Page 4

Page 4, Fire News, February 2014

FireNews.com

From the Editor’s Desk Dennis Whittam, Editor

The Two Sides of Social Media Whether or nor you like it, social media is here to stay. For those who may not know it, social media sites are where people interact with one another freely, share and discuss information about each other and their lives using a mix of personal words, pictures, videos and audio. There are lots of well-known sites such as Facebook, LinkedIn, MySpace, Twitter, YouTube and many others. I use Facebook to share my photos, let my friends know about important events and to let them know what is coming up in the next edition of Fire News. The Fire News Facebook page is “liked” by over 40,000 fans. Our purpose is to remind our readers of events that are happening in the fire service. We share photos and brief stories that we will be covering at length in our next paper. We thank the people who are working hard to make their department look good. What can be bad with this? Social media is a wonderful tool, but it needs to be continuously monitored for inappropriate posts. Unfortunately, the risk of misinterpretation presents problems. Occasionally, someone will twist a post or misinterpret a photograph and offer negative comments that provokes a firestorm of comments that occasionally get out of hand. You must remember that what you write could be viewed as a slanderous comment if you make a comment or statement that is not true. The answer to preventing this from happening is simple. Send a private message to the person who makes a statement you do not agree with and offer your feelings. Posting controversial or antagonistic statements creates problems for everyone. This is why departments, and even your jobs, are creating social media policies that could result in termination if your posts are deemed inappropriate. A new job interview question that comes up from time to time refers to your social media sites. Can you open your social media page and share it with the person who is interviewing you? Don’t put yourself in a bad situation. Keep things positive and use social media properly and intelligently. And remember, even if you delete a post, it is still floating in cyberspace and can come back to haunt you at a future date. As for Fire News, we enjoy utilizing this tool. It is an extension of our purpose, which is to promote the fire, rescue and emergency services in a positive light. Keep up the good work and offer positive comments that make all responders proud of the job they work so hard at to keep our communities safe. - Dennis

PORT NORRIS ANNUAL SPRING OYSTER AND HAM DINNER The Port Norris Fire Company will be sponsoring their Annual Spring Oyster and Ham Dinner at the firehouse on Sunday, March 30, 2014. The dinner will be served family style from noon until 1800. The menu includes golden brown fried oysters, country ham, baked beans, string beans, macaroni salad, pepper cabbage, beverages, rolls and home-baked desserts. Cost is $19 for adults and $9 for children under 12. For more information contact any firefighter or call 856-7852562. Advance reservations are encouraged.

ANNOUNCEMENTS NFFF SEAL OF EXCELLENCE AWARD FOR R.I. ASSOCIATION OF FIRE CHIEFS When the Rhode Island legislators passed a bill exempting emergency vehicle drivers from wearing seatbelts, the Rhode Island Fire Chiefs Association (RIFCA) stood up for safety, telling the governor the bill would make driving an emergency vehicle much more dangerous for firefighters, EMS workers and police. RIFCA’s efforts convinced the governor to veto the bill. In recognition of their work, the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation presented the association with the Seal of Excellence Award at their business meeting on December 19, 2013. (From left, below): Chief Ronald J. Siarnicki, executive director, NFFF; Chief Richard Susi, executive director, RIFCA; Chief Brian Jackvony, president, RIFCA; Victor Stagnaro, director of Fire Service Programs, NFFF; and Rick Mason, training and education coordinator, NFFF.

NISIVOCCIA NAMED PRESIDENT OF ORGANIZATION SUPPORTING PUBLIC SAFETY A local businessman and long-time member of the 200 Club of Morris County, a non-profit organization that supports area public safety personnel, has been elected president of the group. The new president is Randolph resident Lou Nisivoccia, founder and managing director of Nisivoccia Consulting. He has been a member of the 200 Club for many years, most recently as senior vice president. “We owe so much to local police officers, firefighters and emergency medical technicians who protect us every day,” said Nisivoccia. “Membership dues allow us to offer death benefits to survivors and scholarships to the children of local heroes. Joining the 200 Club is a great opportunity to say thank you and we’ll be looking for new members and new opportunities to serve our protectors.” He succeeds Jack Van Orden, owner of Morristown Tire, who is now the chairman of the board. Other officers elected included John Corigliano, senior vice president; Bill Lockwood, senior vice president; Betsy Fila, vice president; Joe Marts, vice president; Peter Kenny, treasurer; Robert Skeele, assistant treasurer; and Ronald Barnett, secretary. Trustees include Chairman of the Board Jack Van Orden, James Gannon, John Mania, Dennis Patrick, Michelle Patrick, Lori Patrick, Janet Rapisardi, James Rizzo, Joyce Stager, and Laverne Wolfanger. Since its inception in 1971, the 200 Club of Morris County has distributed more than $4 million in survivor benefits and scholarships to families who have lost a spouse who was a police officer, state trooper, firefighter, or an emergency medical services provider in the line of duty. Information about membership in the 200 Club and its various programs is available by calling 732-2794258 or by clicking on http://www.200clubofmorriscounty.com.

Fire news nj 02 14  

A Publication Serving Fire, Rescue & EMS Heroes Since 1973

Fire news nj 02 14  

A Publication Serving Fire, Rescue & EMS Heroes Since 1973