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OTHER SWIM SWIM STROKES

UP BIKE FOR SUMMER BIKE 30-MINUTE WORKOUT RUN SHARPEN July 2013 R36.95

JULY 2013 ISSUE 39

ONE SPORT IS NOT ENOUGH

TAKE THE LEAD MEET THREE TRIATHLETES WHO TOOK DECISIVE ACTION TO LEAVE POOR SWIM TIMES BEHIND

www.triathlonplussa.co.za

THE ART OF BALANCING TRIATHLON AND RELATIONSHIPS

ISSUE: JULY RSA R36.95 (inc vat)

 

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WEEK PLAN

TRAIN FOR A HALF IRON DISTANCE RACE THIS WINTER

PLUS

WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN A TRI WETSUIT FAST FOOD TO FIX YOUR BODY CONQUER YOUR OPEN-WATER FEARS WITH PHIL GRAVES’ HELP

NO.1 FOR GEAR ˜HCDDFC8I7HG HCD6F5B8G˜

  




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Photo: Salazar Photography

REVOLUTIONIZING A ROAD CLASSIC Zipp’s new 202 Firecrest® Carbon Clincher revolutionizes what’s possible with a do-it-all classic road wheel. We took our 202 wheelset – the venerable climber’s companion – and transformed it into a stiff, lightweight and aerodynamic speed weapon. Our proprietary Firecrest rim rewrote the fundamentals of wheel making, resulting in improved aerodynamics and stability in even the strongest of crosswinds. Our Carbon Clincher technology provides convenience with optimized ride quality and braking. It’s a road classic, revolutionized.

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JULY 2013

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Welcome

Subscribe today SE E

ISSUE 39 / JULY 2013

Happy indoor training this winter, see you all out on the roads soon! Yours in tri, Glen Gore editor glen@triathlonplussa co.za

Don’t miss this month THIS IS YOUR WORLD

STUNNING SWIMS

CELTMAN EXTREME SCOTTISH TRIATHLON 6 JULY HELD IN Scotland’s north-western Highlands, the Celtman has to be one of the toughest – and one of the most spectacular – triathlons in Europe. The first leg of this epic long-distance adventure starts at 5am on a remote beach on the western shore of Loch Shieldaig. From here, competitors begin a long and gruelling day. The swim is 3.8km long, straight across the loch to Shieldaig village. The 400m-deep sea loch can be exceptionally cold in places, but the sunrise over the peaks of the Torridon Mountains makes the chilliness more than worth it. cxtri.com

Words Huw Jones Photo Steve Carter

THIS IS YOUR WORLD GET READY TO BE THROWN IN AT THE DEEP END WITH THESE INCREDIBLE RACE SWIMS

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JULY 2013 JULY 2013

JULY 2013 JULY 2013

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This Is Your World Get ready to be thrown in at the deep end with these incredible race swims PAGE 12 Swim faster

Swim faster

TAKETHE LEAD

Being a great swimmer isn’t an accident – it’s a choice. We meet three triathletes who took decisive action to leave poor swim times behind Words Edward Gibbes

| Photo Corbis, Getty

tri again

re-start

RYAN JOHNSON After missing a race swim cut-off, Ryan Johnson knew he needed help

open mind

VICKY GILL Runner Vicky Gill knew how to end a race well but had to learn how to start stronger

KEVIN MACKENZIE When his swim hit a plateau, Kevin Mackenzie found an open-water coach

JULY 2013

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JULY 2013

37

Take The Lead Being a great swimmer isn’t an accident – it’s a choice. We meet three triathletes who took decisive action to leave poor swim times behind PAGE 36 Race report

RACE REPORTS

Samantha Anderson gave a commanding performance to win at Oulton Park

Eneko Llanos rode well but had to work hard on the run to seal his victory

BILLARD & HAUSCHILDT CLAIM FIRST ITU LONG DISTANCE WORLD CHAMPS TITLES run. But Hauschildt fought back in the ďŹ nal stages and ďŹ nished in 4:44:15, 1 minute and Where Belfort, France 36 seconds ahead of Pedersen. Rachel When 1 june McBride (CAN) claimed bronze in 4:52:03, Winners Bertrand Billard (FRA), 4:08:45; ďŹ nishing just 13 seconds ahead of Jeanne Melissa Hauschildt (AUS), 4:44:15 Collonge (FRA) and preventing France from

VICTORY FOR TWO EUROPEANS AT THE 2013 IRONMAN ASIA-PACIFIC CHAMPIONSHIPS Where Melbourne, Australia When 24 March Winners Eneko Llanos (ESP), 7:36:08; Corinne Abraham (GBR), 8:10:56

A

USSIE ATHLETES led from the front at the Ironman AsiaPaciďŹ c Championships in Melbourne. Choppy waters meant a shortened 1.9km swim, but saw Australia’s Clayton Fettell and Joe Lampe sticking to their game plan of swimming fast to get out on the bike with time in hand. They arrived in 19:32, with fellow Aussie Luke Bell third in 20:16. A brief spell of home dominance began early in the bike leg with Fettell, Lampe and Bell quickly being joined by Craig Alexander. They were soon caught up by Belgium’s Marino Vanhoenacker and Spain’s Eneko Llanos while Lampe was dropped. Vanhoenacker then broke away, his advantage blossoming to 3mins 30secs. He recorded the day’s fastest bike split at 4:22:22, beginning the run with an 44

advantage of nearly ďŹ ve minutes. Behind, Llanos and Alexander set about chasing the Belgian down. By the half marathon point, Llanos had pulled away from Alexander. At 35km, he was less than a minute behind. He passed a visibly exhausted Vanhoenacker 10 minutes later, and went on to claim victory in 7:36:08. In the women’s race, the swim was led by the USA’s Amanda Stevens and Meredith Kessler, who exited the water at 21:53, nearly two minutes clear of the ďŹ eld. Britain’s Corinne Abraham ďŹ nished the swim in 28:23. Using her cycling strength, Caroline Steffen (SUI) surged into the lead at around the 55km mark, but was unable to shake the train of athletes behind her and slid back to fourth. By the 100km mark, Abraham was less than a minute behind Steffen in ďŹ fth. Abraham quickly overtook Steffen for fourth, then surged on into second place. Eventually, even six-time world champion Natascha Badmann – leading the bike at this point – couldn’t hold onto the rampaging Abraham as she pushed on to take the lead and create a two-minute buffer. Abraham reached T2 with the day’s fastest

B

ride, getting out onto the marathon with more than three minutes’ buffer to Badmann and over seven minutes to Steffen.Abraham dominated the run as Yvonne Van Vlerken gained on Steffen. By the time the take for second occurred, Abraham had an unassailable 12:45 lead. She crossed the line in 8:10:56, announcing herself as a new star on the Ironman scene.

9:47:39 results Elite

Top 3 Men 1. Eneko Llanos (ESP)

7:36:08

2. Marino Vanhoenacker (BEL)

7:38:59

3. Craig Alexander (AUS)

7:39:37

Top 3 Women 1. Corinne Abraham (GBR)

8:10:56

2. Yvonne Van Vlerken (AUT)

8:26:04

3. Caroline Steffen (SUI)

8:31:22

OTH FRANCE’S Bertrand Billard and Australia’s Melissa Hauschildt (AUS) claimed their ďŹ rst ever ITU long distance world championship titles on Saturday in Belfort, France. Billard’s win was a treat for local French fans, while Hauschildt’s gold came as a surprise as it was her ďŹ rst time ever competing in an ITU Long Distance race. The adverse weather conditions resulted in the format being altered before the race, with the swim omitted and the course reverting to a 9.5km run, 87km bike and 20km run. Melissa Hauschildt (AUS) clawed back a three-minute deďŹ cit going into the ďŹ nal 20km run with a superb performance to become the 2013 ITU long distance world champion. Camilla Pedersen (DEN) had to settle for silver for the second year running. Hauschildt was the early pace setter, clocking a time of 35:19 for the ďŹ rst 9.5km run. But with harsh conditions forecast, she took a long ďŹ rst transition to add extra clothing, which allowed Pedersen to take the lead. It looked like it would prove to be a costly decision, as Pedersen led until the second lap of the 20km

having a world championship medallist in the women’s elite race. Billard delighted locals by storming to victory to claim gold in 4:08: 45 while Terenzo Bozzone (NZL) won silver in 4:10:43. Dirk Bockel (LUX) repeated his third place ďŹ nish in last year’s race by taking bronze in 4:11:51. Billard becomes France’s fourth world champion at the long distance format - more than any other nation - and afterwards said his gamble during the Ballon d’Alsace bike climb paid off: “I did not listen to my brother, who told me not to go too hard. I took a risk, I attacked the Ballon d’Alsace. I had no pressure on me, it was my ďŹ rst world championship. I was motivated, I thought of my family. Now I want to share it with them.â€? A fast transition after the bike allowed Bozzone to take second place and the New Zealander then clocked the fastest time for the 20km (1:13:34) to ensure silver, with Bockel settling for a second bronze in as many years. Billard was not about to deny giving the home crowd something to cheer about. With a strong 20km run split of 1:13:53, he ensured his ďŹ rst world championship victory.

OULTON PARK CLASSIC DUATHLON Where Wilmslow, Cheshire When 17 March 2013 Winners Peter Ellis (1:02.32); Samantha Anderson (1:11.07 ) OULTON PARK Motor Racing Circuit played host to Xtra Mile Event’s opening race of the 2013 season on 17 March, with the sprint-distance race the last chance to qualify for the ETU Sprint Distance Duathlon European Championships. The men’s race was a keenly contested affair with a high-quality ďŹ eld. The win went to Peter Ellis after a race-long battle with 16-year-old Jimmy Kershaw, who led the race out of T1. Ellis proved too strong in the early stages of the 21.5km cycle however, overtaking Kershaw and opening a 23-second gap at T2 that was never to be fully overhauled, crossing the line 15 seconds clear. Defending champion Ian Roberts rounded out the podium, nine seconds adrift of Kershaw. In the women’s event, there was less tension as Samantha Anderson produced a commanding display in all three stages of the race. She crossed the line in a time of 1:11:07, nearly a full ďŹ ve minutes ahead of secondplaced Holly Ferrar. Jenny Muston rounded out the top three another 3:27 back in a time of 2:01:54. The standard distance men’s race was won by Matt Moorhouse in 1:41:57, whilst the women’s competition victor was Sarah May in 1:55.35.

JULY 2013

JULY 2013

Words Ashley Quinlan and Tom Ballard Photos Triathlon.org / Delly Carr / ITU, Human Race

ITU LONG DISTANCE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS Corinne Abraham gained the lead on the bike with the day’s fastest split, then held her advantage

IRONMAN MELBOURNE

Words Tom Ballard Photos Delly Carr

July, here we come. This is by far the toughest month of the year. Right smack bang in the middle of winter, there will be times when you doubt the need to get out of bed and go train. Believe it or not, that’s okay. If you ever wanted to be a little lazy, now would be the time. Rather now than September, when spring comes along and the season gets underway. Winter does present some golden opportunities to change your groundhog day routine and mix it up a little. Why go out in the morning, when it’s cold and dark, when the luxury of an indoor gym exists! Try this little workout one morning and reap the benefits of a super session done and dusted in less than 60 minutes. You start by running 4km on the treadmill, the idea being to complete it as fast as possible - the faster the treadmill runs, the faster you finish that 4km. Once off the treadmill, you head straight for the gym bikes and crank out a 10km time trial. One tip: put it into the easiest resistance level and spin those pegs like pistons. The heart rate will shoot through the roof and the fast twitch muscle fibres will go into overdrive. Last but not least, you change into the costume (no need for a speedy transition here, walk down to the pool) and complete the indoor triathlon with a maximum 300m swim sprint from dive-in. In less than 60 minutes, you will have done an indoor triathlon that works the magic, believe me! Try it, you will be amazed at the results. Best of all, no dark and cold climate to fight against. You cannot do this every day, but the odd change to your training regime will keep you super motivated during July. Once August comes along, we will have turned the corner and be heading towards spring. As usual, Triathlon Plus SA has all the content you will ever need to become a better triathlete, both in our magazine and on our website. Use it wisely, there’s no triathlete on earth than cannot improve in some area or another - even the very best pros need to stay on top of their A game!

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Race Report The latest reviews of some of the biggest races PAGE 44 SWIM OTHER SWIM STROKES

SHARPEN UP 30-MINUTE BIKE SUMMER BIKE WORKOUT RUN FOR July 2013 R36.95

TAKE THE LEAD MEET THREE TRIATHLETES WHO TOOK DECISIVE ACTION TO LEAVE POOR SWIM TIMES BEHIND

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WEEK PLAN

TRAIN FOR IRONMAN 70.3 THIS WINTER

TRAINING ZONE: BODY

THE ART OF BALANCING TRIATHLON AND RELATIONSHIPS

ISSUE: JULY RSA R36.95 (inc vat)

 

Get in touch... twitter.com/TriathlonPlusSA or facebook.com/TriathlonPlusSA

PLUS

WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN A TRI WETSUIT FAST FOOD TO FIX YOUR BODY CONQUER YOUR OPEN-WATER FEARS WITH PHIL GRAVES HELP

NO.1 FOR GEAR ˜HCDDFC8I7HG HCD6F5B8G˜

  



ON THE COVER Non Stanford, World Series Madrid Winner Photography triathlon.org

JULY 2013

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ISSUE 39 / JULY 2013

Meet your team of experts We’ve assembled the biggest and best team of triathlon experts around to bring you unrivalled coverage of your sport

The Fire Tree Design Company (PTY) Ltd P.O.Box 18882, Dalbridge, 4014 KZN Tel +27 31 534 6600 Fax +27 31 534 6650 Email info@triathlonplussa.co.za Web www.triathlonplussa.co.za

Editor Glen Gore glen@triathlonplussa.co.za

Contributors Rich Allen, Eva Caiden, Dr Kevin Currell, Eamonn Deane, Fiona Duffy, Txema Garcia, Glen Gore, Phil Graves, Peter Greenwood, Guy Kesteven, Nigel Leighton, Dr Ian Rollo, Spencer Smith, Mark Threlfall, Steve Trew, Jamie Wilkins Photography Steve Carter, Human Race,Will Milner, charleswhittonphotography.com, Delly Carr, Paul Phillips @ Competitive Image, Triathlon.org/ Rich Cruse, Janos Schmidt/ ITU, Ironman, Xterra, James Lampard, Michael Dannenberg www. foodimaging.co.uk , Corbis, Getty, Greg Beadle, British Triathlon

triathlon.org

PHIL MOSLEY

TOM BALLARD

Glen is the editor of Triathlon Plus in South Africa, and coaches triathletes. He’s been a pro ITU World Cup racer and multiple top-five Ironman finisher.

Our coaching editor Phil is an elite triathlete and coach with a degree in sports science. Also the reigning British age-group duathlon champion, he is currently training in Stellenbosch, South Africa

Our senior writer Tom has a love of all things triathlon. He kicked the 2013 season off by acquiring awe-inspiring sunburn racing in Abu Dhabi, and is now looking forward to returning to Ironman 70.3 UK

The Fire Tree Design Company Suite 515, Island Office Park 35/37 Island Circle, Riverhorse Valley P.O. Box 18882, Dalbridge, 4014 www.firetree.co.za

ANDY BULLOCK

PHIL GRAVES

GARTH FOX

Andy has completed over 10,000 hours of coaching and currently works with British Triathlon on both their Paratriathlon and Regional Academy projects, as well as with age-groupers

Phil is a pro Ironman triathlete renowned for his cycling prowess. He won the Ironman UK and 70.3 UK double in 2009, took the 70.3 UK title again in 2012 and has also won TriStar111 Milton Keynes

Garth is a sports scientist (MSc) and coach (garthfox. com). He works with worldclass and age-group athletes, transferring the latest techniques across endurance sport disciplines

8

DR KEVIN CURRELL

STEVE TREW

RICH ALLEN

A leading triathlon coach and commentator, Steve has been in the game forever. You can reach him for coaching advice and details on his training camps on trew@personalbest. demon.co.uk

Rich has won nine national elite British championships and qualified for the Olympics in 2000. He still races professionally, and runs his own coaching business richallenfitness.com

JULY 2013

Art Editor Shane Hardie

Social Media Jonathan Trenor Subscriptions Geraldine Stone

Advertising Glen Gore +27 74 187 7140 glen@triathlonplussa.co.za

Subscriptions +27 31 534 6600 subs@triathlonplussa.co.za Subscribe online at www.triathlonplussa.co.za

TriPlus Voice Blogsite www.triplus.co.za Printed in SA by The Fire Tree Design Company under license with Futurenet Publishers. Distribution through RNA distributors and First Freight.

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Future produces carefully targeted special-interest magazines, websites and events for people who share a passion. We publish more than 170 magazines and websites and 100 international editions of our titles are published across the world.

Future plc is a public company quoted on the London Stock Exchange (symbol: FUTR). www.futureplc.com

Kevin works for the English Institute of Sport as a performance nutritionist, specialising in triathlon. He’s a keen triathlete and his scientific research on sports nutrition is widely published

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Editorial

Cover Photo GLEN GORE

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© Future Publishing Limited 2009. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be used or reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. Future Publishing Limited (company number 2008885) is registered in England and Wales. The registered office of Future Publishing Limited is at Beauford Court, 30 Monmouth Street, Bath BA1 2BW. All information contained in this magazine is for information only and is, as far as we are aware, correct at the time of going to press. Future cannot accept any responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. Readers are advised to contact manufacturers and retailers directly with regard to the price of products/ services referred to in this magazine. If you submit unsolicited material to us, you automatically grant Future a licence to publish your submission in whole or in part in all editions of the magazine, including licensed editions worldwide and in any physical or digital format throughout the world. Any material you submit is sent at your risk and, although every care is taken, neither Future nor its employees, agents or subcontractors shall be liable for loss or damage.

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Contents ISSUE 39 / JULY 2013

ON THE COVER

EVERY MONTH

30 OVERCOME “THE FEAR”

12 THIS IS YOUR WORLD

31 FUEL / REFUEL

24 UP TO SPEED

Conquer your open-water fears with Phil Graves’ help Rhubarb crumble with almonds and crème fraîche

34 WHAT TO LOOK FOR

Triathlon wetsuits are full of tech – here are the basics

36 TAKE THE LEAD

Being a great swimmer isn’t an accident – it’s a choice. We meet three triathletes who took decisive action to leave poor swim times behind

54 TRYING RELATIONSHIPS

Expert advice on how to get the best out of triathlon without causing conflict at home DR MATTHEW TATUM

Get ready to be thrown in at the deep end with these incredible race swims For all the latest tri news

44 RACE REPORTS

Check out all the latest gear on the market

82 RACE LISTINGS

Plan the end of your year with our guide to what’s on

83 SUBSCRIBE AND LOOK COOL

Never miss an issue, save money and get yourself some free gear

85 COMEBACK TALES

59 THE ULTIMATE BIKE SESSION

As nations go further to field the best team, Steve Trew wonders where it will end

61 SHARPEN UP YOUR RUN

Five simple training steps to help you hit the gas pedal and go quicker this race season GARTH FOX

64 TRAIN FOR IRON DISTANCE THIS WINTER

From strong foundations to Iron distance in 12 weeks RICHARD SMITH

GET THE LOWDOWN ON THE HOTTEST GEAR TO HIT THE SHOPS

72 BRAND NEW KIT

57 MIXED STROKE SPEED

How time trials can be incredibly beneficial training tools PHIL MOSLEY

BRAND NEW KIT

The latest review of some of the biggest races

Rich Allen says it is possible to master your swim in four easy steps

Why varying your stroke in training can make you more powerful when racing ANDY BULLOCK

72

86 TREW STORIES

TRAINING ZONE

30

OVERCOME “THE FEAR”

CONQUER YOUR OPEN-WATER FEARS WITH PHIL GRAVES’ HELP

63 PALEOLITHIC DIET

Caveman cuisine is increasing in popularity, but is it any good for you? DR KEVIN CURRELL

70 YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED BY OUR EXPERTS Advice on fuelling for training in the evening and how to avoid cramps when racing DR TAMSIN LEWIS AND KATE PERCY

34

WHAT TO LOOK FOR

TRIATHLON WETSUITS ARE FULL OF TECH – HERE ARE THE BASICS

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Su

and bscri b g goo et fre e SEE dies e PA GE 83

36 44

RACE REPORTS

TAKE THE LEAD

BEING A GREAT SWIMMER ISN’T AN ACCIDENT – IT’S A CHOICE. WE MEET THREE TRIATHLETES WHO TOOK DECISIVE ACTION TO LEAVE POOR SWIM TIMES BEHIND

GET UP TO DATE ON ALL THE BEST RACES

54

TRYING RELATIONSHIPS

EXPERT ADVICE ON HOW TO GET THE BEST OUT OF TRIATHLON WITHOUT CAUSING CONFLICT AT HOME

JULY 2013

11


THIS IS YOUR WORLD

THIS IS YOUR WORLD GET READY TO BE THROWN IN AT THE DEEP END WITH THESE INCREDIBLE RACE SWIMS

12

JULY 2013 JULY 2013


STUNNING SWIMS

CELTMAN EXTREME SCOTTISH TRIATHLON 6 JULY

Words Huw Jones Photo Steve Carter

HELD IN Scotland’s north-western Highlands, the Celtman has to be one of the toughest – and one of the most spectacular – triathlons in Europe. The first leg of this epic long-distance adventure starts at 5am on a remote beach on the western shore of Loch Shieldaig. From here, competitors begin a long and gruelling day. The swim is 3.8km long, straight across the loch to Shieldaig village. The 400m-deep sea loch can be exceptionally cold in places, but the sunrise over the peaks of the Torridon Mountains makes the chilliness more than worth it. cxtri.com

JULY JULY 2013 2013

13


THIS IS YOUR WORLD

TOSHIBA WINDSOR TRIATHLON 16 JUNE

Photo Human Race

SET IN the magnificent surrounds of Windsor Castle and Eton College, the Windsor Triathlon has been a major fixture on the race calendar for over 20 years and has won the British Triathlon Federation’s Best Event of the Year award a total of seven times. The sprint- and standard- distance swim courses can be tricky, particularly if the river is in high flow, but after you pass the turn-around buoy you’ll have the current on your side. You might have to dodge the odd swan, but swimming up the Thames on a mid-summer’s morning in such a historic location makes for an unforgettable experience. humanrace.co.uk

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TT/TRI SERIES

THE ORIG IN OF A ERO IT WAS, OVER 20 YEARS AGO, THAT JIM FELT CONCEIVED DUAL AERO: THE GENESIS OF OUR DA AEROBIKE. SINCE THEN THE FELT DA HAS WON IRONMAN CHAMPIONSHIPS AND TOUR TIME TRIALS. IT‘S BEEN REFINED, REDESIGNED, AND NOW EVOLVED INTO B SERIES BIKES. TO-

Felt Bicycles SA @FeltBicyclesSA www.worldsviewsports.co.za +27 11 844 1000

DAY FELT DA AND B SERIES ARE THE INTEGRATION OF LONG DISTANCE RIDE COMFORT, FUNCTIONAL AERODYNAMICS AND REAL WORLD FRAME FEATURES. FELT RAISED THE BAR FOR AERODYNAMIC BICYCLES. NOW THEY ARE READY TO RAISE YOURS.


