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n. 39 RALPH & RUSSO

Couture Contenders

TREND TRANSITION

A guide to the best Pre-Fall fashion

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The region’s top couture designers

COUTURE COOL SCHIAPARELLI, CHANEL & DIOR Front row access from this season’s most desirable tickets at Paris Haute Couture Week


B est

of fall -

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Take the fashion reigns and get ahead for the coming season with our pick of the best Pre-Fall trends

contents

issue 39

news

smok e show

oh , coutur e

Racil Chaloub suits up for fall in her Saville Row-sourced line of smoking jackets. She shares her rules for how to put your best suit forward

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Rami Al Ali launched his fashion label in 2000. 15 years on, he is still going from strength to strength. SLT caught up with the Syrian-born designer and one of the Middle East’s most talented couturiers to discuss life, fashion and his unique collections

sulta n of shoes

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Emirati-born, London-based shoe designer Sultan Al Darmaki dishes on exhibiting at the V&A Museum and his new e-commerce site

fa mily jew els

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Van Cleef & Arpels show the world just why they are at the top of their game with a stunning necklace that has even royalty swooning

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Style coutur e r eport

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Twice a year the fashion crowd flock to Paris and Rome eager to see what couturiers have devised for a select few. Our stylist Julie Matos makes the trip to fashion’s ultimate playground. See her roundup of the shows

wor ks of a rt

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From the towers of Dubai to the studios of Beirut, the region’s best couture designers go all artsy for the new season ahead

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l a belle epoque

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Indulge your flair for the dramatic and escape into fantasy with FW15’s haute couture creations, where grandeur and show-stopping elegance take over fashion

beauty r ethink your blink

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Not since the days of Twiggy have lashes been this striking. Whether you’re trend-driven or traditional, read our roundup of the best new mascaras of the season

backstage beauty

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Replicating the makeup from the couture runways in Paris requires the right product and a little bit of skill. SLT shows you how


C outur e

contenders

T r av el &

contents

issue 39

beyond

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The SLT team give the scoop on where to go and what to see in South America

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Ralph & Russo founders Tamara Ralph and Michael Russo explain why playing by their own rules has paid off

D ior & I - 79 The documentary sheds light on the inner workings of fashion's biggest house

Dine, dream and delight your senses like a local with the latest hotel openings, restaurant launches and luxurious goings-on for the global traveller. This is a must-read list for those planning a trip in the near future

PLAY a m agnum opus

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SLT’s erstwhile regional managing editor, James McCarthy, heads to Italy to drive the all-new Ferrari 488 GTB. See how he fares as he hits the road in this beauty, the successor to its critically-acclaimed 458 Italia

k ick in ' it

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As a new sneaker exhibition, supported by MR PORTER, opens at the Brooklyn Museum, we’ve chosen four of the most influential kicks ever made – Here are the game changers

plug in

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life - 65

With an endless desire to escape the mundane, this issue kicks off in Ecuador where we explore the country's charms before it becomes the next big It destination for the travel and jet savvy. And because the weather is getting cooler (sadly) somewhat on the horizon, we go looking for a place by the sea before the sun officially sets on summer with a trip to Croatia

globetrot ter

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Nestled within the crumbling 1,700 year old walls that make up the centre of Split - the second largest city in Croatia - is a maze of concept shops and too-cool-forschool terraces. Get ready for a hipster's paradise

l a nd of m a rv els

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From the bustling capital Quito to the city of Guayaquil via the summits of the volcano Tungurahua, SLT heads to Ecuador in search of adventure and the ultimate escape

culture

Image specialist Mohieb Dahabieh’s vision comes from a perfectly honed instinct for spin and eye for style. The PR maven shares his digital habits with SLT this issue

the jour nal

a rou nd the wor ld

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music

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Sound illustrators Mode-F are on the speed dial of some of couture’s biggest names. We meet the boys behind the beats to find out exactly how music and fashion go hand in hand

pages

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As we look forward to the release of Fendi by Karl Lagerfeld, make sure your coffee table collection is graced with gowns and captivated by couture with our must-have list of fashion’s hautest books on the subject

cinem a

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Go behind the lens for a glimpse into the secret world of haute couture and its creators with our pick of the best

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couture documentaries

the eight a rt

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Art has long been an inspiration for fashion designers and couturiers in particular, creating a distinct cross-pollination of worlds. SLT explores the connection between both in this season’s haute couture collections

the list

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Find out what’s going on around the Gulf, from the hottest art shows to the coolest concerts

features coutur e club

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Parisian couturier Stéphane Rolland takes SLT to his atelier to see where all the magic happens. Find out why Hollywood’s darlings flock to the man before their big night

backpage sole sea rching

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Run, don't walk, to the V&A’s latest exhibition, Shoes: Pleasure and Pain


Fairchild Photo Service/Condé Nast/Corbis

ditor's letter

Couture. A carte blanche and free pass to the imagination is what this magic world gives designers. It is here where they can breathe, freed from the clasps of expectations as well as the seasonal trends that tie them down. It is about the jewel-like creations that take days to put together and months to embroider. About people devoting their time to creating something magical, and a dedication to perfection that can’t be seen anywhere else. A world reserved for, and only attainable by, the most privileged of social circles. Perhaps that is its charm, or maybe even the very reason for its existence. Whatever it may be, our issue pays tribute to the creative process and genius that goes into making these completely bespoke, immaculately made and utterly precious handmade garments.

where he shares turning points from his past, present and future. Speaking of Paris, our stylist and fashion editor Julie Matos joined the fashion crowd as they flocked to the city of lights for fashion’s ultimate showcase - the fall winter haute couture shows. She reports from the front row of the lavish show-venues on the best moments of the season, picking her favourite pieces, which she styled for our exclusive cover shoot story “La Belle Époque.” Our globetrotting continues halfway across the world in Ecuador, home to mist-shrouded lowland cloudforests and some of the most stunning landscapes, where we explore the country's charms before the jet set crowd make an “It” destination out of it. And lastly because fall is somewhat on the horizon, we go in search for a place by the sea before summer ends on Croatia’s Dalmatian coast - a final chance to relax, recharge, and breathe...

Hailed as the first British house deemed skilled enough to showcase couture in Paris in more than a century, Tamara Ralph and her partner Michael Russo have gloriously managed to do the impossible, bring back the flame to the fizzling world of haute couture. SLT finds out exactly how the pair managed to pull it all off. Across the Channel, we spend time with haute couture’s modern knight Stéphane Rolland, whose story of gradual ascent proves he is more than just a one-hit wonder. The French couturier lets us into his atelier,

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. sur la terre . editor's letter .

Dina Kabbani

senior Editor


ontributors

“The soundtrack tells the story of the collection as well as setting the rhythm and pacing which is crucial to a great show. The music and the collection should become one.” Sound illustrators MODE-F talk about the importance of music at a couture show “Far from dying; a must have treasure!” Stylist Julie Matos, who styled and produced SLT's FW15 haute coutre shoot "La Belle Époque" in Paris, shares how she feels about couture, fashion's most prized art

“Before summer ends (although this year it feels like an endless summer!), I am planning on wearing my gladiator sandals as much as possible. They are my staple foot accessory, taking me from day to night. I just have to make sure I keep applying the factor 50 sun screen to ensure I don't end up with some decidedly iffy tan lines!” SLT's design maverick Helen Louise Carter, on her favourite summer soles “Why buy a dress off the peg when you have the time and the money to have the perfect creation custom-made to suit your body's every contour?” Writer Sophie Jones-Cooper explores the importance of couture in our digital age

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“I’d be very interested to see Mark Rothko’s paintings translated into a fashion collection... Dries Van Noten would definitely be the candidate I’d pitch.” Visual artist Christos Mouchas dreams about bringing art and fashion to life

“Céline never goes wrong and in my book, designer Phoebe Philo's pre-fall collection takes the cake. Although I loved her wool gaucho pants, it was her stretchy knit slip dresses that got me extra excited for the changing of the season.” Julia Seidl, our Editor-at-Large, on her favourite pre-fall collection and the hero pieces she can't wait to get her hands on


DETAILS Director of Publications Mohamed Jaidah m.jaidah@firefly-me.com General Manager Joe Marritt j.marritt@firefly-me.com - Editorial Regional Managing Editor James McCarthy Senior Editor Dina Kabbani d.kabbani@firefly-me.com Editor-At-Large Julia Seidl j.seidl@firefly-me.com Fashion & Style Sophie Jones-Cooper Staff Writer Yara Jishi

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n. 39 rAlPH & ruSSo

couture contenders

- International Sales International Sales Director Julia Toon j.toon@firefly-me.com

treND trANSItIoN

a guide to the best pre-Fall fashion

HoMeGroWN tAleNt

The region’s top couture designers

- Sales & Marketing Area Manager, Doha Chirine Halabi c.halabi@firefly-me.com Senior Sales Manager, UAE Nesreen Shalaby n.shalaby@urjuan-me.com

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Schiaparelli, chanel & Dior Front row access from this season’s most desirable tickets at paris haute couture Week

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Cover image: Photographed by ezra patchett, styled by julie matos. model is wearing alexis mabille corset

Logistics Manager Joseph Isaac j.issac@firefly-me.com

- Printer Ali Bin Ali Printing Press, Doha, Qatar

couture cool

& bvlgari jewellery

© 2015 Sur la Terre (SLT) is published bi-monthly by Firefly Communications. All material is strictly

copyright and all rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part, without the prior written permission of Firefly Communications, is prohibited. All content is believed to be factual at the time of going to print, and contributors’ views are their own derived opinions and not necessarily that of Firefly Communications or SLT. No responsibility or liability is accepted by the publishers or editorial staff for any loss to any individual or company, legally, financially or physically, as a result of any statement, fact, figure or expression of opinion or belief appearing in SLT. The publisher does not officially endorse any advertising or advertorial content for third party products. Photography and image credits, where not otherwise stated, are those of Getty/Gallo Images and/or Shutterstock or iStock Photo and/or Firefly Communications, each of which retains their individual copyrights.

