three sets of 10-20 reps. Rest for 30secs in between. When this gets too easy, double the resistance by lifting one leg off the ball and pulling the ball with your other leg.


TrainingZone TrainingZone

MAKE IT WORK FOR YOU

You can do this workout at home. All you need is a yoga mat, a Swiss ball, dumbbells and some stretch cords or bands. Aim to complete the

BALL SUPERMAN 3 SWISS This works your back, hamstrings, gluteals and the back of your

shoulders. It’s particularly effective for swimming. Directions Start with the ball under your stomach and chest and your whole body extended like Superman. Alternate raising your arm and leg on opposite sides (eg right arm and left leg) while maintaining balance. Keep the inactive hand on the ground for balance at first. Make sure the area around the ball is clear of hazards in case you roll off sideways. Routine Three sets of 15-30 reps. Rest for 30secs in between.

ROW 7 SEATED This exercise strengthens the muscles at the back of your

shoulders, reducing the likelihood of front crawl overuse swim injuries. Directions You’ll need stretch cords or stretch bands for this. Loop them around an unmovable object. Brace your torso by engaging your core and abs. Keep the spine as tall and straight as possible. In a controlled way, pull the cords towards your chest and back for one rep. Routine Do two sets of 10 to 20 reps, with 20secs rests between sets. Increase the resistance over a period of weeks and months.

routine twice per week in addition to your swim, bike and run sessions, not instead of them. Stop each exercise a few reps or seconds before

you experience a burning sensation. You’ll still get the benefit, but it won’t leave you feeling too sore afterwards.

LUNGE 4 DUMBBELL This move works your gluteals, quadriceps and hamstrings. It

encourages eccentric muscle control, which is particularly useful when you land during running. Do not try if you have any knee problems. Directions Start standing straight, step forwards and down into a lunge in a controlled movement. Keep a flat back and do not allow your front knee to go beyond your toes. Don’t allow the back knee to touch the ground and keep your hip, knee and ankle aligned, facing forwards. Routine Three sets of 10 reps on each leg. Start without dumbbells.

RAISING AND LOWERING 8 CALF This exercise strengthens your calf muscles in both directions.

It’ll improve your lift-off phase during running, as well as controlling impact forces when landing. Directions Stand with both feet on the edge of a step, with something to hold on to for balance. Lower your heels gradually as far as they’ll go, and lift them back up to the top again. Routine Do two sets of 8 to 10 reps at first. Build up the reps to 20 and increase resistance by wearing a weighted backpack. MARCH 2014

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EXPLAINED

Ultimate Day Job speed workouts

TEAM TALK: REACHING THE TOP

Overcome the lack of training time due to your daily job, to build race strength with the help of coach-to-the-pros Mat Steinmetz

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or the working class triathlete, training time periods can be a very frustrating curse as limited hours force most athletes indoors. As a coach, it’s my job to come up with a system that gives athletes the best chance for success. This means making the most of the current environment, being optimistic MAKE IT WORK

Photo: Jesse Wild

Phil Mosley Coaching editor

Mat Steinmetz works with some of the world’s best triathletes and cyclists. www.51-speedshop.com.

TWO INTERVAL SESSIONS TO HELP YOU STAY STRONG THIS SEASON

Set 1: Big gear progression Warm up:

10mins, building to steady 20secs hard/40secs easy, 5mins easy

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and working towards athletic goals. In this feature I’ll show you how. The traditional approach to triathlon training would have you starting with a base phase, where the volume of training gradually increases, while still keeping a lid on hard or sustained efforts. However, for most working athletes, this isn’t possible. Especially if you prescribe to the philosophy that

“Lactate threshold is when your muscles start to accumulate lactic acid faster than they can get rid of it, which causes fatigue.”