THIS IS YOUR WORLD

HEVER CASTLE TRIATHLON 28-29 SEPTEMBER

Photo Will Milner

END YOUR season in style at this weekendlong triathlon festival held in the picturesque grounds of Kent’s Hever Castle – an old haunt of Henry VIII. Last year the sprint and Olympic-distance races attracted around 3,500 triathletes, from first-timers to GB elites such as Tim Don and David Bishop, making it one of the largest triathlons in the UK. A stunning 38-acre lake is the venue for the swim, and then it’s out on the bike into the countryside of the High Weald. Despite the competitive field and cash prize, the emphasis here is on participation, with a women-only swim wave, family relays and a race for children of 8-15 years. castletriathlonseries.co.uk

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RINNY WINS ON THE DA

W H AT D R I V E S Y O U


THIS IS YOUR WORLD

VOTWO PADSTOW TRIATHLON 15 SEPTEMBER

Photo charleswhittonphotography.com

PLUNGE INTO the salty Atlantic at this top event on the North Cornwall coast. With the jagged form of Gulland Rock as a backdrop, this popular coastal triathlon begins with more than 300 competitors charging over the sand and diving into the clear waters of Harlyn Bay. Swimmers complete a rectangular 750m course (one lap for the sprint race and two for the standard distance) and then run back up the beautiful crescent-shaped beach to transition. The sea temperature in mid-September is usually about 17째C, but conditions out on the water are less predictable and can vary from completely flat to waves over a metre high. votwo.co.uk

18

JULY 2013 JULY 2013


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THIS IS YOUR WORLD

THE PENINSULA ROCK MAN ULTRA CROSS TRI VENUE: VAAL DAM. DATE: 1 DECEMBER 2013 1. Triathlon A.

Swim 2 km MTB 70 km Trail run 18 km

B.

Canoe 16 km MTB 70 km Trail run 18 km

C.

Relay: Swim or canoe. Two or three athletes per team.

2. Family sprint cross. · 400 m swim · 12 km MTB · 3 km run 3. Open water swim (Eastern life saving) to be held on the 30th of November · 400 m · One mile – 1600m · 600 relay · 4 men Trophies All Rock Man finishers as well as teams will receive a trophy. Medals All sprint event finishers and open water swimmers will receive a medal. Rock Man. R70 000 in cash prizes. First five men. First three ladies. Jackets. All Rock Man entrants receive a jacket. Entries Limited entries - only 800! No late entries. Race info 0169826060 www.spectrumsportevents.co.za

20

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SN! ”

ur best with U

“ Perform at yo

Kent Horner

PREPARE, PERFORM AND RECOVER 01 to beat your best!

PREPARE

3 DAYS BEFORE RACE Take 3-5 CRAMP BLOCK tablets twice daily in the three days before your race and he then two tablets 30 minutes before the es race starts. Take two tablets 30 minutes after the completion of the event, as well as two tablets before bed. WHY

Improved muscle/ nerve function Buffers lactic acid Limits post-exercise pain

BEFORE THE RACE Start phosphate loading four days before the race with VO2 MAX. On race days, take two V ttablets twice daily.

BEFORE & DURING RACE The new ENERGY HP BAR has a specialised focus on convenient nutrition that supports energy requirements, performance levels and helps shorten your recovery time.

WHY

WHY

Increases oxygen uptake and ventilatory break point, enabling you to push harder for longer

Supplies slow- & fast releasing carbohydrates

Buffers lactic acid, which forms around the muscles following moderate to intense races

Contains electrolytes

Source of vitamins & minerals

NEW

Phosphate & electrolyte loading

02 PERFORM DURING THE RACE Drink 150-200ml of CYTO POWER HP every 15-20 minutes during your race, if longer than one hour.

MAKES 17ℓ DURING THE RACE For events of D 90 minutes +: take a few sips of HYPOTONIC ELECTROLYTE H every 15 minutes, HYDRATOR alternating with your favourite al USN energy drink. U

WHY

Rapidly replaces electrolytes, energy and amino acids during physical activity

DURING THE RACE Fuel up with VOOMA ULTRA for instant energy boosts when you need it.

NEW

WHY W

Rehydrates

Optimises the use of glycogen for energy

High energy content (429kJ per sachet) to promote increased energy availability 25g carbohydrate matrix to aid with increased endurance

Replaces electrolytes and phosphates during activity

Extends power output time

WHY

Espresso and Chocolate flavours contain caffeine for an additional energy surge

Helps reduce pain and muscle cramping

R139.95RRP

03 RECOVER

ALL-IN-ONE

AFTER RACE Drink a full serving of RECOVER MAX within 45 minutes of finishing a race. BEFORE BED TIME Drink a second full serving of RECOVER MAX in the evening if you’re still feeling fatigued.

LOAD BEFORE RACE Start sipping on a full serving of EPIC PRO ALL-IN-ONE one hour prior to your race. DURING THE RACE Drink EPIC PRO throughout. Ensure you have a couple of gulps at least every 15-20 minutes to ensure a consistent supply of glycogen and electrolytes to your working muscles.

WHY

WHY

Four-stage Glyco Matrix blend of Waxy Maize starch, maltodextrin, corn syrup solids, fructose, as well as a Whey Protein concentrate

High- and low-GI carb sources, like Isomaltulose, to sustain peak energy levels

Optimised muscle recovery

Contains pre-digested hydrolysed proteins (incl PeptoPro®) for rapid muscle tissue protection and recovery

Rapid electrolyte, glycogen and amino acid replacement

www.usn.co.za

Helps to remove metabolic waste such as lactic acid, improving muscle tissue performance

USN SA

@USNSA


22

JULY 2013


THIS IS YOUR WORLD

TRI ROCK DURBAN 1.9km swim/90km cycle/21km run When: 22nd September Where: Durban South Africa info The latest addition to the triathlon calendar in SA sees TriRock Durban planned for the 22nd September. The race will consist of a 1.9km swim in the warm Indian Ocean, followed by a super fast 90km cycle out north to Ballito and back, then a 21km run that will take in the top sights of Durbs. A fast course makes for fast times, so this new race is a sure winner come September! Early Bird entries close 14 June, general entries on 30 August. WWW.TRIROCK-DURBAN.COM

JULY JULY 2013 2013

23


UPTOSPEED EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO GET YOUR MONTH OFF TO A FLYER

PLAYING THE LONG GAME

FOLLOWING LONDON 2012, A SWATHE OF TOP ITU ATHLETES HAVE MADE THE JUMP TO LONG-DISTANCE RACING. CAN THEY CONQUER IRONMAN? WHEN THE 2013 ITU World Triathlon Series kicked off in Auckland last month, it was noticeable how many familiar faces were missing. In the wake of London 2012, many ITU regulars have decided that their future lies elsewhere, either toughing it out over long distance in Ironman, or going for the faster-paced Ironman 70.3 circuit. There is nothing particularly new about ITU athletes switching to long-distance racing – many of the sport’s all-time greats have won both ITU and Ironman world titles – but rarely have quite as many athletes made the jump up in distances at the same time. In the last few months, two former ITU world champions, Ivan Rana (2002) and Bevan Docherty (2004) have grabbed their first Ironman wins in Mexico and New Zealand respectively. Another former world

Ivan Rana won his IM debut in Mexico

24

JULY 2013

champion, Tim Don (2006), recently joined fellow Brits Will Clarke and Liz Blatchford in announcing his intention to ‘go long’ in 2013. All three felt hard done by after missing out on selection for London 2012. “I think that people like Will and Tim think that they’ve done the ITU circuit long enough,” says Triathlon Plus columnist and BBC triathlon commentator Steve Trew. “I know Liz was furious that she wasn’t selected for London 2012. Missing out on selection or having a poor Games is probably why we’re seeing so many well-known ITU athletes making the switch now.” Two London 2012 medallists, Alistair Brownlee and Lisa Norden, have expressed a desire to win world titles at longer distances. Both have made moves in that direction by including longer races in their itinerary, with

Words Matt Anniss, Ashley Quinlan Photos Delly Carr, Paul Phillips @ Competitive Image, Triathlon.org/ Rich Cruse, Janos Schmidt/ ITU, Ironman

Bevan Docherty takes a thrilling home win at his debut Ironman


UPTOSPEED

TRI Trick BEGINNER’S BIKE BRASS

Blatchford is turning her back on ITU racing

Alistair Brownlee showed his long-ride power in Abu Dhabi Tim Don made his 70.3 debut back in 2009

Clarke comes to 70.3 from great ITU form

Brownlee setting a new course record at the Abu Dhabi Short Course event in March (despite its name, the desert race includes a gruelling 100km bike leg). Norden has gone further, choosing not to defend her 2012 ITU World Championship crown in favour of taking a year out to race on the 70.3 circuit. Olympic silver medallist Javier Gomez, who won the first round of this year’s ITU World Triathlon Series, is also branching out and will pit himself against longdistance legend Chris McCormack at the middledistance Challenge Barcelona next month. So, is it just the challenge of ‘going long’ that has inspired so many ITU athletes to make the switch, or is there something else at play? Leanda Cave, the current Ironman and 70.3 world champion, and a former ITU world champion, thinks so. “My guess is that they see Ironman and 70.3 as a better way to earn money and recognition,” says Cave. “You could argue that there’s a huge

deficit in exposure to ITU athletes finishing off the podium. Top 20 in an ITU World Series race is a great result, but it essentially goes unnoticed, and sponsors don’t care to endorse athletes well for finishing outside of the top three.” Cave, who initially struggled when she made the switch, also thinks that some athletes enjoy the opportunity to break free from the influence of their national federations. “When

racing Ironman, you race for yourself and there is no one to tell you what to race in or not,” she says. “As an adult, even in ITU racing, I was not a fan of being told how I should go about my job. I’m sure some other athletes feel the same.” Whatever the ex-ITU pros’ reasons for switching, one thing is sure: IM and 70.3 racers will need to do their speedwork to keep up with the newcomers this season.

Every triathlon event you compete in will have a few people with the latest aero bike, but the gains these athletes are going to achieve aren’t that large if they don’t know how to ride them properly. If you’re more comfortable on a bike that you can handle well and leaves you entering T2 less fatigued, you’ll be better off than if you spend thousands of rands on a stiff, uncompromising aero bike that you can’t ride to its full potential.

World champion Cave enjoys the freedom of racing long

> JAVIER GOMEZ AND ANNE HAUG WIN ITU MOOLOOLABA WORLD CUP JULY 2013

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UPTOSPEED

TEAM ITU 2013 APPLICATIONS OPEN The ITU has launched an initiative to support athletes from emerging tri nations on their way to Rio 2016. The project, which offers resources and expertise, is aimed at up and coming athletes in developing nations, to boost the sport’s profile outside traditional triathlon countries.

NEW BRITISH TRIATHLON PERFORMANCE DIRECTOR British Triathlon has presented Brendan Purcell as its new Performance Director. He will work with new Head Coach Ben Bright. “The role I have is to support the environment around the coach and athlete,” Purcell said. “[It allows] performance to be the primary focus for those people.”

NEWS

THE ROAD TO RIO PARATRIATHLON GETS READY FOR THE PARALYMPICS THE ITU have responded to paratriathlon’s inclusion in the Rio 2016 Paralympic Games by increasing the number of international races this year. For the first time, the paratriathlon race calendar will include Continental Championship races on five continents, as well as races tied in to ITU World Cup and World Triathlon Series events. The season will finish with the Paratriathlon World Championship in London, as part of the ITU World Triathlon Grand Final in September. To increase participation, the ITU are offering newcomers the chance to get an official classification from a panel of experts at a number of international races, including the European Championships on 26-27 June. Great Britain has a strong record in paratriathlon, and British paratriathletes should

The ITU is stepping up the profile of paratriathlon in 2013

be in contention for medals at the European and World Championships. Last month British Triathlon announced the names of the 13 athletes that have been included in its Lottery-funded World Class Paratriathlon Squad. The expanded squad includes four current paratriathlon world champions – Faye McClelland,

Iain Dawson, Steven Judge and Matthew Emmerson – and former world champion Jane Egan. A five-person Triathlon England Paratriathlon Development Squad, focusing on newcomers, has also been announced. For more information about the 2013 international paratriathlon season, visit triathlon.org/ paratriathlon.

NEWS

SPONSER SPORTS FOOD

EXCLUSIVELY AVAILABLE AT CYCLE LAB

ingredients. Sponser Sports Food will be exclusively available at selected Cycle Lab stores nationally. over twenty three years ago in Cycling is a lifestyle! Cycle Lab Switzerland as a family company stores offer a comprehensive range of with its own strong research cycling related products for everyone, and development department. with excellent back-up and support Sponser provides scientificallybased, high-performance sports through our workshops, bike set-ups supplementation that is designed and knowledgeable and trained staff. to enhance athletic performance, We cater for the whole family and all physical appearance and health. levels of cyclist, from recreational to professional. As the market leader in Products are divided into SA’s fastest growing sports industry, categories that include Power, Energy, Pro and Fit & Well. The whether it be road, mountain, kiddies, downhill or multisports, we products are manufactured in will always help you make the right Switzerland or Germany using cycling choices through our expertise only the finest high quality

SPONSER SPORT FOOD was founded a little

XTERRA LAUNCH EPIC SERIES Xterra has announced its first Epic Series in the USA. Racers’ two best performances from the four-leg series will count towards crowning the agegroup Xterra Epic Series Champions. The events feature a 1.6km swim, 48 to 56km mountain bike ride and nine to 18km trail run.

and advice. Cycle Lab offers a wide range of products at fair prices, and will help you to make the right choice at all times. Service excellence and support extends beyond the point of purchase, and makes Cycle Lab unique within the marketplace. Currently, Cycle Lab has 14 stores nationally: Cape Town, Tokai, Tyger Manor, Paarl, Winelands, East London, Nelspruit, Polokwane, Little Falls, East Rand, Fourways, Centurion and Lynnwood. For contact details, visit www.cyclelab.com.

> 2013 BLENHEIM TRIATHLON SPONSORED BY LEUKAEMIA AND LYMPHOMA RESEARCH 26

JULY 2013

Words Matt Anniss, Tom Ballard, Philip Mosley, Ashley Quinlan Photos Xterra, Triathlon.org / Janos Schmidt / ITU

NEWS IN BRIEF BIG NEWS MADE SMALL


UPTOSPEED

NEWS

WELCOME HOME, SUPA PIET! DU PREEZ IS BACK AFTER BECOMING THE WORLD’S FIRST QUADRIPLEGIC ATHLETE TO COMPLETE A HALF IRONMAN SOUTH AFRICA’S Supa Piet is back home, at work and celebrating his world first - becoming the world’s first quadriplegic athlete to complete a gruelling Half Ironman. He not only accomplished this feat but did so with style, leaving about 150 able-bodied athletes trailing in his wake. Back in his office at Deloitte, Johannesburg where he works as a senior actuarial analyst, Pieter du Preez had another piece of news waiting - he was notified that he has been chosen to don the green and gold for South Africa’s team of hand-cyclists, who will shortly be competing in World Cup events in Italy and Spain. This is the second time that Pieter has qualified to compete in these events, but this time around he’s qualified to race with the class above him (H1.2). This means that he will be competing against athletes whose injuries do not include limited hand grip and elbow extension - as is the case with Pieter, who only has 15% muscle movement in his body. Pieter accomplished his world first in the Australian seaside town of Busselton, chosen for the flatness of the course, and was the only quad competing against a field of athletes that included an Australian Olympian. He completed the course in a creditable six hours and 36 minutes, smashing his personally set target of seven and a half hours. He completed the sea swim in 54 minutes, spent three hours and 55 minutes on the bike and completed the run in one hour 33 minutes. “I smashed it,” he says, a smile spreading over his face. However, he is also the first to admit that there were challenges along the way. He had a touch of flu shortly

before the event, and it looked for a while that the sea swim portion of the race would be too difficult because of the weather conditions. However, on the day, the sea was calm, his flu had cleared and Pieter was ready. It was while he still had 35km to cover during the 90km bike that potential disaster struck again. There was a puncture in one of his hand bike’s three tyres. “I thought I had hit the wall, as I didn’t hear the tyre go,” Pieter recalls. “Luckily, with the hand bike you have two large tyres at the back and it was one of those that went. It slowed me down, but I was able to finish riding on the flat tyre - it would have taken too long to stop and fix it.” Despite this, however, he still managed to cycle the course at an average speed of 23kph. “I also lost about 10 minutes during the run as the track was narrow and I was slowed down by people who were slower than me. Besides those things, I had a good event and became the first quad in the world to achieve the Half Ironman - that is something that nobody can ever take away from me. I may have been dizzy and unable to see due to dehydration when I crossed the line, but I did it!”

Questioned about whether his fellow South Africans could expect to see Pieter’s performance featured in the Guinness Book of Records, he admits that it never occurred to him to make an application before the event. If the publishers will accept documentation and consider the achievement on a retrospective basis, he says that this could well take place. In the meantime, Supa Piet is riding high. “I thought it was going to be the toughest thing I had ever tried in my life, but it wasn’t. I think that I was so ready and fit for this. A couple of things made it harder for me, but I now have no doubt in my mind that I can do a full Ironman.” Adding to his motivation was the support he received from colleagues, tweeted messages and encouragement from the athletes on the day. However, most of his appreciation is reserved for his wife and the people who helped him during the 200 training sessions he had before leaving for Australia. “The race did what it was meant to do. It made me believe that I could do an Ironman. I am going to set the date for this event - the greatest dream of my life,” he says.

Tri Trick FAST FLAT FIXES

A flat tyre during a race is something you should plan for. You could take the time to remove the tube, find the puncture, seal it with a patch and pump it up (by hand pump or CO2 canister); replace the punctured tube entirely or you could go for a timesaving instant repair such as Vittoria Pit Stop. This is pressurised silicone that fills the tyre, fixing punctures up to 1mm and inflating to ride able pressure in one go. Whichever option you choose will take pre-race kit planning and practice to find what’s best for you.

JULY 2013

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UPTOSPEED

NEWS

TRI-ROCK DURBAN IS ON THE WAY DURBAN TO HOST INAUGURAL HALF IRON DISTANCE TRI THE CHALLENGE of completing a swimbike-run combination of events is one that many athletes aspire to accomplish. Durban, in association with the KZN Triathlon Association and other partners, is happy to welcome a new event to the capital of sport in SA. Tri-Rock Durban is set to proverbially “rock” the town with its fresh ideas, race format and organisation on the 22nd September 2013. Grant Kunneke of TriRock events is the organiser of Tri-Robben Island, and has identified Durban as the ideal venue to host a swim of 1.9km, a cycle of 90km and a run of 21km. Kunneke commented, “Durban has everything we need to make this event happen. It has been years in the planning and we are finally getting closer to the race date of 22nd September.” The swim is to be held in the calm waters below uShaka Marine World, while the cycle will offer beautiful views of the coastline as it winds its way up to Ballito and back. The run route is an out-and-back route on the newly refurbished promenade on Durban’s beachfront and finishes on the green lawns of Suncoast Casino. The route makes for compelling views but is also undulating enough to offer variety and enjoyment for all abilities. Durban will roll out the red carpet for all those wishing to join the action. The city will focus on festivities and events in the month of September, and have a full programme of activities for all those wishing to enjoy the sunshine and experience the warm waters of

the Indian Ocean. The event will accommodate individual athletes as well as those wishing to compete in a relay-type format. For those unable to finish the longer distance event, there will be shorter options to choose from. The weekend will be a sporting festival for the whole family, with a unique event called Chics Rock on Friday evening bringing new meaning to the term “paint the town red” as all participants will experience a Neon Splash dash as part of a 10km run. For youngsters and budding triathletes, there is the Urban Rock Sprint Triathlon on Saturday morning, while Tri-Rock

Saturday (and Sunday) will feature top SA music artists in a celebration of the fun and festivities. Kids Rock at midday on Saturday gives the next generation a chance to join in the fun. Entries for the event are currently open, and all aspiring triathletes can find a distance that suits them. To be part of all this amazing action, take advantage of the “early bird” registration discounts and involve the whole family. Visit www.trirock-durban.com for full details.

COMPETITION

Tri-Rock Are giving away 2 entries into the race on 22nd September. 0ne lucky male and one female will be randomly selected each month over the next three months to compete at the event.

To enter, simply email glen@triathlonplussa.co.za and tell him which other race under the tri rock banner takes place in Cape Town TIP: Visit www.tri-rock.com for the answer Send your answers to glen@triathlonplussa.co.za and stand a chance to win. The draw will take place at the end of the month for each of the issues 28 July and AugustJULY 2013except for the September issue which will draw the winner on the 8th of September. This offer is for a limited time only and restricted to South African residents. If not all criteria are fulfilled, entries will be void. Terms and conditions apply.


