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TO WAYS TO MADE ME FASTER BIKE GUIDE POWER METERS RUN CROSS-TRAINING SWIM 3SWIM FASTER JUNE 2013 R36.95 JUNE 2013 ISSUE 38

ONE SPORT IS NOT ENOUGH

MAIN C:\>_OPENFILE \PROGRAM FILES\RUNNING 2.0.DOC

RUNNING 2.0 >LOADING... >GET TECHNICAL IN TRIATHLON’S SIMPLEST DISCIPLINE AND YOU CAN PROGRAM YOURSELF TO FINISH FASTER IN YOUR NEXT RACE >_

WE’RE INSPIRED BY

How to choose the shoes that best suit your cycling needs

PART 2 OLYMPIC-DISTANCE TRIATHLON TRAINING PLAN

season one to remember

PLUS

  ISSUE: JUNE RSA R36.95 (inc vat)

www.triathlonplussa.co.za

RICHARD MURRAY making the 2013

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

FAST FOOD TO FIX YOUR BODY A MATURE HEAD LEADS TO A GOOD RACE SIX OF THE GREATEST RUNNERS TRIATHLON HAS EVER SEEN

NO.1 FOR GEAR ˜HCDDFC8I7HG HCD6F5B8G˜

  




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Welcome

Subscribe today SE E

ISSUE 38 / JUNE 2013

Don’t miss this month THIS IS YOUR WORLD

GREATEST RUNNERS

ALISTAIR BROWNLEE NO ONE hits the run as hard off the bike as Alistair Brownlee. With the light frame of a long-distance track athlete and the grit of a fell runner, Brownlee sets a punishing pace that few can match. Like his younger brother, Jonny, Alistair is a complete all-rounder as a triathlete, but his phenomenal 29 minutes and seven seconds 10km split at London 2012 confirmed his standing as the best runner over Olympic-distance the sport has ever seen. A key component of his unrivalled success has surely been the competitive, yet supportive, relationship he enjoys with his brother as they constantly push each other in their training sessions around the Yorkshire Dales.

THIS IS YOUR WORLD

SIX OF THE GREATEST RUNNERS TRIATHLON HAS EVER SEEN

12

Words Huw Jones Photo Triathlon.org/ Delly Carr | ITU

As we enter the clutches of winter, with June meaning the start of some seriously cold early mornings, we are reminded to keep on track with our training - and hopefully, an odd race or two. Locally, we have a few duathlons that will keep you busy during the colder months. Besides that, now is the time to try your hand at some cross country running events, mountain biking and the odd cycle race or two. Any form of racing can only be good for you. We tend to train in a zone that is comfortable, but the only way to improve and regain the fitness is to train and race in a zone that is slightly uncomfortable. It hurts when you’re doing it, but the benefits are there once finished. We all know the high you experience when you’ve just done a hard effort and the body is rewarded with some rest. It’s a good feeling, pushing yourself beyond your limits every now and again, so look for the races that you normally wouldn’t do outside of the summer tri season. Our international elite triathletes are carving up a storm overseas. At the recent ITU World Series event in Japan, we had Kate Roberts in 7th place with Gillian Sanders not too far behind in 12th. Well done ladies, that is a great result! On the men’s side, we had Richard Murray (fresh from his 2nd placing at the San Diego event) come home in 5th place, with new kid on the block Henri Schoeman taking the 6th spot. His swimming prowess shows just how important the swim is with this type of intense draft legal racing. So, any juniors out there with aspirations of the world stage and the Olympics one day; the swim is crucial and plays a very important part in your end result. Henri is showing us the way with his incredible swim times. South Africa is known for developing strong swimmers, so there is really no excuse for us not to have many more of our elites performing on the big stages at events overseas. Well done guys and girls, I hope that the triathlon authorities have a good plan in place to look after you until 2016. For now, the rest of us will try and stay warm, fit and ready for the summer when it eventually reappears in September. Keep on tri-ing!

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This Is Your World Six of the greatest runners triathlon has ever seen PAGE 12 WE’RE INSPIRED BY

WE’RE INSPIRED BY

RICHARD MURRAY MAKING THE 2013 SEASON ONE TO REMEMBER

urray started the new season with a bang. He won the ďŹ rst two races in South Africa, including the South African Xterra title – and then claimed podium spots in his ďŹ rst overseas races, including his ďŹ rst ITU World Triathlon Series race of the season in San Diego. On the day, he was only beaten by Olympic champion Alistair Brownlee. “I really can’t complain about the start I have made to the season. But it’s a busy time ahead, with lots of races this season. This year is all about having fun and becoming a stronger swimmer. I must become more competitive as a swimmer in my efforts to be a consistent title contender.â€?

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His goals for the season include good overall performances in the World Series and then testing his skills at the World Xterra championships in Maui, Hawaii in October - but a possible appearance at the very popular Hy-Vee triathlon also has the 24-year-old excited. The Hy-Vee Triathlon is an Olympic distance race held in Des Moines, Iowa. The annual event attracts many of the top professionals in the world, partly due to having the largest prize purse awarded in the sport. In addition to pro triathletes, the event features competition among amateurs as well. Hy-Vee takes place on 1st September, and Murray will also race in the French League this year.

Murray has added to his arsenal by getting Canadian Joel Filliol to be his coach. Filliol is one of triathlon’s most experienced and successful professional coaches, and has been involved in endurance sport since 1989 as both an athlete and coach. As a coach, he has worked with athletes at the highest levels, including the Ironman and Ironman 70.3 World Championships, the ITU World Elite and Age Group Championships, and multisport games such as the Commonwealth, Pan American, and Olympic Games. “I knew that Richard was looking to develop a relationship with a coach, where he hadn’t found the right ďŹ t previously. Rich has lots of personality

and brings his own ideas and intuition into the mix. I felt I could help Richard with his swimming programme, as well as work with him overall as an individual with our squad, so we have given it a shot and it’s working well thus far into the season. He’s a tactical racer, and rises to the occasion,� said Filliol, who describes Murray as an intelligent athlete that is thoughtful in his approach to preparation and attention to detail. Does he see a World and Olympic champion when he looks at the strong willed athlete that calls the Capetonian suburb of Durbanville his home? “Richard has the right mix of ability and mentality, so we’ll continue to work hard, taking steps forward each day/month/year and see how far he goes. Development wise, he’s young and has room to grow, getting stronger and more conditioned across all three sports.�

Not only was Murray signed as one of the Red Bull athletes this year, he is now also part of Specialized’s elite squad of athletes, which includes the likes of Javier Gomez, Jan Frodeno, Craig Alexander, Tim Don and fellow South Africans Conrad Stoltz and Dan Hugo. “It is a great opportunity to be part of the Red Bull team. It is a brand that I can identify with and that is very important. Red Bull is one of my title sponsors moving forward to Rio 2016. Being part of Specialized is like being part of a big family of very talented and like-minded people. I am in a great position in that I can really identify with the brands of my sponsors, which also include Oakley, Puma, Kiwami and Virgin Active. It is an honour and privilege to be

JUNE UN NE 201 22013 20 0133 JUNE

associated with these brands and you always aim to live up to a certain level because of those associations.� When it comes to mottos in life or favourite quotes, Murray’s answer is given with a big smile and a sparkle in the eye: “I love ‘pain is temporary, but glory lasts forever’. I love to push myself and the feeling of hurt is one that I have come to know quite well over the past few years as a professional athlete. At present, I love to say and think that it is time to live a little! In the end, I’m an oddball, wild child, and off-road athlete at heart.� After his sixth place at the ITU world Triathlon Series race in Yokohama in /may, Murray is sitting at fourth in the overall rankings - talk about a season! We’re all behind you, Rich.

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Richard Murray Making the 2013 season one to remember PAGE 36 RUNNING 2.0/

/INTRO

C:\>_openfile \Program Files\Running 2.0.doc Content:\ Images: Joby Sessions Type: Elizabeth Hufton

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GET TECHNICAL IN TRIATHLON’S SIMPLEST DISCIPLINE AND YOU CAN PROGRAM YOURSELF TO FINISH FASTER IN YOUR NEXT RACE ILATERAL BREATHING. Early vertical forearm. Drag coefficient. The first two disciplines in a triathlon race invite triathletes to take a technical approach to training, breaking down the swim stroke to miniscule movements and using hundreds of pounds of technology to analyse drag, power, cadence and speed on the bike. Running is the simple bit. Right? As a runner turned triathlete, I’m still relieved when I see a run on my schedule. Less fuss, less equipment, I can just go out and run without even thinking. In 15 years of running I’ve spoken to dozens of coaches, podiatrists, biomechanists and elite athletes and most of them have tried to break down the run into its technical details. But it’s only been recently, having dramatically altered the way

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I run, that I’ve come to appreciate the benefits to be gained from taking a bit more of a scientific approach to running. Physically, there is nothing simple about the action of running. As you hit the ground and stride forwards, the forces at work throughout your muscles, tendons and bones are incredible – yet we only start to think about those forces when we’re buying new running shoes or trying to get over an injury. Suddenly the precise angle at which your foot hits the ground becomes an issue, the number of times each foot makes contact with the road and the length of time it spends there is of the utmost importance. Through re-learning to run, I’ve come to appreciate what people have tried to tell me for years: that there’s more to run training than simply running, and that if you put a little bit of time into these complementary sessions, you’ll not only have a better chance against injury but run faster too.

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Running 2.0 Get technical in triathlon’s simplest discipline and you can program yourself to finish faster in your next race PAGE 42 GUIDE TO 3 WAYS TO MADE ME FASTER BIKE POWER METERS SWIM SWIM RUN CROSS-TRAINING FASTER JUNE2013 R36.95

Yours in tri, Glen Gore editor glen@triathlonplussa co.za

MAIN C:\>_OPENFILE \PROGRAM FILES\RUNNING 2.0.DOC

RUNNING 2.0 >LOADING... >GET TECHNICAL IN TRIATHLON’S SIMPLEST DISCIPLINE AND YOU CAN PROGRAM YOURSELF TO FINISH FASTER IN YOUR NEXT RACE >_

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

How to choose the shoes that best suit your cycling needs

WE’RE INSPIRED BY

PART 2

RICHARD MU M UR U URR RRAY MURRAY

OLYMPIC-DISTANCE TRIATHLON TRAINING PLAN

making the 2013 season one to remember

PLUS

ISSUE: JUNE RSA R36.95 (inc vat)

 

Get in touch... twitter.com/TriathlonPlusSA or facebook.com/TriathlonPlusSA

FAST FOOD TO FIX YOUR BODY A MATURE HEAD LEADS TO A GOOD RACE SIX OF THE GREATEST RUNNERS TRIATHLON HAS EVER SEEN

NO.1 FOR GEAR ˜HCDDFC8I7HG HCD6F5B8G˜

  



ON THE COVER KIWI CLARK ELLICE – ITU WORLD SERIES RACER Photography Delly Carr - itu.org

JUNE 2013

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ISSUE 38 / JUNE 2013

Meet your team of experts We’ve assembled the biggest and best team of triathlon experts around to bring you unrivalled coverage of your sport

The Fire Tree Design Company (PTY) Ltd P.O.Box 18882, Dalbridge, 4014 KZN Tel +27 31 534 6600 Fax +27 31 534 6650 Email info@triathlonplussa.co.za Web www.triathlonplussa.co.za

Editor Glen Gore glen@triathlonplussa.co.za

Contributors Rich Allen, Eva Caiden, Dr Kevin Currell, Eamonn Deane, Fiona Duffy, Txema Garcia, Glen Gore, Phil Graves, Peter Greenwood, Guy Kesteven, Nigel Leighton, Dr Ian Rollo, Spencer Smith, Mark Threlfall, Steve Trew, Jamie Wilkins Photography Triathlon.org/ Delly Carr | ITU, Rich Cruse, Paul Phillips @ Competitive Image, Triathlon.org / Janos Schmidt, Delly Carr | ITU, Ryan Bowd, Michael Dannenberg www.foodimaging.co.uk, Joby Sessions, Jesse Wild, British Triathlon, Joseph Branston, Corbis

Delly Carr - itu.org

PHIL MOSLEY

TOM BALLARD

Glen is the editor of Triathlon Plus in South Africa, and coaches triathletes. He’s been a pro ITU World Cup racer and multiple top-five Ironman finisher.

Our coaching editor Phil is an elite triathlete and coach with a degree in sports science. Also the reigning British age-group duathlon champion, he is currently training in Stellenbosch, South Africa

Our senior writer Tom has a love of all things triathlon. He kicked the 2013 season off by acquiring awe-inspiring sunburn racing in Abu Dhabi, and is now looking forward to returning to Ironman 70.3 UK

ANDY BULLOCK

PHIL GRAVES

SPENCER SMITH

Phil is a pro Ironman triathlete renowned for his cycling prowess. He won the Ironman UK and 70.3 UK double in 2009 took the 70.3 UK title again in 2012 and has also won TriStar111 Milton Keynes

Smith is a coach and elite triathlete. He has 15 years experience of working and coaching in elite sports programmes. He’s won two world championships and two Ironmans

8

DR KEVIN CURRELL

STEVE TREW

RICH ALLEN

A leading triathlon coach and commentator, Steve has been in the game forever. You can reach him for coaching advice and details on his training camps on trew@personalbest. demon.co.uk

Rich has won nine national elite British championships and qualified for the Olympics in 2000. He still races professionally, and runs his own coaching business richallenfitness.com

JUNE 2013

Social Media Jonathan Trenor Subscriptions Geraldine Stone

Advertising Glen Gore +27 74 187 7140 glen@triathlonplussa.co.za

Subscriptions +27 31 534 6600 subs@triathlonplussa.co.za Subscribe online at www.triathlonplussa.co.za

TriPlus Voice Blogsite www.triplus.co.za Printed in SA by The Fire Tree Design Company under license with Futurenet Publishers.

Managing Director Arthur Lello Financial Director Debbie Palframan Tel +27 31 534 6600

Future produces carefully targeted special-interest magazines, websites and events for people who share a passion. We publish more than 170 magazines and websites and 100 international editions of our titles are published across the world.

Future plc is a public company quoted on the London Stock Exchange (symbol: FUTR). www.futureplc.com

Kevin works for the English Institute of Sport as a performance nutritionist, specialising in triathlon. He’s a keen triathlete and his scientific research on sports nutrition is widely published

Art Editor Shane Hardie

Distribution through RNA distributors and First Freight.

The Fire Tree Design Company Suite 515, Island Office Park 35/37 Island Circle, Riverhorse Valley P.O. Box 18882, Dalbridge, 4014 www.firetree.co.za

Bullock has completed over 10,000 hours of coaching and currently works with British Triathlon on both their Paratriathlon and Regional Academy projects as well as with age-groupers

Creative Director Bianca Schmitz

Copy Editor Alexandra Massey

Editorial

Cover Photo GLEN GORE

Meet the South African team:

Chief executive Stevie Spring Non-executive chairman Roger Parry Group finance director John Bowman Tel +44 (0)20 7042 4000 (London) Tel +44 (0)1225 442244 (Bath)

© Future Publishing Limited 2009. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be used or reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. Future Publishing Limited (company number 2008885) is registered in England and Wales. The registered office of Future Publishing Limited is at Beauford Court, 30 Monmouth Street, Bath BA1 2BW. All information contained in this magazine is for information only and is, as far as we are aware, correct at the time of going to press. Future cannot accept any responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. Readers are advised to contact manufacturers and retailers directly with regard to the price of products/ services referred to in this magazine. If you submit unsolicited material to us, you automatically grant Future a licence to publish your submission in whole or in part in all editions of the magazine, including licensed editions worldwide and in any physical or digital format throughout the world. Any material you submit is sent at your risk and, although every care is taken, neither Future nor its employees, agents or subcontractors shall be liable for loss or damage.

Training and health advice Future Publishing Limited is not an expert provider of medical advice and the instructions provided herein are in no way intended as a substitute for such advice. Please seek medical advice if you have any injuries or medical conditions. If you experience any pain or discomfort whilst carrying out training plans or exercises in this magazine you should STOP immediately and seek advice from your physician or healthcare provider.


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Contents ISSUE 38 / JUNE 2013

ON THE COVER

EVERY MONTH

12 THIS IS YOUR WORLD

50 RACE REPORTS

Six of the greatest runners triathlon has ever seen

The latest review of some of the biggest races

24 UP TO SPEED

76 BRAND NEW KIT

For all the latest Tri news

33 FUEL / REFUEL

Garden pea and sweet potato soup

36 WE’RE INSPIRED BY

Richard Murray, making the 2013 season one to remember

40 WHAT TO LOOK FOR

How to choose the shoes that best suit your cycling needs

42 RUNNING 2.0

Get technical in triathlon’s simplest discipline and you can program yourself to finish faster in your next race

58 NEW WAYS TO GO FASTER

A trio of new ideas that may help you find an extra few seconds ANDY BULLOCK

61 PERFECT PACING

Triathlons are endurance events, not sprints. Here’s how to go the distance SPENCER SMITH

62 POWER METERS

An essential guide to using power meters in training and racing JEFF JONES

70 RACE AN OLYMPIC-DISTANCE TRIATHLON IN 12 WEEKS

The sessions you need to develop your speed and race fitness, so that you reach race day in your best shape ever SPENCER SMITH

76

BRAND NEW KIT

GET THE LOWDOWN ON THE HOTTEST GEAR TO HIT THE SHOPS

Check out all the latest gear on the market

82 RACE LISTINGS

Plan the end of your year with our guide to what’s on

83 SUBSCRIBE AND LOOK COOL

Never miss an issue, save money and get yourself some free gear

93 COMEBACK TALES

Rich Allen figures out that there’s more to a fading run

94 TREW STORIES

Steve Trew spares a thought for domestiques

TRAINING ZONE

67 CROSS-TRAINING BENEFITS

Why training in other sports can make you faster at tri with transferable speed RICHARD HORTON

38

POWERING THROUGH

USE THESE PROTEIN-PACKED SNACKS TO GET BACK TO YOUR BEST AFTER A HARD SESSION

69 SUGAR – GOOD OR BAD?

Some say it’s bad for us while others say it’s OK, but who should we believe? DR KEVIN CURRELL

74 YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED BY OUR EXPERTS How to avoid cramping when racing and fuelling tips for a 70.3 EMMA DEAKIN, DR KEVIN CURRELL

40

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

HOW TO CHOOSE THE SHOES THAT BEST SUIT YOUR CYCLING NEEDS

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JUNE 2013


Su

and bscri b g goo et fre e SEE dies e PA GE 83

42 50

RACE REPORT

RUNNING 2.0

GET TECHNICAL IN TRIATHLON’S SIMPLEST DISCIPLINE AND YOU CAN PROGRAM YOURSELF TO FINISH FASTER

GET UP TO DATE ON ALL THE BEST RACES

36

WE’RE INSPIRED BY

RICHARD MURRAY, MAKING THE 2013 SEASON ONE TO REMEMBER

JUNE 2013

11


THIS IS YOUR WORLD

THIS IS YOUR WORLD

SIX OF THE GREATEST RUNNERS TRIATHLON HAS EVER SEEN

12

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GREATEST RUNNERS

ALISTAIR BROWNLEE

Words Huw Jones Photo Triathlon.org/ Delly Carr | ITU

NO ONE hits the run as hard off the bike as Alistair Brownlee. With the light frame of a long-distance track athlete and the grit of a fell runner, Brownlee sets a punishing pace that few can match. Like his younger brother, Jonny, Alistair is a complete all-rounder as a triathlete, but his phenomenal 29 minutes and seven seconds 10km split at London 2012 confirmed his standing as the best runner over Olympic-distance the sport has ever seen. A key component of his unrivalled success has surely been the competitive, yet supportive, relationship he enjoys with his brother as they constantly push each other in their training sessions around the Yorkshire Dales.