says the closer an athlete gets to his or her event, the more their training should mimic the demands of that race as closely as possible. Since most of us prefer to race over all distances, from sprint right up to long distance, long base miles are not always required. While strength and endurance are still the biggest limiters for long-course triathletes, it’s often not feasible for the working class stiff during a normal workday week. I prefer my athletes to keep it simple and stick with 60-90min indoor trainer sessions, with a focus on strength via big gear sessions (55-65rpm), threshold and anaerobic work. Before jumping right back into training, you need to complete some general conditioning first. Rushing through this phase can increase your likelihood of inconsistency, sickness or injury. Once the body is ready to train, it’s a good time to build the engine by incorporating short intervals of varying intensities. I’ve set some examples below: You can progress Set 1 in different ways. To start, do three weeks at 70 percent (of lactate threshold), adding two intervals per week. Then increase the effort to 75 percent and complete that same pattern again. Another option would be: 6x8min as 70/75/80/75/80/85 percent with 2min easy recoveries. You could also progress Set 2 in a number of ways. You can start by doing all the intervals at the same intensity and then add a repetition each week. Or build the session into blocks like this: 3x3mins at 95 percent, 3x3mins at 100 percent, 3x3mins at 105 percent. These sessions are all flexible so that you can build them up gradually throughout your triathlon season.

MARCH 2014

Set 2: Threshold Main set:

4-8x8mins in a big gear (55-65rpm) between 77-85% of lactate threshold, with 2mins easy recovery between intervals

Main set: Warm up: Warm down: 5mins easy

10mins, building to steady 20secs hard/40secs easy, 5mins easy

8-10x3mins at between 95-105% of lactate threshold with 3mins easy recovery between intervals

Warm down: 5mins easy


TrainingZone any small changes you make to your stroke or technique. To help you fit three swims into your week, you may need to cut back on your running or cycling for a couple of months. But once you’ve improved, you can always revert back to maintenance swim training again.

QUICK GUIDE

The four rules of swimming

Phil Mosley has a quartet of crucial tips to help you fine tune your training and turbo charge your swim

S Photo: James Lampard

wimming can seem like the most complex of sports, with so many different elements of technique for you to master. It’s no wonder that many triathletes prefer to go running or cycling given the option. So rather than getting bogged down wondering which drill to do, or why your legs are sinking, we’ve set out four simple rules for you to follow. Stick to them and you’ll soon find you’re knocking seconds off your splits. And swimming is a lot more rewarding when you can feel like you’re making real progress.

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STRUCTURE YOUR SWIM SETS

The professional triathlete Jodie Swallow told Triathlon Plus that she never swims without a preplanned session. Following a set

encourages you to swim at racespecific intensities and increases your mental focus on your form. It’ll also motivate you to swim further and faster. A well-constructed swim session should include a warm-up, a technique set including drills, a main set with some harder efforts and then a warm-down.

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SWIM AT LEAST THREE TIMES PER WEEK

According to age-group medal-winning swimmer Peter Kirk (aged 60), you should swim at least three times per week. Kirk, who swims 100m in just 61 seconds, reckons that swimming twice is fine for maintenance, but three or four sessions can lead to real improvements. Swimming regularly not only improves your swim fitness, but it also helps you to remember

TEAM TALK: RACING LONG

“If Ironman is your goal next year, I’d add another rule: swim long once a week. Even starting from 30mins, you can build up to 1hr 30mins by spring. Lose yourself in the rhythm of your stroke and don’t stress about your technique in this session – using an MP3 player can help.”

3

SWIM IN GOOD COMPANY

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GET ANALYSED BY A COACH

Solo swimming isn’t as productive as swimming in a group, so only do it if that’s your only option. Swimming in company motivates you to push the boundaries of both speed and distance. Usefully, you’ll also have the chance to look at other people’s techniques and see what works for them. Swimming with a coach is even better, because you’ll focus more on what you’re doing, knowing you’re being watched. And a good coach will make sure your swim sets include everything you need to work on to improve. The best options for group swimming are triathlon clubs and masters swimming clubs. Although there’s no reason why you can’t organise your own swimming group, of course.