UPTOSPEED

NEWS

THE ROCK MAN THE TEAM at Spectrum Sport will bring SA’s first ultra distance off-road triathlon to the shores of the Vaal Dam on the 1st December. The race will comprise a 2km swim, a nontechnical 70km mountain bike ride, and an 18km trail run. The Vaal Dam has been chosen as the venue of choice, with the perfect race

SPECTRUM SPORT EVENTS PRESENTS AN ULTRA DISTANCE TRI IN GAUTENG

day setting awaiting athletes. There will also be a canoe triathlon catering for those that do not swim and a shorter event for family orientated athletes looking for a little fun with minimal training. Race Director and well known sportsman, Louis Harmse, has promised the very best in race organisation

FIRST LOOK Zipp

VUKA STEALTH www.capecycles.co.za THE VUKA Stealth is a brand new fully integrated and adjustable aerobar. It integrates the stem, base-bar and mounting hardware into a single streamlined aero system. Zipp saw an issue with existing bars on the market, which was that you had to fit yourself to the bar rather than the other way round. Their experts started work on a much more adjustable integrated aerobar. The result is a sleek and aerodynamic all-inone system that offers 1,920 different fit positions. It comes in three stem lengths – short, medium and long. Each size includes a stem-length spacer to increase stem length by an extra 10mm.

and is encouraging athletes to enter early and start training for this epic event! For more information, please visit their website at www.spectrumsportevents.co.za or email events@spectrumsport.co.za.

THE BEST NEW GEAR IN BRIEF Perfect fit The bar offers scores of vertical and horizontal adjustment options, as well as pad width and position and tri-bar width and length

Slippery customer Easy install The base-bar’s Rapid Routing cable exits are positioned for easy installation of brake cables

The base-bar uses a truncated airfoil shape that maximises aerodynamics while maintaining the UCI’s 3:1 ratio requirement

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NS

Graves considers what lies beneath – nothing too scary, as he’s learnt

CTAT

OVERCOME “THE FEAR” CONQUER YOUR OPEN-WATER FEARS WITH PHIL GRAVES’ HELP SWIMMING – YOU either love it or you loathe it. It’s a given if you want to be a professional athlete – especially at ITU – that you need to have swum since you were a baby as it’s just so hard to learn to swim at a good level as an adult. It’s definitely the most skillbased of any of the sports us triathletes have to master. There’s so much to think about and get right, and sometimes it can seem like a losing battle. Even I get nervous sometimes about swimming. I’ve swum with a lot of age-group athletes, and even some pros, who make really simple mistakes that crush their swim. A lot of people find they can swim in a pool but not in open water. Why is that? Firstly, I think a

lot of people are just scared of swimming in open water. I certainly was at the beginning of my career. The first open-water race I did was in Weymouth and it was a biathlon – a 500m run, a 100m swim in the sea and then another 500m run. Apart from the fact that it was freezing cold, I was scared to put my face in the water so I did the swim backstroke – not ideal, I know! I’ve come a long way since then but everyone has to start somewhere. I’ve had lots of memorable open-water swimming experiences. Swimming in the lake at Otley Sailing Club when it was 11°C one May – now that was cold and not for the faint-hearted! The training camp near

Manchester I used to go to before the season started, where we swam in Salford Quays, was always Baltic too. It’s not a problem to be afraid to swim in open water. Even now, I get a little nervous when I go swimming by myself. Anything could happen and anything could be down there, you just don’t know. Sometimes it’s worth it though. When I was in Hawaii for the Ironman World Championship, I was swimming around the course one day before the race and a pod of dolphins swam right over the

top of me. Not literally, but as I was swimming one way, they came the other and swam either side of me. That was an amazing, albeit slightly scary, experience. It just goes to show that you shouldn’t be scared of open-water swimming. Relaxing in the water is the single most important thing you can learn to do. Don’t try to fight it but pretend you’re pulling on a rope with the palm of your hand. That’s a good analogy I use. It’s much easier to visualise yourself swimming like that than just flailing your arms and legs around not going anywhere. Finally, what happens when that idiot who’s swimming beside you pummels you? Do you pummel him back and try to drown him? I’m a very docile swimmer, I hate fighting in the swim, but sometimes it’s going to be unavoidable. I can remember my first ever open-water triathlon race was at Eton in 2004 and Alistair Brownlee pummelled me around the first buoy – something which I’ve never forgiven him for. I find the best thing to do is just try to swim as close as you can to them and try to draft them. Even if you swim on the hips of someone, it’ll slow them down significantly. Try to get comfortable swimming in a pack, even if it’s in a pool, as it’s a useful skill to have. We always swim by ourselves at five- or 10-second intervals, but some of the best training comes when you add a slight competitive element and swim a bit closer together. Practising pack swimming in the pool is the most enjoyable swim session you can do. Now go out there and get swimming!

PHIL GRAVES Age 23 Achievements Winner Ironman 70.3 UK (2012), winner TriStar 111 Estonia (2010), winner Ironman 70.3 UK (2009), winner Ironman UK (2009), winner National Age Group Triathlon Championships (2009), selected for GB triathlon team (2009)

> IRONMAN ANNOUNCE IRONMAN 70.3 LUXEMBOURG, TAKING PLACE 8 SEP 30

JULY 2013

Photo James Lampard

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FUEL/REFUEL

FAST FOOD TO FIX YOUR BODY

30 MIN

FUEL

Photos Michael Dannenberg www.foodimaging.co.uk Food stylist Liz Martin, The Hob Words Txema Garcia

Rhubarb is a perennial herb, Rheum Rhabarbarum, and its red, juicy stems are packed with calcium, manganese, dietary fibre, potassium, vitamin C and magnesium. Chef: Txema Garcia

RHUBARB CRUMBLE WITH ALMONDS AND CRÈME FRAÎCHE A DELIGHTFUL PUDDING WITH ENOUGH GOOD STUFF TO STOP THE GUILT SHOPPING LIST 500g diced rhubarb 125g brown sugar 2tbsp water 1tsp vanilla extract 1tsp grated ginger For the crumble topping: 100g plain flour 100g semolina 120g unsalted butter 110g white caster sugar 25g rolled oats 25g whole almonds 25g hazelnuts Serve with crème fraîche or Greek yoghurt with honey and coconut

NUTRITION

1 2

Warm up the oven to 190°C for fanassisted or 200°C if your oven is not fan assisted.

Dice the rhubarb into two-inch pieces. Place the chunks into a large, non-stick pan with the brown sugar and water and grate over a small piece of ginger. Cook on a high heat on the hob for 10 minutes with the lid on.

3

Mix the flour and semolina in a food processor for just under a minute then add the butter, white sugar and vanilla extract and pulse until the mixture is crumbly.

4

In a bowl, stir the nuts and oats into the crumble mix.

5

Pour the caramelised rhubarb into a wide baking dish and cover generously with the crumble mix, ensuring not to compact the ingredients in the dish, and bake for 20 minutes.

6

Serve with crème fraîche, custard or try Greek yoghurt with honey and coconut.

Serves 4 Prep time 25 minutes. Per serving 660kcal, carbs 79g, protein 10g, fat 33g

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FUEL/REFUEL

Recipe by Ina Paarman MAKE

TO FIX FOOD TO FUEL YOUR BODY

TIME

CHORIZO WITH CHICKPEAS AND BEANS SERVES 4 If chorizo (a semi dry, Spanish pork sausage rich with paprika) is not available, one can use thick slices of salami as a very good substitute. You may just have to lift the Cajun Spice a little.

1

Sauté the onion seasoned with Green Onion Seasoning in the oil until onions are soft and golden. Add the celery, garlic and chorizo slices.

2

3

Stir-fry for about 3 minutes. Add Cajun Spice and stir through. Add chopped tomatoes, sugar, water, sachet of Liquid Vegetable Stock, chickpeas and beans.

Simmer slowly for ± 15 minutes. Taste for seasoning, add parsley and a squeeze of lemon juice. Serve with green beans on the side.

2 t (10 ml) Ina Paarman’s Cajun Spice or Braai & Grill Seasoning 1 x 400 g tin chopped tomatoes 1 t (5 ml) sugar 1 x 25g sachet Ina Paarman’s Liquid Vegetable Stock

1 x 400 g tin chickpeas, rinsed and drained 1 x 400 g tin butter beans, rinsed and drained ¼ cup (60 ml) chopped parsley a squeeze of lemon juice ½ cup (125 ml) water

SHOPPING LIST 1 onion, finely chopped 1 t (5 ml) Ina Paarman’s Green Onion Seasoning 1 T (15 ml) canola oil 2 sticks of celery, sliced 3mm thick 3 cloves of garlic, finely sliced ± 225 g chorizo sausage, sliced

> FOR MANY OTHER TESTED RECIPES AND VIDEO COOKERY LESSONS GO TO WWW.PAARMAN.CO.ZA 32

JULY 2013


UPTOSPEED

PEOPLE WHO LOVE TRIATHLON ROBYN-LEIGH JONES Occupation: Student Age: 16 yrs

Triathlon has opened up a lot of opportunities for me, both mentally and physically. Starting a new sport that I really enjoy made me a better and happier person, and helped me work towards goals (academic and sporting) harder than ever before. It encourages me to have a healthy and balanced lifestyle, helping me to commit and work towards challenges in life. Triathlon is an amazing sport as it doesn’t only require one sporting discipline but three. Training for all these disciplines is challenging, but it helps you to become stronger and tougher, physically and mentally, and helps me to achieve my goals. Ever since I started triathlon, I have met amazing people that have become some of my closest friends. Friends are important, so I am glad to meet more every now and then. I love training for triathlon as it keeps me fit, active and also gives me a healthy social life with my teammates. Before the race I get really nervous, but when the gun goes off for the start and the adrenaline kicks in, my mind starts to think about the discipline ahead and what techniques to use there. Whenever I run over the finish line, I have a smile on my face (whether it was my best or worst race) as I appreciate what I can do and have the ability to achieve each day. I also appreciate how everyone (family, friends and sponsor Zinto Sports) is there to assist me in purchasing the necessary equipment and support me, no matter what the outcome is.

Send us a pic and tell us why you love tri and we’ll tell the world. Email: letters@ triathlonplussa.co.za with ‘I Love Tri’ in the subject box JULY 2013

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Buying a tri wetsuit

WHAT TO LOOK FOR TRIATHLON WETSUITS ARE FULL OF TECH – HERE ARE THE BASICS

Zipper Some suits feature reverse zippers, which allow easy removal of the wetsuit to save time in races. These also help avoid the cord being pulled down during the swim – which could seriously hamper your race

Neoprene Wetsuits use different grades of neoprene, with their own thickness and flexibility properties. Thinner neoprene is used for easy shoulder movement and most suits are coated to help you slip through the water

Jersey liner Higher-end wetsuits tend to have smoother jersey liners with fewer seams to increase comfort and reduce friction. This can be a big consideration over longer distances where any niggles are magnified

Buoyancy Wetsuit companies use thicker, more buoyant neoprene to help lift you nearer the surface of the water, lowering drag and helping you swim faster. Some suits have more buoyant legs for athletes with heavy quads

Catch panels Some wetsuits use technology on the forearms designed to increase feel on the water – or even propulsion – during the catch phase. Efficacy of these panels vary, so don’t let them dictate your purchase

Taped seams Most wetsuits have taped seams on the wrist and ankle areas. This enables you to cut the length down for fit and to make it easier to get the wetsuit off

HOW WE TEST

34

WITH A testing group of varying abilities, we whiled away hour upon hour in a 50m pool subjecting over 30 wetsuits to time trials and longer Ironman-pace swims to really get a feel

JULY 2013 JULY 2013

for how the suits would perform on race day. The initial selection was then whittled down to a final shortlist of 14. Then it was back to the pool for more intensive testing. We judged how easily the

suits went on and how quickly we could get them off in a simulated transition. Finally we deliberated on which suits were the most fun to swim in and most worthy of your cash.


GAME CHANGER.

GET READY FOR THE SCIENCE.

C O N TA C T U S : R S A @ H U U B D E S I G N . C O . Z A

HUUBDESIGN.COM JULY 2013 35


Swim faster

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JULY 2013


Swim faster

TAKETHE LEAD

Being a great swimmer isn’t an accident – it’s a choice. We meet three triathletes who took decisive action to leave poor swim times behind Words Edward Gibbes

tri again

RYAN JOHNSON After missing a race swim cut-off, Ryan Johnson knew he needed help

| Photo Corbis, Getty

re-start

VICKY GILL Runner Vicky Gill knew how to end a race well but had to learn how to start stronger

open mind

KEVIN MACKENZIE When his swim hit a plateau, Kevin Mackenzie found an open-water coach

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Swim faster

Learning to exhale underwater is key to having a good swim, says Ryan’s coach. Master that breathing and you’ll have more control in a triathlon race pack

“I TOOK A YEAR OFF RACING TO GET MY SWIM RIGHT” RYAN JOHNSON AGE: 46 JOB: CAREER DEVELOPMENT MANAGER LOCATION: ABU DHABI

I GOT INTO triathlon in

do the cycling and running legs, but I 2007 as a diversion after I got was far from sure I could make the divorced. It gave me something to distance in the swimming. To be take my mind off the stress of it all: honest, at the back of my mind I something to do with my time and an knew I couldn’t do it. On the day, I outlet for all my energy. tried to breaststroke the 2km and I had done quite a lot of running in missed the cut-off. the past, including the London Bearing in mind the cost of all the Marathon years ago, so that was the kit and training, getting to Somerset part I found easiest to get into. I and booking a hotel, it was all such found the cycling hard and the a waste and I felt embarrassed. I swimming pretty much impossible. thought then that there was no point The first tri I did was a sprint in ploughing on and being with a 400m swim but continually disappointed TIPS FOR I breaststroked it, so with myself. So I RYAN I was on the back foot decided to take a year Getting the basics right straight away, and off competing and We began by working on the fundamentals: my cycling wasn’t get coaching for my breathing, efficiency, rotation and timing of the stroke. very good either. It swimming. I found was all a big battle. Swim For Tri and Optimum body position Using drills we worked to improve his A complicating started training body position to minimise resistance factor is that I am with them in the in the water and maximise stroke length for a more economic and diabetic and I have to evenings after work. efficient stroke. inject insulin before My first session was every meal. On the bike in an endless pool but to you can eat as much as you use that you basically have to like, on the run you can eat within be able to swim – and I couldn’t. reason, but when you are in the Luckily they soon changed from that water you can’t eat. Sometimes I set-up to a normal swimming pool start worrying that my blood sugar’s and I also changed tutors. At that getting low even if it’s not. So I have stage I could swim about a third of to make sure it’s spot on before I get a length of front crawl, and I could in the water. hardly breathe when I came out. So Despite that first swim being so Maxine took me right back to the unpleasant, I started plotting out an basics and we did hour-long sessions. annual plan of races and really got At the end of them I’d have to sit in into it. The turning point with the the changing room for 15 minutes swimming, though, was when I trying to get my breath back because entered the Ironman UK 70.3 at she worked me so hard, technically Wimbleball in 2008. I knew I could as well as physically.

Every week there were clear goals and I’d have to do one or two sessions in between our weekly lessons. I was soon getting better and better. I had previously been swimming about twice a week using a pool buoy but I wasn’t aware of the techniques of getting your head down, reaching long and the catch and pull. I’d thought, like a lot of people do, that swimming’s all about kicking your legs really fast, whereas Maxine taught me that the last thing you should be doing is using your legs. She taught me how to use my upper body, to rotate my arms and to use my legs just for balance so I have something left for the bike ride. When I went back to Wimbleball in 2010 – two years after my first failed attempt – I beat the swim cut-off by 15 minutes, with a time of 54min 33sec, and I finished the race in 8hr 6min. I’ve since done two Ironman races and I’ve got one booked for next March. Now when I’m asked which of the disciplines I like the most, I say it’s the swimming – and I never would have said that when I missed the cut-off at Wimbleball just a few years ago.

Meet the coach Maxine George-Tolonen Details George-Tolonen is a former international swimmer and coaches at Swim For Tri, swimfortri.co.uk

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New swimmers must learn how to exhale in the water. There’s not enough time to pivot the head out of the water, exhale and then breathe in. Breathe incorrectly and you will soon fatigue.

2

Legs that are low in the water will create a lot of drag, making you spend energy that could be better used elsewhere. Stop cycling and kicking from your knees; instead, engage your glutes and gently kick from your hips until you can feel your feet on top of the water.

3

Drills will greatly improve your ability to make stroke changes. Start incorporating drills into all your swim workouts. Repetition is key and your aim is to replicate the new improved actions without a conscious effort.

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“I TOOK 12 MINUTES OFF MY OLYMPICDISTANCE SWIM” VICKY GILL AGE: 32 JOB: WORKS IN SPORTS RETAIL LOCATION: LONDON

I TOOK UP triathlon near the end of my running career because I needed a different challenge – but I thought I’d never be competitive as I knew I wasn’t any good at swimming. I joined my local club, Thames Turbo, and did my first sprint race in August 2009. My swim was atrocious – the 400m took me 10min 12sec and I was exhausted.

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At my peak on the track I did the 10,000m in 32min 40sec, I ran for Great Britain on the road and I came second in the 10,000m at the national collegiate championships in the US, so I was a very competitive runner... but swimming always seemed like a punishment. It either meant you were injured or your coach was telling you to take an easy

day. I didn’t enjoy it at all. When I decided to try triathlon I gritted my teeth and went to the pool – I was just trying to go up and down for as long as I could. I had to stop every couple of lengths and I was looking round the pool thinking ‘these people don’t look that much fitter than me but they are going so much faster’. Watching a good swimmer, they look effortless. I’d just done a marathon so I knew I wasn’t unfit, but I was exhausted by swimming just a few lengths. In my first full season in 2010, I represented Great Britain at the World Age Group Duathlon Championships and won, so it was tempting to just focus on the bike and run legs. My first Olympic-distance race was the 2010 London Triathlon, and because my running and biking were strong I was in the 2:30 wave – but I did the swim in 36min, so I was about five minutes behind everyone else. The official told me that if if I


Swim faster

Improving leg kick and body position is one of the key lessons for inexperienced swimmers, as Vicky was, and will reap huge rewards

didn’t make it through the first bike leading to a really poor body lap in 40 minutes I’d be pulled off the position. I had to learn that the leg course, so I was quite angry, and that kick doesn’t have to be like you are fired me up for the rest of the race – I in a steeplechase. ended up finishing in the middle of The improvements took a while. the pack. It was more confirmation Initially I saw improvements not in that I needed to work on my speed but in feeling a little easier swimming, because I was so far and not as out of breath. Once TIPS FOR behind everyone else. the improvements became VICKY Mentally it’s nice to be the more noticeable, they Relaxing in the water chaser but you don’t want weren’t so consistent – I’d This was quite difficult for Vicky as a highto be that far off the pack. plateau for a bit and feel end athlete, and we worked on her breathing and slowing things down. Swimming long A coach from Swim For like I was getting nowhere distance is about being more graceful. Tri had been at my first and then I’d make another Leg kick sprint race in 2009. They little jump, and so on. I If we kick from the knees or have a really had said I should come to saw big improvements deep kick we create drag, and longdistance swimmers need to their endless pool and they when I had the confidence eliminate as much drag as could have a look at me. So I to put running training to one they can. went along and it soon became side and focus on swim-specific clear that it was a technical thing weeks over the winter, swimming and there were ways to improve. Just five or six times per week and only knowing that kept me going. running two or three times. The first thing was working on my The training has slowly but surely leg kick and body position: being a paid off and I did a 1500m race in the runner I was using my legs a lot – I pool this winter in 24min 13sec. In was over-kicking, bending at the that first London Tri in 2010, I did knee and my legs were sinking, the 1500m in 36 minutes, so it was a

colossal improvement. I did the longdistance Challenge Barcelona last year in 10hr 01min and did the swim in 1hr 7mins. That first 400m effort seems a very long time ago now.

Meet the coach Keeley Bullock Details Bullock swam competitively at national level and coaches at Swim For Tri, swimfortri.co.uk

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Take the rest that you need. If you are practising a drill, you need to do it to the best of your ability. Rest is a very important part of training.

2

Focus on your out breath – most people think so much about getting air in that we fail to release enough air.

3

No matter how fit you are on land, it doesn’t translate to the water. It’s a very different environment, and it takes time to build your swim fitness.