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THIS IS YOUR WORLD

MIRINDA CARFRAE

Photo Paul Phillips @ Competitive Image

MIRINDA CARFRAE’S consistency and athleticism as a runner have been the foundation of her rise to triathlon greatness. At the 2009 Ironman World Championship in Hawaii, Carfrae managed the incredible feat of setting a new marathon course record on her first try at full Ironman distance, finishing second to Chrissie Wellington. Since then, she has won the Ironman World Championship, smashed the women’s marathon record down to 2:52:09, and made a name for herself as the strongest female runner on the long-distance circuit. With the flawless technique of a natural runner, Carfrae’s ability to hold her form late into the third discipline enables her to close the gap on even the fastest cyclists in the field.

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GREATEST RUNNERS

MARK ALLEN

Photo Rich Cruse

NO LIST of legendary runners in triathlon would be complete without six-time Ironman World Champion, Mark Allen (right). Although originally a swimmer, it was as a runner that Allen set a new benchmark in triathlon. At the 1989 Ironman World Championships in Hawaii, Allen beat long-time rival Dave Scott (left) in their inspiring ‘Iron War’ showdown, sealing the victory with a record 2:40:04 marathon. A record that still stands. It was in his final appearance in Hawaii in 1995 that the Californian truly showed why he was nicknamed The Grip, when he defied all odds to run from over 13 minutes off the leaders out of T2 to pass Thomas Hellriegel for the win with 5km to go.

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THIS IS YOUR WORLD

CHRIS MCCORMACK

Photo Paul Phillips @ Competitive Image

THE RUN was never Macca’s strongest discipline. In his bid to realise the elusive dream of victory at Kona, the straight-talking Australian reinvented himself as a runner and after several ill-fated attempts, finally became Ironman World Champion in 2007, storming to victory with a 2:42 marathon. With almost 20 years of race experience under his belt, McCormack is an expert at pacing the run and knowing exactly when to make his break. In 2010, at the age of 37, Macca gave an awesome demonstration of his ability as a runner when he won the World Championship again in dramatic fashion, holding off a late challenge from Germany’s Andreas Raelert one mile from the finish.

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TT/TRI SERIES

THE ORIG IN OF A ERO IT WAS, OVER 20 YEARS AGO, THAT JIM FELT CONCEIVED DUAL AERO: THE GENESIS OF OUR DA AEROBIKE. SINCE THEN THE FELT DA HAS WON IRONMAN CHAMPIONSHIPS AND TOUR TIME TRIALS. IT‘S BEEN REFINED, REDESIGNED, AND NOW EVOLVED INTO B SERIES BIKES. TO-

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DAY FELT DA AND B SERIES ARE THE INTEGRATION OF LONG DISTANCE RIDE COMFORT, FUNCTIONAL AERODYNAMICS AND REAL WORLD FRAME FEATURES. FELT RAISED THE BAR FOR AERODYNAMIC BICYCLES. NOW THEY ARE READY TO RAISE YOURS.


THIS IS YOUR WORLD

NICOLA SPIRIG

Photo Triathlon.org/ Delly Carr | ITU

NICOLA SPIRIG has one of the most powerful sprint finishes in the business, but her strength as a runner was pushed to the very limit during the thrilling women’s Olympic final in Hyde Park last year. In the closest finish ever witnessed in an Olympic triathlon, Spirig edged out Sweden’s Lisa Norden on a photo finish to take gold at her third Olympic Games. The sprint finish was a strategy Spirig had trained hard for, focusing on interval training, hill repeats and running after her toughest bike sessions. Competing at national track events for Zurich Athletics Club and becoming Swiss champion over 3,000m and 5,000m must have also helped with that trademark kick.

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RINNY WINS ON THE DA

W H AT D R I V E S Y O U


THIS IS YOUR WORLD

CHRISSIE WELLINGTON

Photo Paul Phillips @ Competitive Image

CHRISSIE WELLINGTON’S singular ability to clock record-breaking bike splits and still have the legs to run so strongly makes her a once-ina-generation athlete. At Challenge Roth 2011, Wellington ran her way to her third title and the long-distance world record (8:18:13) with a 2:44:35 marathon. She crossed the line almost 40 minutes ahead of the next woman and her run split was second only to the men’s race winner Andreas Raelert. The Brit spent a lot of time before the race living in Boulder, Colorado – a training Mecca for pro triathletes – and she certainly reaped the benefits of the altitude and thinner air back down at sea level in Hawaii, where she has now won four times.

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TRI ROCK DURBAN 1.9km swim/90km cycle/21km run When: 22nd September Where: Durban South Africa info The latest addition to the triathlon calendar in SA sees TriRock Durban planned for the 22nd September. The race will consist of a 1.9km swim in the warm Indian Ocean, followed by a super fast 90km cycle out north to Ballito and back, then a 21km run that will take in the top sights of Durbs. A fast course makes for fast times, so this new race is a sure winner come September! Early Bird entries close 14 June, general entries on 30 August. WWW.TRIROCK-DURBAN.COM

JUNE JUNE 2013 2013

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SUPPLEMENTS NO MAGIC BULLET With an alarming number of athletes testing positive for banned substances in SA, athletes are warned that many sports supplements contain banned and sometimes dangerous substances such as anabolic steroids, pro hormones and stimulants. If taken, some of these substances can lead to severe health problems like organ damage, and in some cases, even death. This is according to SAIDS CEO, Khalid

means that products can be advertised

tested to date can; nor can ‘skimping out’

Galant, who says that athletes taking

and sold with misleading claims, incorrect

on any of these aspects be replaced by the

supplements also run the risk of positive

labelling, and lack of scientific-grade

use of supplements, as is often claimed by

doping control test results, often resulting

efficacy and safety evidence,” he says,“The

their advertising.”

in bans and even career loss.

lack of consumer awareness in this regard

Due to the supplement industry

means that consumer demand for these

not being regulated, Galant says

products remains high, with little impetus

manufacturers are not obligated to list all

for supplement companies to change the

of the ingredients on the product label.

status quo.” He points out that there are

Labelling is therefore not always accurate

many untested, harmful supplements

and the ingredients are often disguised on

being launched into the market that are

the packaging, making it difficult for an

only prohibited or banned once a critical

athlete to know exactly what the product

number of public reports regarding serious

contains (including banned substances).

adverse side effects, medical problems

Galant advises against the use of any

and/or fatalities are received. The same

supplements that claim ‘anabolic muscle

goes for the increasing number of failed

growth’ or ‘fat burner’ because they

drug tests in SA (and global) sportspeople.

generally contain banned substances:

There is also evidence that some dietary

“An estimated 1 in 4 sports supplements

supplements may also contain banned

contain banned substances disguised

ingredients that are not declared on the

under labelled ingredients such as

label, but are prohibited by the doping

‘testosterone booster’ or ‘growth-hormone

regulations of the International Olympic

accelerator’, which are used on the

Committee (IOC) and World Anti-Doping

packaging.”

Agency (WADA).

The products that collectively form the

He says that reliance on supplements

sports supplement industry are typically

shifts focus away from the more critical

also referred to as ‘dietary (or nutritional)

and proven methods of achieving optimum

supplements’, ‘ergogenic aids’, ‘health

performance and health: “Sportspeople

supplements’, or ‘sports supplements’,

can easily get sidetracked from the true

with a range of ingredients and alleged

elements of success in search of the

benefits which consumers are willing to

easy, unfounded short-cuts that the

pay for and use in the hope of enhancing

sport supplements promise. Optimising

body composition, exercise capacity and

one’s training, overall dietary intake, rest,

sporting performance.

recovery and sleep patterns can have a far

“The current lack of legislation and governance in the supplement industry

22

JUNE 2013

bigger impact on physique, performance and health than any sport supplement

New Screening Some good news for the future is that HFL Sport Science, an international sports doping control laboratory, is to launch a Sports Supplement Safety Audit Programme in SA, which will audit sports supplement products with regards to their efficacy, quality and safety and test for the presence of banned substances. Supplement manufacturers will be able to use a logo or ‘kite mark’ on their packaging so that athletes can easily spot the products that have met the rigorous certification requirements. SAIDS supports this as it assists athletes in making informed decisions and reduces the risk of using contaminated supplements.

JVT


GREATEST RUNNERS

DISPELLING POPULAR

MYTHS Ignorance is NO Excuse Ignorance is no excuse for the athlete and that strict World AntiDoping Agency laws dictate that the athlete is 100% liable for what goes into his or her system. Therefore, it is not worth it for athletes to take the risk of facing public humiliation and a ban, should they consume sports supplements that contain banned substances and thus test positive. To better guide athletes and coaches in their decision making, the full SAIDS supplements position statement is available at www. drugfreesport.org.za/sports-supplement/ Athletes can also view the list of banned substances at http:// www.drugfreesport.org.za/medication-check-4 or call the hotline on 021 686 1904 for more information.

A common reason for sport supplement use in athletes includes the belief that it may offer a ‘magic bullet’ which will increase sporting performance either directly (e.g. improved power, sprint, endurance capacity) or indirectly (e.g. increase muscle mass, aid body fat loss, improve immune function etc.) Galant dispells some other myths, including: P

P

P

Take the P le

dge:

Since launc hing its ‘I Pla y Fair. Say NO! to Doping’ cam p a ig n to spread the message of e th ics, fairplay and an ti-doping in s p o rt , over 4000 sport smen and w o m en have endorsed th e message o ve r the last year by putting their s ignatures to the anti-d oping pledg e . A thletes are encoura ged to go to h tt p:// www.drugfr eesport.org .z a /i -playfair/ and tak e the I Play Fair pledge .

P

P

P P

Supplements bought or provided by a well known store, pharmacy, website, supplement company or sales rep must be safe and legal. If the product label, website and/or sales rep refers to proven benefits, or that the product is tested and safe, then it must be effective and harmless. If there are no banned and/or harmful substances listed on the label, it cannot harm your health or lead to a positive test. If the label indicates that it is a natural/herbal substance, then it must be safe and beneficial. Active sportspeople need more nutrients, which you cannot get from a well balanced diet, therefore you need a special supplement. Nutrients from supplements are superior to those obtained from foods. Competitors or well known personalities are using it, therefore it will work.

For more information go to www.drugfreesport. org.za or join the conversation on facebook.com/iplayfairZA or on twitter: @iplayfairZN JUNE 2013

23


UPTOSPEED EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO GET YOUR MONTH OFF TO A FLYER

The season kicks off in New Zealand in April

ITU WORLD TRIATHLON SERIES RETURNS FOR 2013 WITH A globe-trotting eight-leg tour this year, the ITU World Triathlon Series (WTS) is set be reignited by top triathletes aiming for ranking points rather than Olympic glory. Races start in April in Auckland and culminate in London in September. AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND, 6-7 APRIL With Sydney bowed out of the ITU WTS after last year’s race, it’s up to New Zealand to open the series in Auckland – last year’s Grand Final venue. Racing here will be actionpacked, with a spiky bike profile meaning that there is the possibility for breakaways which could decide the podium before the flat run to the finish. SAN DIEGO, USA, 19-20 APRIL The series then moves on to triathlon’s ancestral home in San Diego. Only its second appearance on the WTS roster, there will be

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plenty of chances for the locals to cheer on their triathlon heroes during the eight 5km laps of the 40km bike route or the sundrenched 10km run around Mission Beach.

win in 2012. Javier Gomez is sure to want to finally put an end to the Brownlees’ dominance this year, with this, his home race being a top priority.

YOKOHAMA, JAPAN, 11-12 MAY The Yokohama race is third on this year’s WTS itinerary, with athletes jetting to Japan for this inner-city event, which takes place once again in Yamashita Park. The event is now firmly back on points-hungry athletes’ radars after the 2010 tsunami caused the race to be cancelled. You can expect to see the cream of Japanese triathlon going it alone for as long as they can hold off the pack.

KITZBÜHEL, AUSTRIA, 6 JULY Kitzbühel has always offered thrilling racing, but for their fifth year of inclusion on the circuit, the Austrians have altered the usual distances to ensure a truly spectacular day of racing. On 6 July, the swim will be cut to 750m to compensate for the savage bike course, which will see athletes take on 11.5km of racing straight up the Horn Mountain’s 867m of climbing. The pros then have to drag their weary legs over a 2.5km run that also includes 136m of climbing. It’s sure to be one of the season highlights.

MADRID, SPAIN, 1-2 JUNE Madrid will be next on the athletes’ hit lists, with the Brownlees looking to score another notch on their race belts. Alistair won here in 2009, 2010 and in 2011 and Jonny scored the

Words Tom Ballard Photos Triathlon.org / Janos Schmidt, Delly Carr | ITU

FLAGSHIP INTERNATIONAL RACING TO REGAIN STATUS AS PINNACLE OF TRIATHLON FOLLOWING OLYMPIC YEAR


UPTOSPEED

NEWS

5HOUR ENERGY SA SPONSOR THE BEAST 5HOUR ENERGY SA are proud sponsors of The Beast, Tendai Mtawarira. They also sponsor The 5-hour ENERGY® presented by Kenda Racing Team, which is a 10-rider US-based UCI Continental Cycling squad. The original 5-hour ENERGY® was introduced in 2004. Light, portable and effective, 5-hour ENERGY® shots have quickly become the no-nonsense way for working adults and sportsmen to stay bright and alert. It’s packed with B vitamins and amino acids, has zero sugar, zero herbal stimulants and four calories. The benefits for triathletes are certainly there if you’re looking for a boost during your next training session or competitive race. For more information on where you can find this product, contact www.5hourenergy.co.za.

The ITU WTS will hit Stockholm, Hamburg and Yokohama again

HAMBURG, GERMANY, 20-21 JULY Hamburg will not only provide another key WTS race, but will also host the Elite Sprint Distance World Championships as well as the Elite Mixed Team Relay event. This furiously exciting triathlon discipline sees athletes from each country take on a mini-triathlon that consists of a 300m swim, 8km bike and 2km run. Get used to seeing more of this blisteringly quick format as it grows in popularity towards its 2014 Commonwealth Games debut in Glasgow and its possible inclusion for Rio 2016. STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN, 24-25 AUGUST Stockholm will host the penultimate WTS race this year, with athletes typically looking to solidify their points rankings or cause an upset that could secure a podium overall by the end of the ITU Grand Final. Last year’s event was superb, and won by Olympic silver medallist and local girl, Lisa Norden, who was cheered on by huge crowds – the biggest seen at an ITU event

LONDON, UK, 11-15 SEPTEMBER For British athletes, the ITU Grand Final, held at the same venue as the Olympic race in Hyde Park, is sure to stir epic performances. For everyone else, it’s a final chance to go through some serious pain in search of ending the 2013 WTS on a high before the offseason begins. The event will also host thousands of international age-group athletes, coming to breathe in the competitive atmosphere of this unique location in their own world championships. With this thrilling event lineup and $2 million USD (about R18.5 million) for the world’s best athletes to fight for, the 2013 ITU World Triathlon Series looks set to be a classic year of racing culminating in a spectacular showdown in Hyde Park, where the Brownlees will surely go head to head for the world title.

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UPTOSPEED

NEWS IN BRIEF BIG NEWS MADE SMALL JENSON BUTTON RETURNS Formula 1 star Jenson Button has announced that the second Jenson Button Trust Triathlon will take place on 14 July. The racing promises to be fast and furious and is being held in aid of Help For Heroes. For more info, see jensonbutton.com

ZEROD BECOME OFFICIAL BTF KIT SUPPLIERS French sportswear company ZeroD are to be Official Performance Apparel Sponsor to British Triathlon until 2016. ZeroD gear has been used by the world’s top pros for years and now their kit will be proudly worn by all of the BTF’s Great Britain Championship Teams including elites, paratriathletes and age-groupers.

IRONMAN EXPANDS AGR Ironman’s Age-Group Ranking programme, piloted in last year’s European Tour, will be expanded globally to all 70.3 and Ironman races in 2013. Athletes receive points based on their top three finishing times. The top 10 percent of racers will also gain the title of Ironman All World.

ITU WTS SHOWS RATINGS HIKE Television figures for the 2012 ITU World Triathlon Series (WTS) increased by 18 percent compared with the previous year, with 5.43 billion contacts – an increase of 168 percent over the four years since the WTS began, following the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games.

NEWS

CHALLENGE FAMILY

RELAUNCHES IN AUSTRALIA WITH THREE NEW EVENTS

CHALLENGE MELBOURNE, Challenge Forster and Challenge Bateman’s Bay will spearhead the Challenge Family’s return to Australia. All three Challenge half distance events will comprise a 1.9km swim, a 90km cycle and a 21.1km run together with a prize purse of over AUD$30,000 (about R274,000). Challenge Family CEO, Felix Walchshöfer, said that the return to the Australian market is a significant milestone for the Challenge Family: “Australia is an extremely important part of the world for us; we have received messages from athletes every day asking us when we will be back and I’m delighted to announce our return with three very different, but all equally compelling races. Challenge Forster continues our commitment to the legacy of our sport with its strong roots in Australian triathlon, Challenge Bateman’s Bay has been chosen for its great location and athlete experience while Challenge Melbourne brings the Challenge Family to one of Australia’s iconic cities. We are very proud to work with all the communities and race organisers to bring a new triathlon experience to Australian athletes.” Walchshöfer’s sentiments were echoed by four-time world champion, Chris McCormack: “Challenge Family is all about bringing triathlon back to its roots, where you meet the people behind the event, where you’re welcomed across the finish line by them and where you are truly made to feel that you share the same passion. I’m beyond excited that Challenge

is back in Australia and can’t wait to be part of Challenge Family on my home turf.” A team of seasoned triathlon industry professionals has come together to relaunch Challenge Family in Australia, including renowned race directors David Hansen (SuperSprint) and Mark Emerton (Elite Energy). Hansen will oversee the Challenge Melbourne event, while Emerton will deliver the Challenge Forster and Challenge Bateman’s Bay events in collaboration with Challenge Family. The Challenge Family global series of long distance triathlons is changing the face of long distance racing around the world with its focus on athlete experience. Featuring spectacular courses in iconic destinations, Challenge Family events focus on delivering the race of a lifetime to every athlete, and creating a memorable spectator experience that captures all the excitement and emotion of this inspirational sport. The addition of the Australian races takes the Challenge Family to 21 events around the world, including the world’s largest long distance triathlon: Challenge Roth in Germany. Other Challenge Family races take place in Germany, Austria, Canada, UK, France, Spain, Italy, Denmark, New Zealand, Thailand and Taiwan. For further information on Challenge Family, please visit www.challenge-family.com, follow on Twitter @Challenge_Family or like on Facebook at www. facebook.com/ChallengeFamily.