Having a coach analyse your technique is 20 times more effective than a solo swim session. That’s because no matter how much you swim, you won’t get fast if you have a bad swimming technique. There are several ways to achieve better technique. One is simply to ask your local swim club coach if he or she will spend an hour coaching you one on one, in exchange for payment. If you’re a beginner, you might be better off signing up for a series of weekly swimming lessons at your local pool. Alternatively, you could attend a swim analysis day, often organised by triathlon and swim coaching companies. They often feature underwater video analysis, so you can see exactly what you’re doing right and wrong.

Liz Hufton Editor

MARCH 2014

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TrainingZone TECHNIQUE

Gazelle and glider running styles Tom Ballard outlines these two distinct styles that could see you running faster

BEST FOR

FORM

The gazelle style is best for fast runners and athletes whose bodies are resistant to impact injury. Younger and lighter athletes are also good gazelle candidates, with short-course races best suiting the style.

Toe-off is similar for both styles but the high knee drive defines the gazelle style and allows you to cover more distance with each stride. Foot strike is under the centre of gravity for both running styles.

SPEED

Gazelle runners use more powerful push-offs and the spring from elastic recoil on landing to get higher ‘flights’ and travel further with each stride. Gliders’ maximum speed is limited by stride length.

ENERGY

The gazelle style uses more power due to the force needed for each takeoff and the body also has to absorb greater impact forces. It could increase your energy expenditure, causing you to fatigue sooner for the same speed.

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TrainingZone TrainingZone

BEST FOR

The glider style could better suit newer runners and those looking to hold a slower pace for longer, such as in Ironman events. The lower impact forces of this style can also help older and heavier athletes.

STRENGTH

Both the gazelle and glider styles need great core strength, hip mobility and strong glutes to be efficient and safe. If you adopt either styles, prioritise these areas if you’ve got any weaknesses.

TEAM TALK: SPEEDING UP

“These running styles were coined by Todd Kenyon of ttbikefit. com, where you can find out more about his theories on both gazelles and gliders. Always transition slowly if you’re changing your running technique.”

Tom Ballard Senior writer

ENERGY

Back leg positioning is similar in both styles at toe-off, but the glider motion requires less vertical force and puts less stress on muscles and joints on landing. Your cadence governs the speed you can achieve using the glider style.

FORM

The glider style uses a more upright posture with a low knee and throws the foot in front of the body. Each toe-off creates almost no vertical gain. Glider cadence needs to be higher in order to match the gazelle style’s speed.

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TrainingZone

Competition

4 LUCKY

READERS WILL WIN A PROGRAMME FROM WATTBIKE, DESIGNED TO TRANSFORM YOU INTO A STRONGER, BETTER AND FASTER CYCLIST IN HALF THE TIME Send your entry to glen@triathlonplussa.co.za with the subject line: I want to go faster Triathlon Plus SA will select 4 random entrants. Entries are limited to JHB and surrounding areas only, as the programme will be delivered to the new Wattbike studio in JHB. The lucky 4 winners will receive more information once the competition ends on 31 March 2014. Terms and conditions apply.

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TrainingZone

Off-season workouts for Iron distance Once the local tri season is done and you’re already looking forward to the next long race, ease back into regular off-season Iron distance workouts with Phil Mosley’s six-week training plan

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fitness will increase at a steady rate and you won’t feel like you’re killing yourself in the process. Keeping fit year round is key to a successful summer tri season. This training plan allows you to achieve exactly that. There are sessions to do from Monday to Sunday, but you can swap the days around. The key thing is to do most of the workouts consistently each week while allowing time to recover. We recommend starting this plan about seven months before your target race.

oping to do an Iron distance race next season? Even though we’re still in summer and the next season seems a long time away, it’s time you said goodbye to Sunday morning lie-ins and started training consistently. You don’t need to be running a marathon before breakfast, but you do need to establish yourself in a solid training routine during the off-season. Ease into it gently, then build up the key sessions gradually. This way, your 6 WEEK PLAN

TRAINING ZONES GUIDE

DESCRIPTION HEART RATE (%MAX)