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Swim faster

In triathlon, it’s important to be able to swim so that you can conserve energy for the bike and run – something Kevin is learning from coach Rick Kiddle

“I HIT A PLATEAU AND REALISED I NEEDED HELP” KEVIN MACKENZIE AGE: 45 JOB: AIRLINE OPERATIONS MANAGER LOCATION: SURREY

I PLAYED RUGBY

end of last season I approached Rick competitively for more than 35 Kiddle at Nowca. years, but as I got older and family I went to Rick rather than another commitments increased I found that coach partly because a colleague had I couldn’t commit as much to my trained with Nowca. I’d also seen rugby club and needed something them at a lake I swim at, so I knew he else to do. As often happens with would coach me to swim while rugby players, after one too many conserving energy for the bike and beers back in 2009, I agreed to do run, rather than looking at the swim a triathlon. on its own. When I’d started with I did the Super Sprint at Blenheim triathlon I could swim little more and loved, it but I breaststroked the than a length of front crawl without majority of the swim and I a break. I knew I had a fairly was among the last few decent level of endurance TIPS FOR out of the water. I fitness, but I was so out KEVIN hadn’t actually swum of breath – I just Kicking from the hip the full 400m in one could not breathe The leg kick must come from the hips; the go before the race. and swim! kick’s role is to elevate and not propel. This will not take much energy if done properly. After that I drifted Rick identified along for a couple of two major problems Creating a triangle After the catch phase, pivot the elbow and years, improving with my technique. form a triangle with the hand travelling enough to be First, my kick was down one side of the centre line . The body is the base and the elbow is comfortable pretty much nonthe tip of the triangle. completing the existent: my legs were distances but never trailing behind me like enough to be competitive. two planks of wood. Second By the end of last season, I’d done was I had almost no propulsive force 30-odd races – sprints and Olympic from my pull, which Rick identified distance – but I’d plateaued and just from underwater filming. wasn’t getting any better. So I looked Sorting out the kick has been a real at how I could break the cycle. Both grind but the pull less so. I’m my 12- and 14-year-old girls are an aircraft engineer by trade and competitive regional-level Rick explained the problem as a swimmers, so I’m around the pool mechanical process with the arm as seven days a week with them and it a lever. I could understand this way was obvious my swimming was well of thinking and I could visualise below par, whereas my cycling and what I was supposed to be doing. running are comparable with my age The problem is that there is always group. It was clear that swimming more than one thing that’s at fault, was where I could improve and at the and trying to deal with them all at

once doesn’t really work. I struggled initially with trying to isolate the one thing I was supposed to be working on: when I was thinking about my legs, my arms would go to pot; then I’d think about my arms and I’d forget to kick or my hips would drop. It took a while to get it all together, and I’m not 100 percent there yet. The great thing Rick did was explain the method of swimming before I’d even got in the water so I knew what I was doing wrong, whereas previously I would just swim up and down in ignorance. Now I’ll do technique drills, such as static kicks, catch-ups and high elbows, and I’ll do them as timed sets of no more than 100m. The sessions typically only take 20-25 minutes. When I started I was doing 50m in 58 seconds, now I’m down to 52 seconds. My improvements will be put to the test in the new season, but it all seems to be going the right way. As well as my times improving, my stroke count has reduced – I started with 124 for 100m and I’m now down to 108, so I’m starting to swim more efficiently, which for triathlon is half the battle.

Meet the coach Rick Kiddle Details Kiddle is coaching director at Nowca, which runs the Pool to Open Water Course. nowca.org

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Look forward and not down – this will keep the shoulders high at the end of the glide. It will also allow the flutter kick to work better with greater elevation that takes less effort.

2

Finish the push phase with the hand at the thigh and not the hip. This gives you a longer time to finish a good glide at the front of the stroke.

3

Tailor your training to your level of fitness. It’s pointless trying to tackle long-distance endurance sets as a novice, for example, as your stroke will fall to pieces. Instead, try interval sets with plenty of rest so that you’ll be fresh for each one, and you’ll have a better chance of maintaining good technique.

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RACE REPORTS Eneko Llanos rode well but had to work hard on the run to seal his victory

Corinne Abraham gained the lead on the bike with the day’s fastest split, then held her advantage

IRONMAN MELBOURNE VICTORY FOR TWO EUROPEANS AT THE 2013 IRONMAN ASIA-PACIFIC CHAMPIONSHIPS

A

USSIE ATHLETES led from the front at the Ironman AsiaPacific Championships in Melbourne. Choppy waters meant a shortened 1.9km swim, but saw Australia’s Clayton Fettell and Joe Lampe sticking to their game plan of swimming fast to get out on the bike with time in hand. They arrived in 19:32, with fellow Aussie Luke Bell third in 20:16. A brief spell of home dominance began early in the bike leg with Fettell, Lampe and Bell quickly being joined by Craig Alexander. They were soon caught up by Belgium’s Marino Vanhoenacker and Spain’s Eneko Llanos while Lampe was dropped. Vanhoenacker then broke away, his advantage blossoming to 3mins 30secs. He recorded the day’s fastest bike split at 4:22:22, beginning the run with an 44

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advantage of nearly five minutes. Behind, Llanos and Alexander set about chasing the Belgian down. By the half marathon point, Llanos had pulled away from Alexander. At 35km, he was less than a minute behind. He passed a visibly exhausted Vanhoenacker 10 minutes later, and went on to claim victory in 7:36:08. In the women’s race, the swim was led by the USA’s Amanda Stevens and Meredith Kessler, who exited the water at 21:53, nearly two minutes clear of the field. Britain’s Corinne Abraham finished the swim in 28:23. Using her cycling strength, Caroline Steffen (SUI) surged into the lead at around the 55km mark, but was unable to shake the train of athletes behind her and slid back to fourth. By the 100km mark, Abraham was less than a minute behind Steffen in fifth. Abraham quickly overtook Steffen for fourth, then surged on into second place. Eventually, even six-time world champion Natascha Badmann – leading the bike at this point – couldn’t hold onto the rampaging Abraham as she pushed on to take the lead and create a two-minute buffer. Abraham reached T2 with the day’s fastest

ride, getting out onto the marathon with more than three minutes’ buffer to Badmann and over seven minutes to Steffen. Abraham dominated the run as Yvonne Van Vlerken gained on Steffen. By the time the take for second occurred, Abraham had an unassailable 12:45 lead. She crossed the line in 8:10:56, announcing herself as a new star on the Ironman scene.

9:47:39 results Elite

Top 3 Men 1. Eneko Llanos (ESP)

7:36:08

2. Marino Vanhoenacker (BEL)

7:38:59

3. Craig Alexander (AUS)

7:39:37

Top 3 Women 1. Corinne Abraham (GBR)

8:10:56

2. Yvonne Van Vlerken (AUT)

8:26:04

3. Caroline Steffen (SUI)

8:31:22

Words Tom Ballard Photos Delly Carr

Where Melbourne, Australia When 24 March Winners Eneko Llanos (ESP), 7:36:08; Corinne Abraham (GBR), 8:10:56


Race report

Samantha Anderson gave a commanding performance to win at Oulton Park

BILLARD & HAUSCHILDT CLAIM FIRST ITU LONG DISTANCE WORLD CHAMPS TITLES run. But Hauschildt fought back in the final Where Belfort, France When 1 June Winners Bertrand Billard (FRA), 4:08:45; Melissa Hauschildt (AUS), 4:44:15

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OTH FRANCE’S Bertrand Billard and Australia’s Melissa Hauschildt (AUS) claimed their first ever ITU long distance world championship titles on Saturday in Belfort, France. Billard’s win was a treat for local French fans, while Hauschildt’s gold came as a surprise as it was her first time ever competing in an ITU Long Distance race. The adverse weather conditions resulted in the format being altered before the race, with the swim omitted and the course reverting to a 9.5km run, 87km bike and 20km run. Melissa Hauschildt (AUS) clawed back a three-minute deficit going into the final 20km run with a superb performance to become the 2013 ITU long distance world champion. Camilla Pedersen (DEN) had to settle for silver for the second year running. Hauschildt was the early pace setter, clocking a time of 35:19 for the first 9.5km run. But with harsh conditions forecast, she took a long first transition to add extra clothing, which allowed Pedersen to take the lead. It looked like it would prove to be a costly decision, as Pedersen led until the second lap of the 20km

stages and finished in 4:44:15, 1 minute and 36 seconds ahead of Pedersen. Rachel McBride (CAN) claimed bronze in 4:52:03, finishing just 13 seconds ahead of Jeanne Collonge (FRA) and preventing France from having a world championship medallist in the women’s elite race. Billard delighted locals by storming to victory to claim gold in 4:08:45 while Terenzo Bozzone (NZL) won silver in 4:10:43. Dirk Bockel (LUX) repeated his third place finish in last year’s race by taking bronze in 4:11:51. Billard becomes France’s fourth world champion at the long distance format - more than any other nation - and afterwards said his gamble during the Ballon d’Alsace bike climb paid off: “I did not listen to my brother, who told me not to go too hard. I took a risk, I attacked the Ballon d’Alsace. I had no pressure on me, it was my first world championship. I was motivated, I thought of my family. Now I want to share it with them.” A fast transition after the bike allowed Bozzone to take second place and the New Zealander then clocked the fastest time for the 20km (1:13:34) to ensure silver, with Bockel settling for a second bronze in as many years. Billard was not about to deny giving the home crowd something to cheer about. With a strong 20km run split of 1:13:53, he ensured his first world championship victory.

OULTON PARK CLASSIC DUATHLON Where Wilmslow, Cheshire When 17 March 2013 Winners Peter Ellis (1:02.32); Samantha Anderson (1:11.07 ) OULTON PARK Motor Racing Circuit played host to Xtra Mile Event’s opening race of the 2013 season on 17 March, with the sprint-distance race the last chance to qualify for the ETU Sprint Distance Duathlon European Championships. The men’s race was a keenly contested affair with a high-quality field. The win went to Peter Ellis after a race-long battle with 16-year-old Jimmy Kershaw, who led the race out of T1. Ellis proved too strong in the early stages of the 21.5km cycle however, overtaking Kershaw and opening a 23-second gap at T2 that was never to be fully overhauled, crossing the line 15 seconds clear. Defending champion Ian Roberts rounded out the podium, nine seconds adrift of Kershaw. In the women’s event, there was less tension as Samantha Anderson produced a commanding display in all three stages of the race. She crossed the line in a time of 1:11:07, nearly a full five minutes ahead of secondplaced Holly Ferrar. Jenny Muston rounded out the top three another 3:27 back in a time of 2:01:54. The standard distance men’s race was won by Matt Moorhouse in 1:41:57, whilst the women’s competition victor was Sarah May in 1:55.35. JULY 2013

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Words Ashley Quinlan and Tom Ballard Photos Triathlon.org / Delly Carr / ITU, Human Race

ITU LONG DISTANCE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS


RACE REPORTS

ITU WORLD TRIATHLON SERIES MADRID MEN JONATHAN BROWNLEE (GBR) BRILLIANT AT ITU WORLD TRIATHLON SERIES IN MADRID   Where Madrid, Spain When 7 June Winner Jonathan Brownlee (GBR), 01:50:42

Photos JANOS SCHMIDT – itu

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ONATHAN BROWNLEE’S season might only be two races in, but the reigning ITU World Champion showed his title defence was back on track with another stunning performance in Madrid on Sunday. A brief spell of home dominance began early in the bike leg with Fettell, Lampe and Bell quickly being joined by Craig Alexander. After making a brilliant return from an ankle injury in Yokohama last month, Brownlee (GBR) was again in the lead from almost start to finish to win his second consecutive race in the 2013 ITU World Triathlon Series season. It was also his second consecutive win in Madrid. Since the series started in 2009, only Jonathan and brother Alistair have topped the podium in the Casa de Campo park. Brownlee was in the lead group out of the water before driving the pace in a five-man breakaway for the 40km bike leg. They left T2 with over a minute and a half on the rest of the field and within the first few hundred metres, Brownlee strode to the front and made it clear that he was the one to beat. He 46

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had put 16 seconds on Javier Gomez (ESP) on the first lap alone, before going on to claim his sixth ITU World Triathlon Series win by 50 seconds in a time of 1:50:42. “It’s a good triathlon course this one, as I keep saying it’s a pure triathlon course,” Brownlee said, “Our group was incredible there, all the other riders did turns throughout the race and it was a fair race I think, so I enjoyed it but it was tough, it’s always tough.” The day started under blue skies and there were no surprises at Casa de Campo on the non-wetsuit swim. The always strong Ivan Vasiliev (RUS), who finished just outside of the podium in Madrid last year on his way to securing an Olympic spot, was determined to put himself in a top position before heading for the tough bike course. He did just that, followed by his teammate Igor Polyanskiy, younger brother Denis Vasiliev (RUS), Richard Varga (SVK), Gomez and Brownlee. Brownlee’s pre-race plan to push the swim pace and break away with a small group on the bike played out perfectly. Together with Alessandro Fabian (ITA) and 2012 Under 23 World Champion Aaron Royle (AUS), the group quickly hammered up the first hill for a sizeable advantage. The speed proved too much for Varga and Denis Vasiliev, who dropped back early while the top

five forged ahead. The high sun and challenging hill did nothing to slow the fast five, with the group increasing their lead on each lap. Behind them, two chase groups became one on the fifth lap and with more than 30 athletes together, the pace slowed significantly. With two laps to go, they enjoyed a one minute and 27 second lead on the massive chase group. After destroying the final few bike laps for a near two minute advantage, Jonathan headed out of transition first, followed tightly by Gomez. A nine second lead after the first turn increased with each lap as Jonathan pulled away to the win. An interesting battle was also playing out behind them for the final podium place. After lap one, Vasiliev had a slight five second gap over Royle and Fabian and ran strongly to hold onto that and claim his first career series podium. Spain’s Mario Mola did put in the run of the day though, a stunning 30 minutes and 12 seconds, to almost catch him in the final kilometre as he overtook Royle and Fabian to finish fourth. Fabian claimed fifth for the second consecutive year in Madrid, while Richard Murray (RSA) put in another killer run leg to finish sixth. Javier Gomez’s performance was enough for him to take the overall series lead, with four races now completed in the 2013 season.


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RACE REPORTS

ITU WORLD TRIATHLON SERIES MADRID WOMEN Where Madrid, Spain When 1 June Winner Non Stanford (GBR), 2:04:39

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NON STANFORD (GBR) stole the show under the hot Madrid sun with a blistering performance at the ITU World Championship Series, claiming her first WTS title. After a solid swim saw her exit the water just outside the top ten, Stanford made her way through the field on the 40km bike and then never looked back in the 10km run as she hammered further and further ahead. She finished in 2:04:39. Non said: “The plan was to go off really hard in the run, which I did. And I’m not going to lie, in the second lap of the run I thought I’d gone off far too hard. But I managed to hold it together and could see the gap increasing, which gives you confidence, and I managed to hold on. I’m not sure how but I’m absolutely pooped now.” Anne Haug (GER) completed a remarkable 48

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comeback after a slow swim to finish second in 2:05:05 and Jodie Stimpson (GBR) made it two podium places for Great Britain by claiming bronze in a time of 2:05:14. In the 1.5km swim, an initial breakaway group of three soon became five, with Carolina Routier (ESP) exiting the water in the lead in 18:56. Alongside Routier were Pamela Oliveira (BRA), Sarah Groff (USA), Alice Betto (ITA) and Nicky Samuels (NZL). It was an impressive swim from Samuels, knowing that her strength on the bike was yet to come. Indeed, it was Samuels who took the initiative at the start of the 40km bike, overtaking Groff for the lead halfway through the eight-lap ride. The pair tackled the tough, hilly course together in a small breakaway until the final lap when the chase group bridged up. However, the most impressive bike ride was not from the front but from the back, where Haug had exited the water in last place in 20:35. The German finished fourth at the Madrid event last year and started closing down the field as soon as she got on her favoured section of the race. By the halfway stage, she had reached the main chase group

and then started to reel in the leaders as the laps ticked by. Stanford was also nicely placed as the bike entered its closing stages, knowing her strong running ability would give her a chance of a podium finish. The chasing pack caught up with Samuels and Groff on lap 6 to set up the possibility of a thrilling 10km run, and as the field entered transition after the bike, the first ten places were separated by just five seconds. It was Stanford who started to break away on the run, building up a significant lead with three laps to go. But as Haug is apt to do, the German ran her training partner Stimpson down on the final lap for silver. Stimpson put in a mature performance, keeping herself in the top ten throughout the race before pushing on in the run to reach the final podium position, and holding off a super finish from Gwen Jorgensen (USA). Jorgensen is the highest ranked woman in this season’s series, but may reflect on a swim and bike ride that ultimately cost her a place on the podium. Despite just missing out of the medals, Jorgensen remains top of the rankings.

Photos JANOS SCHMIDT – itu

NON STANFORD (GBR) EARNS FIRST WTS TITLE IN MADRID 


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RACE REPORTS

CHALLENGE HALF BARCELONA Where Barcelona, Spain When 19 May Winners Javier Gómez Noya 4:05:01; Camilla Pedersen 4:35:34

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N HIS FIRST middle distance competition, Javier Gómez Noya spectacularly won both the Half Distance Triathlon European Championship and Challenge Half Barcelona. Camilla Pedersen (DEN) took the women’s title for the second year in a row. Gomez dominated the competition throughout, scoring his dream debut in Calella: “I only have one word: spectacular. In the beginning, I tried to manage my effort in the very demanding cycling segment, but when I saw myself getting comfortable and securing enough margin, I decided to enjoy the run course and its public. I am very happy with my result, the atmosphere and the great organisation of this Challenge competition.” Jens Toft was the first to complete the 1.9km swim course, followed only three 50

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seconds later by Javier Gómez Noya and Russian Yaroshenko in third position. After the T1 start, the Dane led the first kilometres of the bike segment. The Spaniard started in second position at 13 seconds. Yaroshenko and Italian Alberto Casadei came next. In the downhill part, Gómez Noya launched an attack and managed to overcome the Dane and get in first position. After that, the Spaniard continuously increased his advantage, making the final 21km run look easy. He finished with a six-minute advantage on the runner-up, Martin Jensen, and eight minutes ahead of bronze medallist Jens Toft. Four-time world champion Chris McCormack finished sixth: “I travelled a long way looking for a challenge, and I found it. It was a hard race, very good training at the beginning of the season. Furthermore, I have been able to enjoy it alongside Javier Gómez Noya, an incredible person with whom I can find no fault; he is extremely talented and very classy. I would feel privileged if he would succeed me in this distance; it has been a real pleasure to compete with him in a town like Calella and with the spectacular organisation

provided by Challenge.” In the women’s race, Camilla Pedersen managed an impressive victory, taking the European title and her second consecutive win at Challenge Half Barcelona. After the swim course, Maria Czesnik and Ricarda Lisk were leading the competition, together with Holly Lawrence and Camilla Pedersen. At the start of the 90km bike leg, Great Britain’s Holly Lawrence headed the race, followed by Pedersen and Lisk. The Danish athlete imposed a strong rhythm and achieved the best intermediate mark of this course. Pedersen then managed to leave her rivals as she showed her strength on the challenging cycle course. Pedersen maintained her advantage all along the 21km run course and reached the finish line with a wide margin over her rivals. Ireland’s Eimear Mullan made the finish line five minutes and 35 seconds after the Dane and won the silver medal. Mullan maintained a constant pace throughout the three segments. Polish athlete Maria Czesnik finished seven minutes after Pedersen and took the bronze. www.challenge-family.com

Words Tom Ballard Photos Delly Carr

GOLDEN DEBUT FOR JAVIER GOMEZ NOYA AT CHALLENGE HALF BARCELONA


Race report

LANZAROTE IRONMAN 2013 DOUBLE DELIGHT FOR GERMANS AT LANZAROTE IRONMAN 2013

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OR THE FIRST time in Lanzarote Ironman history, the participants were greeted with rain at the start. The skies were to clear during the cycle leg and with gusts of wind on hand, Lanzarote certainly lived up to its billing as the toughest Ironman event on the planet. For the fiery Iraqi-German Faris Al-Sultan, the decision to race here after the problems of Port Elizabeth, South Africa were surely vindicated by his decisive victory. From the moment he took the lead on the bike, his authority was never threatened, though he did receive a scare when eventual second place finisher, Spaniard Miquel Blanchart, closed nearly 4 minutes over the first 21km of the marathon. This triggered an attack of his own, as he regained 3 minutes over the next 10km of the marathon (which led to an all too painful last 10km of the race). Al-Sultan ended up with a well-deserved victory margin of close to 10 minutes over the Spaniard and the 2013 title. In the women’s race, it became somewhat of a winner’s procession once Kirsten Möller took the lead on the cycle leg. With Möller’s strength over the run, it was considered very much a formality when she started the marathon leg with more than a 12-minute cushion ahead of the Netherland’s Heleen bij de Vaate, who had ridden herself into second place on the cycle leg. The diminutive 29-year-old proved her running prominence to

register the only sub 3-hour marathon amongst the women (2:58:37) - this would increase her winning margin to more than 30 minutes by the finish. A truly remarkable day for Möller - fifth out the water and first in both the cycle and run leg. Third amongst the women was last year’s 5th place finisher, Spain’s Seleta Castro. Not only had she improved on her 2012 performance, she had incredibly been able to bounce back from last month’s disappointment of 13th place in South Africa. With the top 2 places comfortably decided, nothing had prepared us for the close finish of Estonia’s Kirill Kotsegarov, who was able to haul the UK’s Phil Graves in over the run leg, closing to within 4 seconds by the 36.6 km mark, and thereafter moving away to win by a narrow 8 seconds at the finish. For Kotsegarov, it was great to be back on form after having a torrid time over the last 2 years, breaking his collarbone in Wales (2011) and crashing out at this event last year. To be back on the podium was an enormous result for the likeable Estonian. For Graves it was a bittersweet result, as his podium finish seemed secure until Kirill passed him late in the race. The sweetness would no doubt be that Phillip was able to bury the DNFs of events past by completing his first Lanzarote Ironman. We are sure he will be looking for bigger things in 2014. The day was quite a tough experience for a number of the more fancied athletes, none more so than Bella and Stephen Bayliss, who came into the event looking to improve on their Top 2 placings of 2012. It was not to be, but we are certain that they shall be able to bounce back and transform this disappointment into great results.