FIRST LOOK

THE BEST NEW GEAR IN BRIEF

Slow-Mag

NEW PACKAGING www.slowmag.co.za

Visit www.slowmag.co.za to find out more. Rise to the challenge with Slow-Mag®. Slow-Mag on Facebook – www.facebook.com/SlowMagSA Slow-Mag on Twitter - @SlowMagSA

Slow-Mag, the market leading magnesium supplement by Merck Consumer Health, has recently launched its new pack design. The redesigned pack retains the key design elements, but boasts a premium look and displays the benefit statements on front of pack for new users to the magnesium category. So what is new? With regards to the product range, capsules are now in blister packs for convenience and improved portability. The capsules are also available in a new 10 pack, making it easier for consumers to trial the product and enter the magnesium category. SlowMag tablets are in a new wide neck bottle, allowing easy retrieval – a welcome change for anyone who has ever tried to get the cotton wool out of a bottle of Slow-Mag tablets.

> BROWNLEE BROTHERS TO WEAR HUUB WETSUITS FOR FOUR YEARS 26

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NS IO

Racing with a level head and mature attitude is bringing Phil new successes

CTAT

MATURE RACING A GOOD RACE PERFORMANCE COMES FROM A MATURE HEAD, EXPLAINS PHIL GRAVES I’VE JUST gotten home from my first race of the season, the Abu Dhabi International Triathlon. I finished ninth and was really chuffed with that result. I had told myself that I would be happy to walk away with some money at this race because, well, life hasn’t been that usual for me in the last few months, since I decided to buy a little homestead in York. After travelling and living all over the world in the last three years, I feel like I have finally settled. Recently my time has been spent wallpaper stripping, taking up carpets and then attempting to put it all back together again. It’s been a long and exhausting process. Working on the house all day and trying to fit in my training as well, I have really got to see what it’s like when you have to go to work and try to fit training around it. It has been a struggle, especially with my all or nothing personality. I simply have no idea how any age-

group athlete with a job can do enough training to complete a 70.3 or an Ironman – I find it near on impossible to get in 35 hours of training a week, so all you guys are complete inspirations to me. It’s really been a huge effort; I even went twice on Christmas day to paint the downstairs toilet. I really want all the renovations finished as quickly as possible! I did, however, spend three weeks at Club la Santa in Lanzarote; when I promoted myself from the position of workman to project manager as my dad was coerced into finishing the painting when my training volume picked up again. With another few weeks’ hard training under my belt at home, and carpets being fitted the day before I set off for Abu Dhabi, I was rather nervous as to how Abu Dhabi would go. However, coming away from the race, I felt for the first time that I actually managed a

mature performance, and in turn that’s the single key factor as to why I walked away with some prize money and a huge amount of confidence going into the coming season. You don’t have to be old to do a mature performance –indeed, what is a mature athletic performance? I believe it’s the ability to put everything out there on race day and get to that finish line in the shortest possible time. Surely this is what we try to do every race, finish as fast as we can, but how many times have we looked back at races we have done and thought, ‘if I had only gone 10 minutes slower on the bike, then I could have gone 30 minutes faster on the run’? That’s my main problem, using

everything on the bike and not having enough for the run, even though I know I have great run fitness. So how do I class my race as mature? Well, when I knew the pace was too high on the bike after 20km (of 200km), I let the front pack go and rode my own race. I didn’t feel great at that point but I was prepared to ride steady to make sure I got off that bike still knowing where I was and who I was. Sure enough, I started to overtake so many people in the last 50km who had either gone with the initial pace or had flown past me, spent a bit of time out front, and had then burnt out. After pacing myself throughout the ride and sticking to my plan, I ran the most solid run I have ever done, and in super hot conditions. I proved to myself that I can run in 33°C. After such a momentous performance, I am brim-full of confidence for the forthcoming season. How can you race maturely then? Mainly, it’s about knowing your limits, knowing what training you have done, having belief in yourself and not getting embroiled in racing everyone around you. Race your race, not theirs. Most of your competitors, especially over the longer distances, will just end up dying off and walking large parts of the run. Try your next race going that bit easier on the bike and it will make a world of difference during the last 50% of the run. It’s certainly amazing, even from little training, what you can achieve if you race correctly, intelligently and most importantly, you race maturely.

Photo Ryan Bowd

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UPTOSPEED

PHIL GRAVES Age 23 Achievements Winner Ironman 70.3 UK (2012), winner Tristar 111 Estonia (2010), winner Ironman 70.3 UK (2009), winner Ironman UK (2009), winner National Age Group Triathlon Championships (2009), selected for GB triathlon team (2009)

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27


T C E J B O OF E DESIR

Scicon

AEROCOMFORT 2.0 TSA he padded bike bag can be the most convenient option for travelling with your steed and the Aerocomfort is one of the easiest to use. Open up the three-sided zip and you find an aluminium box section taking up the full stiff reinforced bag floor. Simply stow your wheels in the padded, zipped pockets on either side then attach your frameset via its dropouts using the tough skewers provided. The bag’s wider at the handlebar end than at the rear, meaning you don’t even have to undo your stem or remove the bars, though you do

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need to remove TT extensions. We had no problems fitting a 58cm road frame inside, and only had to drop the saddle a couple of inches. Our first go only took around 10 minutes to pack and subsequent practising has just about halved that. Scicon have been very generous in also including skewers; frame pads; a nylon frame cover; rear mech hanger protector; and a TSA approved padlock (a combination lock padlock that can still be opened by airport security with a master key only held by them). Moving the bag is easy thanks to

four replaceable castors on the bottom, a removable drag handle and a padded shoulder strap, but it can be a little unstable when freestanding. Its weight, at 8.5kg including all the accessories, is good for the protection it offers and once you’ve removed your stuff it’ll pack down to a svelte 34cm x 39cm x 98cm, small enough to stow under a hotel room bed.

www.asgsport.co.za


OBJECT OF DESIRE

Cytomax

MUSCLE MILK uscle Milk is an ideal blend of protein, healthy fats, good carbohydrates and 20 vitamins and minerals to provide sustained energy, spur lean muscle growth and help provide recovery from tough days and tougher workouts.

M  

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JUNE JUNE 2013 2013

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OBJOEF CT DESIRE

Saucony

VIRRATA

he Virrata is our lightest and most flexible training shoe and allows your foot to move naturally. Built on a 0mm offset, this shoe lets your feet do the work while providing plenty of cushioning and protection from the road. Weight : Men-184g, Ladies-170g.

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31


PEOPLE WHO LOVE TRIATHLON

PIETER DU PLESSIS Works: Doctor Age: 40

Triathlon was a challenge that I took up after my 40th birthday, when I needed a goal to shake me out of the groove of too much work and too little activity. Finishing an Ironman seemed to be a big enough challenge! The journey through Sprint, Olympic, 70.3, and finally my first Ironman was incredible and filled with wonderful experiences, self discovery and expensive purchases. After a second South African Ironman, itself just as memorable as the first, I was looking for a new experience that would tick off a bucket list item as well. The world’s largest Ironman, Challenge Roth, seemed to be the right prescription. Nuremberg in summer was magnificent and the race itself unforgettable. Google or Youtube Solarberg and see for yourself. A one in a million experience. Made even better by flying to Zurich the day after the race for a Bruce Springsteen concert.

Send us a pic and tell us why you love tri and we’ll tell the world. Email: letters@triathlonplussa.co.za with ‘I Love Tri’ in the subject box

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UPTOSPEED

FAST FOOD TO FIX YOUR BODY

30 MIN

FUEL

Photos Michael Dannenberg www.foodimaging.co.uk Food stylist Liz Martin, The Hob Words Txema Garcia

The beauty of this soup is that it can be served hot or cold, as well as taken to work or training in a flask. Topping with the Greek yoghurt enhances the soup’s exquisite freshness. Chef: Txema Garcia

GARDEN PEA AND SWEET POTATO SOUP A LOW-FAT GREEN SOUP WITH YOGHURT TO WARM YOU UP AFTER TRAINING SHOPPING LIST 2tsp grape seed oil 100g peeled and finely diced sweet potato 1 finely diced onion 1 celery stick, washed and diced 1 bay leaf (optional) 300g frozen garden peas 1tsp plain flour 500ml chicken stock 25g fresh mint 30g low fat Greek yoghurt Salt, pepper and Tabasco to taste

NUTRITION Serves 1 Prep time 25mins Per serving 573kcal, carbs 81g, protein 34g, fat 12g

1

Heat the oil in a large, non-stick pan. Peel and finely dice the sweet potato, onion and celery. Cook the vegetables, without browning, in the pan on a medium heat for five minutes along with the optional bay leaf if desired.

2

While cooking, run the peas under hot water for five minutes to thaw before adding these to the pan, stirring in for one minute. Then remove two tablespoons of the vegetables, and place aside so that they can be added back in at the end.

3

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Increase heat to maximum and once the soup starts boiling, bring down to medium heat and cook for no more than 10 minutes.

5 6

Remove the pan from the heat and blend the soup until smooth. Taste and season as desired.

Finely chop the mint and stir in along with the diced vegetables removed earlier. Serve the soup in a large bowl and top with the Greek yoghurt.

Mix in the flour and cook for another minute. Pour the stock over the vegetable mix.

> GET CHEWY ENERGY WITH SOREEN LUNCHBOX LOAVES JUNE 2013

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FUEL/REFUEL

Recipe by Ina Paarman MAKE

TO FIX FOOD TO FUEL YOUR BODY

TIME

“More than a palatable potjie, this dish is tasty in the extreme and will add real zing to your coal- or gascooking repertoire. Succulent, creamy and with a good curry kick, your family will rest replete after this meal. Contented. Sated.”

MILD CURRIED CHICKEN POTJIE WITH BANANA SHOPPING LIST 8-10 chicken thighs 2 T (30 ml) flour 1 T (15 ml) medium curry powder 3 T (45 ml) canola or sunflower oil 2 t (10 ml) Ina Paarman’s Chilli and Garlic Seasoning 2 large onions, sliced 2 large carrots, sliced 1 x 400 g chopped tinned tomatoes 1½ cups long grain rice 6 bananas 1 x 200 ml Ina Paarman’s Tikka Curry Sauce 2 cups (500 ml) hot water 1 T (15 ml) Ina Paarman’s Chicken Stock Powder 1 cup (250 ml) coconut milk or regular or fat reduced cream fresh coriander (optional)

1

Remove excess fat from thighs and dust with a mixture of flour and curry powder. Warm the potjie until hot, before adding the oil. Coat the base by tilting the pot. Add the chicken pieces in 2 batches and brown both sides. Spoon out on a plate and season the chicken with Chilli and Garlic seasoning. When all the chicken pieces have been browned, add the onions and carrots to the remaining oil in the potjie and stir-fry until soft and aromatic. Spoon out onto a separate plate.

2

Now start layering the potjie. Place half the chicken pieces back in the pot, sprinkle half of the raw rice over. Add half of the vegetables and half of the tinned tomatoes. Cover with 3 sliced bananas. Repeat the layers once more. In a separate jug or bowl mix together Tikka Curry sauce, hot water, chicken stock powder and coconut milk. Pour down the side of the pot. Cover with a tight fitting lid and cook slowly over moderate coals for 1½ hours. Just before serving, top with plently of fresh coriander leaves stripped from the bigger stems.

3

CHEF’S TIP: Also excellent done in the oven as a casserole. Bake in a deep casserole or ovenproof saucepan with a lid at 180ºC for 1½ hours.

TO SERVE : Delicious with sambal salads of apple and tomato. APPLE SAMBAL 2 red skinned apples, grated 2 T (30 ml) lemon juice ¼ cup (60 ml) seedless raisins ½ t (2,5 ml) Ina Paarman’s Lemon and Black Pepper Seasoning Mix all ingredients together. TOMATO SAMBAL 2 ripe tomatoes, finely diced 1 small onion, finely chopped ¼ cup (60 ml) fresh coriander 1 t (5 ml) Ina Paarman’s Garlic and Herb Seasoning Mix all ingredients together. CHEF’S TIP:Both sambals can be made a couple of hours in advance, but add fresh coriander at the end.

> FOR MANY OTHER TESTED RECIPES AND VIDEO COOKERY LESSONS GO TO WWW.PAARMAN.CO.ZA 34

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35


WE’RE INSPIRED BY

RICHARD MURRAY MAKING THE 2013 SEASON ONE TO REMEMBER

urray started the new season with a bang. He won the first two races in South Africa, including the South African Xterra title – and then claimed podium spots in his first overseas races, including his first ITU World Triathlon Series race of the season in San Diego. On the day, he was only beaten by Olympic champion Alistair Brownlee. “I really can’t complain about the start I have made to the season. But it’s a busy time ahead, with lots of races this season. This year is all about having fun and becoming a stronger swimmer. I must become more competitive as a swimmer in my efforts to be a consistent title contender.”

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His goals for the season include good overall performances in the World Series and then testing his skills at the World Xterra championships in Maui, Hawaii in October - but a possible appearance at the very popular Hy-Vee triathlon also has the 24-year-old excited. The Hy-Vee Triathlon is an Olympic distance race held in Des Moines, Iowa. The annual event attracts many of the top professionals in the world, partly due to having the largest prize purse awarded in the sport. In addition to pro triathletes, the event features competition among amateurs as well. Hy-Vee takes place on 1st September, and Murray will also race in the French League this year.

Murray has added to his arsenal by getting Canadian Joel Filliol to be his coach. Filliol is one of triathlon’s most experienced and successful professional coaches, and has been involved in endurance sport since 1989 as both an athlete and coach. As a coach, he has worked with athletes at the highest levels, including the Ironman and Ironman 70.3 World Championships, the ITU World Elite and Age Group Championships, and multisport games such as the Commonwealth, Pan American, and Olympic Games. “I knew that Richard was looking to develop a relationship with a coach, where he hadn’t found the right fit previously. Rich has lots of personality


WE’RE INSPIRED BY and brings his own ideas and intuition into the mix. I felt I could help Richard with his swimming programme, as well as work with him overall as an individual with our squad, so we have given it a shot and it’s working well thus far into the season. He’s a tactical racer, and rises to the occasion,” said Filliol, who describes Murray as an intelligent athlete that is thoughtful in his approach to preparation and attention to detail. Does he see a World and Olympic champion when he looks at the strong willed athlete that calls the Capetonian suburb of Durbanville his home? “Richard has the right mix of ability and mentality, so we’ll continue to work hard, taking steps forward each day/month/year and see how far he goes. Development wise, he’s young and has room to grow, getting stronger and more conditioned across all three sports.”

Not only was Murray signed as one of the Red Bull athletes this year, he is now also part of Specialized’s elite squad of athletes, which includes the likes of Javier Gomez, Jan Frodeno, Craig Alexander, Tim Don and fellow South Africans Conrad Stoltz and Dan Hugo. “It is a great opportunity to be part of the Red Bull team. It is a brand that I can identify with and that is very important. Red Bull is one of my title sponsors moving forward to Rio 2016. Being part of Specialized is like being part of a big family of very talented and like-minded people. I am in a great position in that I can really identify with the brands of my sponsors, which also include Oakley, Puma, Kiwami and Virgin Active. It is an honour and privilege to be

associated with these brands and you always aim to live up to a certain level because of those associations.” When it comes to mottos in life or favourite quotes, Murray’s answer is given with a big smile and a sparkle in the eye: “I love ‘pain is temporary, but glory lasts forever’. I love to push myself and the feeling of hurt is one that I have come to know quite well over the past few years as a professional athlete. At present, I love to say and think that it is time to live a little! In the end, I’m an oddball, wild child, and off-road athlete at heart.” After his sixth place at the ITU world Triathlon Series race in Yokohama in /may, Murray is sitting at fourth in the overall rankings - talk about a season! We’re all behind you, Rich.

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MINI TEST

NEW GEAR PUT THROUGH ITS PACES

POWERING THROUGH

1

ACCEL RECOVER

pacifichealthlabs.com

Weight 53g | Carb 60% | Protein 15% | Fat 9% Accel have blended chocolate and peanut butter together into a nougat-style mix. It’s a bit dry in texture but chews down easily. The triple-source protein mix is potentially more potent per gram. Its 4:1 carb:protein ratio makes it suitable for general use. OVERALL

USE THESE PROTEIN-PACKED SNACKS TO GET BACK TO YOUR BEST AFTER A HARD SESSION

2

PULSIN MAPLE AND PEANUT PROTEIN

pulsin.co.uk

Weight 50g | Carb 34% | Protein 24% | Fat 24% Pulsin’s vegan-friendly, gluten and dairy-free bar is high in fat, and the cacao butter and carob flavouring make it a hard-going chew. It’s not bad value though. OVERALL

3

1

CLIF BUILDER’S BAR

clifbar.co.uk

2

Weight 68g | Carb 40% | Protein 29% | Fat 12% This has a nice texture and taste. Its high protein content makes it a potent recovery recipe and it’s vitamin and mineral enriched if you’re concentrating more on your training than your cooking. OVERALL

4

MULTIPOWER PROTEIN FLAPJACK

multipower.com/uk

3

Weight 70g | Carb 48% | Protein 26% | Fat 11% The protein/carb balance in this should make for a versatile bar and it’s pretty low cost. However, the substance under the thin veneer of chocolate is more like MDF than flapjack. It’s a stiff chew that rapidly dissolves, leaving an unpleasant sticky residue. OVERALL

5

MULE BAR REFUEL

mulebar.com

4

Weight 65g | Carb 58% | Protein 20% | Fat 10% Mule Bar’s Refuel is the only Fair Trade bar on the market. The chocolate chunks help to break up the fruity consistency and avoid any dry aftertaste. The high fruit content means it’s a high calorie snack with a relatively low proportion of protein, but that makes it potentially more versatile outside of pure recovery use. OVERALL

5

6

HIGH5 PROTEIN BAR

6

Weight 50g | Carb 44% | Protein 27% | Fat 10% High5 is the only bar we actually enjoyed eating. The 20% milk chocolate, high cocoa content and palatable texture help. The high proportion of protein to carbs makes it an excellent weightconscious recovery snack. OVERALL

7

SIS REGO

scienceinsport.com

7

Weight 55g | Carb 39% | Protein 36% | Fat 12% The Rego bar packs a higher protein percentage than any of the others here. It tasted good with a fast digesting texture under a thin chocolate skin. That meant we never struggled to eat one straight after training. OVERALL

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Words Guy Kesteven Photos Jesse Wild

asgsport.co.za


AVAILABLE IN OAKLEY PRESCRIPTION

LENSES SPECIFICALLY ENGINEERED FOR MAXIMUM CLARITY AND GLARE REDUCTION ON THE ROAD

OO RED IRIDIUM POLARIZED LENS ®

®

BEYOND REASON JUNE 2013

©2013 Oakley, Inc.