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THE ODYSSEY OF HAUTE COUTURE Custom-made fashion – to be worn, treasured or trashed? Words: Sophie Jones-Cooper

I

n a world where stately homes are being sold off to become 18 holes of manicured greens and heirloom art treasures are auctioned and replaced by abstract notions of contemporary art, it remains a serious feat of the fashion industry that haute couture is still alive and kicking. What began back in 1858, when English couturier Charles Frederick Worth established House of Worth, the first haute couture house in Paris, has gone from strength to strength over the years. As fashions have come and gone, haute couture has retained its artisan heights. And in today’s super paced fashion industry where for most people, time is of the essence and shopping is done online for the mode ‘de la mode’, it is hard to fathom how dresses which take hundreds of man hours to hand stitch and cost tens of thousands of dollars to create are still in demand. For the elite few who belong to the tightknit club of haute couture (which today encompasses the unapologetically wealthy and the new A-list), time is not always of the essence. Why buy a dress off the peg, when you have the time and the money to have the perfect creation custom-made to suit Models wear the latest fashions from the house of Dior, late 1960s. your body's every contour? And it needn’t (Photo by Jack Robinson/Hulton Archive/Getty Images) be one of those headline-making eccentric money. The front rows at the shows are full of fresh-faced celebrities experimentations, but a subtle and stylish on the look out for their red carpet masterpieces. The avant-garde, the creation, say an every day suit or an evening dress. That is the joy of haute adventurous and ultimately, the most flattering. couture - when you are paying that sort of cash, you can dictate the details. Quality matters. The notion of, “Why drink sparkling wine when you can drink champagne?” applies as equally to haute couture. If you can afford the best, buy the best. Much like champagne, haute couture is also controlled by a governing body, the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture, which further fuels the appeal of this elite bespoke clothing club.

Today’s modern masterpieces are for wearing. A couture gown from the 50s may now be a relic - and yes, today’s creations will too one day become treasures from our time - but for now, the couture customer is spending her money on something she can wear today, something unique to her, which is the the ultimate in luxury dressing.

While couture still continues to stay afloat, it cannot be denied that the actual number of women buying into couture is significantly lower than it was during its heyday back in the 40s and 50s. Back then, there were around 20,0000 clients, whereas today there are thought to only be a few thousand. The clients are getting younger too. Couture is no longer just fashion for old women with old money, but young women with new

Donatella Versace puts it pretty well. "Couture is like a laboratory, where you can explore ideas and clash materials with complete creative freedom.” Summing up the modern meaning of couture she adds, “Experimentation and elegance is what couture means in the 21st century." If only we all had the pennies to play dress-up with the finest luxuries the fashion world has to offer.

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The best of pre-fall 2015

Bottega Veneta

Take the fashion reigns and get ahead for the coming season with our pick of the most note-worthy pre-fall 2015 trends

Designers certainly know when they are on to a good thing and so, surprise surprise, fashion’s current retro redux isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. For pre-fall, retro inspired prints are not shy at coming forward. They make for an ideal transition trend from summer to winter, as you are likely to have some existing wardrobe pieces to get you started. Hang on to those bold prints and 60s and 70s inspired separates and give them an instant update by teaming with the latest pre-fall has to offer. Our motto - the busier and ‘clashier’, the better. We love Kenzo’s turquoise on navy swirls, Emilio Pucci’s fuchsia pink and maroon combo and M Missoni’s busy blend of orange and yellow. Whirling brush strokes, abstract graphics and rainbow bright florals combine to become leaders of the pre-fall pack, heading straight for FW15 domination.

Derek Lam

Words: Sophie Jones-Cooper

THE RETRO PRINT PACK

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THE ultimate SHOPPING LIST

Stella McCartney

Raoul

Chloé

Emilio Pucci

The statement dress

Kenzo

Diane von Fürstenberg

VICTORIA Victoria Beckham

M Missoni

MICHAEL Michael Kors

Where to buy

While there are retro prints galore amongst the big name designers, for something a little more authentic, head to ASOS Marketplace (right) where you will find true retro relics. „

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BOYISH TAILORING

Stella McCartney’s collections are always tailored to perfection and for pre-fall there is a distinct mannish vibe to not only her easy separates, but also spotted on the runways of her bevvy of designer chums. Channel Max Mara’s unstructured suiting with wide-legged cropped pants and oversized blazers or go for Balenciaga’s more sleek and slick take on the gents' wardrobe with fitted cropped trousers and a preppy shirt or blouse.

Gucci

THE ultimate SHOPPING LIST

Stella McCartney

Model wearing a pinstriped trouser suit by Yves Saint Laurent

CHECK MATE

McQ Alexander McQueen

The saying “it’s hip to be square” couldn’t be nearer to the truth right now, as square patterns and all things chequered are making their way into our wardrobes. There is a refined modern heritage feel to pre-fall’s four-sided offerings with layers of squares and chequered prints teamed with leather, satin and wool. As well as the ubiquitous black and white chequerboard colour scheme; Gucci proves that maroon and navy make great shapes too.

An ode to Le Smoking

It was Yves Saint Laurent who invented the first tuxedo for women. Celebrate his timeless contribution to our wardrobes at YSL’s first UK exhibition, "Yves Saint Laurent: Style is Eternal" at the Bowes Museum, Country Durham until October 25th.

DSquared2

Gucci

Talbot Runhof

McQ Alexander McQueen

our hero pieces DVF

Acne Studios

Gucci

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Confused on how to pull off the borrowed from the boys look? Try a simple rendition with a pair of cigarette pants and leather suspenders. Once you're feeling confident, break out in a head-to-toe suit.

The icon

Balenciaga

Stella McCartney

Max Mara

Jimmy Choo

. sur la terre . news .

Look to Ali MacGraw circa 1979 for a nostalgic take on scoring a style checkmate.


Givenchy

LEOPARD ALERT

Watch out! There is a leap of leopards on the loose. From classic spots to intriguing new takes on the print, this is the go-to animal print for pre-fall and it is on the prowl for winter too. Coach has dedicated an entire collection to the ‘Wild Beast’ while Lanvin has given their leopard print a tonal black and white twist. Slighty scared by the call of the wild? Tiptoe tamely into the trend with a few cleverly placed leopard print accessories. Missoni

The icon

Leopard print has been on the style radar for decades. Dior first showed it in 1947 and Elizabeth Taylor bedecked herself in spots back in 1963.

Sonia Rykiel

our hero pieces Stella McCartney

Temperley London

Gucci

Diane von Fürstenberg

THE ultimate SHOPPING LIST Escada Sport

Kenzo

FURRY FRIENDS

Faux fur was a huge hit last winter and as we transition into FW15 once again, all things fuzzy and furry remain tight BFFs. This season’s fur coats, patchwork shearlings and fluffy gilets embrace a bohemian luxe attitude, as once again the spirit of the 70s is running into our outerwear. Giorgio Armani also added another dimension with a bold and rounded silhouette. Right now though, a fur coat is likely to be somewhat of an overkill so instead, opt for a luxe fur trimmed biker or shearling jacket. „

Gucci

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Fendi

Marni

Chloé

The icon

Be inspired by 93 year-old style icon Iris Apfel and her fur loving style by watching her documentary Iris, which was released earlier this year. „

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SWITCH ON THE POWER

Alexander Wang

This is one style not to shy away from but it requires a serious dose of confidence. Yes, we can all wear a leather biker, a structured mini and some killer heels but without a rock ‘n’ roll edge and some after dark elegance, you will be teetering on try-hard territory. Shoulders back, chin down, hemline up and strut your stuff in leather, Lurex and dark lace. Presto, you are one fierce lady.