ATU TRIATHLON AFRICAN CHAMPIONSHIPS Where Morocco When 26 may Winners Gillian Sanders 2:10:01; Henri Schoeman 1:54:14

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OUTH AFRICA swept both the men’s and women’s podiums at the ATU African Championships this weekend. Despite exiting the water more than a minute down on the leaders, Gillian Sanders posted an impressive bike leg and even stronger run to earn the continental title. Anel Radford led the contingency of women on the swim, but her head start slipped away from her on the run. Radford finished as the runner-up, while Carlyn Fischer rounded out the podium in third. Henri Schoeman, who recently broke into the top 10 in a World Triathlon Series race in Yokohama, claimed the men’s African Championships title with a wire to wire win. Schoeman and Junior World Champion Wian Sullwald went head to head until they hit the run, when Schoeman gained an insurmountable lead, leaving Sullwald with silver. Wikus Weber also stayed with the leaders until the run, when he faded slightly behind for bronze. JULY 2013

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Words Ashley Quinlan and Tom Ballard Photos Triathlon.org / Delly Carr / ITU, Human Race

Where Lanzarote, Canary Islands When 8 May Winners Faris Al-Sultan (GER) 8:42:41; Kristin Möller (GER) 09:37:35


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TRAININGZONE

TRAININGZONE

Swimming

EXPERT ADVICE TO GIVE YOU THE EDGE

Welcome In this month’s Training Zone we have an interesting feature by Dr Matthew Tatum about how to balance triathlon and relationships. It’s a bit different to the normal subjects we cover, but it’s no less important. There are so many good and healthy things about triathlon, but it is also a time consuming and costly sport, and one that’s easy to get too wrapped up in. We all want to do well, but not at the detriment of those closest to us. Dr Tatum’s advice shows you how to use triathlon to enhance relationships and make sure your loved ones are always a big part of the picture. A stable and happy home life provides the foundation upon which all your training is built upon. With this in place, you’re good to go. Phil Mosley Coaching editor philmosley.co.uk

Race faster in open water by varying your strokes in the pool, says Andy Bullock

BODY

NUTRITION

54 TRYING RELATIONSHIPS

63 PALEOLITHIC DIET

Expert advice on how to get the best out of triathlon without causing conflict at home DR MATTHEW TATUM

SWIM

57 MIXED STROKE SPEED

Why varying your stroke in training can make you more powerful when racing ANDY BULLOCK

PLAN

64 TRAIN FOR A HALF IRON DISTANCE RACE THIS WINTER

From strong foundations to Iron distance in 12 weeks RICHARD SMITH

BIKE

SOLVED!

59 THE ULTIMATE BIKE SESSION

70 YOUR QUESTIONS ANSWERED BY OUR EXPERTS

How time trials can be incredibly beneficial training tools PHIL MOSLEY

RUN

61 SHARPEN UP YOUR RUN Photos Corbis

Caveman cuisine is increasing in popularity but is it any good for you? DR KEVIN CURRELL

Advice on fuelling for training in the evening and how to avoid cramps when racing DR TAMSIN LEWIS AND KATE PERCY

Five simple training steps to help you hit the gas pedal and go quicker this race season GARTH FOX JULY JULY 2013 2013

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TRAININGZONE

Training need not disrupt relationships and family life if you keep everyone involved

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BODY RELATIONSHIPS Body

THE ART OF BALANCING TRIATHLON AND RELATIONSHIPS FITTING TRIATHLON TRAINING AND RACING AROUND FAMILY LIFE CAN BE A CHALLENGE. HERE’S HOW TO GET IT RIGHT Meet the expert Dr Matthew Tatum Is a clinical psychologist, triathlete, marathon runner, and family man

THINGS AT work are busy. Your son has a football game, your daughter has a ballet recital, and it’s your partner’s birthday. And then there’s your training schedule. This week is your biggest volume of training for the whole season. Sound all too familiar? Although triathlon can be a challenge for relationships, it doesn’t have to be detrimental. With open and honest communication, and with a flexible and adaptive approach, relationships can grow through each season of training and racing and it’s important to make sure they remain a priority in your life. It is possible to stay passionate about triathlons and ensure your loved ones are happy. Relationships are about flexibility. There are always times in a relationship where one partner may be giving or sacrificing more than the other. That’s OK – it’s actually healthy. When one person is making sacrifices in a relationship it allows the other partner to reach for their goals, with support. But this type of balance doesn’t come easy. The best thing is that the more you work at obtaining this balance, the easier life will be. Here are some tips for balancing relationships with triathlon training when things in life get busy.

Photos Getty

PRE-SEASON All healthy relationships start with good communication. When it comes to balancing triathlon training and racing with relationships, communication is key. It’s important you communicate with your partner about your triathlon wants and needs before the season starts. Here are a few things to cover in the preseason conversation: how long will your season last? How many races do you want to do? What will the financial impact be? How will you

navigate times of heavy training? When will you important to you. Why do you train, what do you spend quality time together? What scheduling get out of it, how does it fulfil you, how does it issues are important to your partner (e.g. make you a better person? Help them holiday, anniversary, birthdays or their own understand why triathlons are important to you. sport or hobby)? P .4(=-)-.(()4(5@4=.3).4B5>;($B<Y The goal of this conversation is to open the lines of communication and begin to set plans Cancelled meeting? Extra 15 minutes after and expectations. The approach should be one lunch? Call, text, or email your partner. Let them of openness and flexibility. If one of your races know you are thinking about them. Ask them how their day is going. Connect with them. conflicts with a family holiday or special occasion, go back to your list of races and pull P .?)=-)=;.$=-154=$10$;)<=Y).4,8$<<.54$=) out another one. If your partner is worried about about triathlons is great. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what drives us. time you will miss with the family, talk about Unfortunately, our partners arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always quite how you can make up that time. The more open as enthusiastic as we are about the and flexible you are during this sport. Make sure you are asking conversation, the more your about your partnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passions partner will see how much you YOU SAYâ&#x20AC;Ś and interests. Make sure you value the relationship and the are talking about other areas more likely they will be to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Train before everyone else is awake (ie of your life besides just support your triathlon silly oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; clock). The earlier the better!â&#x20AC;? triathlons. season. Jane Holmes

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RACING SEASON There are also lots of things you can do during the racing season to help loved ones remain supportive and pro-triathlon.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Appreciate their sacriďŹ ces for your sport and remember to simply say thank youâ&#x20AC;? James Stewart

P)+1)A.&1).4=-))$;1B<)$<54Y-)35;)B5> can demonstrate flexibility with training in the early season, the easier it will be when things get demanding later. P).4+5;')B5>;8$;=4);h<<>885;=.?)&)-$?.5>;Y After a long training week, take your partner out to dinner or do something that helps them. Make sure you express your gratitude for their support when you are showing your appreciation. P54.=5;B5>;8$;=4);h<+))1.4,<Y5=.').+B5>; partner is getting tense or frustrated when you go out the door to train. If this happens, talk about it. Ask them how they are feeling about your training. Take the time to problem-solve and find out what is causing their distress. Then try to make an adjustment to ease the situation.

P$0)<>;)B5>;$'=.54< speak for themselves. If you say your relationship with your partner is important, make sure you show it. If triathlons are getting in the way of your relationships, maybe itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to re-evaluate things.

POST-SEASON By this point in the year you have spent thousands of rands on triathlons, you have spent countless hours training, and you have 85>;)($==)4=.54$4()4);,B.4=5;$'.4,Y5@Z.= is time to show your appreciation to your partner for the love they showed you throughout the season. Tell them how important their support $4()4'5>;$,)3)4=@$<Y .?)=-)3=-)=.3) and gratitude they deserve.

P533>4.'$=)B5>;+))1.4,<$&5>==;.$=-154<Y Talk to your partner about why triathlons are JULY JULY 2013 2013

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SWIM MIXED STROKES

Swim

SHOULD YOU SWIM OTHER STROKES? THE PROS AND CONS OF MIXING STROKES AND

Using a combination of strokes when training may increase your race pace

HOW TO INTEGRATE THEM INTO YOUR WORKOUTS Meet the he expert Andy Bullock k Bullock works with British Triathlon on both their Paratriathlon and Regional Academy projects as well as with age-groupers

FRONT CRAWL is the stroke that all triathletes aim to master, but Masters, swimmers, swim coaches and triathlon coaches support the idea of swimming the other main strokes. These will bring in variety and technique that can transfer from one stroke to the next. Swimming all four strokes can build a more balanced shoulder and back musculature, which may lessen your risk of overuse swimming injuries. However, some triathlon coaches will not teach anything other than front crawl

because if this is what you are going to do in the race then this is all you need to practise. Integrating other strokes into your swim session is easy. You could add simple repetitions of individual medley of anything from 25m of each through to 100m of each. If you would prefer to practise the individual strokes, it would be useful to learn some drills for each and add them into the warm-up of your swim session. If you find that working through the other strokes is challenging, there are steps that you can take to make it easier. Fins are an easy addition to your session that will help give you basic propulsion and an improved body position while you learn the arm technique for backstroke and butterfly. Pull buoys are not used in all strokes and should be avoided for butterfly and breaststroke but could be used in back stroke. If you’re completely new to these strokes, the time to start adding them into your swim training is during the off-season. At this time it’s

easy to work on technique if you fancy a more relaxed swim session, while some cardiovascular training can still be achieved. As you approach the race season your front crawl technique needs to be at its best and your fitness needs to build to a peak. During this build-up you would reduce the volume of other strokes within your sessions. Are there downsides of swimming other strokes? Maybe. Many age-group athletes have not had the intensity and hours of swimming as they’ve grown through their teens as other swimmers have done. In fact, many will not have even been in a pool during these years, so there is a bit of catch-up being played by these swimmers. So they need more time practising front crawl to ensure a good technique. You may argue that, in these circumstances, swimming other strokes is wasting time that could be spent on developing front crawl.

Photo Corbis

Learn all the strokes Quick tips to help improve your all round skills BREASTSTROKE

BACKSTROKE

BUTTERFLY

Timing is very important when swimming breaststroke so say to yourself as you swim: kick, glide, pull, breathe.

Flick the water with the top of your feet as you kick and maintain a good body roll to both sides, getting each shoulder out of the water.

Undulation of the hips is key and is controlled by your head position – lift your head to drop your hips and drop your head to lift your hips.

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BIKE TIME TRIAL Time trials are a great way to supplement your bike training for triathlon

good idea to wear a heart-rate monitor to give you an idea of just how hard you’re working, and then compare it every time you race. You’ll soon learn what you can and can’t sustain in time trials and triathlons. A power meter is even better. It is likely that your times will improve quickly in the first few weeks of regular racing. Beginners often report that they’re able to sustain a higher heart rate at every race during the first four or five weeks, before it begins to plateau. Some cyclists even complain of a shortlived chesty cough after their first time trial of the season, known as pursuer’s cough. After you’ve raced a few time trials, the bike leg of a triathlon will never seem so gruelling. That’s why some of the best cyclists in triathlon are keen time triallists, such Triathlon Plus '54=;.&>=5;-.1 ;$?)<Y-.1)=-);)$;)3$4B benefits to time-trialling, there are also a few things to watch out for:

Intensity

O

16km time trials are over in a flash. Even so, they are very stressful for your body. Do them once per week at the most, and only in blocks of six weeks leading up to key races. Then have a few weeks off before the next block.

Bike

THE ULTIMATE 30-MINUTE BIKE WORKOUT

TIME TRIALS CAN BE BRILLIANT HIGH-INTENSITY TRAINING SESSIONS THAT WILL SEE YOU RIDE FASTER Meet the expert Phil Mosley Mosley is an elite triathlete and has successfully coached dozens of athletes to success at all levels from sprint to Ironman

FOR A triathlete, these solo against-theclock races can be worth their weight in gold, often providing the best 30 minutes of cycle training you’ll ever do. Cycle time trials replicate the type of riding you do in a triathlon, where it’s just you versus the clock, without the advantage of being shielded by a peloton. So it makes perfect sense to do them in training. They are very low-key events. The race HQ is usually a car park or a village town hall, and the race route tends to be one single road – out and

back. Each competitor is set off at one-minute intervals, and you’re not allowed to draft by riding directly behind the other cyclists. The races themselves are given codes rather than names, and they’re not advertised like triathlons are. You can enter some time trials on the day for around R30, known as club events, whereas others require an entry form to be sent two weeks in advance, known as open events. The simplest way for a triathlete to race their first time trial is at a club event. These are often held mid-week during the summer at around 6 or 7pm. The most common distance is 16km, which is ideal for most triathletes’ needs. You turn up, pay R30, pin on a number and then you start in number-order. What then follows is 20 to 35 minutes of sustained high-intensity cycling while someone times you. You finish, get your time and go home. It really is that simple. The more 16km time trials you do, the more you learn how hard to push yourself and the better you pace each subsequent race. It’s a

O

Competition

Don’t get too caught up in competing with other cyclists. Many will have tapered, shaved their legs and spent all their spare money on aerodynamic kit. Keep your eye on the ball and only use time trials as training for your key triathlons. O

Conditions

Don’t get depressed about your results. Times are very dependent on weather and course conditions. Cold days, hot days, windy days, calm days – it all makes a big difference to your speed. You can’t always compare one race to the next.

Find your nearest time trial O Go to ww.cyclingsa.com for info on teams, clubs and events in your area.

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RUN RACE SPEED T2 TRANSITION TUNER

5.4,+;53;.(.4,.4$';5>'-)($);5 position straight into hard running is very challenging. Your breathing frequency, oxygen consumption and lactate production all rise for a given pace off the bike, while running efficiency is also reduced. You can train for this – it’s known as brick training. What underpins a really good brick is performing the bike-to-run transition as fast as you would in a race and then immediately accelerating up to target race pace. It is the actual changeover from bike to running and the race-pace running that you need to focus on.

2

Example Set your race bike up on the turbo trainer and do three to four repeats of seven minutes cycling at moderate intensity, into five minutes running at race pace from the off. For progression add one more set per week. SKIP FOR SPEED Finnish researchers have shown that just four weeks of plyometric training can improve running economy by as much as eight percent. Including a series of hopping, bounding or skipping movements (skipping is especially effective) once or twice weekly before an easy run will do the trick.

3

Now is the time to maximise your training time

Run

SHARPEN UP YOUR RUN FIVE WAYS TO INJECT SOME SPEED INTO YOUR RUNNING Meet the expert Garth Fox

Photo Greg Beadle

Fox is a top coach, triathlete and cyclist. He also has a masters degree in sports science

HOPEFULLY, YOU are managed a reasonably consistent period of running over the winter months. This is important because it provides a springboard for the next block of training. Sports scientists and coaches recommend periodisation – organising training periods and workouts so that they build upon each other. You should aim to hit peak condition for the summer. Here are five ways to go about it.

REV THE ENGINE HARD Aerobic capacity (or VO2 max) represents your maximal ability to process oxygen to meet energy demands via aerobic metabolism. For triathlons, this attribute is very important because it is almost entirely fuelled by energy derived from aerobic metabolism. One way in which we can boost it is by including a weekly dose of VO2 max stimulus over the next four to six weeks.

1

Example >4¥3$=¦¢‰3$A)++5;=Y5=) the time it took and then allow yourself the exact same time to recover. Repeat this three to four times or until you are no longer able to maintain the pace of the first set. Add one set per week as progression.

Example Single-leg hops. Hop on one leg at a time but aim to really cover some distance with each hop. World class runners can cover about 25m in seven hops. The key is to minimise ground contact time and to land as softly as possible. Repeat no more than three times on each leg. RACE TESTING The best training data always comes from races. This is because racing provides an environment that allows us to dig deeper than when training. This is a really powerful tool when used sparingly. The idea is to insert a few shorter distance run races than the distance you will encounter in your triathlon, around three to six weeks out from your A-race. Recover properly after each and you will get a significant boost in fitness and general race readiness.

4

Example Add 1 or 2 pure 5km run races at six and three weeks out from your Olympicdistance A-race. A 10km race would be ideal preparation for a half-Ironman. DIETARY SPRING CLEAN If you still find yourself somewhat heavier than you had anticipated for this stage in the year, do not despair. By simply knuckling down to clean eating and cutting out alcohol, excess sugar, fat and processed foods for the next six weeks, you will shed some of the excess. This matters because research shows that we can gain as much as two to six seconds per kilometre per kilogram of body weight lost.

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Sasol Cross

This was the 5th year that the Sasol Cross triathlon/duathlon series took place. What a wonderful series where top athletes, the whole family as well as the kiddies could take part

BSG Series

This series came to an end on a very high note at the Emerald Casino. We were so blessed to organize this series for more than 18 years and more than 126 events and with no serious injuries or lost of any athlete. This series was the highlight of Spectrum Sport’s career. We know it is a big loss for the sport and all of us have to work together to organize sprint events for the athletes.

MEALS ON WHEELS CYCLE RACE 22 SEPTEMBER 2013 CHARITY CYCLE ROAD RACE

It’s here, the first Ultra Rockman Cross Tri When: - 1 December 2013 Where:- Vaaldam Distance:- 2000m swim, 70km MTB, 18km run 16km Canoe, 70km MTB, 18km run Family Sprint event – 400m swim, 12km MTB and 3km run Open water swim – Saturday 30 November 2013 For more information see our website www.spectrumsportevents.co.za

www.rockmanxtri.co.za

REDSTONE MTB - NO 3 21 July Redstone - Hartebeespoort REDSTONE MTB - NO 4 25 August Redstone - Hartebeespoort REDSTONE MTB – NO 5 16 December Redstone - Hartebeespoort

For more information: Office Tel: 061 9826060 Email: events@spectrumsport.co.za 62

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Fax: 0866287371


NUTRITION PALEO DIET A caveman type diet is proving to be increasingly popular among triathletes

Nutrition

THE HUNTERGATHERER DIET THE PALEOLITHIC DIET IS BECOMING POPULAR, BUT IS IT WORTH THE EFFORT? Meet the expert Dr Kevin Currell

Photo Getty

Currell is a performance nutritionist at the English Institute of Sport and a triathlete

EATING A palaeolithic diet (paleo diet) seems to be all the rage these days, with many blogs and internet sites dedicated to it, and a fair few books as well. The general principle is to eat like we would have when we were hunter-gatherer Neanderthals or

cavemen. During this time we would potentially have only eaten meat, fish and vegetables, and of course we certainly wouldn’t have been able to walk to shops and buy a quick burger and chips or pop to the supermarket and buy a microwave meal. The scientific argument for a palaeolithic diet is made on some significant circumstantial evidence around studies of other primate diets, studies of fossils, anthropology and understanding our own metabolic pathways. If you were to eat like a caveman, what would you need to do? Well let’s start with those foods that are not on the list. It includes anything pre-

prepared such as pasta, rice and quinoa as well as other cereals and wholegrains, like porridge, dairy, legumes such as lentils and chickpeas, bread, sausages, most sandwich meats, alcohol and even the humble potato. What can you eat? Meat, fish, nuts, fruit and vegetables. But not any old meat and fish, just =-5<)=-$=$;)5;,$4.'$4(,;$<<+)(Y5=.44)( fish, just those caught naturally out in the ocean. So pretty simple really. If you make these changes to your diet what is likely to happen? Firstly, you will reduce the carbohydrate content of your diet, while increasing the protein and fat intake you have. Most of the fat is likely to come from healthy fat sources though. The carbohydrates you do eat will be slow-release carbohydrates, which is generally a good thing, and research suggests it would be good to have the majority of your diet coming from these types of carbohydrates. Alongside this, you will certainly eat more fibre in your diet. Which again, is seen as a good thing in terms of health. You will also consume far more micro-nutrients such as vitamins and minerals. You will increase your potassium intake and decrease your sodium intake as well. So far, not too bad. However, the word health has been mentioned a lot, with not much mention of performance. We know that restoring and maintaining muscle glycogen after exercise is key to recovery and optimal performance. We know that if you remove carbohydrates from your diet and replace them with fat then your endurance improves, but your time-trial performance doesn’t change and you lose the ability to go fast. Is salt also that bad for an athlete? We certainly lose a lot during training, so maybe we need to replace some in our diet too. The paleo diet idea is based on significant circumstantial evidence and as such is not based on too much science. There is good evidence that low-carbohydrate, high-protein diets aid weight loss, but not much about the long-term adherence to them. I would also question the idea that the humble potato, is not a natural food – if a caveman saw a potato I think he would have eaten it. We also know the Incas ate quinoa too. So is the paleo diet a good thing? Certainly some of the principles are. The protein intake is good too – as eating protein in every meal is essential for athletes. Research shows that 20g in each meal is optimal. However, there are times when you are going to need a more carbohydrate-based meal like pasta or bread such as after a long bike ride or during periods of really heavy training. It can sometimes be hard to achieve this when following a paleo diet. So in conclusion, eating fresh, good quality food is essential, but don’t get too obsessed – I don’t think our caveman ancestors would have.

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TRAININGZONE IRONMAN 70.3 TRAINING PLAN TIPS

The plan

TRAIN FOR THE HALF IRON DISTANCE EVENT THIS WINTER Meett the expert ert

RACE RECCE / VISUALISATION Review the courses by visiting the venue or looking at maps. Do some of your key race paced sessions on similar courses and visualise yourself racing.

3

Richard Smith An MSc Sports Science and Coaching postgraduate, Smith has 15 years of experience

WITH A good winter of base training, preparing for the challenge of a Half Iron Distance event (1,9km swim/ 90km bike/ 21.1km run) is a rewarding journey. We have a training plan this issue that will see you on the start line for The Tri-Rock half Iron distance event in Durban in September-super fit and race ready!. It builds on the strong foundations and consistency in training you have earned over the past summer and early winter months.

Try this strength & conditioning session Strength and conditioning sessions are included in these training plans, and are referred to as S&C. Feel free to adapt the example below, or try a gym circuit training session or yoga class instead. Warm-up 5mins skipping followed by two sets of 15 reps of walking lunge steps with upper body twist, glute

NUTRITION AND HYDRATION Aim to hit your race weight by the middle of the plan by eating a balanced, healthy diet that supports your training and recovery. Practise race nutrition and hydration strategies during your long race-paced sessions.

4

BRICK SESSIONS / TRANSITION TRAINING Brick sessions help you adapt to the specific demands of longer bike/run events, as well practising efficient transitions.

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bridging and foam roller mobilisation of upper back. Main set Lower body: Squats; single-leg quarter-squats; dumbbell lunges to front, side and back; calf raises; step-up on bench with high knee drive. Three sets of 12-15 reps. Upper body: Seated pulley row; press-ups (with your elbows in); dumbbell tricep extensions; front and side plank. Three sets of 12-15 reps.

Are these plans for you? Before beginning these plans you should already be able to: Swim 1,000m non-stop Ride your bike for at least 2hrs Run for at least 1hr If you have consistently been able to follow part one of this plan (Issue 48) and can train for up to 10-14hrs per week, you should be able to follow the Advanced Plan. If you have only been able to follow part one some of the time, or have less than 10hrs per week, you should follow the Intermediate Plan.

Photos Ironman

Conditioning to enhance performance Support your training with appropriate strength and conditioning training and sports massage. This can be integrated into warm-up and recovery work.