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The BIGT TES Cycling shoes

WHAT TO LOOK FOR HOW TO CHOOSE THE SHOES THAT BEST SUIT YOUR CYCLING NEEDS

Outsole Plastic/nylon is cheap but carbon is lighter and stiffer. Look for vent/drain holes which can help dry wet shoes. Most are drilled for triple point cleat attachment

Mesh Useful for venting hot feet and drying wet feet, but take care to consider foot warmth too as riding in the wind with numb toes can hamper your best efforts

Heel tabs A good-sized heel tab helps pull the shoe open with nervy or cold fingers. Also useful for levelling pre-attached shoes with elastic bands

Sole rubber Most people will roll into T2 with their feet on top of their bike shoes, but if you don’t do that then make sure you have some heel rubber to help steady your trot to your changing spot

Straps

Seamless interior

Many shoes use reverse main straps, running the opposite way to road bike shoes’ straps. Ensure yours aren’t so long they foul the crank arms, in which case you’ll need to trim them

Look for shoes with smooth, seamfree interiors. These will offer the best place for wet (often bare) feet to do their work without getting run-hampering blisters

HOW WE TEST

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WE SIMULATED a typical T1 transition, with wet and cold feet and tried to get the shoes on as quickly as possible. We opened them as wide as possible next to the bike and also attached them

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to the pedals for a barefoot mounting. We aggregated out the user-induced fumbles and only had the shoes’ designs in focus. We rode them all as well, after all shoes that go on easy

but pinch after 15km are as much use as a cardboard wetsuit. The combination of both elements gave us the rounded view of each shoe we were reviewing.


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RUNNING 2.0/

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GET TECHNICAL IN TRIATHLON’S SIMPLEST DISCIPLINE AND YOU CAN PROGRAM YOURSELF TO FINISH FASTER IN YOUR NEXT RACE ILATERAL BREATHING. Early vertical forearm. Drag coefficient. The first two disciplines in a triathlon race invite triathletes to take a technical approach to training, breaking down the swim stroke to miniscule movements and using hundreds of pounds of technology to analyse drag, power, cadence and speed on the bike. Running is the simple bit. Right? As a runner turned triathlete, I’m still relieved when I see a run on my schedule. Less fuss, less equipment, I can just go out and run without even thinking. In 15 years of running I’ve spoken to dozens of coaches, podiatrists, biomechanists and elite athletes and most of them have tried to break down the run into its technical details. But it’s only been recently, having dramatically altered the way

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I run, that I’ve come to appreciate the benefits to be gained from taking a bit more of a scientific approach to running. Physically, there is nothing simple about the action of running. As you hit the ground and stride forwards, the forces at work throughout your muscles, tendons and bones are incredible – yet we only start to think about those forces when we’re buying new running shoes or trying to get over an injury. Suddenly the precise angle at which your foot hits the ground becomes an issue, the number of times each foot makes contact with the road and the length of time it spends there is of the utmost importance. Through re-learning to run, I’ve come to appreciate what people have tried to tell me for years: that there’s more to run training than simply running, and that if you put a little bit of time into these complementary sessions, you’ll not only have a better chance against injury but run faster too.


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Regularly featuring in sprint athletes’ training, plyometric drills – used to improve power – are useful for anyone who runs. The explosive force generated by these exercises is not something you’ll have to call on directly very often, but just as running at speeds above your race pace for short intervals helps raise your race pace, training your muscles to cope with the high load of plyometric drills makes them better able to cope when you’re running fast. Research on plyometric training for distance runners suggests that these drills also help reduce ground contact time, meaning a faster run speed. And on the odd occasion that you do need to call on a sprint – witness Alistair Brownlee literally sprinting out of T2 at ITU races – it won’t take it out of your legs for the rest of your run. It might seem a lot to ask to add these drills on top of your usual run volume – which you should keep up – but it doesn’t take long to see the impact that power drills can have on your running. Australian research in 2003 showed improvements in 3km running times with just six weeks of plyometric drills (three sessions per week). As well as strengthening your muscles, power exercises could help boost your running economy (the amount of energy and oxygen you use to run), delay fatigue in long runs, and some researchers believe the drills have a neuromuscular effect, helping your body learn efficient run movements. Done properly, plyometrics also improve core strength and balance, leading to fewer injuries and crossover benefits to cycling – one study on cyclists showed an improvement in 1km power, 4km power and lactate threshold after four weeks of plyometric and resistance training. However, these drills should be performed at maximum effort, so can be risky if they’re not done correctly. If possible, have a coach help you, and stop the drills if you feel any twinges in training afterwards.

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— As with any squat, keep your back straight and core strong

STANDING LONG JUMP Boost your forward motion and balance with this drill

Start in a squat with your feet hip-width apart, core held in tight and back straight. Make sure you sit back and not down in the squat, so your knees are not further forward than your toes. At the bottom of the squat, jump with as much explosive force as you can to travel as far as you can, swinging your arms to help with the movement and balance, and try to land firmly into the squat. To begin with, recover between each jump, then progress to a series of eight to 10 jumps in succession.

RUNNING 2.0/

SQUAT JUMP Ramp up the explosive power of your glutes and calves

Similar to the standing long jump, but this time you’re aiming to jump as high as you can rather than as far as you can. Start in a squat, again checking your form so you have your core muscles engaged, back straight, shoulders rolled back and knees no further forward than your toes. Have your arms hanging down at the start of the movement, then spring up as high as you can, swinging your arms up above your head to aid the movement. Land back down, bending your knees to absorb the impact. Rest for 15-20secs between jumps and start with just five to 10 of them.

/MORE MOVES SPLIT JUMPS This drill more closely replicates a run action

BUNNY HOPS Cut your ground contact time with this exercise

BOUNDING Use this sprint drill to improve single leg power

Start in a split squat position with your knees at about 90 degrees, keeping your back as straight as possible and your elbows bent as if you were running. Jump as high as you can and switch legs mid-air, landing in a split squat with your legs the other way round. Do six to eight to start with.

Stand with your feet together, back straight, and bend at the knees and hips slightly. Keep your hands on your hips for balance; hop forward as quickly as possible in for 30-50m, bouncing on the balls of your feet. Repeat four to five times. This is best done on a running track or even lawn.

On your track or lawn, bound forwards (a bit like a triple jumper), driving your lead knee high and not allowing your heel to drop to the ground between bounds. Keep good form with a straight back, driving your arms with the movement and keeping a bend at your elbows.

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HIGH KNEES Improving the drive of your front leg helps turnover

BUM KICKS Bring on the cycling action of your run with this drill

Run with an exaggerated leg return – kicking your heel up towards your bum as you come through the stride. With each step, raise your lead knee so you’re trying to keep your foot underneath you, rather than keeping your knee down and kicking up backwards. The steps should be short and bouncy (don’t let your heel fully drop). Keep your torso upright and drive your arms back and forth just as you would when running.

To begin with, perform this drill at walking speed; form is everything. With your back straight and a strong, upright stance, step forward slowly and deliberately, driving your lead knee as high as you can (as if trying to clear a hurdle). Make sure your pelvis is stable, your back stays straight and your foot is flexed throughout. Keep your shoulders relaxed, elbows bent and drive your arms. Progress to doing this at a slow run, making sure your form isn’t lost.

— You’ll feel sore in the hamstrings if you’ve got this right

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/MORE MOVES ANKLING This fast-feet drill lowers ground contact time Start by walking through this exercise – take baby steps, putting the ball of the foot down first then bringing the rest of the foot down, as you inch forwards. Speed up the drill once you’re happy with the motion but keep it to a fast walk rather than a full-on run. Add it into your run warm-ups.

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BULL AT THE GATE Boost foot return and ground response Hold on to a post or wall and cycle each leg through the running action, pawing your foot at the ground (your heel shouldn’t touch the ground). Make sure your foot lands directly underneath you, and keep your hips and lower back still and stable. Start with one minute on each side.

ARM SPEED The simplest way to drive cadence: use your arms Practise driving your arms back and forth, with your elbows at right angles. Don’t twist your torso. Do this as fast as you can. Start by doing it standing up, then make it into a balance exercise by lowering into a single-leg quarter-squat and driving the arms quickly. Do 30 seconds on each leg.


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Look at elite triathletes and runners in photos and you’ll notice their strong form and enviable stride length. What you might not see, even when they’re in motion, is just how quickly those strides are taken. Anecdotal evidence from elite runners suggests that 180 is about the minimum cadence for long-distance Olympians – that is, each foot hits the ground at least 90 times per minute. Just as a high stroke rate and long stroke length in swimming is a formula for fast splits, maintaining a good stride length while speeding up your running cadence makes you faster overall. Not only that but raising your cadence tends to reduce overstriding – landing with your heel down and foot way out in front, increasing braking forces – and improve running economy. Increasing your cadence consciously is tricky and, at first, you may find your strides are radically shorter. Smaller steps aren’t necessarily a bad thing, though. Learn to run with a faster cadence by using a cyclical running action – instead of striding forwards, your feet cycle around so your heel comes up and through before striking the ground directly underneath you; almost as if you were riding a bike. This in turn reduces ground contact time and impact and encourages a midfoot or forefoot strike, so you’re less likely to develop impact injuries and, once you’re used to it, should fatigue slower in long runs. You don’t need to be precise about your cadence but seeing measurable improvements is useful and motivating. You can combine the data with your heart-rate and speed to help find your ideal cadence. The most accurate way to do this, and to track it over time, is using a speed-and-distance monitor that has that function, such as Polar and Suunto’s top-end models with footpods. For a simpler, cheaper measure, set a countdown on your watch for 30 seconds and count the number of footstrikes on one side during that period. Double the number to get your cadence. JUNE JU JUNE 2013 201 02013 3

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Any triathlete who has been to a physio will have been admonished for their poor core strength. It’s a loose term that refers to strength in the torso, which helps you maintain good form and stabilises your body’s moving parts. Usually, working on core strength involves exercises for the deep abdominal muscles, the lower back and glutes (which help stabilise the pelvis when running). Most runners and triathletes consider core strength work to be an injury prevention measure, but one 2009 study showed that six weeks of core training could improve 5,000m running times. There’s also plenty of anecdotal evidence from the elite triathlon and running communities – you won’t find many pro athletes who neglect their core. The fastest triathletes put in regular hours of functional strength training. Surprisingly little research has been carried out on its effects on tri performance, but it’s deemed so important that British Triathlon now includes functional strength training for all young athletes joining its performance pathway, working with their coaches to target individual areas of weakness and learn good movement patterns. According to British Triathlon’s lead physio, Emma Deakin, her work is as much about performance gains as it is injury prevention – and since she works with two Olympic medallists, we’ll take her word for it. As well as bodyweight exercises and movement patterning, lifting heavy weights can be a useful addition to your training regime. Hitting the gym is traditionally more associated with sprinting than endurance running, but there’s evidence that lifting weights – both in explosive exercises and in traditional programmes – also works for long-distance athletes. It’s been shown to improve running economy, time to exhaustion, and – most importantly if you’re looking for a new PB this summer – 3km and 5km run times. The gains should cross over to your riding performance, too. 48

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— Do squats in front of a mirror to keep an eye on form

HEEL DROPS Stabilise your pelvis and torso as you run

The key to this exercise is doing it slowly and keeping the movement controlled. Lie on your back with your spine in neutral (rock your pelvis back and forth to find the comfortable mid-point). Engage your core and draw your abs in without flattening your back. Raise both legs with your knees bent, so your thighs are at right angles to the floor. Slowly lower one leg at a time without allowing your pelvis to move; touch the heel on the floor and bring back up. Do two sets of 20, alternating legs.

SQUATS This classic bodyweight move boosts strength and stability

Start with standard squats: facing a mirror, with your feet hip-width apart, back straight and core engaged, lower yourself down by bending at the knees and hips and sticking your backside out – at the bottom of the movement your toes should be in line with your knees if viewed side-on. Slowly move back up. Progress to doing this on one leg at a time, slowing the movement even more. Your hips should stay level throughout. If you’re struggling to hold your form, just do quarter- or half-squats at first.

RUNNING 2.0/

/MORE MOVES SIDE PLANKS Resist twisting of the torso with this move

SUPERMAN This exercise is much harder than it looks

Lie on your side with your legs stacked, propped up on the elbow and forearm of your lower arm, with your top arm straight and relaxed on your side. Push up so your body is in a straight line, supported by your lower forearm/elbow and feet. Hold for as long as you can; repeat on the other side.

Start on your hands and knees with your belly pulled in. Very slowly, keeping your hips and torso absolutely fixed, raise one leg back and up and the opposite arm up and forwards, until both are straight out. Slowly lower them back down and repeat on the other side. Do eight to 10 on each side.

CALF RAISE/LOWERING This should improve your drive and avoid injury Stand with your forefeet on a step (touching a wall for balance if necessary) and lower your heels down as slowly as you can, then slowly raise up onto the balls of your feet. Repeat 10-15 times. When you’re more comfortable, try this one leg at a time to make it harder.

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RACE REPORTS

Elite results Men’s Long Course 1. Frederik Van Lierde (BEL)

6:41:02

2 Eneko Llanos (ESP)

6:45:03

3. Tyler Butterfield (BER)

6:47:51

Women’s Long Course 1. Melissa Hauschildt (AUS)

7:20:32

2. Caroline Steffen (SUI)

7:23:55

3. Michelle Vesterby (DEN)

7:27:55

Short Course Eneko Llanos leads the pro men around the Yas Marina Formula One circuit

1. Alistair Brownlee (GBR)

3:20:21

2. Cesar Beilo (NED)

3:25:36

3. Alexander Bryukhankov (RUS)

3:28:54

ABU DHABI INTERNATIONAL TRIATHLON Where Abu Dhabi, UAE When 2 March Winners Alistair Brownlee (GBR), 3:20:21; Frederik Van Lierde (BEL), 6:41:02, Melissa Hauschildt (AUS), 7:20:32 NDER THE Arabian sun’s rippling heat, the stellar cast of pro triathletes and 2,000 agegroupers provided a spectacular race at the fourth Abu Dhabi International Triathlon. Alistair Brownlee boosted the profile of the short-course race, lining up in his first beyond-standard-distance event.

U

Brownlee showed he could time-trial with the best in Abu Dhabi

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The 1.5km swim was led out by Alexander Bryukhankov (RUS), Brownlee and Lawrence Fanous (JOR), the trio leaving the water in 16:27 while 2010 winner Cesar Beilo (NED) had work to do after a 19:21 swim. Neither the heat, distance or wind seemed to bother Brownlee, while fellow ITU specialists Fanous and Bryukhankov – the latter on a road rather than TT bike – couldn’t hold onto the Yorkshireman’s pace. Beilo zipped through his deficit, managing to take first place after Brownlee briefly went off course on the Yas Marina Circuit. Posting the fastest bike split by some five minutes – 2:21:50 at more than 26mph – Beilo was first onto the run with a minute on Brownlee, but the Yorkshireman’s lightning legs soon saw him blast past his competitor, the Brit running a 32:47 10k, the day’s fastest, to secure victory in 3:20:21, smashing the course record by 29 seconds. Beilo held strong to claim a hard-fought second place finish in 3:25:36, while Bryukhankov performed his usual grimacing run to clean up the podium in 3:28:54. In the men’s long-course race, it was a British one-two out of the water with Daniel Halksworth leading Fraser Cartmell and

2011 winner Frederik Van Lierde (BEL) from the buoyant salty water in 35:16. Once out in the headwinds of the sunbleached highway, Van Lierde and 2010 winner Eneko Llanos (ESP) traded pole position while Chris McCormack (AUS) – nursing a broken finger after the swim – was behind with Xterra legend Conrad Stoltz (RSA) and Tyler Butterfield (BER). McCormack’s bad luck continued with a broken wheel ending his race after around 20km, while Stoltz pulled the remnants of the second group up to the leaders. The off-road racer then lost speed as his legs ran out of gas, leaving Van Lierde, Llanos and Butterfield in contention at the sharp end of the race. With around 20km to go, Van Lierde opened up the taps, blasting away in a decisive move; dropping Butterfield and hurting Llanos, who fought to hold on. Van Lierde’s perfect pacing paid off as he powered through the 20km run in 1:12:47 to cross the line as 2013 Abu Dhabi International Triathlon Champion in 6:41:02. Llanos took second in 6:45:03, holding off Butterfield, who took bronze in 6:47:51. In the women’s race Tenille Hoogland (CAN) was first out of the water in 38:14,

Words Tom Ballard Photos Paul Phillips @ Competitive Image

BROWNLEE, VAN LIERDE AND HAUSCHILDT VICTORIOUS IN THE UAE’S BIGGEST RACE


Bevan Docherty smashed his first-ever Ironman, proving this ex-ITU racer is one to watch

Mellissa Hauschildt’s speedy bike and run showed she’s ready to move up from 70.3s

Caroline Steffen had a great race, but was pipped to the post by Hauschildt

Photos Delly Carr

Frederick Van Lierde paced his race perfectly to claim his second win in Abu Dhabi

leading in Michelle Vesterby (DEN) and Caroline Steffen (SUI). Behind them, Melissa Hauschildt (AUS) led the charge in the chasing pack, three minutes back. Steffen was first onto the 200km bike course with Hoogland and Vesterby in close proximity. Hauschildt pushed hard, going past Hoogland and Vesterby to catch Steffen, the pair exchanging the lead, before the Swiss Miss managed to distance the Aussie on the final lap. Not to be undone, Hauschildt pushed on to regain contact with 15km to go, only to have Steffen edge a gap of 55 seconds out onto the run. After the day’s fastest bike split of 5:17:45, Hauschildt set about chasing down Steffen while Vesterby was next to rack her bike, 1min 38secs behind. The Aussie passed Steffen at around 7.5km and went on to create an advantage of almost three minutes, crossing the line in 7:20:32 with the day’s fastest run split of 1:16:42. Steffen continued to run well, ensuring second place in 7:23:55, while Vesterby claimed third in 7:27:52.

IRONMAN NEW ZEALAND Where Lake Taupo, North Island Determined to stay ahead of Crawford, When 2 March Kessler pushed the pace on the bike course, Winners Bevan Docherty (NZL) 8:15:35 ; recording the day’s fastest split – 5:04:44 – and boosting her lead to nearly eight minutes. Meredith Kessler (USA) 9:17:10 ITU STAR Bevan Docherty proved he had the legs to move up to Ironman with a powerful course-record win at Ironman New Zealand. Kiwi Docherty came out of the water second in 45:44, 10 seconds behind Marko Albert (EST), but nearly two minutes ahead of Terenzo Bozzone (NZL)and almost five minutes ahead of Brown. Albert and Docherty raced on, the latter pushing hard in his first Ironman. By 135km, Bozzone and Brown were seven minutes behind Docherty, who managed to power away to reach T2 with more than three minutes in hand, having posted the fastest bike of the day – 4:35:06. Brown was third in, another eight minutes behind. Docherty continued his Ironman education on the run, pacing out fast, but having to walk for a short spell before supping Coke and going on to finish in 8:15:35, a new course record. Albert held on to second in 8:25:30, while perennial champ Brown was third in 8:34:28. The women’s race provided a domineering performance from Meredith Kessler (USA), the winner of last year’s weather-affected event. Kessler was first from Lake Taupo, swimming with the pro men to clock a 47:37 split – fourth overall – for the 3.8km course. Gina Crawford (NZL) was next to T1, looking to make up four minutes.