RPE 1-10

ACCUMULATED INTENSITY

Z1 Recovery

55-70

<2

1-6hrs

Easy

Z2 Endurance

70-75

2-3

1-3hrs

Steady

Z3 Tempo

75-80

3-4

50-90mins

Comfortable

Z4 Threshold

80-88

4-6

10-60mins

Uncomfortable

Z5 Vo2 max

89-100

>7

12-30mins

Hard to very hard

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KEY WU Warm up, MAIN Main set, WD Warm down, FC Front crawl, PULL Front crawl with a pullbuoy float between your thighs, KICK Kick with a float held out in front, Z1 Training Zone 1, Z2 Training Zone 2 Z3 Training Zone 3, Z4 Training Zone 4, Z5 Training Zone 5, DRILL Your preference of swim technique drill, BUILD do each rep slightly faster than the previous

IS THIS PLAN FOR YOU?

Goal An Ironman in seven months – part one Timescale 6 weeks Start point Cycle 2 hours Run 1 hour Swim 800m Level Intermediate to advanced

For those looking to do an Iron distance race toward the end of this year, this programme is ideal. At this time of year, you also need to work on some triathlon fundamentals. That means seeking out some swim technique coaching, having your running style analysed and getting a bike fit if you’ve never had one before. Do these things over the next two months and you’ll see real benefits on race day. There’s an ever-increasing body of evidence indicating that improvements in strength and conditioning lead to faster swim, bike and run performances. So I’ve included two sessions per week, with step by step instructions. Iron distance training is best suited to intermediate or advanced triathletes, rather than beginners. This training plan eats up around 12 hours per week and is designed for people with a full-time job. If you have extra time, add an hour to the beginning and end of the mid-week rides. An extra swim would help too. For simplicity’s sake, the swims are given as Main Set only. In addition, you should incorporate a warm up and warm down too. At the beginning, include a few hundred metres of front crawl, drills, backstroke and kicking. For your warm downs, do at least five minutes of gentle swimming. Check out the Key and Training Zones Guide to understand the abbreviations.

Photo: Jesse Wild

TRAINING PLAN


TrainingZone TrainingZone ESSENTIAL WORKOUT

WEEK 2

WEEK 1

DAY

Mon

Swim (recovery)

MAIN All in Z2 with 30secs rests: 500m FC, 400m as (25m KICK, 50m FC), 300m PULL, 200m alternating (25m DRILL/25m FC)

Tue

Bike (strength)

WU 10mins in Z2, 2mins in Z3 MAIN 4x7mins in Z3 at low cadence (60rpm) +2mins recoveries WD 5mins in Z1

Strength

Wed

Swim (endurance)

MAIN All with 5secs rests: 250m FC Z1, 50m FC Z3, 200m FC Z1, 100m FC Z3, 150m FC Z1, 150m FC Z3, 100m FC Z1, 200m FC Z3, 50m FC Z1, 250m FC Z3

Run (speed)

Thur

Bike (speed)

WU 10mins in Z2, 5mins alternating (20secs in Z5, 40secs in Z1) MAIN 6x3mins in Z4 with 2mins recoveries WD 5mins in Z1

Strength

Fri

Swim (speed)

MAIN 8x50m FC BUILD +15secs rests, 4x200m, FC Z4 +60secs rests

RECOVERY

Sat

Bike (endurance)

Ride in Z2, road or MTB for 2hrs. Consume 300 calories per hour

RECOVERY

Sun

Run (endurance)

Off road if possible for 1hr. Run in Z2, but pick up the pace to Z3 for the last 10mins

RECOVERY

Mon

Swim (recovery)

MAIN All in Z2 with 30secs rests: 400m as (25m KICK, 50m FC), 400m alternating (25m DRILL/25m FC), 400m PULL, 400m mixed strokes

RECOVERY

Tue

Bike (strength)

WU 10mins in Z2, 2mins in Z3 MAIN 3x9mins in Z3 at low cadence (60rpm) +3mins recoveries WD 5mins in Z1

Strength

See Training Zone p10. Plank, bridge, hamstring curl, superman, side plank, squat, lunge, calf raise

Wed

Swim (endurance)