THE ultimate SHOPPING LIST

Emilio Pucci

news

Stella McCartney DSquared2

The material has grown up this season, lending a tough edge to ssophisticated silhouettes. High shine or patent, this is definitely fall's simplest way to shine!

McQ Alexander McQueen

Diane von Fürstenberg Jimmy Choo

DSquared2

Giorgio Armani

Alexander McQueen

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The muse

With bedhead hair and kohl-lined eyes, model Erin Wasson (right) leads the pack.

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Versace

The statement dress


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Oh,

Couture

Rami Al Ali launched his fashion label in 2000. 15 years on, he is going from strength to strength. SLT caught up with the Syrian-born designer and one of the Middle East’s most talented couturiers to discuss life, fashion and his unique collections. Words: Francesca Moser

To meet face to face with a successful fashion designer is always a big deal and real thrill; nothing can compare to or is more inspiring than fervent chit chat about fashion and trends with the creators and experts of style themselves. Such is the case with Rami Al Ali. Sipping tea in the stylish settings of Doha’s fashion Mecca Fifty One East, it isn’t surprising to see how over the years his passion for fashion and creativity, combined with hard work and dedication, has allowed the young handsome designer to affirm his very own label in the competitive world that is couture, and amongst some of the industry’s household names like Chanel, Dior and Valentino. His love affair with glamour and style came at a very young age; growing up with four sisters, he witnessed their transformation as women thanks to the powerful game of fashion.“My sisters played a key role in my career. I was fascinated to see how style and fashion influenced their moods and personality while their body changed every time they stepped into a gorgeous dress. Without them I wouldn’t be where I am today. I’m so thankful for their continuous advice, help and support.” To pursue his dream of breaking into the fashion arena, the Syrian-born designer left his native town Deir ez-Zor and moved to Damascus to join the College of Fine Arts. He left for the UAE straight after, with dreams of establishing his own label and the hunger of gaining valuable international experience. “Creativity has been key all my life. To experiment with shapes and fabrics is so much fun. I’m so lucky to be doing what I love every day! If I wouldn’t have become a fashion designer I probably would have been a chef, as they are artists and creators in their own right. Instead of playing with silk and lace they work with different ingredients and flavours to create the perfect dish.” The breakthrough in his career came in 2009, with his first appearance at Rome’s Alta Moda Couture Week. He showcased his collections there for six consecutive editions before making his debut at Paris

Couture Fashion Week in January 2012 among the crème de la crème of the fashion world. This year, Rami returned to the ‘City of Light’ to present first, his Spring/Summer 2015 couture collection and last July he showcased his outstanding twenty-piece Fall/Winter 2015-16 collection. “Each season, it is such a big honour - and nerve wracking too - to showcase my creations at the prestigious French fashion week among the world’s top designers.” While Rami’s Couture SS15 collection paid tribute to the iconic Japanese kimono, his FW15 collection took shape thanks to the iconic 40s and 50s silhouettes - think regal capes, full length gowns and short cocktails dresses featuring sharp cuts and luxurious fabrics in feminine pastels shades of rose pink, powder blue and dove grey. Once again, through his works of art, Rami Al Ali has demonstrated how traditional techniques still reign true in the modern world. “Fashion gives me an opportunity every day to express my ideas,” he says. “I communicate unspoken words through my creations and express my true self.” And looking at his jaw-dropping creations we definitely get the message! To view Rami Al Ali's latest collection, head to page 43. www.ramialali.com

Now on his 7th consecutive season in Paris, Al Ali’s transition from daydreamer to global trendsetter is complete.

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The Sultan of soles

Business in the front, party in the back: Darmaki's origami heel.

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f you find yourself at London’s Victoria & Albert Museum this fall, don’t miss their “Shoes: Pleasure and Pain exhibition”. Mixed in with the gold leaf ancient Egyptian sandals and spiky Vivienne Westwood pumps, you’ll find the Lydia heels by Emirati-born, London-based luxury footwear designer Sultan Al Darmaki. Inspired by the metallic burqa, the strappy laser cut python sandals were borrowed from Darmaki’s first collection. Countless pairs later, prestigious retailers from around the world including Level Shoe District in Dubai and Le Grand Bazar in Cannes are stocking his coveted wares. As he launches his e-commerce site, SLT goes for a walk with the rising sole star.

Tell us about the Darmaki heel. The heel is the essence as well as the DNA of the brand. Strong, very independent and unorthodox. When I started working on the origami heel, I wanted to stay as far away as possible from anything that would be labeled with a gender reference.

Italy, where my shoes are produced and where I spend most of my time during production and sampling season.

Is it important to be based in London? One cannot disregard the fact that being based in the UK has many privileges to it. As an emerging brand, London offers a brilliant platform for like-minded people to network, collaborate and to create beautiful things for the world. Not to forget its accessibility to

How do you add a personal touch to the shoes you create? In my main production, I make one pair of shoes personally. I sign the bottom so whoever buys them knows that I personally made that pair. It gives me so much pleasure to do that. www.darmaki.com

Darmaki's Lydia heels, on display now at the V&A Museum.

Family jewels With a mom like Grace Kelly, good taste and a keen eye for jewels is in Prince Albert II of Monaco’s genes. Case in point: the Van Cleef & Arpels Océan transformable necklace that he presented to his wife-to-be Princess Charlene on their wedding day. Four years later, as part of their Seven Seas collection, the French maison has created the Pangée necklace (complete with pear-shaped diamonds of D and E colour quality) inspired by the iconic gift. www.vancleefarpels.com

Food for thought

T

he rise of blogs that cover both fashion and food proves that style setters really do eat (check out The Spicy Stiletto or Milk and Mode for proof). Merging the two avenues on the runway is UAE-based designer Reema Al Banna of the line Reemami, who turned to her plate for inspiration when designing her resort collection. The results? A veritable feast for fashionistas. From A-line toppers decked out with hand-drawn illustrations of fried eggs to asymmetrical vests complete with cheeky silver fish, the pieces are begging to be shared on Instagram (#goodeats). www.reemami.com

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“I have my jewellery with me in case something happens and I suddenly have to dress up.” – Grace Kelly

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INSIDER SCOOP

Smoke show Born in Lebanon, raised in Paris and currently based in London, designer Racil Chaloub suits up for fall in her Saville Row-sourced line of smoking jackets. Bianca Jagger

Wrap it up

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NEW RULES "There was a moment when I felt like I wanted a smoking but one that would be chic and cool enough for me to wear often; a smoking that could be versatile and nonchalant unlike the stiffer ones I would see on the market." Inspiration “My love for fashion comes from my mother, Racil. She had me many years after my brothers so instead of doing kids stuff with me, she took me to shows and fittings. Also, she named me after her, so it felt natural to name my brand after her!” Heritage “Lebanon for me is a country of contradictions and mixes. The colour of the sunset sky in Beirut is unbeatable and has so far influenced the touch of colour I have chosen to add to my black jackets.” Timeless tuxes “Bianca Jagger in that white tux and the entire Le Smoking collection by M. Saint Laurent of course!” www.racil.com

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f the fall runways are any indication (we’re talking to you Balenciaga and Chloé), the scarf is the accessory of 2015. Get in on the action with a colourful concoction from Nazanin Rose Matin’s debut collection of hand-painted printed silk, cashmere and modal scarves. “One of the most exciting stages in scarf design is analysing how the print will be seen on the final design," says the Central Saint Martins graduate who cut her teeth at Alexander McQueen, Christian Lacroix, Celine and Kenzo before launching her own line, which is designed in Paris and created in Italy. Transferring her sketches to textile format is not her only passion. "I love how a printed scarf can be emotive and allow the wearer to make a statement by way of colour, illustration and texture." www.nazaninrosematin.com

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Twice a year the fashion crowd flock to Paris (and this season, Rome) eager to see what couturiers and their ateliers have devised for a select few. For FW15, our stylist Julie Matos makes the trip to fashion’s ultimate playground.