Kiwi Candice Hammond was another 15 minutes back, a solid 5:15 bike putting her into podium contention after a slower swim. Crawford narrowed the gap during the marathon, but couldn’t quite catch Kessler, whose strong cycling legs ultimately ensured victory in 9:17:10. Crawford was second in 9:20:54, with Hammond third in 9:35:52. Meredith Kessler rode hard to ensure Crawford couldn’t catch her on the run

9:47:39results Elite

Top 3 Men 1. Bevan Docherty (NZL)

8:15:35

2. Marko Albert (EST)

8:25:30

3. Cameron Brown (NZL)

8:34:28

Top 3 Women 1. Meredith Kessler (USA)

9:17:10

2. Gina Crawford (NZL)

9:20:54

3. Candice Hammond (NZL)

9:35:52

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RACE REPORTS

CHALLENGE TAIWAN

MCNEICE AND GRANGER CLAIM INAUGURAL TITLES AT CHALLENGE TAIWAN Where Taitung, Taiwan When 5 May Winners Dylan McNiece (NZL), 8:16:21; Belinda Granger (AUS), 9:23:15

EW ZEALAND’S Dylan McNeice has again made his mark on the international triathlon circuit, taking his second major title in only his second long distance race at this weekend’s Challenge Taiwan. Meanwhile, Belinda Granger (AUS) won the women’s race, claiming her 15th long distance victory in the process. His two from two win proved that his victory at January’s Challenge Wanaka was no fluke as he once again led from start to finish. The 27-year-old asserted himself early on, leading a competitive field out of the swim by over three minutes in 47:00 and never relinquishing his lead, taking the title in 8:16:21. McNiece’s closest rival out of the water was Todd Skipworth (AUS), an Olympic rowerturned-triathlete and also a rookie in the professional long course ranks. Skipworth leapfrogged between second and third place throughout the bike course with Georg Potrebitsch (GER), eventually reaching T2 just ahead of the German with the fastest bike split of the day in 4:28:40. Within a few kilometres on the run, Potrebitsch managed to pull ahead and maintained his position to the finish line, taking second in 8:27:06.

Photos Rocky Arroyo, Matt Alexander Words Tom Ballard

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Skipworth would ultimately drop back to fifth, passed by both Fredrik Croneborg (SWE) and Petr Vabrousek (CZE), who crossed the line in third and fourth respectively. But while Vabrousek’s finish marked a historic 125th long course race for the Czech athlete, Croneborg’s performance was equally remarkable. The smiling Swede was a swift yet silent achiever, working his way steadily through the men’s field and capping his stellar day with a race best run split of 2:52:33. Also of note in the men’s race was Guy Crawford (NZL) who, despite a debilitating mechanical issue on the bike, fought hard to hold onto sixth place. Typically humble, McNiece was disbelieving of his win. “I was running and I was at the front and I thought, ‘Geez I’ve been at the front all day again today. This is just what people are going to always expect of me!’ It really is a hard way to race. It’s a good way to race because you’re always in control and it’s your own race and your own pace, but today and in Wanaka both I suffered the last 10k. I was stopping and walking, I started cramping and my stomach was a mess. It’s just like after Wanaka - I still don’t even know that I won. It takes a long time to settle in. At the moment I’m just happy to have finished, just happy it’s done. But in the next few weeks it will settle in and be a great feeling.” The women’s race featured an equally dominant champion, with Challenge Family ambassador Belinda Granger (AUS) claiming her 15th title in 47 career long

course finishes. Fresh off of a two-week training camp in Phuket, Granger initially seemed too far in arrears to set the first women’s course record in Taitung. She exited the water 6:23 back from notably strong swimmer Hillary Biscay (USA) and 4:50 from fellow Australian Kate Bevilaqua. But the swim deficit only served to light a stronger than usual fire underneath the already powerful cyclist, and by T2 Granger’s 4:55:34 bike split propelled her to the women’s lead. “My swim was shocking,” admitted Granger, “But sometimes that’s a blessing in disguise. It makes you kick it up a notch, where when you have a really good swim you can become complacent. So I had to chase from the start. Hats off to Hillary, she was having a storming bike and I didn’t catch her until 60k. Then she stayed with me, legally, until 90k. The only reason I got rid of her is because I knew she would stop for her special needs bag. I don’t use special needs on the bike so I took off like a maniac!” Granger’s ride, followed by an equally strong run, built a comfortable buffer over Biscay, and she posted a winning time of 9:23:15. Biscay, who boasts an even more impressive long course resume with 59 finishes to her credit, held tough on both the bike and the run, finishing in 9:37:40 for second place. Kate Bevilaqua rounded out the women’s podium.


Q & A with FELT The Escape From Alcatraz begins on a ferry just out from Alcatraz island

Hayley is an active sportswoman, mad about the outdoors and almost any form of sport. She is a former South African rowing champion and has competed internationally in the sport of rowing for South Africa. Hayley is qualified in Biokinetics and Sports Science, works at the Physical IQ Medical Centre in Durban as a biokineticist and runs her own business as a trainer.

Cross Training Through the Winter The winter months are all about cross training. Initially aim to improve strength, work-on cardiovascular fitness and correct muscular imbalances. Try these workouts: Monday and Friday: The indoor rowing machine is a great modality for cross training. Warm-up on it for ten minutes followed by one minute on / one minute off at level 4/5 on the machine, rating 20 strokes per minute pushing as hard as you can (80%+ HR max) for the minute on. Do this 10 times and work up to two sets of 10 and then cool down.

ESCAPE FROM ALCATRAZ

JAVIER GOMEZ AND HEATHER JACKSON LIGHT UP THE COURSE TO TAKE ESCAPE FROM ALCATRAZ TITLES Where San Francisco, USA When 3 March Winners Javier Gomez (ESP), 2:04:27; Heather Jackson (USA), 2:18:08 OLLOWING A superb 2012, Javier Gomez now seems able to pick and choose iconic triathlons to win – in this case, the fabled Escape From Alcatraz in San Francisco. The race got underway with a cold 2.4km sea swim from the legendary island penitentiary to the shore. Fellow Spaniard Godoy Francesc led Gomez from the water in 27:21, with Graham O’Grady (NZL)and Ironman World Champion Pete Jacobs (AUS) leading the best of the rest nearly a minute behind. Jesse Thomas (USA) – twice a winner at the prestigious Wildflower Triathlon – soon blasted out onto the dastardly-tough 30km bike course to hunt down Gomez and O’Grady. The Spaniard shone on the bike with the day’s fastest split (47:11), and went on to make short work of the 13km run through San Francisco. Gomez clocked a 45:12 split, crossing the line in 2:04:27 to take his maiden Alcatraz win. O’Grady took second in 2:05:39 while Thomas ran the day’s fastest time of 44:54 to claim bronze ahead of Jacobs. In the women’s race, Sara McLarty

F

(USA) broke away during the swim to reach her bike alone after 28:24 in the water. Behind her, Olympian Sarah Groff (USA) left the seawater in 29:08 while compatriot Heather Jackson was three minutes back. Groff rode strongly over the technical course to reach T2 first, but it was Jackson’s bike performance that stood out, completing the course in 51:39 to diminish her swim deficit and put Groff in her sights. Groff soon began to suffer from stomach cramps, causing her to slow and allowing Jackson to take the lead. Jackson’s 48:23 run split ensured first place in 2:18:08, while Groff hung on for second close behind in 2:18:37. The prowess of the two leaders was underlined by the five-minute wait for Ricarda Lisk (GER) to claim bronze in 2:23:36.

Follow this with a gym set: 3 x 8-10 pull ups (or your max), 3 x 5 one-legged squats to 90 degrees (on each side), 3 x 10-15 push-ups, finish with 3 x 8 cleans –with a weight light enough to make them smooth and explosive. Wednesday: Warm-up on the stationary bike / trainer for 15 minutes followed by 30 seconds right leg, 30 seconds left leg using a heavy gear, again pushing as hard as you can (80%+ HR max). Follow with one minute active rest normal cycling x 10. Do this set twice and be sure to focus on smooth pedalling through the dead spots. Again follow this aerobic session with the above gym set.

send your questions to info@felt.co.za

9:47:39 results Elite

Top 3 Men 1. Javier Gomez (ESP)

2:04:27

2. Graham O’Grady (NZL)

2:05:39

3. Jesse Thomas (USA)

2:06:40

Top 3 Women 1. Heather Jackson (USA)

2:18:08

2. Sarah Groff (USA)

2:18:37

3. Ricarda Lisk (GER)

2:23:36

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RACE REPORTS

ITU WORLD TRIATHLON YOKOHAMA MEN

JONATHAN BROWNLEE RETURNS IN TRIUMPH AT ITU WORLD TRIATHLON YOKOHAMA Where Yokohama, Japan When 11 May Winners Jonathan Brownlee (GBR), 01:44:59

REAT BRITAIN’S Jonathan Brownlee started his season in a now familiar way in Japan, as he led from almost start to finish in an all-round perfect performance at ITU World Triathlon Yokohama. Alistair Brownlee made his 2013 ITU debut in San Diego just last month, and blew the field there away despite not being confident of his run form. In Yokohama it was a similar story, except that Jonathan had an added complication - his layoff was because of an ankle injury. That made his performance even more impressive as he showed no signs of weakness on the run, burning off Spain’s Javier Gomez and Portugal’s Joao Silva over 10km to record his fifth career series win in a time of 1:44:59. Brownlee was emotional afterwards as he revealed that he thought his entire season would have to be ruled out because of that injury: “At the start of the year, I was told that I wouldn’t be racing at all this season, so I got

Photos Delly Carr

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a bit emotional towards the end because this year I thought I wouldn’t be here at all. I thought the season was over two months ago.” If one thing is becoming clear through the opening rounds of the ITU World Triathlon Series in 2013, it is that the men’s swim has been taken to a new level. Hot on the heels of a low 16-minute swim in San Diego, the field was again strung out behind the leaders out of the water in what became the decisive leg of the race. From the first transition, Brownlee, Gomez and Silva positioned themselves safely in a small but powerful lead group of eight and then went to work on the bike, casting aside the slippery conditions to further extend their lead on the chasers. Meanwhile, amongst those to miss the break were Richard Murray (RSA), as he (along with most of the field) could only watch his podium chances disappear up the road. An early casualty on the bike leg was last year’s Yokohama bronze medallist Dmitry Polyanskiy (RUS), with the Russian not taking a corner in the tricky conditions and ending up on the pavement and out of the race.

At the front of the race, Ivan Vasiliev, Brownlee and Gomez just kept getting faster and put an average of 10 seconds into the closest chase in each lap. It meant that the lead group of eight, which included Marco Van der Stel, Henri Schoeman, Andrew McCartney and Benjamin Shaw, entered T2 one minute and 30 seconds ahead of the next bunch. Once onto the run, an eight-man production quickly became a two-man show as Brownlee and Gomez bid farewell to the rest of the competitors. The answer most emphatically was Brownlee, as the young Brit simply powered away on the second lap of four on the run. It was his fifth WTS series win, which means that he is now joint second with Gomez in the overall WTS winners list. The Spaniard held on for silver followed by Silva, whose third consecutive bronze medal was enough for him to hold onto the top spot in the series rankings. Murray ended up with the second fastest run split of the day to finish fifth, just overtaking fellow South African Henri Schoeman, who recorded his best WTS result.


ITU WORLD TRIATHLON YOKOHAMA WOMEN GWEN JORGENSEN (USA) CLAIMS BACK-TO-BACK ITU SERIES WINS Where Yokohama, Japan When 11 May Winners Gwen Jorgensen (USA), 01:57:05 IF SAN DIEGO hinted at it, Yokohama has well and truly confirmed USA’s Gwen Jorgensen as the leading contender in 2013. She took back-to-back ITU World Triathlon Series titles and the overall series lead in Japan on Saturday. Conditions played a huge part, with constant rain and cooler temperatures making for a treacherous race at times, with numerous crashes on the bike. But it was Jorgensen who reigned supreme, first running down Emma Moffatt (AUS) and Jodie Stimpson (GBR) and then simply flying off into the distance to win by 14 seconds in a time of 1:57:05. Jorgensen initially stayed back after the first lap of the run, but pulled out another negative split 10km to pull it in on the final lap. She said it played out to her race plan: “I wouldn’t say it was a repeat of San Diego, there were different conditions out there today, a choppy swim and the rain on the bike, but it was an exciting race for sure. I just

I

started the run and to be honest I was a little worried; those girls really took it out fast and I just tried to focus on my race. I just tried to maintain pace the whole way.” In overcast conditions with light rain at the start, Mariko Adachi (JPN) led out the swim, taking Moffatt (AUS) with her as they established a lead of 10 seconds out of the water. Moffatt immediately pushed the pace on the bike, dropping Adachi as Stimpson (GBR) closed quickly, aware of the danger Moffatt would pose should she break away solo. However, that urgency soon dissipated as the chase group caught and formed one group of 13 athletes with all the favourites in attendance, including Jorgensen (USA), Moffatt, Stimpson, Kate McIlroy (NZL), Maaike Caelers (NED) and former junior ITU world champion Kirsten Sweetland (CAN), who was racing her first WTS event in two years. Caelers, who won bronze in Yokohama in 2012, didn’t have a great start to the bike as she took a tumble early on, but the brave Dutchwoman quickly remounted and joined the chase 30 seconds down on the lead group. Aside from that crash, not many other major moves happened across the next

25km, with the leaders keeping a gap of between 45 and 55 seconds from a chase group of seven being led by Great Britain’s Katie Hewison. But it all quickly changed in the final two laps. Just as the chase managed to cut that to about 30 seconds, the rain started to pour and another crash splintered that pack, putting Caelers, Natalie Van Coevorden and Ai Ueda off the back. However, Hewison kept pushing the pace and bridged to the lead group on the second to last lap, bringing a few others, including Caelers and Charlotte McShane, with her. It meant that T2 suddenly became busy, with 18 athletes hitting it together. From there, Stimpson and Vendula Frintova went to the front and were quickly joined by Moffatt. While Frintova dropped, Stimpson and Moffatt kept pushing and for most of the run, it looked like the podium would be between them. However, Jorgensen, Ashleigh Gentle and Caelers started to move through the field behind them. Halfway through the run, it then looked like it was San Diego on repeat, as Jorgensen closed the deficit to six seconds with 5km to run and then joined the leaders and went past them within another 400m. JUNE 2013

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TRAININGZONE

TRAININGZONE

Swimming

EXPERT ADVICE TO GIVE YOU THE EDGE

Welcome In this month’s exciting issue of Training Zone, we have a 12-week Olympic Training Programme aimed at making you fitter and faster. For the SA triathletes that have qualified for the big event (the World Triathlon Championships at Hyde Park, London) in September, this programme is ideal for ensuring that you go there fully prepared and in the best shape possible. Besides the training programmes, the Zone is once again packed with the regular information features, including some great insight into the sport and the dynamics that make it one of the greatest on earth.

A successful run in a triathlon is all about endurance pace and not sprinting speed

SWIM

NUTRITION

58 NEW WAYS TO GO FASTER

69 SUGAR – GOOD OR BAD?

A trio of new ideas that may help you find an extra few seconds ANDY BULLOCK

RUN

PLAN

61 PERFECT PACING

70 RACE AN OLYMPIC-DISTANCE TRIATHLON IN 12 WEEKS

Triathlons are endurance events, not sprints. Here’s how to go the distance SPENCER SMITH

BIKE

62 POWER METERS

An essential guide to using power meters in training and racing JEFF JONES

BODY Photo British Triathlon

Some say it’s bad for us while others say it’s OK, but who should we believe? DR KEVIN CURRELL

67 CROSS-TRAINING BENEFITS

The sessions you need to develop your speed and race fitness, so that you reach race day in your best shape ever SPENCER SMITH

SOLVED!

74 YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED BY OUR EXPERTS

How to avoid cramping when racing and fuelling tips for a 70.3 EMMA DEAKIN, DR KEVIN CURRELL

Why training in other sports can make you faster at tri with transferable speed RICHARD HORTON JUNE JUNE 2013 2013

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Swim

3 NEW WAYS TO SWIM FASTER Meet the expert Andy Bullock Bullock is a highly experienced coach and currently works with British Triathlon on their Paratriathlon and Regional Academy Projects as well as with age-groupers of all abilities

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TRADITIONALLY, IMPROVING your swimming technique requires you to practise a series of drills, breaking down your technique into smaller parts and then putting the swim stroke back together, integrating the new part of the technique back into your stroke. This, combined with a committed approach to a structured swim programme that includes speed development, steady aerobic swimming and pacing practice, results in the ideal steady progression of your swimming. But

what if there were other ways of improving your swimming? What if you could find ways of keeping your stroke together, improving your pace and staying relaxed throughout your swim training and racing in a different way? This feature will look at three different techniques – visualisation, the use of music and learning using analogies. You may not have heard of them or experienced them before, but they might be just the thing you’ve been looking for to help revitalise your swimming.

Photos Corbis, Triathlon.org / Delly Carr | ITU

SWIMMING DOESN’T HAVE TO INVOLVE ENDLESS DRILLS. HERE ARE THREE WAYS TO IMPROVE YOU MAY HAVE NEVER CONSIDERED BEFORE OVE THAT Y


SWIM NEW TRICKS Pre-race visualisation of your technique may help you go faster and feel more controlled

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VISUALISATION

There is an idea that we can actually imagine ourselves swimming quicker, and then make it happen. There are several ways in which you can use this technique; all are relatively simple. This one works in three stages. Firstly, find a video of someone who swims in a similar style to one you would like to adopt. Watch this video and focus on any aspect of the swimmer and the video clip that stands out to you; this could be the action, speed of movement, rhythm. Try to get the image of the swimmer as clear as possible in your head and separate it from anything around it by brightening the contrast between the two. Stage two is to close your eyes and replay the video in your own mind, keeping the image bright and clear, and focusing on the areas that stand out to you. This will take a bit of practice but you should eventually be able to play this image back in your mind at will, so repeat stages one and two until this is possible. Stage three is to simply play this image in your mind while swimming, concentrating on the areas that you highlighted when you first watched the video. Then see what happens with your swimming.

Listening to music when training can help you get into a rhythm

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MUSIC

It has been said that music makes the world go round but can it be used to make your swimming go faster? Some people respond to music better than visual images, so using music may be a more suitable way of improving your swimming. The use of music can either help you associate or dissociate from your task at hand. Neither is better than the other; it’s just personal preference. One way in which music is used is to set the tempo of your movement. How many times have you used music in turbo or run sessions to set the cadence of your movements? So why not do it in your swimming? Find a song or tune that allows you to develop and maintain the arm turnover that

you want during your swimming and simply sing it, to yourself, while swimming. Or you could even invest in a waterproof MP3 player that allows you to listen to your favourite tracks while swimming in the pool.

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ANALOGIES

Swimming drills help break your stroke down into several small, manageable chunks. However, there is an increasing amount of scientific evidence that over-thinking skills in this way can actually be detrimental to your speed during a race. This is because it’s very hard to think of lots of different details when trying to perform at your absolute best when under race pressure. So instead of thinking about exact hand entry, the angle of your elbow at the catch or where your fingers point as you push the water, try to think about the movement in larger pieces. For example, imagine you are wrapping your arm around a barrel as you place your hand into the water at the start of your catch. This will automatically place your arm into an effective position – a position that grabs hold of the water. Similarly, concentrate on pushing water towards your feet, as this will focus several aspects of your stroke, such as the position of your elbow and how deep your hand is.

Use mental images to hone technique

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RUN PERFECT PACE

remember that once you get off that bike, you still have to run. No one is impressed if you are fast in the swim or the bike, but walk the entire run. Good coaching will teach you to know your limits so that you don’t dig too deep early in the race. What you do in the swim and on the bike can often determine how you will execute your run.