MAIN 400m PULL in Z3 +40secs rests, 2x200m FC Z3 +20secs rests, 2x150m PULL Z3 +15secs rests, 2x100m FC Z3 +10secs rests

Run (speed)

WU 10mins in Z2, 60secs in Z4 MAIN 3x1,600m in Z4 with 3mins rests in Z1 WD 5mins in Z1

Thur

Bike (speed)

WU 10mins in Z2, 5mins alternating (20secs in Z5, 40secs in Z1) MAIN 5x4mins in upper Z3 with 60secs recoveries WD 5mins in Z1

Strength

See Training Zone p10. Plank, bridge, hamstring curl, superman, side plank, squat, lunge, calf raise

Fri

Swim (speed)

MAIN 8x100m alternating (100m FC/100m PULL) Z4 +45secs rests

RECOVERY

Sat

Bike (endurance)

Ride in Z2, road or MTB for 2hrs 15mins. Consume 300 calories per hour

RECOVERY

Sun

Run (endurance)

Off road if possible for 1hr 10mins. Run in Z2, but pick up the pace to Z3 for the last 10mins

RECOVERY

Mon

WEEK 3

OPTIONAL WORKOUT

RECOVERY

RECOVERY

MAIN See Training Zone p10. Plank, bridge, hamstring curl, superman, side plank, squat, lunge, calf raise WU 10mins in Z2, 60secs in Z4 MAIN 3x(6x200m) in

Z4 to Z5 with 20secs rest between reps and 3mins between sets WD 5mins in Z1 See Training Zone p10. Plank, bridge, hamstring curl, superman, side plank, squat, lunge, calf raise

RECOVERY

Tue

Bike (strength)

WU 10mins in Z2, 2mins in Z3, 3mins in Z2 MAIN 2x15mins in Z3 at low cadence (60rpm) +3mins recovery WD 5mins in Z1

Strength

See Training Zone p10. Plank, bridge, hamstring curl, superman, side plank, squat, lunge, calf raise

Wed

Swim (endurance)

MAIN 4x200m FC in Z3 +30secs rests, 6x100m PULL in Z3 +15secs rests, 8x50m FC in Z3 +10secs rests

Run (speed)

WU 10mins in Z2, 60secs in Z4 MAIN 2x(5x400m) in Z4 with 20secs rest between reps and 3mins between sets WD 5mins in Z1

Thur

Bike (speed)

WU 10mins in Z2, 5mins alternating (20secs in Z5, 40secs in Z1) MAIN 7x2mins in Z5 with 2mins recoveries WD 5mins in Z1

Strength

See Training Zone p10. Plank, bridge, hamstring curl, superman, side plank, squat, lunge, calf raise

Fri

Swim (speed)

MAIN 4x100m FC BUILD +15secs rests, 6x100m PULL Z4 +45secs rests

RECOVERY

Sat

Bike (endurance)

Ride in Z2, road or MTB for 2hrs 30mins. Consume 300 calories per hour

RECOVERY

Sun

Run (endurance)

Off road if possible. Run in Z2 for 1hr 20mins, but pick up the pace to Z3 for the last 10mins

RECOVERY MARCH 2014

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TrainingZone TrainingZone ESSENTIAL WORKOUT

WEEK 5

WEEK 4

DAY

Mon

Swim (recovery)

MAIN All in Z2 with 30secs rests: 3x400m as (100m FC, 100m KICK, 100m PULL, 100m DRILL)

Tue

Bike (strength)

WU 10mins in Z2, 2mins in Z3, 3mins in Z2 MAIN 20mins, 10mins both in Z3 at low cadence (60rpm) +3mins recovery WD 5mins in Z1

Strength

See Training Zone p10. Plank, bridge, hamstring curl, superman, side plank, squat, lunge, calf raise

Wed

Swim (endurance)

MAIN 300m PULL Z2, 4x100m FC Z3 +10secs rests, 200m PULL Z2, 3x100m FC Z3 +10secs rests, 200m KICK alternating (25m in Z2, 25m in Z3)

Run (speed)