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CHRISTIAN DIOR Bosch’s ‘The Garden of Earthly Delights’ was the inspiration behind Raf Simons' collection. The contrast between the innocence of Adam and Eve and the evil purgatory in which they were condemned can be seen in Simons' pairing of flowy dresses and heavy capes. If Wendy had any of these nightgown­esque Dior ensembles, I doubt she would’ve been waiting by the window for Peter Pan. Fresh faced models gave the already innocent collection a child­like feel, as if they had snuck out of bed in their robes. The sleeve received a lot of attention in this collection, being shown as embroidered in feathers and fur, or heavily draped and open. Naked skin was another focal point and was revealed with high slits or openings in silk chiffon gowns, evoking a feeling of soft sensuality. Dior has always kept the woman’s body in mind and this collection did not disappoint. A woman’s subtle sexuality and grace are at the core of Simons' aesthetic. Dior’s haute couture show had a sense of child­like wonder and magic, a true fantasy come to life. „

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VIKTOR & ROLF Is fashion art? Is art fashion? Viktor & Rolf say yes to both of these questions! Their collection was given the perfect name of ‘Wearable Art.’ The Amsterdambased design duo Viktor Horsting and Rolf Snoeren believe one-­of-­a-­kind haute couture pieces are as exquisite and precious as paintings on the walls of a museum. And that is exactly what this pair created. Models entered the catwalk dressed with white canvases fastened by gilded frames. Horsting and Snoeren then removed the canvas and hung it on the white wall behind them, displaying it as a piece of art. The show read more performance art than runway show, with the designers as the curators. With each passing look, the canvases were painted with more detail and portraits began to emerge. Beneath the wearable artworks were paint splattered denim (I definitely see a little DIY project in my near future!). Although I appreciate how they pushed the boundaries of haute couture, I would’ve appreciated more diversity in their collection.

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VALENTINO The historic Italian fashion house takes us back to their roots. The city of Rome is after all where Valentino Garavani founded the atelier. Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli wanted to show people the ancient city through their eyes so the fashion crowd headed south to the house's birthplace. Models emerged from the Palazzo Mignanelli, the place where Valentino’s designers and craftsmen create each collection. There was a gothic feel to this show, with black velvet, oxblood fabrics and gold embellishments seen throughout. Fine delicate lace and tulle was balanced by heavy capes and gladiator armour elements. Roman sandals were paired with each look and brought an earthy enchantment to the collection. Chiuri and Piccioli channeled strength in each look, with models portrayed as powerful Roman empresses adorned in gold head dresses. Their stoic faces matched the aristocracy of the gowns they were wearing. I imagine the Met Gala of the Medieval Times to be something along these lines. „

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MAISON MARGIELA Everyone had a front row spot at the presentation of Maison Margiela’s collection. Models sported face paint that looked like torn fabric, while others were painted with palm leaves inspired by the work of Henri Matisse. It looked like creative director John Galliano had a mad hatter moment during arts and crafts time. Burlap sacks, patches, feathers and tassels were seen all over the runway. An even more intriguing element of the show was Galliano’s use of male models. These swanky boys walked the runway in heels, dresses and a even a touch of makeup. Galliano definitely has his fingers to the pulse of current culture, with the continuing blend and merging of gender roles. Masculine was paired with feminine, chic with disheveled, finished with tattered. And don’t even get me started on the finale gown. It’s as if outer space’s fashion elite decided to crash the party and make their fashion week debut. Maison Margiela showcased opposing ends of all of life’s spectrum, and I ain’t mad about it.

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JEAN PAUL GAULTIER Seaside in Brittany was the inspiration behind Jean Paul Gaultier’s show. Crêpes and cider greeted guests as they arrived for the show. Clogs, nautical uniforms and traditional Breton festival costumes were given an elevated twist in the fifty look collection. The pieces had a dark Candy­land feel to them, almost a sinister Alice in Wonderland (as if that movie wasn’t trippy enough). Bursts of orange, yellow and blue were seen amongst the dominance of black. Not only were Breton stripes a common nautical theme, but so were pea coats and bombers. Models looked like toy dolls with their sailor caps and pouty lips. Gaultier's playful approach to haute couture was further enforced with his finale ensemble, a dress worn by Anne Cleveland to look like a well­- cooked crêpe - a gown good enough to eat! I’ll never look at a crêpe the same way again.

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Michael Cinco His frothy creations have floated across the red carpets of the MET Gala and the Golden Globes thanks to A-list clients including Jennifer Lopez, Mila Kunis and Rihanna. In between stints in Paris and London where he studied at Central Saint Martins, the Filipino designer has called Dubai home since 1997, where socialites from around the world gather in his atelier to order one-of-a-kind gowns for their own red carpet moment or walk down the aisle. Water Lilies by Claude Monet, 1914-1917

Homegrown Talents

From the towers of Dubai to the studios of Beirut, the region’s couture designers compete on the world stage. Here, visual artist Christos Mouchas intersperses their collections with seminal works of art.

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Ashi Studio Hailing from Saudi Arabia, Mohammed Ashi draws on the mystery of the veiled woman when creating his sculptural pieces. After completing internships for Riccardo Tisci at Givenchy and Elie Saab, the designer’s studio can now be found in Beirut, the town that launched the careers of both Saab and fellow couturier Zuhair Murad. Interior Strandgade 30 by Vilhelm Hammershøi, 1908

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Rami Kadi Over 400 hours of work went into creating certain pieces from the Lebanese-American designer’s latest collection that showed at the Plaza Athénée in Paris last July. Describing himself as a contemporary couturier, his appreciation for modern theatrics is evident through his use of 3D embroidery, glow in the dark threading and laser cutting. Currently based in Beirut, his technical prowess is what couture dreams are made of. The Surveyor of Dreams by Yves Tanguy, 1935

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Rami Al Ali Growing up in Syria as the only boy in a family of five children, an appreciation for fine fashion was a household tradition. Visible in both his regal wedding gowns that he has created since he launched his house in 2000 and his seasonal couture collection that shows in Paris, the Dubai-based designer manipulates fabrics like stiff boucle and satin de chez into cascading capes, coquettish gowns and elegant masterpieces that define the female form. On a Lee Shore by Winslow Homer, 1900

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PHOTOGRAPHER: EZRA PATCHETT MODEL: EXKATERINA @ ELITE PARIS FASHION EDITOR & STYLIST: JULIE MATOS ART DIRECTOR: EMILIE CHANIN MAKEUP: ALISONN FETOUAKI HAIR: CHRISTOS VOURLIS PRODUCER: KIM CREIGHTON SHOT ON LOCATION @ HOTEL MAISON SOUQUET IN PARIS


Rami Al Ali sleeveless champagne gown with geometric beadwork at the hips & metallic evening heels; Dior Fine Jewellery ring & earrings.

La belle Époque Indulge your flair for the dramatic and escape into fantasy with FW15’s haute couture creations, where grandeur and show-stopping elegance take over fashion.


Atelier Versace strapless evening dress in dark grey with silk chiffon that is fully embroidered with Swarovski crystal tubes and hand shredded strips of silk .

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Elie Saab Haute Couture deep green kaftan gown fully embroidered with flowers guipure & ornate headpiece.

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LEFT: StĂŠphane Rolland Haute Couture half coat in gazar colour sand with embroidered tulle dress. RIGHT: Ralph & Russo Couture antique gold Chantilly lace jumpsuit with glass bead and silk thread hand embroidery, golden Barguzin Russian sable cape and heels.

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LEFT: Alexis Mabille Haute Couture long dress in black Chantilly lace with midnight blue Moroccan crepe drape worn over a lingerie corset in nude duchess satin & black evening heels. RIGHT: Alexis Mabille Haute Couture nude satin corset; Bvlgari High Jewellery Necklace & Bvlgari MVSA watch.

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Rethink Your If Donatella Versace and Roberto Cavalli had it their way, messy mascara would be fall’s hottest beauty trend. Models slinked down their runways with devil-may-care attitudes and smudged lashes evoking a I-slept-with-my-makeupon look. Not since the days of Twiggy have lashes been this clumpy or this striking. Whether you’re trend-driven or traditional, turn the page to find our roundup of the best new mascaras of the

Credit: Getty Images

season, including a few eye-popping shades.

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Eyes on the prize Brush up on the latest formulations for lashes with flash

E sté e L auder l ack Little B er Prim

ng the If ma steri p m up akeu no-make ur goal, yo is k o lo es of a few swip ht eig tw this ligh sures n e n o ti formula shes la e notice-m th y an ing that look but fau x.

Gucc Opule i nt Volum M a sc a e ra

The Gucci’s star of co collec tio smetic n (w ju st laun hich the UAE ched in th is their li is year) ghtweig ht yet supe r build ma scara able bru sh th with a at leave s behind pe separate r fec tly d la shes .

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ld An o lt favourit ed t u this c en reinven n: tio e ha s b 5. Transla hout 1 it for 20 olume w v h e s r o la ! m or e sold eed f the n ions. We’r s n e x te

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Guerlain Maxi Lash So Volume Mascara The latest edition to the Maxi Lash family is anything but shy thanks to the ultra-glossy oils that leave lashes with an intense coat of deep black.

YSL M Vol ascar um e a Fau Effe x t Cil It’s b s e en

15 ye YSL ar la gem unched t s since , whic his a slig h ht m is gettin akeo for 2 g v 0 intro 15. The er duc t ion o cond f it pro- ioning o four vitam ils an d la sh in B5 c level are on th put s e s am a s vo lume e .