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SPEED JUDGEMENT

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RESEARCH THE COURSE

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USE TECHNOLOGY

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RACE YOUR OWN RACE

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BE TRUE TO YOURSELF

You have been on the bike and have been travelling at speeds in excess of 32kph. You get off and even though you may be running very fast, it will feel very slow because you have just been going fast on a bike. Your head will tell you that you are going too slowly, so you speed up. However, you still feel like you are slow, so you go even faster. Take the first half-mile or, in longer races, the first mile to settle down. Keep in mind that it only takes about 200 metres to go into oxygen debt. When in doubt, throw the first mile out, meaning slow down and err on the side of caution. It is better to start out slow and get faster than go out too fast and end up walking.

Be prepared. Learn the run course. If possible, drive the course. Know where it is flat, where there are turns, hills etc. Visualise this course in your mind in the days leading up to the race. I always go over the course in my mind the night before a race, right before I go to sleep. All of this will help you to know where and when your pace will fluctuate.

Pace management is essential for successful running in a triathlon

Run

HOW TO RUN AT A PERFECT PACE

STRONG RUNNING REQUIRES SPEED MANAGEMENT. HERE ARE SIX POINTERS TO HELP YOU DO JUST THAT Meet the expert Spencer Smith

Photo British Triathlon

Smith is a coach and elite triathlete. He’s won two ITU world championships, two Ironmans and was a professional cyclist

PACE IS frequently discussed among runners and triathletes. In fact, as multisport athletes, pace is a part of our everyday lives. Why then do so many triathletes struggle with it, especially when running off the bike? We seem fairly adept at

pacing during the swim and the bike, but something strange happens when we start running. We set off feeling OK, but then we start to burn up after a mile or two. Even I have fallen victim to bad run pacing and I can assure you that there is no magic trick to feeling great off the bike every time. Fortunately, if you learn to pace you can minimise the damage.

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IT’S ALL ABOUT ENDURANCE

Even sprint triathlons are endurance events, and need to be treated as such. Patience and planning during each race, regardless of distance, is essential. Yes you can go hard, but

Some people like to wear their Garmin watch during races in order to see their minutes per mile pace. This is a good tool, but keep in mind that they can have issues such as running out of battery life mid-race or losing a satellite. They will also highlight the huge difference that wind and hills make to your running speed.

This is your race. You have trained and devised a race plan. Don’t get caught up in someone else’s race plan. It may be tempting to go after your nemesis, but if it is not in your plan, don’t do it. Stick to what you and your coach (if you have one) have planned.

Make sure your race goals are realistic. Your coach should be able to help you understand what you can and can’t do on race day. The ego can bruise easily so don’t set yourself up for failure by setting ridiculously high goals. Learning how to run well off the bike in triathlon can be a tricky feat to master but it’s well worth the effort.

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Power meters can provide essential data that can help you improve your efficiency when training on the bike

Bike

IDIOT’S GUIDE TO POWER METERS Meet the expert Jeff Jones Jones is the editor of BikeRadar.com and is one of Britain’s fastest cycle TT riders. In 2012 he set a new PB by riding 10 miles in 18mins and 9secs

A POWER meter is a way of measuring how many watts you’re putting out on the bike and it’s the most accurate way to gauge your fitness. They’re also not cheap, can be a little confusing to understand at first and can cause no end of heartache when they go wrong. But if you can get your head and wallet around

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the drawbacks you won’t regret it. Bike-mounted power meters have been available for around 25 years, their popularity mainly limited by their expense. With prices starting from around R4 000 and going up to R20 000, it’s easy to see why. In my experience, though, most people who start training with power meters never willingly go back to more rudimentary methods because it gives them the gold standard in fitness measurement. Why is knowing your wattage so important? How many watts you can sustain over a given time period tells you how good your engine is. More power means you go faster. How fast you go depends on what’s slowing you down: drag, rolling resistance, air density, weight, wind, and gravity. Increasing power and reducing resistance is the name of the game when it

comes to going quick on the bike. They have other uses too. They give you a very good idea of calories burned because they measure the work that you’re doing. And for pacing yourself over any distance, it’s important not to start harder than the wattage you can sustain. The power meter will tell you this and it’s rarely wrong. Your brain will lie to you, telling you that you feel great in the first five minutes, or even the first half of an Ironman, before your physiology catches up and you pay for starting too hard. If you are a bit more geeky you can use a power meter trace to determine your aerodynamic drag. This is incredibly useful if you’re looking at ways to go faster.

Photos Joseph Branston, Paul Phillips@ Competitive Image, Russell sell Burton

A PLAIN ENGLISH GUIDE TO USING A CYCLE POWER METER TO BOOST YOUR CYCLING PERFORMANCES


BIKE POWER METERS Pete Jacobs, seen here in Kona in 2012, uses a Quarq power meter for post-race data analysis

Stages crank-based power meters should be quite accurate and easy to use

Measuring crank deflection should be relatively straightforward too so accuracy should be good. Prices for the Stage One crank (left one only) starts at R7 000 and goes up to R20 300 for the Rotor Power meter. The Pioneer meter is expected to be at least R2 1 000 too.

WHAT TO DO FIRST

WHAT POWER METER DO I BUY? Power meters come in several guises and I’ll be honest and say that none of them are the perfect solution. How do you know which one you should get? Start by thinking about your current bike setup. Do you have a training bike and a racing bike or do you do everything on one? Similarly, do you have training and racing wheels? Do you have an ANT+ capable computer? Ideally you want to use power all the time. If that’s too much of a hassle or too expensive then just stick to using it for training.

TYPES OF POWER METER SRM pioneered the crank spider-based power meter and they are still the current market leaders. Quarq and Power2Max have come to the market much more recently and offer cheaper alternatives. All use strain gauges to measure the deflection of the spider during pedalling, converting it to torque and power through measuring your cadence as well. The advantage of these systems is that you can use any wheels. Swapping them between bikes is possible too. They will transmit to ANT+ head units although the SRM is best used with its own computer, the PC7. Pricing starts at around R4 000 for the cheapest Power2Max and goes up to about R52 500 for an SRM Campagnolo Record with the PC7 computer.

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CycleOps PowerTaps are hub-based power meters that use strain gauges to measure the torque you’re producing in the rear hub and convert that to watts. They’re one of the cheapest systems on the market but if you race on different wheels than you train on then you might want more than one wheel, or you can fit wheel covers to your training wheel to make it as aerodynamic as a disc. You’ll need an ANT+ computer to read the data (CycleOps Cervo or Joule, Garmin Edge 500-810, Bryton Rider 35-50). They cost from R4 000 to R21 000 (hub only).

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The only pedal-based system on the market is the LOOK KeO power pedals. The power sensing pedals work using strain gauges contained within the pedal axle, with a pair of sensors attached to the inside of each crank arm to measure and transmit the data. It’s a simple and light system, attractive because you can easily swap between bikes. You do need to use a Polar computer to see the data on the oth, bike as the wireless transmission is bluetooth, not ANT+. Also I, wasn’t overly impressed by the quality of the data in the first set of pedals I icess tested. It may have improved since then. Prices start at R21 000 for the pedals alone.

3

Several companies have launched crankank-eer based power meters – Stages, Pioneer and Rotor – and these should hit the markett ese soon although we’ve not tested any yet. These ks have sensors attached to or inside the cranks which typically doesn’t add much weight.

Before you do your first ride with a power meter you will have to pair it with your computer. Each power meter has its own ID and your computer needs to know this. Instructions on how to do this will come with it. I also recommend changing the settings on your computer to turn autozero on and smart recording (Garmin only) off to get the best data. And if you can, use threesecond and 30-second power averaging on screen to reduce the jumpiness of the readings that you will get with a one-second readout. This is because your power output is not smooth over short time periods. Finally, if you use ovalised chainrings with an SRM, Quarq or Power2Max, you will see artificially inflated numbers which can’t accurately be

Main contenders Q REAR HUB: PowerTap QSPIDER: SRM, Quarq, Power2Max QCRANK ARMS: Rotor, Pioneer, Stages QPEDALS: Look-Polar Of these we rate the PowerTap, SRM and Quarq for good reliability and accuracy. We haven’t tested any of the crank arm power meters yet.

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CycleOps PowerTap rear hub power meter is accurate and cheap

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TRAININGZONE “How many watts you can sustain over a given time period tells you how good your engine is. More power means you go faster”

The Polar/Look Keo Power Pedal system easily swaps across bikes

calibrated out. The next thing is to reset the torque output reading, to ensure accuracy (follow the instruction manual for this process). Do this before every ride, preferably after leaving the bike outside to acclimatise to the temperature for 10 minutes. If you don’t, you could end up with an offset error that shows up as too high or too low wattage. Remember that zeroing is not the same as calibrating. The latter typically requires checking the torque readings against known values, eg calculated torque from hanging accurate weights off the crank arms. It’s useful to do once in a while.

GETTING TO KNOW POWER As mentioned before, your power output will look jumpy when you ride, even if you are pedalling at a steady speed and heart rate. This is partly because it’s sampled at different places in the pedal stroke and partly because of the way your muscles produce energy. It is variable and this is normal. Your average power won’t vary nearly as much though, and we find it’s useful to have this on screen, particularly if you’re doing intervals. You’ll notice that your power will rise on a hill and fall on a descent, similarly it will increase in headwinds and decrease in tailwinds. It’s your body’s natural pacing, wanting to push harder when it’s harder. You’ll also notice that to keep your average power up you need to pedal as much as you can. No coasting unless you have to. You’ll get more training effect from this and you will go faster. You’ll quickly realise how little power you need in a group compared to riding solo, so you’ll need to balance your training needs with your 64

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desire to ride with others. Do a variety of rides to get to know what sort of power you are capable of. Recovery, endurance, tempo, threshold, VO2 max – they will all tell a different story and indicate strengths and weaknesses. In an OlympicWKO+ 3.0 displays a wide distance triathlon you’ll likely be riding variety of long-range performance data close to threshold whereas in an Ironman you’ll be in the endurance zone. We’d then recommend doing some testing to define your current limits: fivefor power-meter training: The Road Cyclist’s second (sprint), five-minute and one hour Guide to Training by Power by Charles Howe and (functional threshold power, or FTP) are the Training and Racing with a Power Meter by standard durations. These will help you set your Hunter Allen and Andrew Coggan. These will training levels. give you a solid grounding in how to train by power. LOOKING AT YOUR DATA As an example, say you had three months to Post-ride data analysis is an extremely useful train for an Olympic-distance triathlon, had six function of a power meter because you can hours of bike time a week and weren’t starting better track your performance over time as well from scratch. In the first two weeks you would as being able to look closely at sections of the stick to endurance rides between 70-80% of ride where you did your intervals. your FTP. Over the next four weeks, lift the There are several programs you can use to intensity and duration of one of your rides until look at the data, the main ones being: WKO+ 3.0 you’re able to ride at 90% FTP (hard tempo) for (my favourite), Golden Cheetah (free and comes an hour. Over the next four weeks maintain the with aero analysis), Power Agent (for PowerTap) tempo and introduce some threshold work into and SRM Win (for SRMs). WKO+ 3.0 and Golden another ride, with a classic effort being 2x20 Cheetah both offer long-range performance minutes at FTP. In the last couple of weeks, metrics that give an accurate picture of what replace the tempo session with a set of 4x4-5your training load is and how fit you are. minute intervals at 110% FTP to sharpen up.

COACHING YOURSELF A power meter is a tool, it’s not a coach. You still need to put the work in and devise or follow a training programme that works to get you fit for the demands of your event. We highly recommend reading a couple of useful manuals


IS MAGNESIUM THE ANSWER TO YOUR CRAMPS, INSOMNIA AND MIGRAINES? The vital element you’re not getting enough of. By DONAVAN BECHUS

The No.1 magnesium supplement.

4,5

Migraines, cramps, insomnia, fatigue – if you’re an internet selfdiagnoser as I am, looking up these symptoms will give you every result from tape-worm to typhoid. So when I went to the doctor, I was a little annoyed when he suggested that it might just be a 1,2,3* magnesium deficiency – in that tone that only doctors and IT staff have mastered. I demanded a CAT scan and I got an over-the-counter bottle of pills instead. And it worked. Magnesium is one of those overlooked elements. It seems that 1 only athletes are aware of its cramp-stopping powers , everyone else tends to only have a very vague recollection that it burned white in science class. Actually, your body needs it. However, you don’t get nearly enough of it from multivitamins or from your diet, unless you are eating things like nuts, grains and about 3 cups worth of spinach, every day.

“You don’t get enough magnesium from your multivitamins.” Think of magnesium as your Mary Poppins’ bag, giving you what you need, when you need it. So if you’re feeling fatigued then magnesium could be the solution, but if you have too much 1 nervous energy to sleep, then magnesium may help you rest . Without it, your body inefficiently diverts its resources trying to fill in the gaps, and it’s this action which leads to muscular cramps, headaches, insomnia and all those wonderful things which can 1,2,3* make a week last a lifetime.

Find us on:

@SlowMagSA, www.slowmag.co.za

References: 1.Cox IM et al. Lancet 1991; 337: 757-80. 2. Hornyak, M. et al. Sleep 1998, 21(5), 501-505. 3. Mauskop, A. Altura, B.M. CNS Drugs (1998) 9 (3), 185-190. 4. IMS data, March 2013. 5. Impact Rx data, March 2013. *Muscle cramps is a recognised symptom of magnesium deficiency. S0 Slow-Mag® Tablets. Each enteric coated tablet contains magnesium chloride 535 mg (equivalent to 64 mg elemental magnesium) H/24/89. Slow-Mag® Caps. Each capsule contains magnesium amino acid chelate 450 mg (equivalent to 45 mg elemental magnesium). Slow-Mag® Fizzy. Each tablet contains elemental magnesium 172 mg and Vitamin C 150 mg. For further information, refer to the package insert approved by the Medicines Regulatory Authority. Merck (Pty) Ltd. Reg. No. 1970/004059/07. 1 Friesland Drive, Longmeadow Business Estate South, Modderfontein,1645. Tel. (011) 372-5000, Fax. (011) 372-5252. SM.05.13.004

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So do yourself a favour, the next time the internet tells you that you’re the carrier for some new tropical disease, look up the symptoms of magnesium deficiency as well. Chances are it’s the one search that gives you the solution you need.

New User-friendly Packaging


BODY CROSS TRAINING Body

HOW CROSS-TRAINING MADE ME A FASTER RUNNER THE TRAINING SECRETS OF THE 18-YEAR-OLD WHO BECAME WORLD CHAMPION, STARTING FROM JUST ONE HOUR OF RUNNING PER WEEK Meet the expert Richard Horton Horton is a human biology student at Loughborough University. In 2012 he won the European and World duathlon titles in the junior category

I DON’T BELIEVE that you need to do a huge volume of run training in order to run fast. Aerobic conditioning is aerobic conditioning no matter what the activity. Through crosstraining, you develop a great engine that is still there when you switch sports. In triathlon, this gives you an opportunity to directly improve your race performances without overloading in one discipline. I had my most successful season thanks to the benefits of cross-training. I ran faster than ever in 2012, but without doing much run training for half the year. Last winter my goal was to be a pro cyclist, so I spent most of the winter logging 18-19 hours on the bike every week, while taking a gap year from studying. After my rides I would nail my

recovery by stretching to loosen my muscles and by refuelling within 30 minutes – known as the carbohydrate window. Aside from the more focused recovery, I benefited from turbo sessions. The hardest thing to do is set it up and get on; it’s easy from there. I swear by the Pete Read session of 25mins at 75%, 20mins at 80%, 15mins at 85% of max heart-rate. It’s especially good as it gives you double the benefit of the equivalent time on the road bike. Having focused on cycling all winter, and runnig for about one hour per week, I turned my focus to duathlon, and my running volume shot up to four or five hours by midspring. Looking back, I’m surprised I didn’t get injured, as my cardiovascular engine was ahead of my running muscles in terms of fitness. I quickly adapted though and this led to some good 10km times. I knocked one minute and 41 seconds off my 10km PB within the next six months (with a time of 30:28). This form helped me win the European and world junior duathlon titles, somewhat unexpectedly. I even

ran the 10,000 metres at a Diamond League international track and field event. As my running mileage increased, I started swimming for three to four hours each week to prepare for joining the Loughborough University high performance triathlon squad at the end of the season. I had to cut back my biking significantly but I had confidence from all the cycling I’d done throughout the winter, so I just tried to hold my cycling form, regularly gauging where I was by racing in local time trials. My success last year shows that training is not an exact science. I’ve experimented with various training principles; some helped, some hindered. It’s important to implement what you’ve learnt. You should only make a mistake once before you correct it and move onwards and upwards.

My season of success The highlights of Horton’s surprise rise to the top

25 March 2012 O British elite duathlon championships

(Horton’s first ever duathlon) OResult: 3rd in senior race. 1st in junior race

29 April 2012 OETU European junior duathlon championships

Photos British Triathlon

(Horton’s second ever duathlon) OResult: Winner

21 September 2012 OITU world junior duathlon championships

(Horton’s third ever duathlon) OResult: Winner

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GAME CHANGER.

GET READY FOR THE SCIENCE.

C O N TA C T U S : R S A @ H U U B D E S I G N . C O . Z A 68 JUNE 2013

HUUBDESIGN.COM


NUTRITION SUGAR As with most things, sugar is useful when eaten in moderation – but look for nutrition-rich sources such as fruit

Nutrition

IS SUGAR THAT BAD FOR YOU?

MANY PEOPLE THINK SUGAR IS THE ROOT OF ALL EVIL, BUT IS IT ANY DIFFERENT FOR TRIATHLETES? Meet the expert Dr Kevin Currell

Photo Corbis

Currell is a performance nutritionist at the English Institute of Sport and a triathlete

SUGAR IS the cause of all health problems. Sugar improves performance. Sugar is essential for athletes. Confused? I’m not surprised. There are so many mixed messages out there about sugar, and what it does for the body. In this article I aim to present the facts about sugar and its role for triathletes and exercise. ‘Sugar’ is the generalised term for sweetflavoured carbohydrates. There are many different types of sugars, depending on the molecular structure. Sugars can be simple monosaccharides such as glucose or fructose,

through to disaccharides such as sucrose (table sugar) and lactose (milk sugar). Sugar is found naturally in many foods, particularly fruit and vegetables. The processed versions we add to our cup of tea in the morning come from crops such as sugar beet and cane sugar. Sugar has been available in the human diet since ancient times, but prior to the 19th century it was an expensive luxury. Since then it has become cheap, spawning a huge industry. So is sugar good or bad for you? As with most nutritional research, there is no conclusive answer from the evidence we currently have. If you search, you will almost certainly find evidence that sugar is a terrible thing that we should all avoid, as too much of it can lead to type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer’s. There is also good evidence that blood sugar control is essential to allow the body to function effectively and maintain a healthy weight, and if eaten to excess, sugar will lead to fluctuations in blood sugar, particularly if the individual does

not exercise regularly. In terms of peer-reviewed evidence, when sugar is substituted for other carbohydrates in a calorie-controlled diet, there seems to be little evidence of a negative health effect. However, if sugar is added on top of your normal diet then there is increasing evidence that the sugar can indeed have a negative impact on your health and lead to weight gain – but we all know that eating too much is bad for you. What is undeniable is that sugar only contains carbohydrates and is therefore seen as an ‘empty’ – i.e. nutritionally poor – food. Where possible it is more effective to consume foods that also contain vitamins, minerals, fibre and other nutrients. In other words, if you need a sugar hit, go for fruit. While the effects of sugar on health are inconclusive, the effects of sugar on endurance performance are most certainly conclusive – sugar keeps you going. Some seminal studies from the University of Texas in the 1980s showed that fatigue during endurance exercise coincides with a drop in blood sugar. However, when blood sugar is maintained, endurance performance improves. The simplest way to maintain blood sugar is by taking on board a simple sugar-based drink during exercise. Most of the research is based on the use of glucose, a simple monosaccharide. Most research would suggest a two to five percent improvement in performance lasting longer than one hour when you ingest a simple sugar such as glucose. However, not all sugars are created equal. Glucose is used by the body most effectively, where it has been shown that the body can use approximately one gram per minute of exercise as fuel. Fructose is used at a much slower rate, approximately 0.4g per minute of exercise. The real magic happens when you combine the two, and you can increase the use of the sugar as fuel by 50%, which leads to an eight percent improvement in performance over three hours of exercise when compared with glucose alone. So the evidence clearly shows that sugar improves endurance performance over one hour in duration, with a mixture of glucose and fructose being most effective. Outside of using sugar during exercise, the evidence for its use or harmful effects are inconclusive. However, as a triathlete you need to get as much quality nutrition as possible and simple, refined sugars come with no other nutrients. So it’s a much better idea to stick to fruit when you need a sweet hit.