WU 10mins in Z2, 60secs in Z4 MAIN 5x800m in Z4 with 30secs rests WD 5mins in Z1

Thur

Bike (speed)

WU 10mins in Z2, 5mins alternating (20secs in Z5, 40secs in Z1) MAIN 7, 6, 5, 4, 3mins all in Z4 with 2mins recoveries WD 5mins in Z1

Strength

See Training Zone p10. Plank, bridge, hamstring curl, superman, side plank, squat, lunge, calf raise

Fri

Swim (speed)

MAIN 4x(200m PULL Z2 +15secs rest, 4x50m FC Z5 +30secs rest)

RECOVERY

Sat

Bike (endurance)

Ride in Z2, road or MTB for 2hrs 45mins. Consume 300 calories per hour

RECOVERY

Sun

Run (endurance)

Off road if possible. Run in Z2 for 1hr 30mins, but pick up the pace to Z3 for the last 10mins

RECOVERY

Mon

Swim (recovery)

MAIN All in Z2 with 30secs rests: 4x300m as (100m FC, 100m DRILL, 100m PULL)

RECOVERY

Tue

Bike (strength)

WU 10mins in Z2, 2mins in Z3, 3mins in Z2 MAIN 25mins, 5mins both in Z3 at low cadence (60rpm) +3mins recovery WD 5mins in Z1

Strength

See Training Zone p10. Plank, bridge, hamstring curl, superman, side plank, squat, lunge, calf raise

Wed

Swim (endurance)

MAIN 400m FC Z2 +20secs rest, 2x200m PULL Z3 +10secs rest, 300m FC Z2 +15secs rest, 2x150m PULL Z3 +10secs rest, 200m KICK alternating Z2, Z3

Run (speed)

WU 10mins in Z2, 60secs in Z4 MAIN 4x1,000m in Z4 with 30secs rests WD 5mins in Z1

Thur

Bike (speed)

WU 10mins in Z2, 5mins alternating (20secs in Z5, 40secs in Z1) MAIN 8, 7, 6, 5 all in Z4 with 2mins recoveries WD 5mins in Z1

Strength

See Training Zone p10. Plank, bridge, hamstring curl, superman, side plank, squat, lunge, calf raise

Fri

Swim (speed)

MAIN 4x150m FC BUILD +20secs rests, 100m KICK Z3, 4x100m PULL BUILD +15secs rests, 100m KICK Z3, 4x50m FC BUILD +10secs rests, 50m KICK Z3

RECOVERY

Sat

Bike (endurance)

MAIN Ride in Z2 for 3hrs, road or MTB. Consume 300 calories per hour

RECOVERY

Sun

Run (endurance)

MAIN Off road if possible. Run in Z2 for 1hr 40mins, but pick up the pace to Z3 for the last 10mins

RECOVERY

WEEK 6

Mon

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OPTIONAL WORKOUT

RECOVERY

RECOVERY

Tue

Bike (strength)

WU 10mins in Z2, 2mins in Z3, 3mins in Z2 MAIN 30mins in Z3 at low cadence (60rpm) WD 5mins in Z1

Strength

See Training Zone p10. Plank, bridge, hamstring curl, superman, side plank, squat, lunge, calf raise

Wed

Swim (endurance)

MAIN 5x250m as (150m FC Z2, 50m FC Z4, 50m PULL Z2) +30secs rests

Run (speed)

WU 10mins in Z2, 60secs in Z4 MAIN 3x1,600m in Z4 with 45secs rests WD 5mins in Z1

Thur

Bike (speed)

WU 10mins in Z2, 5mins alternating (20secs in Z5, 40secs in Z1) MAIN 3x9mins in Z4 with 2mins recoveries WD 5mins in Z1

Strength

See Training Zone p10. Plank, bridge, hamstring curl, superman, side plank, squat, lunge, calf raise

Fri

Swim (speed)

MAIN 3x100m FC Z4 +30secs rests, 300m PULL Z2, 2x100m FC Z4 +30secs rests, 200m PULL Z2, 100m FC Z4 +30secs rest, 100m PULL Z2,