Dior Addict It- L ash in Violet After tw

d Fo r Tom eme r E xt ar a i n c e M as Intensky l o m a Te up your s a hint

o coat this eye-o s of pening shade, th e only word s ou t of your mouth w ill be “J’adore!”

Step me with s a k eye g l tint than est t a of te Ford’s la h-filling s m to To rpiece. La d send o e g t s a a e m rs ar he s . e d w la s po arse for sp

Chanel Cils Scintillants in Jazzy Blue Designed specially for the tips of your lashes, this turquoise dream leaves your wink with a certain "je ne sais quoi."

Lancôme Grandiôse Mascara in Bleu Mirifique Black swan no more! The revolutionary swan neck wand takes a dip in a rainbow of shades including our favourite, this greyblue showstopper.

Clinique Chubby Lash Fattening Mascara in Bodacious Black Honey Fans of Clinique’s cult favourite lipstick shade Black Honey can now test-drive the hue on their lashes with their plumping mascara that proves size really does matter.

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backstage beauty COUTURE week

It may take hundreds of hours and over a million pearls to create one couture gown but replicating the hair and makeup from the fall couture runways in Paris requires only the right product and a little bit of skill.

Coloured Contour

The sharply angled bobs at Chanel may have had many reaching for the scissors but it was the deeply contoured cheeks that left us lusting after a heavy handed application of blush. Carved out rosy hued cheekbones recalling the ‘80s were created by blending two shades of powder blush with a lashing of Rouge Coco lipstick. Kim Kardashian-cheekbones these were not. Master the application with a flat, wide angled brush.

@chan

Guerlain Rose Aux Joues in Crazy Bouquet

Nars Ita Brush

ial 3h

Chanel Joues Contraste in 74 Ultra Rose

Nars Contour Blush in Gienah

Rookie Blue

Giambattista Valli

Bite Beauty Opal Lip Gloss

From the dusting of baby blue shadow that covered models’ lashlines and browbones at Schiaparelli to the crazy cobalt liner at Jean Paul Gaultier and Azzaro Couture (not to mention the smudged navy metallic shadow at Tony Ward), it’s clear makeup artists are borrowing a brush from Picasso as they enter into their blue period.

Lips left free of colour with nothing but shine was the pout du jour at Dior while “cellophane lips” (translation: a glossy pucker with a pearlised finish) played off the metallic details at Giambattista Valli. This fall, prep your kisser with a multidimensional finish heavy on the shine with just a hint of an irredescent opalesque hue. It’s a modern twist on the frosty lip.

Azzaro

Pearls Of Wisdom

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elof fic

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Sephora Collection Colorful Shadow & Liner in My Boyfriend’s Jeans

Chanel Ombre Essentielle in Swing


Names to know

E lie S a a b

Valentin o

A lb e

r t a F e r re t t

i

They paint the faces of the most famous models backstage and create some of the most legendary looks at couture week. Make sure these makeup artists are in your beauty lexicon: Peter Philips

Circle Of Life

The crowning glory at many a show was the addition of ornate headbands that added a fairytale-like atmosphere. But there’s nothing make believe about these romantic headpieces, worn with M u r i rad a hair up or down. h Vers ace Atelier Zu

If you’re still hanging on to your bottle of Chanel’s Jade Le Vernis (the discontinued polish that fans sometimes score on eBay for up to US$365), you can thank this Belgian artist. He served as Chanel Makeup’s creative director for five years before heading over to Dior last year. Fendi, Dries Van Noten and Alexander McQueen (top) have all benefited from his brushes.

Val Garland

Disco Digits Givenchy Le Vernis in Croisère Sensation

Forgive us for thinking that the runways were reminiscent of the line outside Studio 54 but designers from Stéphane Rolland to Azzaro and Armani Privé came down with a case of disco fever. Head down to funky town by matching your glittery party dress with a mani in a shocking pink shade.

From creating Lady Gaga’s alien cheekbones to ditching her blush brush in favour of cotton wool and pieces of potato, the resourceful makeup artist is a fixture backstage at Mary Katrantzou and Vivienne Westwood as well as the magician behind campaigns for Balenciaga and Jimmy Choo.

Tom Pecheux In addition to creating some of the most iconic looks at Chanel, Marni and at YSL during Stefano Pilati’s reign (Tom was the man behind the headline-making black lips at YSL’s fall 2008 show), the French beauty pro collaborates almost daily with Mario Testino and Carine Roitfeld.

Pat McGrath

Armani Privé

She travels with an entourage of 50 makeup artists during fashion week, in addition to 75 bags of inspirational material from books to Polaroids. She is so in demand that if she can’t make a shoot, the shoot gets canceled. We don’t have enough column inches to list her A-list clients but if you’ve ever worn makeup by Dolce & Gabbana, Covergirl or Max Factor, that's Pat's doing.

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a MAGNUM OPUS

SLT’s erstwhile Regional Managing Editor, James McCarthy, heads to Italy to drive the all new Ferrari 488 GTB Words: James McCarthy Pictures: Ferrari

Even bumbling along behind one of the many big 18-wheeled trucks along the tiny roads, the 488 cruises comfortably.

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hen I was a lad, growing up in the rain-soaked Welsh coastal town of Swansea, I used to escape my perpetually moist reality by switching on the TV on a Saturday night to watch the adventures of a Hawaiian shirt-wearing, moustachioed private eye called Magnum PI. Set on the sun-drenched Island State of Hawaii, Tom Selleck brought life to the macho character, who would woo gorgeous women en-route to solving wonderfully convoluted mysteries, sometimes in nothing but a pair of Speedos. However, the thing that really grabbed my attention was his car. It was the achingly pretty 1979 Ferrari 308 GTS, the convertible version of the company’s iconic 308 GTB, in which he sped around the tropical island. I wanted one. Badly.

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culture

Now, 30 years on, I find myself in sunny Italy behind the wheel of the all-new Ferrari 488GTB, the successor to its critically-acclaimed 458 Italia and the company’s first rear-mid-engined V8 Grand Touring Berlinetta since Magnum P.I.’s heyday. Like last year’s California T (see SLT Issue 33), the 488 GTB continues the company’s push towards forced induction engines, yet delivers 100 horsepower more than the 458, capping off at 660hp. That’s more than enough to catapult the 488 GTB to a top speed of 205mph, or to go from a standing start to 62mph in three seconds. In Sport mode, the 488 is rock solid at speed and in tight handling situations, even on the pocked-marked surfaces of some of the appallingly maintained roads. I’m completely amazed at its agility; approaching a bend with pace, before sitting hard on the brakes, I simply point the car where I want it to go, and with no fuss whatsoever, it stays true to its line. If I do find myself in a bit of bother, the surgically precise steering helps pull the car back into shape, while the grip from the 20-


Fast facts The very first car built by Enzo Ferrari was the Auto Avio Costruzioni 815, built in 1940. The Ferrari logo, the prancing horse, pays homage to a fallen Italian World War One flying ace, Francesco Baracca, who used the prancing horse symbol on his plane.

inch Michelins is Herculean. In Race mode, the 488 becomes a little more playful, allowing me to break traction just enough to get the back end to slide, but when it does, it feels utterly controllable.

Many Ferraris have odd names for their colours (for example, an aquamarine colour called Turchese Molvedo). Their nomenclature is derived from famous race horses.

Even bumbling along behind one of the many big 18-wheeled trucks that are legion on these tiny roads, the 488 cruises comfortably. When that moment to overtake does present itself, however, the throttle is like a hair trigger for the epic and immediate power delivery. Thanks to the full power only being available at the top of the gears, there’s still more to give when, in mid-manoeuvre, I realise that nestled in front of the 18-wheeler is a tiny, previously unnoticed Fiat Panda, emblazoned with the word “Carabinieri.”

Tractor Manufacturer Feruccio Lamborghini only started building sports cars because of a spat with Enzo Ferrari. The first Ferrari 308GTB came with glass-fiber bodywork but was soon remade in steel because it was so fragile. The most expensive car ever sold at auction was a 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO, which was sold by Bonhams for $34.65 million in April 2014.

It’s a split-second decision as the corner is rapidly incoming, so I bury my foot and put the hammer down. Fortunately, Italy is the one place where you can go screaming past the local police in a Ferrari at full chat and get a free pass – even a thumbs up!

Saturday nights of my childhood and I make a decision. I climb back in and, just like the opening credits of that formative TV show – and with its theme tune rattling through my head – I plough my foot into the carpet.

On the return journey, I allow myself a brief stop to admire the 488 GTB in its natural environment. I cast my mind back to the

In a shower of gravel and a trail of thick black tyre marks, I screech away in search of a beautiful damsel with a case to solve.