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TRAININGZONE The plan

RACE AN OLYMPIC-DISTANCE TRIATHLON IN 12 WEEKS THE SESSIONS YOU NEED TO DEVELOP YOUR SPEED AND RACE FITNESS, SO THAT YOU REACH RACE DAY IN YOUR BEST SHAPE EVER Meet the expert Spencer Smith Smith is a coach and elite triathlete. He’s won two ITU world championships, two Ironman titles and was a professional cyclist

THIS IS the second half of a 24-week training plan for Olympic distance triathlons (1.5km swim, 40km bike, 10km run). This 12-week plan will take you up to race day, by adding speed and race readiness to the winter base

training you’ve already done. The sessions will get gradually more intense as the weeks go by, so that eventually they almost replicate the race you’re training for. I’ve used training zones in this programme, so you know what intensity to train at. I’ve explained these below, as well as a key to any abbreviations I’ve used. Take a few minutes to get your head around them. This programme is only a guide and nothing should be written in stone. Over the coming weeks, the best way to achieve success is by listening to your body. Be realistic and be patient. Rome wasn’t built in a day!

How it works

Are these plans for you? Before beginning this plan you should already be able to: Ride your bike steadily for 2 hours Jog for 70 minutes Swim 1,000 metres non-stop

Get your guide ready to go

Part 2: Speed an d

Cut out the guide following the dotted outline

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Fold the guide in quarters using the fold guides

JUNE 2013 JUNE 2013

Now carry it with you for reference while training

Race Readiness

OLYMPIC DISTANCE

GET REA GE READY DY D FOR FO ORS R SPR PRIN IING NG G WITHT H HE HE SECO OND N HALF LFO OFFTH THIISS RACE TRAINING TTHE GUIDE

32Gi OFFICIAL TRAINING PLAN PARTNER

Photos British Triathlon

YOU R 12-WEEK PLAN


THE PLAN OLYMPIC DISTANCE TRAINING ZONES FOLD2

YOUR K E 12-WEN PLA

USING THESE TRAINING zones will help you train at the right intensity for each session. This helps develop specific aspects of your fitness, as well as making sure you don’t overdo it. You can either estimate your intensity, using the training zone descriptions, or use a heart-rate monitor for a more precise measure. If you use a heart-rate monitor, use the percentages provided below and subtract them from your maximum heart rate to calculate your zones. Tools like cycle power meters and GPS watches will also help track your training progress but they’re not essential for these plans. These training zones are only a guide, so don’t worry about being too precise with heart rates because they’ll fluctuate anyway. It’s good to be mindful of your intensity but it’s even more important that you get out there and enjoy your training. Zone 1 (Z1) Active recovery. If 1 is your easiest intensity and 10 is your hardest, this zone should feel like somewhere between 2 and 5 Zone 2 (Z1) Endurance pace. If 1 is easiest and 10 is hardest, this zone should feel like somewhere between 5 and 7

Part 2: Speed and race readiness

OLYMPIC DISTANCE

GETREADYFORANEWPBWITHTHESE GET READY FOR A NEW PB WITH THE SECOND HALF OF THIS RACE TRAINING GUIDE

Zone 3 (Z3) Tempo pace. If 1 is easiest and 10 is the hardest, this zone should feel like an 8 Zone 4 (Z4) Race pace. If 1 is easiest and 10 is the hardest, this zone should feel like a 9 or above KEY WU Warm up, WD Warm down, MAIN Main set, FC Front crawl, KICK Legs only, RPM Pedal revolutions per minute, PULL Front crawl with a pull float between thighs, RI Rest interval, FIST Swim FC with clenched fists, BUILD Build your pace throughout

STAY IN THE TRAINING ZONE WITH TRIATHLON PLUS

Mon

Brick: Bike 80mins aerobic WU 10mins in Z1/low Z2 at 100rpm+ MAIN 30mins in Z2 at 95rpm+, 20mins in low Z3 at 95rpm+, 10mins in Z2 at 100rpm+ WD 10mins easy spin at 100rpm+ into Run 20mins as (5mins in low Z2, 10mins in mid Z2, 5mins easy jog)

Thur

Swim 2,200m WU 300m FC easy, 4x50m PULL +10secs RI MAIN 8x25m FC (as 12.5m in Z3/4, 12.5m easy) + 10secs RI, 200m PULL steady (3 stroke breathing) +20secs RI, 8x75m FC as (25m easy, 25m hard, 25m easy) +20secs RI, 200m PULL steady (3 stroke breathing) +20secs RI, 8x25m (as 12.5m hard, 12.5m easy) +10secs RI WD 300m FC easy

Session 1: Swim 2,450m WU easy 200m FC, 100m KICK, 200m PULL, 100m FC MAIN 15x100m in Z2/Z3 (make second 50m slightly faster) +10secs RI WD 150m FC easy, 200m KICK Session 2: Gym 40 mins strength/yoga/Pilates

Fri

Session 1: Run 45mins WU 10mins in Z1/Z2 MAIN 30mins as 10x (1min in low Z3, 2mins in low Z2) WD 5mins jog Session 2: Gym 40 mins strength /yoga/Pilates

Run 45mins WU 10mins in Z1/low Z2 MAIN 30mins as 10x (2mins in Z2/low Z3, 1min in low Z2) WD 5mins jog+stretch

Brick: Bike 2hrs aerobic WU 1hr in Z2 at 95rpm+ MAIN 4x (5mins in upper Z2 at 90rpm+) +5mins RI WD 20mins in Z1 at 100rpm+ into Run 20mins as (5mins in low Z2, 10mins in mid Z2, 5mins easy jog)

Brick: Bike 2hrs WU 20mins in Z1 at 95rpm+, 20mins in low Z2 at 90rpm+ MAIN 1hr as alternating (4mins in upper Z2, 1min in low Z2) WD 20mins easy at 100rpm+ into Run 20mins as (5mins in low Z2, 10mins in low Z3, 5mins easy jog)

Session 1: Run 80mins Mixed terrain WU 5mins jog MAIN 50mins in Z2, 10mins in low Z3, 10mins Z2 WD 5mins jog Session 2: Optional swim 1500m for post-run recovery

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Tue

Wed

Brick: Bike 1hr WU 10mins Z1/low Z2 at 100rpm MAIN 40mins in Z2 at 95rpm+ WD 10mins spin at 100rpm+ into Run 20mins as (5mins in low Z2, 10mins in mid Z2, 5mins easy jog)

(stretching or yoga)

Swim 2,750m WU 6x50m FC easy +10secs RI MAIN 1,000m FC. First 500m should be in Z2, second 500m in Z3. 5x50m PULL in Z1 +10secs RI, 10x100m FC +10secs RI, beating your average 100m times for the 1,000m you just swam WD 200m FC easy

Run 30 mins WU 5mins easy jog, 5mins steady jog MAIN 10mins in low Z2 WD 10mins jog

Run 1hr WU 10mins in Z1, 10mins in low Z2 MAIN 20mins Z2, 10mins at race pace, 5mins slightly faster than race pace (Z4) WD 5mins jog

Wed

Run 1hr WU 5mins jog, 10mins in low Z2, 3x100m accelerations +30secs RI MAIN 2x1 mile in low Z3, 1x1 mile in Z3/Z4+3mins RI WD 5mins jog

REST DAY

Brick: Bike 1hr WU 10mins easy at 95rpm+ MAIN 4x (5mins in low Z2 at 95rpm+, 5mins mid Z2) WD 10mins easy spin at 100rpm+ into Run 20mins as (5mins in low Z2, 10mins in upper Z2, 5mins easy jog)

Brick: Bike 80mins WU 20mins Z1/low Z2, 20mins in Z2 MAIN 20mins as 10x(1min in low Z3, 1min in low Z2) WD 20mins in low Z2 into Run 20mins as (5 mins in low Z2, 10mins in mid Z3, 5mins easy jog)

Thur

Tue

Run 45mins WU 5mins jog, 10mins low Z2 MAIN 25mins low to mid Z2 WD 5mins jog

RECOVERY WEEK

Session 1: Swim 2,350m WU 200m FC easy, 4x50m FIST MAIN 10x100m FC PULL in Z2+10secs RI, 50m FC easy, 5x100m FC in Z2 +10secs RI, 6x50m PULL breathing every 3 to 5 strokes WD 100m FC easy Session 2: Gym 40 mins strength/ yoga/Pilates

Swim 2,350m WU easy 300m FC, 200m KICK, 100m FC, 6x50m PULL+10secs RI MAIN 4x(200m FC in low Z3) +20secs RI, 2x75m FC in low Z3+15secs RI, 400m KICK as (100m easy, 200m hard, 100m easy) WD 100m easy choice swim

Fri

Swim 2,450m WU 5x100m FC in Z1 +10secs RI, 4x75m FC as (25m steady/25m easy/25m steady) +10secs RI, 6x50m FC (breathing every 3 to 5 strokes) +10secs RI MAIN 5x200m PULL in Z2 +15secs RI (get faster through reps 1 to 5), 50m FC easy, 4x50m KICK as (25m hard/25m easy) +10secs RI WD 100m FC easy

WEEK 04

Run 40mins aerobic WU 5mins in Z1/low Z2 MAIN 30mins in Z2, include 2x100m accelerations. Think form WD 5mins jog

Session 1: Run 55mins WU 10mins in low Z2 MAIN 5x5mins in Z2/Z3 build throughout each 5mins+2.5mins easy jog recoveries WD 5mins jog Session 2: Gym 40mins strength/yoga/Pilates

Sat

Mon

Swim 1,800m WU 300m FC easy, 300m FC Z2 +15secs RI MAIN 3x100m FC Z2/Z3 +10secs RI, 300m PULL in Z2 +15secs RI, 3x100m FC Z3 +10secs rest WD 300m FC easy

Session 1: Run 70mins Mixed terrain WU 5mins jog MAIN 50mins in Z2, 10mins in low Z3 WD 5mins jog Session 2: Optional swim 1500m for post-run recovery

WEEK 03

Brick: Bike 90mins WU 10mins in Z1 at 95rpm+ MAIN 70mins in Z2 at 95rpm+ WD 10mins easy spin at 100rpm+ into Run 20mins as (5mins in low Z2, 10mins in upper Z2, 5mins easy jog)

Brick: Bike 2hrs WU 20mins in Z1, 20mins in low Z2 MAIN 1hr as 4x10mins at target race intensity (Z3/ low Z4) +5mins easy spin recoveries WD 10mins in Z1 into Run 25mins as (5mins in low Z2, 15mins in low Z3, 5mins easy jog)

Sun

WEEK 02

Sun

WEEK 01

Sat

FOLD1

Run 1hr Mixed terrain WU 5mins easy, 5mins steady MAIN 45mins steady aerobic in Z2 WD 5mins easy jog

Session 1: Run 80mins Mixed terrain WU 5mins jog MAIN 50mins in Z2, 20mins in low Z3 WD 5 minutes jog Session 2: Optional Swim 1500m for post-run recovery

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TRAININGZONE WEEK 06

Brick: Bike 40mins WU 20mins in Z2 MAIN 5mins at race pace WD 15mins in upper Z1 into Run 20mins as (10mins in upper Z1, 5mins in Z3, 5mins in upper Z1)

Swim 750m in Z2 with 5x25m FC sprints

Run 40mins in Z2, with 4x200m accelerations

Brick: Bike 20mins in Z2 into Run 10mins in Z2

Mon

Run 25 mins WU 15mins building from Z1 to low Z3 MAIN 5mins at race pace WD 5mins in upper Z1

Tue

Swim 900m race specific WU 200m FC in low Z2 MAIN (All with 20secs RI) 2x25m FC sprint, 2x50m FC as (25m easy, 25m sprint), 100m FC as (75m easy, 25m sprint), 200m FC as (sprint 1st, 4th and 8th 25m), 100m FC sprint (as 75m easy, 25m sprint), 50m FC as (25m easy, 25m sprint) WD 100m FC easy

Wed

WEEK 12

Brick: Bike 1hr WU 30mins in low Z2 MAIN 5mins in Z4 WD 25mins in low Z2 into Run 20mins as (5 mins in low Z2, 10mins in upper Z2, 5mins easy jog)

Brick: Bike 90mins WU 30mins as (10mins in Z1, 20mins in Z2) MAIN 5mins in low Z3, 5mins in Z3/low Z4, 5mins in Z4 with 10mins recoveries between each (low Z2) WD 30mins in low Z2 into Run 20mins as (5 mins in low Z2, 10mins in upper Z2, 5mins easy jog)

Session 1: Swim 2,200m WU 5x100m FC+10secs RI MAIN 1,000m FC breaking it down so that each 200m gets faster. 500m PULL easy breathing every 3 to 5 strokes WD 200m easy Session 2: Gym 40mins strength/yoga/Pilates

Session 1: Swim 2,250m WU all easy. 400m FC, 300m PULL MAIN 5x150m FC in Z2 +20secs RI, 200m easy mixed strokes, 5x100m FC at Olympic-distance race pace +20secs RI WD Easy 100m mixed strokes Session 2: Gym 40mins strength/yoga/Pilates

Thur

WEEK 11

Brick: Bike 80mins WU 20mins Z1/low Z2, 20mins in Z2 MAIN 30mins as 10x(2mins in low Z3, 1 minute in low Z2) WD 10mins in low Z2 into Run 20mins as (5mins in low Z2, 10mins in mid Z3, 5mins easy jog)

Session 1: Swim 2,500m WU Easy 300m FC, 200m alternating 25m FC/25m FIST MAIN 4x200m FC as (100m in Z1, 100m in Z2) +15secs RI, 2x200m PULL (both in low Z3) +20secs RI, 1x200m FC at race pace, 2mins rest, 10x50m FC as 2x(4x50m hard, 1x50m very easy) WD 100m easy mixed strokes Session 2: Gym 40mins strength/yoga/Pilates

Run 1hr WU 10mins in low Z2, 2x100m accelerations +1min jog rests MAIN 2x15mins in Z2/Z3 building throughout each 15mins+5mins recovery jogs WD 10mins jog+stretch

Run 25mins in Z2

Fri

Run 80mins Mixed terrain WU 10mins jog MAIN 55mins in Z2, 10mins Z2 WD 5mins jog

Run 30mins in Z2

Run 45mins WU 10mins in Z2 including 4x200m accelerations MAIN 2x2 miles as (1 mile at race pace, 1 mile just below race pace) +3mins jog recovery WD 5mins in Z2

Brick: Bike 2hrs 30mins WU 30mins in Z1 MAIN 90mins in Z2 WD 30mins in Z1 into Run 20mins easy

Brick: Bike 20mins in Z2. At 5, 10 and 15mins insert 1min hard effort into Run 10mins in Z2, including 1min hard effort

Sat

Brick: Bike 2h30mins WU 1hr in Z2 MAIN 3x15mins as (rep 1 in Z3, rep 2 in Z3/Z4, rep 3 in Z4) +5mins in Z2 recoveries WD 30mins in Z2 into Run 25mins WU 5mins in Z2 MAIN 15mins in low Z3 WD 5mins jog

Run 30mins WU 15mins in low Z2 MAIN 5mins in Z3, 5mins in Z4 WD 10mins jog

Brick: Bike 2hrs WU 1hr in Z2 MAIN 20mins at race pace WD 40mins in Z2 into Run 25mins WU 5mins in Z2 MAIN 15mins in low Z3 WD 5mins jog

Session 1: Run 80mins Mixed terrain WU 10mins jog MAIN 1hr in Z2, 10mins Z2 WD 5mins jog Session 2: Optional swim 1500m for post-run recovery

Race or race simulation (sprint or Olympic distance)

Sun

Run 45mins WU 10mins in Z2 including 4x200m accelerations MAIN 4x1mile alternating (1mile at race pace, 1mile 5secs below race pace) +3mins jog recovery WD 5mins in Z2

Mon

Session 1: Swim 2,500m WU Easy 300m FC, 200m alternating 25m FC/25m FIST MAIN 4x200m FC as (100m in Z1, 100m in Z2) +15secs RI, 2x200m PULL (both low Z3) +20secs RI, 200m FC at race pace, 2mins rest, 10x50m FC as 2x(4x50m hard, 1x50m very easy) WD 100m easy mixed into Session 2: Gym 40mins strength/yoga/Pilates

Tue

Brick: Bike 90mins WU 30mins as (10mins in Z1, 20mins in Z2) MAIN 5mins in low Z3, 5mins in Z3/low Z4, 5mins in Z4 +10mins RI (low Z2) WD 30mins in low Z2 into Run 20mins as (5mins in low Z2, 10mins in upper Z2, 5mins easy jog)

Run 1hr WU 5mins jog, 10mins in low Z2, 3x100m accelerations +30secs RI MAIN Pyramid 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 mins all in mid Z3+1min RI WD 10mins jog

Wed

Run 1hr WU 10mins in Z1/Z2 MAIN 2x20mins as (rep 1 in Z3, rep 2 in Z3/Z4) +5mins jog recovery (gradually building your pace) between each 20mins WD 5mins easy jog

Swim 1,250m easy recovery

Thur

Swim 2,800m WU 2x(200m FC easy, 4x25m drill of choice) +15secs rest MAIN 2x(300m FC just below race pace +30secs RI, 3x100m at Olympic-distance race pace +15secs RI)+1min rest. 16x50m FC, alternating 50m easy/50m fast, +20secs RI WD 200m mixed strokes

Swim 2,700m WU 10x easy 50m FC +15secs RI. 300m PULL easy MAIN 400m FC in Z2+20secs RI, 4x100m in Z3+20secs RI, 300m FC in Z3+20secs RI, 3x100m in Z3 +20secs RI, 200m FC in Z2 +20secs RI, 2x100m FC as fast as possible+20secs RI WD 100m easy choice swim