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YOUR 12YO -WUR EEE EK K PL-W 12 AN

Get your guide ready to go

PLAN

Intermed dia iatte e Tr

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PACING Training regularly at target race pace and being able to maintain specific efforts is key to middle-distance racing. For a 70.3 race you should be able to stay within 2-3secs per 100m of your Critical Swim Speed (CSS – your race speed); cycle at between 75-83% of your max heart rate and run at a similar level with the aim of going faster in the last third of the run.

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How it works

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MONITOR PROGRESS Use regular in-session testing – like a T20 swim test, where you swim as far as you can in 20 minutes – to monitor your progress, establish your target race paces and for your own personal motivation.

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FROM STRONG FOUNDATIONS TO THE IRON DISTANCE

Cut out the guide following the dotted outline

CONSISTENCY / TIME MANAGEMENT Plan your week in advance, maximising the time you have available for training, recovery and everything else going on.

1

Fold the guide in quarters using the fold guides

Now carry it with you for reference while training

aining Advanced Train ning i ng

HALF IRONHA LFNIRO RONMAN MA TRAININGTRAININ ING THE TRAINING PLAN THE TRA N THAT THA THA HATW TRAIN T WILL WILLSSEE EEYOU IN ININ NING YOU G PL PLA AN N THATW T WILHALF IRONM LSE L SEEEYO YOU IN JJUST HALFI US 12 WEEKS U U AN FIT IN LF IRO RON NM MA AN NFFIT IT IN JUST 12 WEEKS

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THE PLAN INTERMEDIATE TRAINING ZONES FOLD2

YOU 12-WER E PLAN K

TRY TO WORK to the prescribed Training Zones explained below as these will help you train at the right intensity for each session. This will help you to develop specific aspects of your fitness, as well as making sure that you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t overdo it. You can either estimate your intensity, using these descriptions, or use a heartrate monitor for a more precise measure. If you use a heart-rate monitor, use the percentages provided, and subtract them from your maximum heart rate to '$1'>1$=)B5>;C54)<Y551<1.0)85@);3)=);<$4( @$='-)<-)18=;$'0B5>; progress, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not essential. These training zones are only a guide, so donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry about being overly-precise with heart rates because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll fluctuate anyway. Be mindful of your training intensity and pacing but more importantly be consistent, get out there and enjoy your training. Zone 1 (Z1) Recovery 60 to 65% of your maximum. Easy pace, feels nice and light. Zone 2 (Z2) Steady 65 to 75% of your maximum. Fairly easy pace. Easy enough so that you could breathe just through your nose if you wanted to.

Intermediate Training

HALF IRONMAN TRAINING THETRAININGPLANTHATWILLSEEYOUHALF THE TRAINING PLAN THAT WILL SEE YOU HALF IRONMAN FIT IN JUST 12 WEEKS

Zone 3 (Z3) Tempo 75% to 80% of your maximum. A fairly hard, but sustainable pace. Zone 4 (Z4) Race tempo 80 to 90% of your maximum. A hard pace that requires real focus to sustain. KEY: WU Warm up, WD Warm down, MAIN Main set, FC Front crawl, KICK Legs only, BUILD ;$(>$11B increase the intensity of each rep within a set, PULL Front crawl with a pull float between thighs, RI Rest interval, 2STROKE Second stroke of choice, IM Individual medley: butterfly, back, breast, front crawl, 1-ARM Front crawl using one arm only, N/S),$=.?)<81.=V<@.3=-)<)'54(-$1+ faster than the first, SC Stroke counting, FDRAG drag your fingers along the surface during the FC arm-recovery, CUP Catch-up touching hands at front of stroke, FISTS swim FC with clenched fists, DOG doggy paddle, SCULL Kick with arms held out in front, sculling your hands side to side, BAND Front crawl with a rubber band or inner-tube tied around ankles, ANKLES FC with pull float between ankles, SLD Single leg bike drills

FOLD1

Fri

Swim 2,000m Technique session WU 200m FC, 200m PULL, 100m KICK +20secs RI MAIN 8x50m as (25m FDRAG/25m FC) +60sec RI, 1x400m in Z3 +15sec RI, 2x200m in Z3 +15sec RI, 2x100m in Z3 +15sec RI WD 100m easy FC or BACK S&C 30mins

Swim 1,800m Speed session WU 400m as (50m FC, 25m KICK on side, 25m CUP) MAIN 8x50m BUILD 1-4 +20sec RI, 16x50m Z4+20sec RI WD 200m easy FC/BACK S&C 30mins

Brick 2hrs WU Bike 20mins BUILD Z2 MAIN Bike 20mins at 70.3 race pace, Run 15mins steady Z2/Z3 Bike 40mins 70.3 race pace Run 15mins Z3 WD easy jog and stretch

Bike 2hrs including 3x10mins at 70.3 target race pace+10mins RI followed by 10min easy transition run

Bike 2hrs Long ride: Z2 into lower Z3 on climbs

Run 80mins Endurance, multi-terrain â&#x20AC;&#x201C; get off road allowing terrain to mix intensity Swim 2,400m Endurance WU 200m FC, 100m BREAST, 100m BACK+30sec RI MAIN 4x400m alternating FC/PULL Z3+30sec RI WD 8x50m alternating easy KICK/PULL+20sec RI

32Gi OFFICIAL TRAINING PLAN PARTNER

Tue

Bike 1hr Strength hill intervals (road or turbo) WU 10mins BUILD+SLD MAIN 4x(5mins seated hill reps ride down hill or 3mins recovery spin) WD 5mins easy spin

Wed

Thur

Bike 1hr Strength intervals (road or turbo) WU 10mins BUILD+SLD MAIN 10mins overgearing working legs more than CV, 5mins spin, 10mins cadence 95rpm+ 5mins spin, 10mins overgearing, 5mins high cadence spin 100rpm+ WD 5mins easy spin

Run 1hr Tempo intervals WU 15mins BUILD + DRILLS MAIN 2x20mins Z3+3mins RI WD 5mins easy jog

Thur

Run 1hr 1km intervals WU 10mins Z2+DRILLS MAIN 8x1km as (1km at 10km race pace/1km easy recovery) WD 5mins Z2

Swim 2,000m Technique session WU 200m FC, 4x50m alternating kick on side/pull+15sec RI, 200m FC MAIN 4x50m 1-ARM, 200m FC N/S, 4x50m CUP, 200m FC holding pace, 4x50m FISTS, 200m FC N/S all+20sec RI WD 200m mixed swim S&C 30min

Bike 70mins Strength (on road or turbo) WU 15minsBUILD+SLD MAIN 8mins small chain ring 85rpm, 6mins big chain ring 90rpm Z3, 6mins small chain ring 95rpm, 4mins big chain ring 95rpm Z3, 4mins small chain ring 100rpm, 2mins big chain ring 100rpm Z4, 5mins easy spin 4x30secs power jumps+90secs easy spin WD 10mins easy spin

Fri

Wed

Run 1hr Muscle endurance WU 15mins Z2+drills MAIN 3x10mins Z3+3mins RI WD 5mins Z2

REST DAY

Swim 2,800m Endurance session WU 400m mixed swim/drills MAIN 5x400m FC at target 70.3 race pace +90sec RI, 4x50m as 25m FC fast/25m FC easy WD 200m easy swim

Sat

Swim 2,000m Technique session WU 2x150m as 50m FC, 50m BREAST, 50m BACK)+20sec RI MAIN 4x (25m SCULL, 25m FC, 25m FIST, 25m CUP, 50m FC)+20secs RI, 3x300m FC N/S (holding SC)+30sec RI WD 200m mixed stroke S&C 30mins

WEEK 4

Bike 2hrs 30mins Endurance including 90mins at target 70.3 race pace

Run 1hr Endurance run in Z2

Sun

Tue

Swim 2,400m Speed endurance session WU 2x(150m FC, 100m KICK, 50m PULL)+15sec RI MAIN 8x200m as 150m at 70.3 race pace, 50m faster +1min RI WD 200m 2STROKE S&C 30mins

Sat

REST DAY

WEEK 3 Mon

WEEK 2

Sun

Mon

WEEK 1

Run 70mins Endurance WU 10mins BUILD+drills MAIN 4x10mins at target 70.3 race pace+5min easy between S&C 30min

Bike 2hrs Endurance ride in Z2+10mins easy transition run S&C 30min

Swim 2,200m Technique session WU 400m mixed swim MAIN 12x100m as 25m choice drill, 25m FC, 25m FC 6 strokes/CUP 6 strokes, 25m FC + 20sec RI, 8x50m KICK as (25m hard, 25m easy) +30sec RI WD 200m FDRAG S&C 30min

Run 40mins Tempo WU 15mins Z2+drills MAIN 15min at target 70.3 race pace WD 10mins Z2

Bike 1hr Tempo (road or turbo) WU 10mins BUILD+SLD MAIN 3x10mins Z3+3min RI WD 10mins easy spin

REST DAY

JULY JULY 2013 2013

65


TRAININGZONE

Fri

Swim 2,300m technique session WU 2x150m as IM but no butterfly MAIN 3x (8x25m) as (15m drill/10m swim +10sec RI), 400m FC 70.3 race pace+1min RI) WD 200m FDRAG

Swim 2,400m Speed endurance session WU 400m mixed swim/drills MAIN 16x100m FC at target 70.3 race pace+10sec RI, 4x50m as 25m FC fast/25m FC easy WD 200m easy swim

Sat

Run test (treadmill test or 10km time trial) WU 10mins BUILD+drills MAIN Start at 10mph and increase by 0.5mph every 1.5mins; record heart rate and RPE. Continue to increase work until you cannot sustain 1.5mins WD 5mins easy jog

Bike 3hrs Endurance including 90mins at target 70.3 race pace+15mins race paced transition run

Bike 2hrs 30mins Endurance ride in Z2 into Z3 on hills – stay seated for climbs+15mins easy transition run S&C 30min

Run 80mins Endurance WU 10mins BUILD+drills MAIN 6x8mins at target 70.3 race pace+3min easy between S&C 30min

Tue

Bike 70mins Strength (on road or turbo) WU 15mins BUILD+SLD MAIN 2x10km time trial efforts with 10mins easy spin between. Aim for 2nd to be slightly faster than 1st WD 10mins easy spin

Wed

Thur

Bike 1hr Turbo test (or another) WU 10mins BUILD+SLD MAIN Start at 15mph (or 100watts) and increase by 1mph (or 20watts); every 1.5mins record heart rate and RPE. Continue to increase work until you cannot sustain 1.5mins WD 10mins easy spin

Swim 1,600m Technique session WU 200m choice swim MAIN 400m alternating 25m KICK, 50m FC, 25m drill; 400m as 25m PULL, 25m breathing every 3-5 strokes; 400m relaxed swim WD 200m mixed swim S&C 30min

Run 70mins 1km intervals WU 10mins BUILD+DRILLS MAIN 12x1km intervals as 1km at 10km race pace 1km easy Z2 recovery WD 5mins easy jog

Run 40mins Recovery in Z2, focus on maintaining good technique

Thur

Run 70mins Tempo runs WU 10mins BUILD+DRILLS MAIN 4x 3km Z3+2mins RI WD 5mins easy jog

Swim 2,000m Technique session WU 200m FC, 4x50m alternating kick on side/pull+15sec RI, 200m FC MAIN 4x50m 1-ARM, 200m FC N/S, 4x50m CUP, 200m FC holding pace, 4x50m FISTS, 200m FC N/S all +20sec RI WD 200m mixed swim S&C 30min

Bike 1hr 30mins WU 15mins BUILD+SLD MAIN 1hr as 4mins Z3, 1min Z4, 5mins high cadence spin WD 15mins easy spin

Swim 2,000m Technique/endurance WU 4x150m as 50m FC, 50m DRILL, 50m PULL+20sec RI MAIN 4x300m as 50m DRILL/250m controlled swim focusing on technique and stroke length+1min RI WD 200m easy swim

Fri

Wed

Run 1hr Endurance run in Z2

REST DAY

Swim 2,400m Endurance session WU 400m mixed swim/drills MAIN 4x400m FC at target 70.3 race pace +60sec RI, 4x50m FC as 25m fast/25m easy WD 200m easy swim

REST DAY

Sat

Swim 2,400m Technique session WU 200m FC, 4x50m alternating kick on side/pull+15sec RI, 200m FC MAIN 5x300m swim as 50m DRILL, 50m CUP, 100m hypoxic breathing (every 3/5/7 strokes), 100m swim+30sec RI WD 300m mixed swim S&C 30min

WEEK 8

Brick WU 10mins on bike MAIN Bike 30km, run 10km, bike 30km, run 5km – all at target 70.3 race pace WD 10mins easy spin – practise race nutrition and transitions

Bike 2hrs Recovery stay in small chain ring and spin at a high cadence – opportunity for café stop

Sun

Tue

Swim T20 Swim test WU 200m FC+60sec RI, 2x50m alternating 25m DRILL/25m FC+15sec RI, 2x50m BUILD+20sec MAIN T20: max distance in 20min WD 200m FC easy S&C 30min

Sun

REST DAY

WEEK 7 Mon

WEEK6 FOLD2

Mon

WEEK 5

Open-water swim 2,400m WU 3x200m BUILD including sighting drills and turns MAIN 500m BUILD from deep-water start, 500m hold 70.3 race pace, 500m accelerate with hard leg kick WD 300m easy swim down Optional bike 1hr Endurance ride in Z2

Run 40-50mins Endurance – steady Z2, focus on ease and flow of run technique S&C 30min

WEEK 11

WEEK 12

FOLD1

66

Bike 75mins Road or turbo WU 10mins BUILD+SLD MAIN 3x(2mins seated hill climb, 2mins standing hill climb, 2mins race pace on flat, 2mins mixed seated standing climb, 2mins sprint+3mins easy spin RI) WD 5mins easy spin

Fri

Swim 2,200m Technique session WU 3x300m as 100m FC, 50m DRILLS, 50m KICK on side, 100m PULL +20sec RI MAIN 8x50m as 25m SCULL/25m FC, 4x(100m FC Z2, 50m FC Z3, 25m FC Z4)+20sec RI WD 200m easy swim run 40mins tempo at 70.3 race pace

Swim 2,500m Speed endurance WU 2x150m IM (no butterfly)+20secs RI MAIN 10x200m as 50m race start/sprint into 150m at target 70.3 race pace+15sec RI WD 200m easy swim

Sat

Open Water Swim WU 10mins BUILD+drills MAIN 2x1km swims at target 70.3 race with 2mins RI WD 5mins easy swimming Bike 3hrs endurance ride Z2

Open-water swim WU 15mins build+open-water skills MAIN 30mins swim at target 70.3 race WD 200m easy swim Bike 90mins Z2 ride

Run 90-100mins in Z2 into Z3 on climbs S&C 30min Alternatively complete an Olympic-distance practice race this weekend

Brick WU 10mins on bike. Use race bike and kit and practise race nutrition/transitions MAIN 40km bike/10km run, 20km bike/5km run all at target 70.3 race pace accelerating last 2km of run WD 10mins easy spin

JULY 2013 JULY 2013

Tue

Thur

Bike 25mile Time trial or test WU 15-20mins BUILD+SLD MAIN 25-mile road time trial or test ride WD 15-20mins easy spin

Wed

Run 80mins Fartlek – speed endurance WU 20mins BUILD+DRILLS MAIN 15x3mins fartlek intervals working Z1–Z3 WD 15min easy jog

Run 50mins Z2

Thur

Wed

Run 1hr Endurance run in Z2

Swim 1,800m Technique WU 3x100m as FC, DRILL, PULL MAIN 8x50m as 25m DRILL/25m FC, 3x(150m FC in Z2, 100m FC in Z3, 50m in Z4)+20sec RI WD 200m FC easy S&C 30min

Bike 1hr Road or turbo WU 15mins BUILD+SLD MAIN 3x(10mins above 70.3 race pace with 3mins easy spin recovery between) WD 5mins easy spin

Fri

Swim 2,500m Endurance WU 300m mixed swim MAIN 5x400m alternating FC/PULL at 70.3 target race pace +30sec RI WD 200m FC easy S&C 30min

REST DAY

Swim 2,500m Speed endurance WU 200m FC, 100m BREAST, 100m BACK+20secs RI MAIN 15x100m at 70.3 race pace+10sec RI, 6x50m KICK as 25m HARD/25m EASY+20sec RI WD 300m easy swim

Sat

Tue

Swim T20 Swim test WU 200m FC+1min RI, 2x50m alternating 25m DRILL/25m FC+15sec RI, 2x50m BUILD+20sec MAIN T20: max distance in 20mins WD 200m FC easy S&C 30min

Sun

REST DAY

Mon

WEEK 10

Bike 2hrs or 50km Z2/Z3+10mins transition run

Race prep (switch to Friday if preferred) Swim 1km Ideally at venue, including 200m warm up, drills, accelerations and a few race-paced efforts Bike 15-20min spin checking bike is all OK Run 10mins stretching out and a few strides

Sun

Mon

WEEK 9

Run 45mins at 70.3 race pace open-water swim 30mins at 70.3 race pace

RACE DAY

Swim 1,500m Race prep (ideally open water) WU 300m build including sighting drills MAIN 4x50m race starts – hard effort, 200-400m at 70.3 race pace, 4x50m accelerations with strong leg kick WD 300m easy swim down

Run 45mins Intervals WU 10mins build Z2 and technique drills MAIN 6x600m alternating easy/ effort with 1st effort just under 70.3 pace, 2nd effort at 70.3 pace and 3rd effort just faster than 70.3 pace WD 5mins easy & stretch

Bike 1hr Easy soft pedaling with a few short race paced efforts Optional swim 1,000m Relaxed Z2 swim including some drills and accelerations

REST DAY

32Gi OFFICIAL TRAINING PLAN PARTNER


THE PLAN ADVANCED TRAINING ZONES FOLD2

YOUR 12-WEEK PLAN

TRY TO WORK to the prescribed Training Zones explained below as these will help you train at the right intensity for each session. This will help you to develop specific aspects of your fitness, as well as making sure that you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t overdo it. You can either estimate your intensity, using these descriptions, or use a heartrate monitor for a more precise measure. If you use a heart-rate monitor, use the percentages provided, and subtract them from your maximum heart rate to '$1'>1$=)B5>;C54)<Y551<1.0)85@);3)=);<$4( @$='-)<-)18=;$'0B5>; progress, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not essential. These training zones are only a guide, so donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry about being overly-precise with heart rates because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll fluctuate anyway. Be mindful of your training intensity and pacing but more importantly be consistent, get out there and enjoy your training. Zone 1 (Z1) Recovery 60 to 65% of your maximum. Easy pace, feels nice and light. Zone 2 (Z2) Steady 65 to 75% of your maximum. Fairly easy pace. Easy enough so that you could breathe just through your nose if you wanted to. Zone 3 (Z3) Tempo 75% to 80% of your maximum. A fairly hard, but sustainable pace.