Tom Selleck in a 1979 Ferrari 308 GTS is a legendary image, but he wasn’t the only lucky Hollywood star who got to get behind the wheel of a Ferrari

GONE IN 60 SECONDS

FERRIS BUELLER’S DAY OFF

SCENT OF A WOMAN

MIAMI VICE

THE ROCK

WHO: Matthew Broderick

WHO: Al Pacino

WHO: Don Johnson

WHO: Nicholas Cage

WHO: Nicholas Cage

MODEL: 1961 250 GT California

MODEL: Ferrari Mondial

MODEL: Daytona Spyder 365

MODEL: 1996 Ferrari F355 Spyder

MODEL: Ferrari 550 Maranello

Spyder

GTS/4

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KICKIN’ IT As a new sneaker exhibition, supported by MR PORTER, opens at the Brooklyn Museum, we're lacing up for the big event with FOUR game-changing kicks

Run-DMC, in their Adidas Superstars, preparing to board a helicopter at Elstree Airport, London, May 29th, 1987.

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e’ve all probably worn sneakers at some point in our life, whether for running, jogging or just as everyday footwear. These practical streamlined pieces have, over the years, had more impact on pop culture than most will give them credit. The 70s punk trend and its adherents rocked Converse Chuck Taylor black canvas high-tops (The Ramones and their Jack Purcells became synonymous with that era); a rookie Michael Jordan played some of his greatest moments in the Air Jordan 1 back in 1985; and rap group Run-DMC made Adidas' Superstar a legitimate success when they stepped out in the box-fresh sneakers. The Brooklyn Museum is turning a spotlight on the scene with their latest exhibition, The Rise of Sneaker Culture, which explores the history of the shoe and the cult following they've had for decades. The exhibition, which includes approximately 150 pairs, looks at the evolution of the sneaker from its beginnings to its current role as status symbol and urban icon. Included are works from the archives of manufacturers such as Adidas, Converse, Nike, Puma, and Reebok as well as private collectors such as hip-hop legend Darryl “DMC” McDaniels, sneaker guru Bobbito Garcia, and Dee Wells of Obsessive Sneaker Disorder. The Rise of Sneaker Culture runs at the Brooklyn Museum until October 4th, 2015. www.brooklynmuseum.org

CONVERSE: The Rubber Shoe Company All Star/ Non Skid, 1917.

NIKE: The Nike Air Jordan I, 1985.

ADIDAS: Adidas Superstar, circa 1980s.

NIKE 2: The Waffle Trainer, 1974.

All images courtesy of American Federation of Arts/Bata Shoe Museum

SLT ARABIA plugs in...

Images sourced from @mohiebdahabieh

Mohieb Dahabieh’s vision comes from a perfectly honed instinct for spin and eye for style. as an image specialist, this astute strategist is widely acknowledged by industry heavyweights, with a trail of impactful PR maneuvers and blanket coverage - both glossy and tabloid - in his wake. The London-based ‘go-to man’ for luxury brands and red carpet divas alike shares his e-habits and digital addictions.

DIVA DUTY Clockwise from top right: Mohieb with Fan Bingbing; Hanaa Ben Abdesslem; Aishwarya Rai; Sonam Kapoor; & Carmen Dell'Orefice.

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WHAT ELECTRONIC DEVICE CAN'T YOU LIVE WITHOUT? My iPhone. I can’t imagine how PR was handled in the pre-smartphone era.

HOW DIGITALLY ACTIVE ARE YOU? Reasonably. I like Instagram as my approach to communications is image-led.

SOCIAL MEDIA – LOVE IT OR HATE IT? Love to hate it and hate to love it. WHAT IS THE DIGITAL TRAIT YOU DISLIKE MOST IN OTHERS? Endless irrelevant hashtagging, especially of city names.

FAVOURITE INSTAGRAM FILTERS? #NoFilter

of what a celebrity is wearing before she has even hit the red carpet. In the case of people that I actually admire, such as Queen Rania Al Abdullah (@queenrania), it s the intimacy of a sneak peek into what makes them tick that I enjoy the most.

Deena Abdulaziz (@ deenathe1st) for her unique eye and informed posts, especially on 90s fashion (#so90s). I also love the elegance and integrity that Cindy Crawford oozes, not just through her social media presence but all-round.

WHAT DO YOU LOVE MOST ABOUT THE DIGITAL AGE? The connectivity and immediacy. I love that you can give a glimpse

IS THERE ANYONE YOU’RE ADDICTED TO FOLLOWING? I’m not addicted to following anyone, but I appreciate Princess

FAVOURITE HASHTAG? #JeSuisDonatella in tribute to the one and only platinum Versace siren. There will never be nother Donatella!

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Royalty-free Middle Eastern & Arab stock images

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The Journal With a desire to escape the mundane, this issue kicks off in Ecuador where we take to the road to explore a country that is fast becoming popular with the travel and jet savvy crowd alike. From Quito to Guayaquil, it’s a whirlwind tour of misty lowland cloudforests and island hopping amongst the country's most stunning landscapes. And because summer is slowly fading and cooler days can be seen creeping on the horizon, we go in search for a place by the sea on Croatia’s Dalmatian coast, making Split (below) our town of choice to unpack and unwind.

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globetrotter Where to dine, dream and delight your senses like a local - the latest hotel openings, restaurant launches and luxurious goings-on for the global traveller.

CHILE If you don’t have a reason to visit Chile, you do now - Viña Vik. This exceedingly luxe hotel and winery in a far-away valley in Millahue, Chile was created by Norwegian billionaire Alexander Vik and is a destination in itself. The winery was the starting point for Vik’s concept and is at the crux of any stay here. Enjoy a horseback ride through the vineyards, wine tastings in the underground winery, vinotherapy treatments in the spa and glorious farm-to-table food at one of the two restaurants. The hotel’s 22 suites are each unique to each other and bursting with contemporary style, art and innovation. Utter luxury surrounded by grapes. www.vinavik.com

IBIZA

TUSCANY

There is never a shortage of haute hedonistic places to dance the day or night away on the super stylish Balearic party island of Ibiza, but fast becoming the hotspot for summer 2015 is Beachouse. Just down the road from Bora Bora and Space, in Playa d’en Bossa, this all day beachside party pad is uber chic and uber cool with summer parties from Diynamic Outdoor and Outside with Andrea Olivia. Don’t miss the Sunday night sessions with DJ Guy Gerber. www.beachouseibiza.com

For art purveyors a trip to Tuscany usually involves a beeline for Florence, the centre of Renaissance art in Italy. If money is no object and art your weakness, how about bidding for a wonderfully unique property once lived in and designed by Leonardo da Vinci himself? The fortress turned luxury villa, perched on a cliff on the Livorno coast is currently on sale and expected to sell for between $5.6 million and $11.2 million. A recent Da Vinci work sold for $75 million, so at just a fraction of the cost, this five-bedroom home is a bit of a bargain. www.lionard.com

SEATTLE

Geoffrey Smith

Seattle is already home to some fine hotel restaurants and now there is a new joint to add to the foodie list and that is Goldfinch Tavern. This big upscale eatery downtown is a joint venture between Seattle chef Ethan Stowell and the Four Seasons. Taking the place of the former ART Restaurant and Lounge, Goldfinch Tavern has totally revamped and redesigned the space into a huge relaxed and casual dining room. The menu is inspired by the Pacific Northwest and is big on seafood and local meat. With its superb location above Elliott Bay and proximity to local farmers' market Pike Place, you can see why. www.goldfinchtavern.com

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MYKONOS The fall season on the Greek island of Mykonos looks set to be party central as the island welcomes two big players to its already stylesoaked nightlife scene. As well as the opening of the world’s first Buddha-Bar Beach, prepare to drink, dine and dance the night away at Hakkasan’s latest launch, Ling Ling in the Old Town. Inspired by the Eastern izakaya concept of enjoying small plates to accompany drinks, this is the place to try and share Cantonese cuisine and sink some cocktails in the open-air restaurant, private dining area, lounge and bar all while kicking back to the eclectic beats mastered by Hakkasan London resident DJ Pathaan. See you at sunrise! www.hakkasan.com/lingling

LONDON Greek seafood might not be the first cuisine that springs to mind on a trip to Britain's capital, but with Estiatorio Milos, the latest addition to chef Costas Spiliadis’ acclaimed six-restaurant 'chain’ of Greek hot spots which is set to open this August on London’s Regent Street, a decadent Mediterranean meal should most definitely be on the agenda. The huge restaurant spans two floors and promises the freshest Greek, British and worldwide seafood complete with raw seafood bar and market style fresh seafood display. www.milos.ca/london