Fri

WEEK 08

Sat

FOLD2

TEST WEEK

WEEK 07

Sun

WEEK 05

Run 1h 25mins Mixed terrain WU 10mins jog MAIN 1hr in Z2, 10mins Z2 WD 5mins jog

REST DAY (stretching or yoga)

FOLD1

72

WEEK 10 Swim 2,500m WU 300m mixed swim MAIN 5x400m alternating FC/PULL in Z2 +30sec RI WD 200m FC easy

Mon

Swim 1,900m WU 600m as (300m FC, 200m KICK, 100m FC), 6x50m FC gradually building pace each rep MAIN 8x100m FC +15secs RI (faster than your average 1,000m pace last week) WD 200m FC easy

Tue

Run 40mins WU 10mins in upper Z1 MAIN 25mins in Z2 WD 5mins in upper Z1

Run 1hr WU 5mins jog, 10mins in low Z2, 3x100m accelerations +30secs RI MAIN 3x10mins in Z3/Z4 +3mins jog RI WD 10mins jog

Tue

Run 50mins WU 10mins build Z1/Z2 MAIN 30mins in Z2 WD 10mins easy jog

Wed

Brick: Bike 1hr WU 10mins in upper Z1 MAIN 40mins in Z2 WD 10mins in upper Z1 into Run 20mins as (5mins in upper Z1, 10mins in low Z2, 5mins in upper Z1)

Brick: Bike 80mins WU 20mins Z1/low Z2, 20mins in Z2 MAIN 30mins as 10x (3mins in low Z3, 2mins in low Z2) WD 10mins in low Z2 into Run 20mins as (5mins in low Z2, 10mins in mid Z3, 5mins easy jog)

Wed

Brick: Bike 1hour 25mins WU 10mins in low Z2 MAIN 5x5mins in Z3/Z4 +10mins recoveries in low Z2 WD 10mins in upper Z1 into Run 20mins as (5mins in low Z2, 10mins in upper Z2, 5mins easy jog)

Thur

Session 1: Swim 2,000m WU All easy: 400m FC, 300m PULL MAIN 4x150m FC in Z2 +20secs RI, 200m easy mixed strokes, 2x200m FC in Z2 +20secs RI WD Easy 100m mixed strokes Session 2: Gym 40 mins strength/yoga/Pilates

Session 1: Swim 2,200m WU 5x100m FC+10secs RI MAIN 1,000m FC breaking it down so that each 200m gets faster. 500m PULL easy breathing every 3 to 5 strokes WD 200m easy Session 1: Gym 40 mins strength/yoga/Pilates

Thur

Session 1: Swim 2,200m WU 5x100m FC easy+10secs RI MAIN 1,000m FC with each 200m getting slightly faster, 500m PULL in Z2 WD 200m easy mixed strokes Session 2: Gym 40mins strength/yoga/Pilates

Fri

Run 40mins in Z2 with 4x200m accelerations

Run 1hr WU 10mins in low Z2, 2x100m accelerations+1min jog rests MAIN 2x15mins in Z2/ Z3 building throughout each 15mins+5mins recovery jogs WD 10mins jog+stretch

Fri

Run 45mins WU 15mins in Z2 including 3x200m accelerations MAIN 2x1mile slightly faster than race pace+5mins jog recovery WD 10mins in upper Z1

Sat

Brick: Bike 90mins WU 20mins in upper Z1 MAIN 1hr in Z2 WD 10mins in upper Z1 into Run 20mins WU 5mins in Z2 MAIN 10mins alternating (1min in Z3/1min in Z2) WD 5mins in upper Z1

Brick: Bike 2hrs 30mins WU 30mins in Z1 MAIN 90mins in Z2 WD 30mins in Z1 into Run 20mins easy

Sat

Brick: Bike 85mins WU 20mins in Z1, 10mins building intensity every 2mins (start in Z2 and end in Z3) MAIN 3x5mins as (rep 1 Z2, rep 2 Z3, rep 3 Z4) +10mins recoveries in low Z2 WD 20mins easy spin into Run 25mins WU 5mins in Z2 MAIN 15mins in low Z3 WD 5mins jog(5mins in low Z2, 10mins in mid Z3, 5mins easy jog)

REST DAY

Session 1: Run 1h 25mins Mixed terrain WU 10mins jog MAIN 1hr in Z2, 10mins Z2 WD 5mins jog Session 2: Optional swim 1500m for post-run recovery

Sun

RECOVERY WEEK Swim 1,900m WU 200m FC in Z1 MAIN 15x100m FC as (5x100m in Z2, 5x100m PULL in Z2, 5x100m FC in Z2) +15secs RI WD 200m backstroke

Sun

Mon

WEEK 09

Session 1: Run 40mins all in Z2, but every 5th min do 1min in Z3 Session 2: Optional swim 1500m for post-run recovery

(stretching or yoga)

JUNE 2013 JUNE 2013

RACE DAY

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JUNE 2013

73


TRAININGZONE Expert advice

SOLVED! EXPERT ADVICE ON HOW BEST TO AVOID CRAMPS WHEN RUNNING AND FUELLING ADVICE FOR RACING 70.3 IRONMANS

Meet this month’s experts Training advice Emma Deakin Sports physiotherapist

Training advice Dr Kevin Currell Performance nutritionist

Most cramps will ease on their own but more severe episodes need longer stretching and possibly massage

QUESTION OF THE

MONTH

Training advice

AVOIDING CRAMP

Martin Smith, Warwick

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Emma Deakin Sports physiotherapist CRAMPS ARE unpleasant, often painful sensations caused by muscle contraction or over-shortening. Cramps or spasms can occur in any muscle, but are most common in the legs or feet. They can occur during hard training, but more importantly during a race, having a negative impact on your performance. Most cramps will suddenly ease, while some more severe episodes need soft tissue therapy and stretching. The exact cause of muscle cramps is still unknown, but theories include dehydration, loss of electrolytes, muscle fatigue, poor muscle conditioning, new activities, poor or

altered neuromuscular control, poor posture or really extreme temperature changes.

TREATING MUSCLE CRAMPS Cramps may occur at any time in a race. However, they are more commonly associated with the run phase, nearing the end of race. At this point you are more susceptible to fatigue and dehydration, both possible causes of cramp. Effective treatment of cramp is dependent on its cause. The most effective way to treat it is to stop the activity. Gently stretch the muscle and massage it until the cramp eases. Athletes suffering cramping from muscle overuse or fatigue may also find it useful to ice the affected muscle, or to contract the opposing muscle group. In your case, tense

Photo Corbis

I competed in my first two triathlons in 2012 and on each occasion I suffered severe cramp on the run. Before my middle-distance race I loaded up with fluid. I had a litre beforehand and two 750ml bottles on the bike, plus six High5 energy gels. I also took some Enduralyte tablets but my hamstrings still cramped after one mile, although eased after two. Is there any other way to get cramp other than dehydration, such as a muscle imbalance? I’d like to race long distance but the thought of more cramping is putting me off.


SOLVED EXPERT ADVICE

your quads to relax the hamstring.

PREVENTING MUSCLE CRAMPS Until the exact cause of cramps is diagnosed, it is difficult to say with certainty how we can prevent them. Here are a few handy tips to minimise the risk of cramps and make sure you’re as prepared as possible.

CONDITIONING Prepare your muscles to work as they would in a race. Make sure race-pace and hard bike-to-run sessions are a part of your training, so you know your muscles can cope with the load that will be placed upon them. This may also include strength work and gym-based sessions for the legs so muscles are more resilient to fatigue.

CHECK MUSCLE LENGTH Regular stretching is vital for any athlete, but you can also use these stretches to monitor muscle length and any changes in tightness. These changes may require further investigation or treatment.

BIOMECHANICS/POSTURE To prevent muscle overload, check your bike position and running posture. It may be a simple technical change that will prevent a muscle being over-stressed and cramping. Ask an expert or coach to analyse the mechanics of each of your disciplines.

STRUCTURED WARM-UP If you always cramp in the same muscle, make sure that this is targeted in the warm-up.

REST

Nutritional advice

SOLID OR LIQUID FUEL? Should I eat solid food during an Ironman 70.3? I looked at the energy bars that are recommended on the internet. A lot of them have traces of, or are based on, cow’s milk. My problem is that I have an allergy to cow’s milk. Eating this kind of bar will cause cramps in my stomach. Any advice? Frank van de Werff Hoofddorp, the Netherlands

Dr Kevin Currell Performance nutritionist FUELLING DURING long-distance racing can be an issue and a confusing area. So what should you consume to improve performance? Put simply, you need carbohydrates. They are the only fuel proven to improve performance. One of the major causes of fatigue during endurance exercise is a decrease in blood sugar. This provides your muscles with fuel, but most importantly it provides your brain with fuel and when your brain gets fatigued and runs low on fuel, you slow down. The most effective way to prevent this drop in blood sugar is to consume carbohydrates during exercise. Your body can use the carbohydrate you ingest at a maximum rate of between one and 1.5g per minute of exercise. To get the use of carbs to these maximal rates, you need to consume simple sugary sources of ks or carbohydrate such as sports drinks gels, and research shows that thee higher the rate of ingested carbohydrate, carbohydrate, the

faster you go. There is little evidence that you need to take on board carbohydrates as a solid during long-distance triathlons. In my experience, you can actually complete a 70.3 race on gels and drinks if you consume enough, but having solid foods should do you no harm. In theory you can also do without solids for an Ironman, but this is difficult and can cause flavour fatigue. The best way for you to find out is to practise with different ways of consuming the carbohydrate. Pick a training session where you ride for three hours or so and then run off the bike; repeat this on two to three occasions. Each time, try a different feeding strategy. Try one where you only consume gels and drinks, taking on board about 1.5g per minute of carbohydrate. For the second, make some homemade flapjack to have as a solid food. For the third, use flapjack for the first half and gels and drink for the second half of the bike. See which one causes you the least discomfort and go for it in the race. So the key lessons to learn here are that you definitely need to consume carbohydrate and that the best way to work out what you can tolerate is to test it in training by replicating your race. Hopefully, with this advice you’ll come up with the best nutrition strategy for your upcoming races.

As part of your training programme, make sure that there is adequate rest and recovery for muscles after hard training sessions and races.

NUTRITION A nutrition and hydration plan is vital for both training and racing. It’s not just the amount, but type of fluid you take on board that’s important.

Ask our experts Send your questions to: SOLVED!, Triathlon Plus, Future Publishing, 30 Monmouth Street, Bath, BA1 2BW Email: triathlonplus@futurenet.com

Good quality carbohydrates are essential for fuelling a race

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FINIS, a world leader in technical swimming products that maximise your fitness potential and technique, announces the immediate availability of the Neptune MP3 Player. The Neptune, the next generation of the popular SwiMP3® player, uses revolutionary Bone Conduction technology to transmit crystal clear audio through the cheekbone and directly into the inner ear. The unique waterproof MP3 player allows swimmers and aquatic enthusiasts to listen to music, audio books, and podcasts while working out, something that land athletes have been able to do for decades. After over 5 years of success with the SwiMP3®, FINIS has upgraded the Neptune with an integrated display and increased memory. The waterproof Neptune now has 4GB of storage and an OLED display for easy access to music, podcasts and audiobooks. The new model also utilises the latest in Bone Conduction speakers for enhanced sound quality, and an improved file transfer compatibility with iTunes®. “The Neptune, with its Bone Conduction technology is one of the coolest products I have ever used,” said Jason Dunford, 2008 and 2012 Olympian, and current African Record Holder. “Long aerobic workouts are made that much more enjoyable when I can listen to my favourite tunes.”

BE A WINNER WITH FINIS AND THE NEW NEPTUNE

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WINNERS

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR TWO WINNERS

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CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR TWO WINNERS

Jennifer Muir and Phillip Gibb JUNE 2013

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Shoes and technique play a huge role in maintaining running performance

RUNNING FREE

THERE’S MORE TO A FADING RUN PERFORMANCE THAN YOU MAY THINK, AS RICH ALLEN HAS DISCOVERED

I

have always had a love/hate relationship with running. There is nothing quite like the feeling of cruising effortlessly on a scenic trail, breathing in great lung-fulls of the crisp clean air, with the sun glistening through the trees and creating patches of light and shade on the ground. Nothing compares to knocking out a 14:40 5km and showing up some rather speedy runners who weigh the same as my right leg. However, that’s all well and good - but when my legs fall off on the sixth mile of a 70.3, I certainly have a strong hatred for running. On more than one occasion, I have been reduced to a pathetic jog with women in the 50-55 age-group flying past me, and it’s not a pretty sight. That said, I am enjoying running more these days, as I have finally figured out what the problem has been. Quite simply, I was barking up the wrong tree. I had always assumed that the reason for me wavering during the last few miles of a race was just calorie depletion and that was a puzzle I have been constantly trying to work out. While this was partly true, there were still days when,

even though I might get my nutrition planning spot on, I would still fall apart. I also have those random days when I will just not feel great, with no plausible explanation. All this was really beginning to frustrate me. If you have pinned your hopes on nutrition to save you, or just expect to have a good day, then you may still find yourself in a deep, dark hole with no way out. So what can you do if you find yourself wanting? Well, I found that by working on my technique, I could maintain form and this would keep me moving in the right direction, even if I was completely and utterly knackered. There are four simple ways that I work on my technique. The first goes back to my old rugby days many years ago. As I did when I was a teenager, I find a fairly steep hill, approximately 60 to 100 metres in length, and I sprint up it with a slow jog back down for recovery. When I say sprint, I am no longer a young rugby player and I am not training myself to actually sprint. It is basically a strength workout where I am slightly exaggerating the motions of running. I drive my arms more and snap

quickly off my toes like I am running on hot coals. As I tire towards the top, I focus on holding my form and posture and I try to stay very relaxed. It’s actually harder than it sounds, as it’s only natural to become tense when sprinting and as I tire, I tend to bend over with my rear end sticking out. The point is, I am developing strength to hold posture and form when fatigued. The treadmill doesn’t have to be a dread-mill and for me, it’s the most valuable tool I have when it comes to fine-tuning my run technique. Mirrors surround my treadmill, which does sound rather narcissistic, but there is a plausible reason, I promise. Particularly towards the end of a tough interval session, I will watch my form intently and focus on holding posture and not slipping into bad habits. When you can see what you look like, it’s easier to correct mistakes. The treadmill is also a fantastic way for me to develop leg speed without the impact of the running track, which my 39-year-old body just can’t take. I know we all run slowly during a 70.3 or Ironman relative to a sprint, but a fast natural leg speed really helps keep my legs ticking over during longer races. I can’t talk about my run technique training without touching on the core work I do. I never used to do core work, which was certainly a big mistake. Nowadays I live in constant fear of getting a beer belly and do core exercises every other day. This has helped improve my run posture and form considerably without really trying. I have noticed a definite improvement in my running towards the end of my races just because of a stronger core holding me together. I have never given much thought to running shoes changing my technique, but a change in sponsors this year has given me great hope. I have been lucky enough to sign a long-term deal with Skechers Performance. I have always run in fairly standard shoes and all these did was support my mistakes. However, my new Skechers have changed all that and enable me to run with an improved technique. So mark my words, don’t just think about your swim technique and never assume that the later stages of the run are just about nutrition. I have certainly learnt my lesson and, although it’s late in my career, I am running better than ever before.

Richard Allen For more about professional triathlete Richard Allen visit his website richardallenfitness.com, where you’ll find details of his fitness programmes and training days

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Photo Paul Phillips / Competitive Image, Ironman

COMEBACK TALES


TREW STORIES

*i)  *

Other people made sacriďŹ ces in that race. The worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best road sprinter â&#x20AC;&#x201C; another Brit, Mark Cavendish â&#x20AC;&#x201C; was expected to take the green jersey for the sprinterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s title, but the help from the domestiques that would have been needed had to take second place to protecting Wiggins. In this instance though, an absolutely magniďŹ cent and selďŹ&#x201A;ess lead-out by Wiggins in the yellow jersey ensured that Cavendish did once again win the ďŹ nal sprint on the Champs Ă&#x2030;lysĂŠe.

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SPARE A THOUGHT FOR THOSE WHO PUT THEIR OWN AMBITION ON THE BACK BURNER, SAYS STEVE TREW â&#x20AC;&#x153;

T

hey also serve who only stand and wait.â&#x20AC;? (Not, as I thought in my halcyon days of surďŹ ng, â&#x20AC;&#x153;They also surf who only stand and wade.â&#x20AC;?) As the ITU season kicks off again and the debates ďŹ&#x201A;are up, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spare a minute for those unsung heroes who wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make the podium, but who are increasingly important for victory.

&$*+ (,*

The debated selection of two athletes, Stuart Hayes and Lucy Hall, for last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Olympic triathlon team brought the issue of domestiques into a sharp focus. A clear precedent had been set in Beijing when a domestique was brought into the Canadian team to help previous gold medallist Simon WhitďŹ eld. This proved to be successful, as Simon took silver, eight years after his gold in Sydney. Eight years is a long time in an athleteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life, and Simon generously gave great appreciation to the help he received in winning that second Olympic medal. 86

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0# %

Domestiques have been used in road cycling for many years. In cycling, the role of the domestique is honoured and appreciated; it is viewed as a job in its own right. Domestiques are recruited for cycling teams and are brought into certain races when their particular skills are appropriate â&#x20AC;&#x201C; especially the Grand Tours such as the Tour de France, and Vuelta a EspaĂąa. However, it is the Tour de France that is seen as the number one race in the world, and that captures the public attention and imagination. It is this huge interest that brings the debate over the use of domestiques into the public domain. In the 2012 race, it was brought home to UK audiences when Bradley Wiggins won. The second-best rider in the Tour, Brit Chris Froome, was highly touted to win, but had a different job to do. He wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t there to win, he was there to protect Wiggins. A job he did remarkably well. Domestiques sacriďŹ ce: that is their job.

Steve Trew A35:QA??7@F3FAD Steve was thinking of employing a domestique to assist him to write. He is an advisory coach for Speedo and can be contacted for all things .

Illustration Peter Greenwood

SUPPORTING ACTORS

So what exactly is the role of the domestique in a triathlon? My interpretation of the role is that of one as a protector. Certainly we saw that with Stuart Hayes in London where he was always around the Brownlee brothers, not necessarily doing anything aggressive but being there in case he was needed. Stuart Hayes ďŹ nished his Olympic triathlon with a run that got him round the course and that was all. One of the reasons? In the six weeks leading up to the race, Hayesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s training did not include a single run session. His job was to focus on the swim to ensure that he was with the Brownlees on the bike, and then to counter and control any moves during that 40km ride that threatened their chances. Hayes did his job magniďŹ cently and the distinctly average run was the price he paid. Because both Brownlee brothers went into the Olympic Games with very strong expectations to medal, there were lots of rumours and murmurings that other teams might gang up on them â&#x20AC;&#x201C; effectively building one large, strong team to counter the three British athletes. Personally, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think this materialised. However, there were strong indications in the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cycle road race that these intimidating tactics were used against Mark Cavendish with riders from several teams working to block, thwart and impede Great Britain from bringing through and then setting up Cavendish. A frustrated Cavendish did not feature in the ďŹ nal sprint. So it seems likely that domestiques are here to stay in triathlon. When huge amounts of money have been invested in trying to win medals in the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s number one multisport extravaganza, NGBs and funding governments are going to want a return on their money. And that return is winning a gold medal.


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