Advanced Training

HALF IRONMAN TRAINING THETRAININGPLANTHATWILLSEEYOUHALF THE TRAINING PLAN THAT WILL SEE YOU HALF IRONMAN FIT IN JUST 12 WEEKS

Zone 4 (Z4) Race tempo 80 to 90% of your maximum. A hard pace that requires real focus to sustain KEY: WU Warm up, WD Warm down, MAIN Main set, FC Front crawl, KICK Legs only BUILD

;$(>$11B.4';)$<)=-).4=)4<.=B5+)$'-;)8@.=-.4$<)=ZPULL Front crawl with a pull float between thighs, RI Rest interval, 2STROKE Second stroke of choice, IM Individual medley: butterfly, back, breast, front crawl, 1-ARM Front crawl using one arm only, N/S),$=.?)<81.=V swim the second half faster than the first, SC Stroke counting, FDRAG drag fingers along the surface during the FC arm-recovery, CUP Catch-up touching hands at front of stroke, FISTS Swim FC with clenched fists, DOG Doggy paddle, SCULL Kick with arms held out in front, sculling your hands side to side, BAND Front crawl with a rubber band or inner-tube tied around ankles, ANKLES FC pull float between ankles, SLD single leg bike drills

FOLD1

Fri

Swim 2,000m Technique session WU 200m FC, 200m PULL, 100m KICK+20secs RI MAIN 8x50m as (25m FDRAG/25m FC) +60sec RI, 1x400m in Z3+15sec RI, 2x200m in Z3+15sec RI, 2x100m in Z3+15sec RI WD 100m easy FC or BACK S&C 30mins

Swim 2,200m Speed session WU 400m as (50m FC, 25m KICK on side, 25m CUP) MAIN 8x50m BUILD 1-4 +20sec RI, 16x50m Z4+20sec RI WD 200m easy FC/ BACK S&C 30mins

Brick 2hrs WU Bike 20mins BUILD Z2 MAIN 20mins at 70.3 race pace, run 15mins steady Z2/Z3, bike 40mins 70.3 race pace, run 15mins Z3 WD Easy jog and stretch

Bike 2hrs 30mins Including 3x15mins at 70.3 target race pace+10mins RI followed by 10min easy transition run

Bike 2hrs 30mins Long ride Z2 into lower Z3 on climbs

Run 10miles Endurance â&#x20AC;&#x201C; multi-terrain; get off road allowing terrain to mix intensity Swim 2,600m Endurance WU 3x200m as 25m FC, 25m DRILL, 25m KICK on side, 25m FC+30sec RI MAIN 6x300m alternating FC/PULL Z3+30sec RI WD 4x50m alternating easy KICK/PULL+20sec RI

32Gi OFFICIAL TRAINING PLAN PARTNER

Bike 90mins Tempo (road or turbo) WU 10mins BUILD+SLD MAIN 2x10km Z3+5km spin between WD 10mins easy spin

Tue

Bike 90mins Strength hill intervals (road or turbo) WU 25mins BUILD+SLD MAIN 4x(5mins hill reps alt overgearing cadence <80rpm, undergearing cadence >90rpm, ride down hill or 3mins recovery spin) WD 5mins easy spin

Wed

Thur

Bike 1hr Strength Intervals (road or turbo) WU 10mins BUILD+SLD MAIN 10mins overgearing working legs more than CV, 5mins spin, 10mins cadence 95rpm+ 5mins spin, 10mins overgearing, 5mins high cadence spin 100rpm+ WD 5mins easy spin

Run 1hr Endurance run in Z2

Swim 2,400m Technique/endurance session WU 200m FC, 4x50m alternating kick on side/ pull+15sec RI, 200m FC MAIN 5x100m as 25m FISTS, 25m CUP, 50m FC, 5x100m hypoxic breathing, 5x100m FC+20sec RI WD 300m mixed swim S&C 30min

Thur

Run 65mins 1km intervals WU 10mins Z2+drills MAIN 10x1km as 1km at 10km race pace, 1km easy recovery WD 5mins Z2 S&C 30mins

Swim 2,200m Technique session WU 400m mixed swim MAIN 12x100m as 25m choice drill, 25m FC, 25m CUP, 25m FC+20sec RI, 8x50m KICK as 25m hard, 25m easy +30sec RI WD 200m FDRAG S&C 30min

Run 1hr Tempo intervals WU 15mins BUILD+drills MAIN 2x 20mins Z3+3mins RI WD 5mins easy jog Bike 1hr Steady Z2 spin working on efficient pedaling

Bike 70mins Strength (on road or turbo) WU 15mins BUILD+SLD MAIN 5x6mins alt overgearing cadence 75-80rpm/high cadence 95rpm+, 8min small chain ring 85rpm, 6min big chain ring 90rpm Z3, 6min small chain ring 95rpm, 5mins easy spin, 6x30sec power jumps+90sec easy spin WD 10mins easy spin

Fri

Wed

Run 1hr Muscle endurance WU 15mins Z2+drills MAIN 3x10mins Z3+3mins RI WD 5mins Z2

REST DAY

Swim 2,800m Endurance session WU 400m mixed swim/drills MAIN 5x400m FC at target 70.3 race pace +90sec RI, 4x50m FC as 25m fast/25m easy WD 200m easy swim

REST DAY

Sat

Swim 2,100m Technique session WU 200m FC, 100m BREAST, 100m BACK+20sec RI MAIN 4x(25m SCULL, 25m FC, 25m FIST, 25m CUP, 50m FC)+20sec RI, 3x300m FC N/S (holding SC)+30sec RI WD 200m mixed stroke Run 40mins Easy run Z2

WEEK 4

Bike 2hrs 30mins Endurance including 90mins at target 70.3 race pace

Run 40mins Tempo WU 15mins Z2+drills MAIN 15mins at target 70.3 race pace WD 10mins Z2 Swim 30mins Relaxed open-water swim drills session

Sun

Tue

Swim 2,800m Speed endurance session WU 2x (150m FC, 100m KICK, 50m PULL)+15sec RI MAIN 10x200m as 150m at 70.3 race pace 50m faster+1min RI WD 200m 2STROKE S&C 30mins

Sat

REST DAY

WEEK 3 Mon

WEEK 2

Sun

Mon

WEEK 1

Run 80mins Endurance WU 10mins BUILD+drills MAIN 4x3km at target 70.3 race pace+3min easy between S&C 30min

Bike 2hrs Endurance ride in Z2+10mins easy transition run S&C 30min

JULY JULY 2013 2013

67


TRAININGZONE

Fri

Swim 1,500m Technique session WU 2x150m as IM, no butterfly MAIN 3x (8x25m) as 15m drill/10m swim +10sec RI, 400m FC at 70.3 race pace +1min RI) WD 200m FDRAG

Swim 2,800m Speed endurance session WU 400m mixed swim/drills MAIN 20x100m FC at target 70.3 race pace +10sec RI, 4x50m as 25m FC fast/25m FC easy WD 200m easy swim S&C 30min

Sat

Run test (treadmill test or 10km time trial) WU 10mins BUILD+drills MAIN Start at 10mph and increase by 0.5mph every 1.5mins; record heart rate and RPE. Continue to increase work until you cannot sustain 1.5mins WD 5mins easy jog

Brick 3hrs 90mins at 70.3 race pace followed by 40mins run out, 36mins back in – 2nd half of run faster than first

Bike 2hrs 30mins Endurance ride in Z2 into Z3 on hills – stay seated for climbs+15mins easy transition run S&C 30min

Swim 30mins Relaxed open-water swim drills session working on OW skills Bike 1hr 30mins Endurance. 2hrs Z2 ride on a hilly course working on high cadence controlled efforts on climb

Tue

Run 70mins Tempo runs WU 10mins BUILD+drills MAIN 2x5km Z3+2mins RI WD 5mins easy jog

Wed

Thur

Bike 1hr Turbo test (or another) WU 10mins BUILD+SLD MAIN Start at 15mph (or 100 watts) and increase by 1mph or (20 watts) every 1.5mins; record heart rate and RPE. Continue to increase work until you can not sustain 1.5mins WD 10mins easy spin

Bike 1hr 30mins Threshold WU 15mins BUILD+SLD MAIN 1hr as 4mins Z3, 1min Z4, 5mins high cadence spin WD 15mins easy spin S&C 30min

Thur

Bike 70mins Strength (on road or turbo) WU 15mins BUILD+SLD MAIN 2x10km time trial efforts with 10mins easy spin between; aim for 2nd to be slightly faster than 1st WD 10mins easy spin S&C 30min

Swim 2,000m Technique session WU 200m FC, 4x50m alternating kick on side/pull+15sec RI, 200m FC MAIN 3x400m as 2x (50m FISTS, 100m FC, 50m PULL with paddles, 100m FC) + 20sec RI WD 200m mixed swim Run 1hr Endurance Z2

Run 75mins 1km intervals WU 10mins BUILD+drills MAIN 12x1km intervals as 1km at 10km race pace 1km easy Z2 recovery WD 5mins easy jog

Fri

Wed

Run 1hr Endurance run in Z2

REST DAY

Swim 2,800m Endurance session WU 400m mixed swim/drills MAIN 10x200m FC at target 70.3 race pace +20sec RI, 4x50m as 25m FC fast/25m FC easy WD 200m easy swim

Sat

Swim 2,400m Technique session WU 200m FC, 4x50m alternating kick on side/pull+15sec RI, 200m FC MAIN 5x300m swim as 50m DRILL/50m CUP, 100m hypoxic breathing (every 3/5/7 strokes), 100m FC+30sec RI WD 300m mixed swim Run 1hr steady Z2 with 5x2min accelerations in middle of run

WEEK 8

Brick WU 10mins on bike MAIN Bike 20km/run 5km, bike 20km/run 5km, bike 10km/run 3km, all at target 70.3 race pace WD 10mins easy spin – practise race nutrition and transitions

Swim 30mins Relaxed open-water swim drills session working on OW skills Run 50mins Endurance, steady Z2, focus on ease and flow of run technique

Sun

Tue

Swim T20 Swim test WU 200m FC+1min RI, 2x50m alternating 25m DRILL/25m FC+15sec RI, 2x50m BUILD+20sec MAIN T20: max distance in 20mins WD 200m FC easy S&C 30min

Sun

REST DAY

WEEK 7 Mon

WEEK 6 FOLD2

Mon

WEEK 5

Open-water swim 2,400m WU 3x200m BUILD including sighting drills and turns MAIN 500m BUILD from deep-water start, 500m holding 70.3 race pace, 500m accelerate with hard leg kick WD 300m easy swim down Optional bike 1hr Endurance ride in Z2

Bike 2hrs Recovery, stay in small chain ring and spin at a high cadence – opportunity for café stop. S&C 30min

WEEK 11

WEEK 12

Swim 2,000m Technique session WU 200m choice swim MAIN 400m BUILD, 400m alternating 25mKICK/ 50m FC/25m DRILL, 400m alternating 50m PULL/50m breathe every 3-5 strokes, 400m relaxed swim WD 200m mixed swim S&C 30min

Brick Session 70mins WU 5mins build MAIN Bike 20mins Z3/run 10mins Z2, bike 20mins Z3/run 10mins Z3 WD 5mins easy spin

Swim 2,000m Technique/endurance WU 4x150m as 50m FC, 50m DRILL, 50m PULL+20sec RI MAIN 4x300m as 50m DRILL 250m controlled swim focus on technique and stroke length+1min RI WD 200m easy swim

REST DAY

FOLD1

68

Bike 90mins WU 15mins BUILD+SLD MAIN 10x2min Z4 efforts with 3mins easy spin between or through and off WD 20mins easy spin

Fri

Swim 2,200m Technique session WU 3x300m as 100m FC, 50m drill, 50m KICK on side, 100m PULL +20sec RI MAIN 8x50m as 25m SCULL/25m FC, 4x (100m FC Z2, 50m FC Z3, 25m FC Z4)+20sec RI WD 200m easy swim

Swim 2,700m Speed endurance WU 4x200m as swim/PULL/KICK on side/swim +20sec RI MAIN 6x50m BUILD 1-3+20sec RI, 5x100m from deep-water starts, 5x100m drafted swims, 5x100m from deep-water starts all+20sec RI WD 400m easy swim/drill

Sat

Open-water swim WU 10mins BUILD+drills MAIN 2x1km swims at target 70.3 race with 2mins RI WD 5mins easy swimming Bike 3hrs Endurance ride Z2

Open-water swim WU 15mins build + open-water skills MAIN 30mins swim at target 70.3 race WD 200m easy swim Bike 90mins Z2 ride

Run 90-100mins in Z2 into Z3 on climbs S&C 30min Alternative: complete an Olympic-distance practice race this weekend

Brick Use race bike and kit and practise race nutrition/transitions WU 10mins bike MAIN 40km bike/10km run, 20km bike/5km run, all at target 70.3 race pace accelerating last 2km of run WD 10mins easy spin

JULY 2013 JULY 2013

Tue

Thur

Brick 2hrs WU 10mins build MAIN 3x10km bike 3km run WD 10mins easy spin

Wed

Run 75mins Speed endurance WU 10mins BUILD+drills MAIN 2x (400m Z3, 200m easy, 800m Z3, 400m easy, 1,200m Z3, 600m easy, 800m Z3 400m easy, 400m Z3 200m easy) WD 10min easy jog

Run 50mins Z2

Thur

Wed

Run 1hr Endurance run in Z2

Swim 1,800m Technique WU 3x100m as FC, DRILL, PULL MAIN 8x50m as 25m DRILL/25m FC, 3x (150m FC in Z2, 100m FC in Z3, 50m in Z4)+20sec RI WD 200m FC easy S&C 30min

Bike 70mins Tempo on race bike in aero position WU 10mins BUILD+SLD MAIN 50mins at 10% above 70.3 race pace WD 10mins easy spin

Fri

Swim 3,000m Endurance WU 300m mixed swim MAIN 6x400m alternating FC/PULL at 70.3 target race pace +30sec RI WD 300m FC easy S&C 30min

REST DAY

Swim 2,400m Speed endurance WU 200m FC, 100m BREAST, 100m BACK+20sec RI MAIN 4x150m at 70.3 race pace+20sec RI, 4x100m at +5% race pace + 15sec RI, 4x50m + 10% race pace+10secs RI, 8x50m KICK as 25m hard/25m easy+20secs RI WD 400m easy swim

Sat

Tue

Swim 2km TT WU 200m FC+1min RI, 2x50m alternating 25m DRILL/25m FC+15sec RI, 2x50m BUILD+20sec MAIN 2km time trial attempt to negative split your swim WD 200m FC easy S&C 30min

Sun

REST DAY

Mon

WEEK 10

Bike 2hrs or 50km Z2/Z3 on race bike in aero position+10mins transition run

Race prep (switch to Friday if preferred) Swim 400m–1km ideally at venue including 200m warm-up, drills, accelerations and a few race-paced efforts Bike 15-20mins spin checking bike is all OK Run 10mins stretching out and a few strides

Sun

Mon

WEEK 9

Run 45mins at 70.3 race pace Open-water swim 30mins at 70.3 race pace

RACE DAY

Swim 1,500m Race prep (ideally open water) WU 300m build including sighting drills MAIN 4x50m race starts hard effort, 200-400m at 70.3 race pace, 4x50m accelerations with strong leg kick WD 300m easy

Run 45mins Intervals 10mins build Z2 and technique drills followed by 6x600m alternating easy/effort with 1st effort just under 70.3 pace, 2nd effort at 70.3 pace and 3rd effort just faster than 70.3 pace WD 5mins easy and stretch

Bike 1hr Easy soft pedaling with a few short race-paced efforts Optional swim 1,000m relaxed Z2 swim inc some drills and accelerations

REST DAY

32Gi OFFICIAL TRAINING PLAN PARTNER


32Gi OFFICIAL TRAINING PLAN PARTNER

JULY 2013

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TRAININGZONE Expert advice

SOLVED! EXPERT ADVICE ON HOW TO FUEL PROPERLY DURING A BUSY WORKING DAY AND HOW TO BEAT RACE-RUINING CRAMPS

Meet this month’s experts Nutritional advice Kate Percy Runner and author

Training advice Dr Tamsin Lewis Medical doctor and psychiatrist

QUESTION OF THE

MONTH

Fuelling correctly for training and work can be difficult to manage sometimes

Nutritional advice

I have to fit training in where and when I can, like many others who train for triathlons. As a father of a young family, I do my bike training on the commute to work. On the days I cycle to work I do not finish until after 8pm, and arrive home after 9:30pm. I am nearly always hungry but wary of eating that late at night. Often I will eat a big lunch before the ride in and then, once home, wait until breakfast the next morning to eat again. It’s difficult to eat at work as I teach tennis and it’s not appropriate to eat while teaching. Any ideas? Sam Pink, via email

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Kate Percy Runner and nutrition author TRAINING IN the evening always presents a conundrum; how to eat enough of the right foods after a workout to fuel consistent training without it interfering with a good night’s sleep or causing weight gain. Carbohydrate is stored in the muscles and liver as glycogen. This glycogen becomes depleted after a workout and the quicker it is topped up again, the quicker your muscles will repair and recover. Protein is also necessary to maintain and promote muscle health. The timing of your workouts may not be optimal, but the need to replenish your glycogen levels quickly should outweigh any

concern about eating late at night; it’s immediately after a workout that the body absorbs nutrients most readily. Gaining fat is more about the overall amount and type of calories you eat rather than when you eat them. True, calories consumed at night are not processed quite as efficiently as those consumed during the day, but with your training schedule and the nature of your job, this shouldn’t be an issue, providing your diet is generally balanced and healthy. Most importantly, you should ensure that you constantly top up your glycogen levels throughout your training. Fail to do this and levels will become depleted, you’ll lack energy and your training will suffer. Having said this, many people find that late-night eating disrupts their sleep. Studies also show that eating a large meal

Photo British Triathlon

HOW SHOULD I FIT IN FOOD?


SOLVED EXPERT ADVICE

Training advice

WHAT CAUSES CRAMP? I get various bad cramps, especially in my arches while swimming in the pool. It spreads to the front of the foot, travelling down to the toes if not stretched immediately. Last year I got a lot of cramp when lake swimming. I also get cramps in the arches when my feet are cold. Also, if I push it on the bike I get cramp in my hands and sometimes in the hip. Running off the bike results in calf cramp. I put orthotics in my cycle shoes which seems to help, although I still have to jog for the first 1km. I did an aquathon last year and suffered from severe cramping in both legs on the run. Can I do anything to stop this happening?

exercising. Providing you drink to thirst, there is no reason to suggest that dehydration is causing your cramps.

INTENSITY/GENETICS/ INJURY Shang et al. studied 433 Ironman triathletes and found evidence that EAMC is associated with exercising at a higher intensity during a race which may result in premature muscle fatigue. They also found that an inherited risk – a family history of cramps – can be a contributing factor to a person suffering from cramps, as can a history of tendon and/or ligament injury.

Dehydration can cause cramps while

In your full letter you said that you’ve seen a physiotherapist, but also that you have back problems caused by a car crash and that the MRI showed no damage. Perhaps overly tight lower back muscles could be pressurising nerve roots, increasing muscle excitability and causing cramp. Have you tried regular soft tissue release in your lower back? It seems that many of your cramps are experienced in cold conditions. If it is not possible to avoid cold conditions, you must warm up as much as possible before competition. The best controlled, large-scale studies on cramps suggests that premature muscle fatigue is the biggest contributor to EAMC. Preventing muscle fatigue is achieved by reducing intensity. If there is a correlation between increased intensity and increased cramping, try reducing intensity for a while. Increasing fitness through a controlled training programme will increase the time until muscle fatigue

before bedtime can increase triglyceride levels, which in turn teases our body into storing fat. For this reason, I would stick to your routine of eating a proper meal at lunchtime. Lean meat or fish with plenty of vegetables and brown rice or potatoes, a pasta dish or a risotto would make ideal midday meals. Eating at lunchtime will help fuel both your teaching and your ride home. Could you find a moment for a snack at around 6pm, between lessons? You’ll get more out of your rides home if you don’t train on empty. Try something packed with nutrient-dense calories like a peanut butter sandwich on wholegrain bread, a banana

and a handful of raisins, or a couple of slices of malt loaf, an apple and a yoghurt. When you get home, a lightweight carbohydrateprotein combination will be better than a proper meal. This should promote recovery and provide enough calories to sustain you through the night without interrupting a good night’s sleep. Milky drinks – for instance, hot chocolate or banana smoothies – are excellent for recovery, providing carbohydrate, protein and electrolytes. For something solid, try a bagel with cottage cheese, wholegrain cereal with milk, scrambled eggs or natural yoghurt with granola and fruit salad. Nutrient-dense, wholegrain unrefined carbohydrates are

Ronan Mulvey, via email

Dr Tamsin Lewis Medical doctor and psychiatrist EXERCISE ASSOCIATED/INDUCED Muscle Cramps (EAMC) have many causes and potential cures:

MAGNESIUM There have been no adequate scientific trials that suggest magnesium helps reduce EAMC. However, anecdotal evidence suggests high doses can help when taken regularly before and after exercise.

HYDRATION

Cramp while swimming could be caused by a number of different factors

and should reduce cramping. There are a few options to consider. Firstly, have your MRI scan analysed again by a doctor or radiologist. Also, I would suggest an appointment with a neurologist given your symptoms, to rule out nerve outlet compression. Tight muscles can cause a compression of nerves locally and increase cramp frequency (other symptoms such as numbness and tingling may be expected). You may also want to consider that you could have Raynaud’s Syndrome, which I suspect from your history. Discuss treatment with your GP. There are medications that can help reduce cramp intensity and frequency, but I would not recommend these before a cause of the cramps can be found – or at least a neural cause ruled out.

better than processed, refined foods, which are more likely to give a rapid energy rush and be detrimental to sleep.

Ask our experts Send your questions to: SOLVED!, Triathlon Plus, Future Publishing, 30 Monmouth Street, Bath, BA1 2BW Email: triathlonplus@futurenet.com

JULY JULY 2013 2013

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GO AH EA D AN D TR EAT YO

UR SE LF TH IS SE AS ON !

32Gi

ENDURE ENERGY DRINK www.32gi.com

Its unique formulation helps your body release the exact amount of glucose you need for sustained energy. At the same time it promotes fat store tapping to deliver the balanced energy supply.

32Gi

RECOVER www.32gi.com

Recover is an excellent protein supplement with no unnecessary ingredients; only those critical to muscle and glycogen recovery. Recover can also be consumed as pre training or racing meal or during a long endurance event. Recover is the first endurance protein recovery sports drink suitable for vegans and diabetics.

32Gi 32Gi

ACCELERATE www.32gi.com

Accelerate provides the natural combination of ingredients when the muscles need a faster uptake of glucose. Accelerate is designed for high intensity training and sports. It uses a multi-carb transporter system which provides a significant combination of fast absorbing and stability carbohydrates, giving the athlete immediate energy requirements whilst maintaining balance and preventing sudden drops.

CHEWABLE ACCELERATE ENERGY TABS www.32gi.com

It is not always convenient to carry a water bottle or mix a sachet of energy drink on route in a training or racing session, specifically in an endurance running event. 32Gi sought a way of changing the delivery mechanism to ensure a simpler way of providing the energy requirements for an athlete. 32Gi Accelerate Energy Tabs come in a convenient carry tube which contains 10x5grams chewable tablets, providing fast releasing & sustainable energy.

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USN

EPIC PRO www.usn.co.za

A premium intraand post-workout performance and recovery supplement, scientifically formulated with PeptoPro®, Vitargo® & other fast acting nutrients for peak performance & instant muscle recovery.

USN

PROTEIN DELITE BARS www.usn.co.za

The new 50g Protein Delite is a compact nutrition bar designed for active individuals who demand the benefits of high quality proteins and complex carbohydrates to support optimum health.

32Gi

FOODBARS www.32gi.com

They are an ideal energy source for all sporting activities, providing +-240 calories of healthy carbohydrates, fats and protein. They can be used as a pre or training / racing meal and as a post training recovery meal. Suitable for children and diabetics.

Cytomax Cytomax

MUSCLE MILK RTD www.cytomax.com

414ml Muscle Milk Ready-to-Drink (RTD) is a proteinenhanced functional beverage that promotes sustained energy, lean muscle growth, and recovery from exercise with a milkshake like taste. Muscle Milk provides a precise blend of 25 grams of premium protein, healthy fats, good carbohydrates, and 20 vitamins and minerals in a lactosefree, gluten-free formula.

CYTOMAX DROPS www.cytomax.com

Cytomax ENERGY DROPS™ are a fully portable, chewable means by which athletes can carry additional fuel on longer efforts or when traveling. Delivering a precise blend of carbohydrates and essential electrolytes, Cytomax ENERGY DROPS may be used before and during training. Each portable pouch provides ten individual chews.

Cytomax Cytomax

CYTOMAX 2KG www.cytomax.com

Exclusive to Cytomax products, Alpha-L-PolyLactate™ is a proprietary energy source proven to provide energy longer and faster. Cytomax lowers acid in muscles, which prevents burning and cramping during training and helps reduce soreness and speed recovery.