SAN FRANCISCO As one of the most eclectic and quirky cities stateside, we couldn’t think of a better shopping destination for Isabel Marant’s third store opening in America than San Francisco. The très chic French label is now open on Jackson Street in the

city’s Bay Area and occupies 2,300 square feet of retail space in a former whisky repository building dating back to 1866. Franklin Azzi Architecture designed the new boutique, so as you can imagine, this is one seriously stylish shopping haunt. www.isabelmarant.com

PARIS

Los Angeles Silk embroidered Fromental wallpaper, wall art by David Dauncey and a custom weave sculpture by Renee Dinauer are just some of the interior delights at the newly renovated Mosaic Hotel in Beverly Hills. The bathrooms are Calacatta marble and stocked with Bulgari products, although if you fancy an al fresco dip, the hotel’s pool and its surround, complete with fire pit and cabanas, is equally as pleasing to the senses. www.mosaichotel.com

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Fine dining in Paris needn’t end once you leave the city thanks to a new Michelin starred restaurant at Paris’ Charles de Gaulle Airport. With I Love Paris, the gastronomic adventure continues. The restaurant in Terminal 2E will be headed up by three-star Michelin chef Guy Martin and will serve the thirsty traveller at its bubble bar, feed the lunch rush at its Miyou sandwich bar (think fancy sandwiches and light bites) and delight culinary connoisseurs in the main dining room. www.aeroportsdeparis.fr

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where in the world . . . Nestled within the 1,700 year old walls that make up the centre of Split - the second largest city in Croatia - is a maze of concept shops and too-cool-for-school terraces. Get ready for a hipster’s paradise. Alley eaterY Sitting down for a meal at the spot of the first ordered assassination in history may not sound romantic but thanks to the simple yet mouthwatering menu, one hundred different labels of vino and the cosy wooden tables burrowed in a narrow alleyway inside the ancient palace walls, Diocletian’s Wine House is true gem. In a coastal town like Split where seafood is as fresh as it gets, it seems blasphemous not to tuck into into traditional Dalmation fish dishes or modern delicacies liked smoked tuna carpachio and lobster linguine. www.diocletianswinehouse.com @dioc

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Island life Located on the southern coast, Split is the ultimate harbour for island hopping in the crystal clear waters of the Adriatic Sea. Charter a private gullet boat to explore the series of hip isles in style. For a taste of Croatia’s version of St.Tropez, dock at Hvar where the rich and famous head to party or make sure Vis is on your itinerary – the serpentine coastalhugging roads are begging for a scooter adventure.

Game of Thrones fans, we know that winter is coming but until it does, get your geek on at these sites in and around Split where seasons four and five were filmed:

Klis Fortress, Diocletian’s Palace, The Water Mill, Zrnovica River

Fashionable Finds Where tastemakers shop for their wares

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ID Ikat shirt dresses by Rough Rugs, metallic espadrilles by Manebi and tropical prints by Ganni are just some of the finds on offer at this treasure near the waterfront. Just don't stop by on Sundays when many shops are closed.

Ganni

KRUG For a taste of Croatian street style, head to this concept shop which stocks super talented local designers. Try the handmade frocks and bucket bags by design duo Chicks on Chic and the statement jewels by Little Wonder.

Chicks on Chic

Marc by Marc Jacobs

KARLA Trade in your sneakers for some seriously stylish footwear at this accessory hot spot. Slip into something strappy by Ancient Greek Sandals, ballet flats by Marc by Marc Jacobs or chunky mules by McQ by McQueen.

Pit stop-worthy Carve out time to hit up these local favourites SWEET CORNER:

MORPUGO:

KOKOLO JUICE BAR: Cool

Part old-fashioned candy

Founded in 1860, this

down with a thirst-quenching

store, part yoghurt shop,

cosy bookstore is one of

treat at this not-to-be-

this sweet spot is a welcome

the oldest in Europe. A

missed open air stand. Sip

reprive from the countless

booklovers dream come true

on takeaway mojitos, freshly

gelato stands that line the

awaits shoppers behind the

squeezed lemonade or a

streets.

iconic green wooden door.

healthy green smoothie.

BOBIS:

RIVA:

KLAPA SUFIT:

Follow your nose to this

A stroll up and down the riva

Keep your ears open for

bakery for pizza sandwiches

(Croatian for boardwalk) is

the sweet harmonic sounds

(the chicken one is to die for),

a must. Rest your feet on a

of this all-male a cappella

creamy Croatian pasteries,

grassy patch under a palm

group that performs

melt-in-your-mouth

tree - gelato in hand – or gaze

traditional Dalmatian music

baguettes and more.

admiringly at the back of the

inside the palace vestibule.

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OUTLETCITY METZINGEN The exclusive destination for premium and luxury brands Fancy a meet & greet with Giorgio, Miuccia, Hugo, Jimmy, Diane and Ralph? A unique shopping experience awaits anyone who visits OUTLETCITY METZINGEN. More than 70 premium and luxury brands such as Prada, Burberry, Gucci, Hugo Boss, Armani, Michael Kors, Ermenegildo Zegna, Bally and Escada present themselves and their range of goods in a first-class ambiance. Year-round discounts of up to 70 % (compared to the RRP) make shopping even more enjoyable. Better still, if you are visiting from a country outside the European Union you qualify for tax-free shopping with an additional saving of up to 19 %. There are exceptional events like “Oriental Night” on 21st August 2015 when OUTLETCITY METZINGEN will turn into a world of colours and lights. Oriental sounds will provide as a background to spectacular decoration and impressive highlights for young and old.

Furthermore there are popular events like “Sunday Shopping” and “Late Night Shopping” which take place every year. Luxury, lifestyle and fashion all come together under one roof at OUTLETCITY METZINGEN.

CosmoBag by Porsche Design

To receive your personal invitation with great benefits, exclusive specials and lots of additional savings, register your details on www.outletcity.com/member. By using the code word “Sur La Terre” you will receive a VIP Shopping Pass in the tourist information of Metzingen. Benefit from an exclusive additional discount of 10 % on the outlet price at participating stores. Valid until 12/31/2015 (sales periods excluded).

Necklace by Swarovski

. sur la terre . advertorial .

Luxury, lifestyle and fashion all come together under one roof at Outletcity Metzingen.

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OUT OF THIS WORLD

ECUADOR – LAND OF MARVELS Bordered by Peru and Colombia, Ecuador may be small, but it is rich in attractions. Particularly renowned for its Amazon rainforest and natural parks, such as the Galápagos Islands, it never ceases to impress with its beauty. From the bustling capital Quito to the city of Guayaquil via the summits of the volcano Tungurahua, it's time for a quick visit. „

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At the foot of Volcán Cotacachi, 3,070 metres up in the Andean páramo, the azure waters of 200-metre-deep Laguna Cuicocha shine brightly with twin volcanic cones at the centre.

Words: Francoyse Krier

FROM QUITO TO GUAYAQUIL Founded in the 16th century on the ruins of an Inca city, Quito, the first city to be declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1978, has the best-preserved historic centre in Latin America. Here, different styles intertwine in the richly ornamented interiors of churches and monasteries: Spanish, Italian, Moorish, Flemish and even Indian. The houses of the colonial city that flank both sides of the pedestrian streets exemplify a Spanish or Moorish style, while the modern city has wide avenues lined with imposing banks, hotels and shopping centres. Amazonas Avenue immediately strikes the visitor as Ecuador’s answer to the Champs-Élysées, while railings from the old Palais des Tuileries adorn the presidential palace, built by Baron de Carondelet in the 18th century. Perched atop the hill of El Panecillo (The Bread Roll), an imposing 41-metre aluminium Virgin Mary protects the city, which extends over more than 20 kilometres. Exceptional views guaranteed! This profoundly diverse city also has a beautiful Botanical Garden – a true paradise in the heart of the city, full of hummingbirds, parrots and tropical flowers, including more than 1,200 species of orchid. Art lovers will enjoy discovering the works of Oswaldo Guayasamín (1919-1999), the country’s iconic artist. The foundation named after him runs a museum, which includes rooms dedicated to Inca and pre-Inca art. Further up the hill, the Chapel of Man exhibits the artist’s finest masterpieces and hosts an eternal flame lit in 2002 as a symbol of peace and respect for human rights. Two hours from Quito, the spectacular and colourful Otavalo market is renowned for the quality of the textiles and handicrafts found within the endless stalls. It is a riot of colours and flavours, and you are expected to haggle. It’s well worth a visit unless you prefer to take a short flight to Guayaquil, the country’s largest city and main port, located 420km from Quito. The huge waterfront, Malecon 2000, has shops, galleries, restaurants and museums, and is a favourite place for both residents and „

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Ecuadorian woman in traditional clothes in the street; Indian woman wearing a hat and a necklace of gold beads in the Andean market, Saquisili; Ecuadorian woman at the Otavalo Market; Old man from Guaranda Ecuador wearing traditional clothing; Shaman from the indigenous group of Santo Domingo de los Tsachilas; Ecuadorian man in the street. visitors to walk. Another attraction is Seminario Park, founded in 1895 where numerous wild iguanas bask. Guayaquil’s most emblematic spot is undoubtedly the historic district of Las Peñas, declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1982, with its 444 individually numbered steps. At the top of the hill are old colonial-style houses, a majestic lighthouse and a breath-taking view. Finally, the city is a great place for water sports thanks to its many beaches extending from the pleasant fishing town of Playas to the popular seaside resort of Salinas.