RECOVERY

Sat

Bike (endurance)

MAIN Ride in Z2, road or MTB, for 3hrs 15mins. Consume 300 calories per hour

RECOVERY

Sun

Run (endurance)

MAIN Off road if possible, for 1hr 50mins. Run in Z2, but pick up the pace to Z3 for the last 10mins

RECOVERY

MARCH 2014


TrainingZone

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FUNDAMENTALS

Turn faster in the pool Use efficient touch turns for slick racing and better swim training GET READY FOR POOL-BASED RACING

Some pool-based tris don’t allow tumble turns, so learn to touch-turn without putting your feet down to get onto your next lap as quickly as possible. This will also help you train for open water, when you don’t get a rest every 20-30 seconds.

KEEP YOUR SPEED UP

As you approach the end of the lap, keep swimming at full speed – you’ll need to harness your momentum to turn fast.

REACH OUT AND TOUCH THE WALL 1

2

With your lead arm, touch the wall – if your arm is relaxed as it should be, it will naturally fold in towards the wall.

TUCK YOUR LEGS RIGHT IN 2

As you touch, bend your legs and bring your knees right in to your body, letting the momentum of your forward motion help your body to turn sideways.

3

BREATHE EASY

As your body turns, you’ll have a natural opportunity for a quick breath – don’t pause, turn your head or put your feet down, just allow the rotation of your body to bring your head briefly above the water.

USE YOUR LEGS

When your body has done a full 180-degree rotation, press your feet against the wall to push off, using all that bike and run strength you have to gain extra speed in the water.

ARCH YOUR ARM OVER

Bring your lead arm over, maintaining your usual bent elbow and wrist as you would in a normal arm recovery, ready to spear the water again.

GET STREAMLINED

As you push off and stretch out, streamline your body as much as possible, and don’t kick until you take your first stroke – which you should do the split second you lose speed from the push-off.

MARCH 2014

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TrainingZone PEP TALK

“There must be millions of talented people out there. Thankfully not all of them do tri or I’d get beaten even more”

T

Coaching editor Phil Mosley says winning isn’t just down to being born good: you need hard work, a strong will and expert advice, too

his month’s column is on the subject of talent. It follows my recent dismal effort at the Gosport Half Marathon where I finished five minutes slower than my PB, despite the most perfect conditions ever. At the same race my fiancée smashed her personal best, despite averaging just one short run per week over the last 12 months. These weekly runs normally involved her jogging with her friend Emma whilst chatting about babies – hardly the stuff that world records are made of. Still, her training regime obviously worked well for her. And frankly, I was rather envious. I spent the afternoon telling myself that PBs are only relative and that the faster you become, the harder they are to beat. These days I’m just happy if I get near one, let alone beat it. However, it did get me thinking about the subject of talent. I’ve always believed that there are millions of physically talented people out there. Thankfully not all of them race triathlons; otherwise I’d get beaten even more often than I do already. One of the things I like about triathlon is that it isn’t solely about talent anyway. It’s not like football, where some people are born brilliant and some can’t hit the proverbial cow’s arse with a banjo. I’ve coached dozens of triathletes and I would say that

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most had enough natural talent to win a triathlon. It often boiled down to their situations (age, family, career and so on) and sometimes their mindsets too. There are so many little things you can do to improve and talent is only part of the equation. Take this issue of Training Zone for example. There’s a DIY guide to bike fitting, advice on nutrition, an Ironman 70.3 training plan and some great tips about

swimming technique. No single piece of advice will turn you into a race winner overnight, but they all add up, bit by bit. Of course, I did think about writing a feature about the benefits of jogging once per week whilst chatting about babies, but there just wasn’t room this month. In the meantime, you’ll have to make do with all the other expert advice in this jam-packed issue.

Phil Mosley Coaching editor —

The brains behind Training Zone is Phil Mosley, an elite triathlete, former national duathlon champion and coach with a degree in sports science. He also trains individuals at myprocoach.net

Phil knows there’s more to winning than natural talent – but it’s a start…

Triathlon Plus Training Plus 47