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JULY 2013

MUSCLE MILK 1KG www.cytomax.com

Muscle Milk consists of a precise blend of multi-source proteins, functional fats, lowsugar carbohydrates and 20 vitamins and minerals in a lactose-free formula. Muscle Milk is an ideal nutritional choice whether you are a performance athlete, watching your diet, or simply desire to gain strength & maintain lean muscle mass.


Biogen

ENERGY & ENDURANCE ENERGY GELS www.biogen.co.za

:: Boost energy levels :: Improve performance :: Reduce fatigue and cramping :: Replenish glycogen (stored energy) During physical activity, it is very important to supply our body with sufficient carbohydrates to maintain and increase energy levels and performance as well as reduce fatigue. Biogen energy gels’ combination of slow and fast release carbohydrates and electrolytes make it an ideal and convenient way of supplying your body with these essential nutrients as and when they are needed. The added electrolytes contained in Biogen energy gels help replenish those lost through perspiration whilst exercising, reducing the risk of cramping and muscle fatigue. Biogen energy gels are an ideal supplement for any person participating in endurance sporting activity. Visit www.biogen.co.za for more info!!

Ice Power

Ice Power

COLD GEL

SPORT SPRAY

www.icepowersa.co.za

Clinically proven effect with published studies - Ice Power® Cold Gel quickly and effectively relieves muscle pain and inflammation associated with sport injuries. It is a safe long term cold treatment that reduces swelling, releases muscle tension and promotes recovery. One product with many uses, Ice Power® Cold Gel can be used by the whole family.

www.icepowersa.co.za Clinically proven effect - Ice Power® Sport Spray is a powerful, long lasting cold gel in a convenient spray formula. The benefit to athletes is that the spray can be used at any time and as often as required when an ache or pain occurs – just spray on without rubbing!

CLINICALLY PROVEN EFFECT ICE POWER

®

For fast effective pain relief One product with several uses: - strains, sprains, sport injuries - neck, shoulder and back pain - stress pain and muscle tension - minor burns and sunburns -

reduce swelling hemorrhage and bruises ischias pain rheumatic pain

For further information & orders, contact Laurinda Cell: +27 (0) 82 469 0606 - Email: info@icepowersa.co.za

www.icepowersa.co.za Manufactured in Finland

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Sponser

LIQUID ENERGY LONG www.cyclelab.com RSP- R28

Liquid energy long is a highly concentrated energy gel with both quick and slow release carbohydrate sources. Isomaltulose and barley fibres containing beta-glucans delay the absorption of sugar into the blood to help keep your blood sugar levels more stable. The neutral salty taste is also great for long rides!

Sponser

COMPETITION www.cyclelab.com RSP- R175

Competition is focused on delivering the highest possible energy replacement during endurance events. The different absorption routes utilised enable an athlete to absorb more than the normal 1g of carbs per minute, as well as simultaneously providing both slow and fast energy release.

De Marchi

EVO BIB SHORTS www.asgsport.co.za

Few companies last like De Marchi. They’ve clothed racing cyclists since 1946, and it’s through innovation that they’ve remained so successful. Their 3D fit and elastic chamois are but two De Marchi ideas that are industry standards today. They bring performance and comfort with a timeless style that won’t look out of place next season. “The Ferrari of deluxe bibs” (as described by Bicycling magazine) is a concentrate of technology and style and features the best in fit, fabric and chamois technology available today. A new paradigm in cycling shorts. Made with legendary Italian ability.

SIXS

ORIGINAL CARBON UNDERWEAR www.asgsport.co.za

Sixs original carbon underwear is considered to be the only sports underwear that truly transfers perspiration away from your skin. As you perspire, the unique, patented fabric allows your perspiration to evaporate directly from your skin, creating a perfect natural thermo-regulator without cooling your body temperature, even at very low temperatures or when faced with strong wind. Sixs original carbon underwear is specially designed to assist athletes in achieving maximum performance and comfort.

Speedo

FUTURA BIOFUSE FEMALE GOGGLES www.speedo.com

The Futura Biofuse Female features deeper and softer seals than traditional goggles, allowing them to mould to the face. Produced using soft and flexible gel-like materials, the goggles provide a cushion-like comfort which allows the wearer to relax and enjoy the freedom of being in the water without unnecessary discomfort. While the frames are super soft and flexible, a rigid internal frame eliminates lens flex for unimpeded vision, while the goggles also feature an Antifog-Ultra lens to offer unparalleled clarity and to allow the wearer to clearly see underwater. Perfect whether swimming for fitness and fun, the Futura Biofuse Female is the ideal choice for mums swimming with little ones, and with the Biofuse range boasting models for men, juniors (6-14) and the new Sea Squad Mask for those aged 2-6, it’s the ideal choice for family swim sessions whether at the local pool or on holiday. Stay tuned for the next great Biofuse Goggles. The Futura Biofuse Female goggles will be available from selected Speedo stockists and the Speedo Concept Store, Canal Walk in July 2013.

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Sidi

WIRE

www.asgsport.co.za The Wire is 100% pure performance with zero compromise, SIDI’s latest go-to shoe for WorldTour athletes and pros everywhere. Wire features an ALL NEW Tecno 3 closure system utilising an exceptionally supple, low-friction line material for unimpeded action without binding. It provides extremely even pressure distribution across the entire foot, for perfect fit with uncompromising comfort and pedalling efficiency. Tecno 3 micro-ratcheting buckles allow easy one-click adjustment in either direction, for simple finetuning on the fly. Rest assured that the quality is unrivalled, and with spares readily available, they should last forever.

Pinarello

DOGMA 65.1 THINK 2 www.asgsport.co.za

Pinarello debuted their 2013 Dogma 65.1 Think 2 at last year’s Tour de France, and the results were impressive: seven stage victories and the top two spots on the podium. An upgrade on the Dogma2, this version boasts the strongest carbon ever produced, which allowed Pinarello to strip weight from the frame while retaining its integrity. The Dogma 65.1 Think 2 provides a superb combination of ride quality, stiffness and handling. We thought the Dogma 2 was exceptional, the Dogma 65.1 proved us wrong!

Rudy Project

HYPERMASK PERFORMANCE Rudy Project

WINGSPAN www.asgsport.co.za

The best of Rudy Project technology, tested in a wind tunnel and at the Tour de France. All the features of the Rudy Project road helmets with a light weight aero form. Ideal for time trials or triathlon events. The Wingspan was a collaborative design effort between Rudy Project and renowned Aero-dynamics expert, John Cobb.

www.asgsport.co.za

From cycling to running, from kite surfing to triathlon, and even cross country skiing: Hypermask Performance™ sunglasses are perfect for all sports that require the utmost in reliability and comfort.Featuring a wraparound design and a rimless frame, this eyewear provides an exceptional visual range and the ultimate in aerodynamic performance

FFWD

FR6

www.asgsport.co.za This is the most chosen wheel set for the tourist rider and competitive rider looking for strong carbon wheels for clinchers. The F6R-c also comes with a DARC™ profile on the 58mm deep carbon clincher rims. It’s a great aerodynamic wheel that accelerates quickly and maintains speed very well. The joint of the aluminium brake surface is welded and the rim has wear indicators to advise when the rim needs to be replaced.

Fuji

Fuji

KESTREL TALON andrew@larcdistributors.co.za

The Kestrel Talon is one of the first aero bikes designed for both road and triathlon use. Designed to transition from a road to triathlon bike, the Talon series fits all levels of athlete, from the budding roadie to the tri vet.

4000 PRO SL ULTEGRA andrew@larcdistributors.co.za

Everyone claims to have the fastest bike on the market, but we’ve actually produced it. We took the 4000 frameset and its components to the A2 Wind Tunnel and tested it from every angle, with multiple parts, in order to design a superbike that performs just as well in the wind tunnel as it does on the lava fields of Hawaii. Not only is the 4000 outrageously fast, it’s one of the best fitting, most comfortable bikes on the market because we know that after 112 miles on the bike... your body’s still got 26.2 to go. And for 2013, our new proprietary carbon lay-up allowed us to reduce weight and increase frame compliance, making the rider experience that much better.

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Trigon

TRIGON MTB www.trigonsouthafrica.co.za

The Trigon SQC01 range of dual suspension bikes are fitted with SRAM X9, X0, XX or XX1 groupset configurations, extremely lightweight at 11.2 kg for the X9 version down to 10 kg for the XX1 version. Bikes are fitted with American Classic wheels with options for rear shocks. Frames are monocoque masterpieces, manufactured from next generation Nano Carbon Composite material. Geometry is designed to enable the bike to handle the rough stuff as well as any, with responsive acceleration stiffness being a trade mark of the design. With a 2 year warranty, industry standard components and with a direct marketing approach to reduce prices to customers, Trigon bikes are a serious option for the enthusiast or racing rider, suited to marathon racing or cross country. Price from R33 000 to R48 000, dependent on spec of the complete bike. Contact Trigon at 084453880 or for more information, go to www.trigonsouthafrica.co.za.

Wattbike

WATTBIKE www.wattbike.com

If your experience of training indoors is sitting for hours on a turbo trainer randomly pedalling away, then you might just have been wasting your time. Training using heart rate and power on a Wattbike means you can exercise at exactly the right intensity for optimal gains based on your fitness. Establish your training zones on a Wattbike and you’ll have the most time-efficient training method available to a triathlete at any level. Honing your indoor cycle training on a Wattbike can also improve your run too as the live pedal technique analysis allows you to remove dead spots in your pedal stroke by encouraging the correct use of muscles. Not only will you be producing more power for the same effort, but you’ll also be less fatigued as you transition from the the bike to the run. It was no surprise to those who saw Stanford leaving the rest of the field standing in Madrid that training on a Wattbike had really paid off. She said: “Focused training on the Wattbike has really improved my performance on the bike but it’s also had a big impact on my run too. In Madrid I felt fantastic in the transition and was able to really push on and away from the other athletes in the run to secure victory.” The combination of accurate performance data, live pedal technique analysis and the feel of riding a real bike makes the Wattbike an incredibly powerful training tool for every triathlete.

Trigon

THE TRIGON RQC31 www.trigonsouthafrica.co.za

The Trigon RQC31 is a ridged sleek monocoque masterpiece; lightweight, ridged and superfast. This bike is aimed at the serious enthusiast and racer. It incorporates a host of leading edge aerodynamic design features , resulting in reduced drag not seen in other road bikes. At a weight just on the UCI legal limit at 6.8kg and fitted with the latest SRAM Red group set, this bike is priced very aggressively at R 48 000. Frame sets including the seat post and integrated handle bar are available at R 17600. Complete bikes are shipped with a choice of American Classic 58mm carbon clinchers or American Classic 44mm tabular tyres. For more info go to www.trigonsouthafrica.co.za or phone 0844538880 .


Physicool

PHYSICOOL THERAPEUTIC BANDAGES www.ivohealth.co.za

Physicool, an internationally-acclaimed therapeutic bandage that combines cooling with compression, is now available in Dis-Chem stores around South Africa. This re-usable cooling bandage is more effective than ice and easier to use, with no refrigeration required. Ideal to treat inflammation and bruising whilst helping speed up recovery. Physicool coolant spray and re-usable bandages are available from Dis-Chem in two sizes (A: ankle and knee / B: wrist, thigh and shoulder) as well as the 500ml Coolant Spray or Combo pack (spray and bandage). The prices range from R113 to R200. For more info: www.ivohealth.co.za / 0860 456 123 / info@ivohealth.co.za or follow them on Facebook for regular news and updates at www.facebook.com/ivohealth.

Greeper Laces

GREEPER: KNOT TIED! www.rokal.co.za/greeper.htm RRP R120

Compared to regular laces: - Never come undone - Quick release and fastening: even with gloves on - Loop size fully adjustable - 100% confidence during sports activity - Easy adjustment without retying Compared to elastic laces: - 100% polyester laces enable your footwear to provide the full support they were designed to for optimum foot health and performance The recommended retail pricing is R120.00 and can be ordered online or through our stockists, which are listed on our webpage: http://www.rokal.co.za/greeper.htm.

21&($33/,('_$/:$<67,('

COMPETITION GREEPER LACES are giving away 5 sets of laces in July. To stand a chance at winning a pair email glen@triathlonpplussa.co.za and tell him which female elite used to be sponsored by Greeper.

Hint: She was World No 1 over IM. Send your answers to glen@triathlonplussa.co.za and stand a chance to win. Winners will be selected at random on the 31st of July. This offer is for a limited time only and restricted to South African residents. Product may differ from image shown. If not all criteria are fulďŹ lled, entries will be void. Terms and conditions apply. 79 JULY 2013


2XU

MEN’S & WOMEN’S XLITE MEMBRANE JACKET

za@2xu.co.za RRP R1450

WC2454a and MC2188a - Men’s & Women’s Xlite Membrane Jacket - R1450 Once again, 2XU has put together a garment that can take you from a casual look to keeping you dry on the bike, and off on a trail run! Built from 2XU’s X LITE MEMBRANE fabric for water resistance, breathability, vapour release and unrestricted movement via 5:10 membrane technology, this Spray Jacket is the optimal performance shield for both men and women. With reflective trims, fusion welded seems and inside pocket, all Winter fitness demands are addressed.

TRI KIT AND CYCLE KIT CLEARANCE SALE AT COST PRICE

JOIN OUR TEAM GET YOUR VERY OWN TRIATHLON PLUS TRI KIT AND CYCLE KIT FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY EMAIL INFO@TRIATHLONPLUSSA.CO.ZA TO PLACE YOUR ORDER NOW

TRI KIT R550 CYCLE KIT R650 80

JULY 2013

+ R100 FOR SHIPPING


JULY 2013

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TAKE THE RACE LIST THE PLUNGE

PLAN FOR THE MONTHS AHEAD WITH OUR GUIDE TO TRIATHLON AND DUATHLON EVENTS IN SA AND AROUND THE GLOBE

SA & ITU

IRONMAN

(PROVISIONAL) KNYSNA

FRANKFURT, GERMANY

JULY 2013 THUR 4 TOTALSPORTS XTERRA PEZULA

JULY 2013 SUN 7 IRONMAN FRANKFURT SUN 28 IRONMAN NY LAKE PLACID

SAT 6 2013 ITU WORLD TRIATHLON KITZBUEHEL

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ZURICH, SWITZERLAND

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SAT 21 MOMENTUM HEALTH / I-FLEX NATIONAL DUATHLON SERIES EVENT 4 JOHANNESBURG SOUTH

SAT 21 IRONMAN 70.3 WASHINGTON

SAT 21 2013 GENEVA ITU TRIATHLON EUROPEAN CUP

RACINE, WISCONSIN

GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

Fourways 13/14 July, 3/4 August, *28/29 September

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SAT 20 2013 ITU TRIATHLON WORLD SERIES

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LAKE STEVENS, WASHINGTON

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COMEBACK TALES

STROKE OF GENIUS RICH ALLEN SAYS IT IS POSSIBLE TO MASTER YOUR SWIM IN FOUR EASY STEPS

P

eople always ask me if it’s possible to go from drowning donkey to dolphin in the water. “Can I learn to swim with a degree of competence?” My answer is always yes and their response is always the same: “That’s easy for you to say – you’re a pro.” Yes, my swimming is pretty good these days but that’s not to say I haven’t struggled before. Believe me, I know that sinking feeling. I started my triathlon journey when I was 17. At that time, my main sport was rugby and I was training to physically resemble a brick. This was great for tackling big buffoons, but when I hit the pool for my first swim training session, I hit the bottom of the pool. I struggled to finish the triathlon club workouts over the coming weeks, with only general fitness and determination getting me through. All this effort was to no avail. My first open-water race was done in my mum’s sailing wetsuit, which was a two-piece with a metal bar

linking the two parts together. It was heavy and the female fit did me no favours. As soon as the gun went off, I was taking on water faster than the Titanic and I seriously thought I was going to drown. I was floating low in the water, which just encouraged people to swim over me. Being a rugby player, I enjoyed the physicality but the swim technique went out the window as I tried to fight back. It was an utterly awful experience which steered me more towards duathlons for the next two years. So yes, I do know what it’s like to start from scratch, but how did I get to be a confident swimmer? Well, there were four steps in my evolution from drowning donkey to dolphin, none of which mattered until I figured out the final step. Firstly, I found that as I started to train more and more, I wasn’t getting much faster. It was very frustrating to put in the hard graft with little to no reward. Someone suggested that I have a few swim lessons, which I did. Following three pitiful

Richard Allen For more about professional triathlete Richard Allen visit his website richardallenfitness.com, where you’ll find details of his fitness programmes and training days

JULY 2013

Photo Corbis

Four key stages could help you find your perfect swim stroke

swim lessons, I threw in the towel, finding out the hard way that paying more for a highly experienced swim coach is definitely worth it. A few months later, I was lucky enough to work with one of the top Australian Olympic swim coaches during a training camp in Sydney and in a matter of weeks my technique had drastically improved. Secondly, spend hours in the pool. Triathletes in general love going out for a four-hour bike ride but ask them to swim 5,000m and they will have a fit. There are no shortcuts with swimming and as long as your technique is sound, you have to put in the mileage. I returned to Australia the following two winters with the goal of improving my weakest discipline. I was swimming 5,000m to 7,000m six days a week and while I was fairly knackered, I found that swimming started to feel natural. I actually felt like a swimmer. Thirdly, and this is probably something that you don’t want to hear, it didn’t happen overnight. I had to be patient. I steadily improved each year but it did take a good few years until I was coming out in the lead pack of elite races. I kept working on my technique, I kept swimming the high mileage and I kept getting better. I was fairly happy, but it was still not good enough until I hit step four. Fourthly and finally, I had been trying to improve my swimming when one day it dawned on me. I was trying too hard. Every breath, every stroke, every leg kick, I was analysing my technique. Was my hand entering correctly? Was my elbow high? In short, everything was perfect but the results were not. How could this be if my stroke was perfect and I was training as hard as possible? Then one day I had an epiphany while swimming with five-time world champion Simon Lessing. His stroke really didn’t look that good but he was incredibly fast. I noticed how relaxed he was in the water; almost jelly like. I gave it a go, thinking only about my breathing and relaxing. Within a matter of minutes, I was swimming faster – much faster. I was there – I had evolved. Now, I am not saying that you can all jump in the pool and as long as you are relaxed you will swim like a fish, but try working on your technique in the warm-up and then switching off and relaxing. After phin? all, when do you ever see a tense dolp dolphin?

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TREW STORIES

Nobody had ever said not to - but nobody ever talked. It wasn’t important to talk, it was important to succeed! To win! To be the best! But not for the self, of course; for the country. The athlete wondered where that knowledge came from… It had always been there… always. The stretching, the exercising continued, as it did every day. Then it would be swimming – and then the medical checks. Then it would be cycling – and then the medical checks. Then running – and medical checks again and again. For this was what sport was all about. They stopped to eat. All of them received their individual food requirements and the plastic box of their individual pills and pellets and tablets. They accepted them, of course. For this was sport – top-class sport – and this was what top-class sport was all about. Finally the day drew to a close, a close like all the other days. The athlete hated it, yet somehow looked forward to it. Sometimes The Coach and The Doctor spoke to the athlete. And the athlete was able to speak back. Lying there, waiting, the athlete anticipated the important visitors. Did they have a life outside the camp? Did anyone have a life any more, inside or outside?

AS NATIONS GO FURTHER TO FIELD THE BEST TEAM, STEVE TREW WONDERS WHERE IT WILL END riathlon is a pretty clean sport – at least, that’s what we think. But last year’s revelations about Lance Armstrong and the planned doping programmes in professional cycling have raised serious doubts for all of us – all of us who love our sport. When a top-level sport can hide systematic doping, it couldn’t really get much worse… could it?

T

One hand stretched out and pushed the buttons above the dispensing chute. Within seconds a glass of opaque, milky liquid and a bowl with a myriad of pills and pellets in an infinite variety of colours appeared. The athlete wondered sometimes what the pills were… but knew better than to ask. Everybody had to take them if they wanted to succeed.

SOMEWHERE NEAR SOMETIME SOON The athlete lay there in the half dawn, quietly checking the body and awaiting the rigours of the day. With a sigh, the athlete stretched out one right arm into the soft rubberised pulsometer that immediately bleeped back 24 beats per minute. Twenty four? The athlete remembered the early days with their heart rate laughably high at 48 beats per minute… it seemed like a different world back then; perhaps it was a different world back then. It was certainly a different existence. 86

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When the buzzer sounded, the athlete exited the cell and walked, then jogged, with all the others – all in the same grey, uniform-like tracksuits and then stood quietly until The Coach (the athlete always thought the word “Coach” with a capital letter) and the assistant coaches appeared and the athletes went through that same routine that they had done so often before. Regarding the rows of grey-suited lookalikes, the athlete wondered about them; their names, their backgrounds, and wondered whether to dare talk to them.

The visitors entered, carrying the paraphernalia of their trade and their calling. The athlete cowered back. Electrodes were attached, meters strung, drips dripped and wires wired. The athlete lay there accepting it all, as ever. Tiny points pricked tiny agonies of consciousness into the subdued body. Tapes and tubes were attached to the arm, more pills and pellets. And then the syringes started. Finally: “You please us. Your body systems are good. They grow better. You are a credit to us, a credit to our nation.” A shadow of a half-smile crossed the stern, grey face. Almost. The athlete lay there, still. The words echoed. A credit to Our Nation! It was the highest honour – she was only 12 years old and already she was fulfilling some of what the programme had laid out for her. To be the best. To make her country the best. Consequences? There were no consequences. For this was sport – top-class sport – and this was what top-class sport was all about.

Steve Trew Coach & Commentator Couldn’t be real, sometime soon, somewhere not too far away… could it? Steve is an advisory coach for Speedo, he can be reached for all things tri on trew@personalbest.demon.co.uk

Illustration Peter Greenwood

FUTURE PERFECT

SOMEHOW


JULY 2013

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