NATURAL RICHES Not far from Quito is the equator: latitude 0°0’0”. It was here in 1736 that the first mission

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from the Academy of Sciences measured the exact size and shape of the Earth. A large memorial and a museum recall the work of the French scientists. Since then, GPS has located latitude 0°0’0” about two kilometres from this place. Here, partly in the southern hemisphere and partly in the northern hemisphere, water flows straight down the drain without forming a swirling vortex. Another Ecuadorian curiosity is the Avenue of the Volcanoes. This was the name given in the early 19th century by the German explorer Alexander von Humboldt to the road that winds its way along the Andes mountain chain, where some forty peaks rear up to a height of over 4,000m, their forms clad in mist, a permanent snow cap and sometimes

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steam vents. There, Tungurahua awakens noisily every two or three months. South of Quito, Cotopaxi is the highest active volcano in the world at 5,897m. Also regarded as the most perfect mountain cone, it is dormant but potentially active. On its slope, the Hacienda San Agustín de Callo, built on the foundations of an Inca palace, is an extremely welcoming place. Here, the gazebo is covered in geraniums, fuchsias and passion flowers, hammocks are strung between ochre and hot pink walls, and llamas sometimes wander across the patio. In the evening, the façade is coloured red at sunset. Some of the rooms feature remains of Inca architecture, and all have stunning views of the Tungurahua and Chimborazo volcanoes.


SLT RECOMMENDS

One of the most beautiful parts of the Andes, the isolated Laguna Quilotoa is a spectacular place to hive.

1. Island-Hopping In The Galapagos Awe-inspiring, the ancient landscape and rare inhabitants of the Galápagos Islands offer a mind-blowing experience.

2. A River Boat Ride Jump aboard the 8-suite M/V Anakonda that sails from El Coca down the Ecuadorian Amazon to Yasuni National Park. Canoe on white waters, trek through the forest and see the most bizarre animal life.

3. Buying A Panama Hat A symbol of elegance, the Panama has graced the heads of many famous people such as Ernest Hemingway, Winston Churchill, Harry S. Truman and Henri Salvador. Of varying shape, colour and quality, affordable or prohibitively expensive – such as the Montecristi extra fino Panama – the legendary hat is now sold around the world.

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music THE SOUNDTRACK TO COUTURE

Sound illustrators MODE-F are on the speed dial of some of couture’s biggest names. SLT meets the boys behind the beats Words: Sophie Jones-Cooper

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hen Jean-Paul Gaultier, Zuhair Murad and Stéphane Rolland need a soundtrack for their shows, they and many other designers enlist the artistic talents of three sound illustrators otherwise known as MODE-F. Alexander Maxwell, Nano de Clausel and Laurent Ballot have been working together since their first show in 2002, editing tracks and compiling beats. This past couture week, the trio have been working non-stop creating the sound tracks to six shows. We met up with the boys behind the scenes to find out why music is so important for fashion, how they create their unique soundtracks and what Jean-Paul Gaultier is really like to work with. How did three sound engineers become the go-to show music producers for haute couture? “We are very passionate about fashion and especially haute couture which is an art form in itself. We were very impressed by the passion, time and amount of detail that goes into creating just one dress. Naturally we had to illustrate the designers’ stories in music.”

Why do you think the music for a couture show is so important? “The soundtrack tells the story of the collection and it sets the rhythm and pacing which is crucial to a great show. The music and the collection should become one.” How do you create the soundtrack for a show? “First we meet with the designer and they

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Jean-Paul Gaultier

Who was your first client and how did you land big names such as Gaultier? “One of our first designers was Frédéric Molénac. He was really cool and unconventional. He had a bride in the middle of the show and the dress had real speakers incorporated within it and was tagged live by a graffiti artist. From word of mouth we found ourselves at Jean-Paul Gaultier and it clicked right away.”

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describe the collection to us and show us their mood board and sketches. We then come back with a large selection of music tracks, and together with the designer, we pick the ones that fit best with the collection. From there we start slicing, editing and mixing all these different sources to create one unique patchwork which becomes the soundtrack and then it is just a question of fine-tuning until everyone is happy.”

Schiaparelli

Zuhair Murad

Ralph & Russo

Stéphane Rolland

Alexnader maxwell

Do the designers give you a lot of creative control? “The designer is like a conductor of an orchestra. He has the vision in his head and we are only there to translate his story into music. It is a collaboration – when we work together the soundtracks become so much more interesting.”

fW15 COUTURE SHOW SOUNDTRACKS

Number of shows worked on: Around 800 Number of minutes of a couture show: 6 - 28 minutes Number of hours to complete a soundtrack: 24 hours to several weeks Number of tracks in one show: 15 - 84 Three words to sum up your work: Share, listen and create Laurent Ballot

Nano de Clausel

MODE-F’s COUTURE FACT FILE

Murad is extremely nice and so humble. We usually meet with him a couple of days before the show, so it is quite intense, but great.”

What has been the most challenging soundtrack to create? “For Stéphane Rolland’s SS13 show, we had violinists and cellists playing live over our soundtrack. All the musical parts had to be written and rehearsed. Then during the show, we had to cue them in through their earpieces as well as mixing the different sequences live too.”

What has been your favourite show soundtrack? “Well there was one show with Jean-Paul Gaultier for his SS11 collection where we recorded the voice of Catherine Deneuve, and the soundtrack was simply the description of the dresses that we cued live according to the show. It was very intense and intimate. That would definitely have to be one of our favourites.”

What is it like working with fashion’s biggest names? Fantastic. Take Jean Paul Gaultier. It’s a lesson in fashion every time. He is so creative it’s crazy. He never runs out of ideas! Zuhair

If you could choose someone to be a vocalist on a soundtrack who would it be? “If Maria Callas was still alive, we would love to collaborate with her. She was amazing.”

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Haute couture is an age-old tradition surviving in a contemporary world. How do you think these two worlds mix and how does the music fit in? “Haute couture is a great legacy and has to be maintained no matter what. Many of the couture houses have pieces that are easier to wear and some are only for very special events. I guess the balance happens very naturally. The music on the other hand can give a total modern perception to a very classic dress.” As technology, music, social media and the fashion world continue to develop, how do you see the future of the traditional fashion show and its music? “Today’s technology and media really helps haute couture become more visible to more people. As for the future, well what Alexander McQueen was doing at his shows, offers a great perspective for what is possible.”

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THE COUTURE BOOKS YOUR COFFEE TABLE NEEDS As we look forward to the release of Fendi by Karl Lagerfeld, make sure your coffee table collection is graced with gowns and captivated by couture

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Words: Sophie Jones-Cooper

hen it comes to haute couture coffee table tomes, the Kindle becomes extinct. You can’t touch and feel the pages of an e-book whereas coffee table books are not only for reading and perusing but are objects of beauty – soft furnishings adding style, sophistication and substance to your décor. You can practically smell the luxury of those glossy hard backs bursting with beauty perched next to your latte on a Saturday morning. So what are the books that make the coffee table cut?

editor's pick

Dior New Couture

Fendi by Karl Lagerfeld Anything by Karl Lagerfeld grabs our attention and this new beauty of a book will look back at the designer’s 50-year reign at the helm of Fendi, one of Italy’s most famed fashion houses. Anticipate page after page of anecdotes from the designer, his beautiful signature sketches and also interviews and conversations spanning the last five decades. Save a prime spot for this gem which is out September 28th.

This stunning photographic account of one of the world’s most prestigious fashion houses, shot by revered photographer Patrick Demarchelier, is simply stunning. It features hundreds of exclusive photos of Dior creations dating back from 1947 and the days of Christian Dior himself to today.

Electric Fashion This relatively new glossy tome is the result of a wonderful partnership between Internet trailblazer and couture collector Christine Suppes and fashion and portrait photographer Frederic Aranda. The pair worked together over five years to create a visual narrative of Christine’s remarkable collection comprising three decades of couture. Frederic shot Christine and her beloved collection both in the studio and around the world, and the result is 270 stunning images exploring the modern legacy of a couture collection.

Haute Couture Ateliers: The Artisans of Fashion The unsung heroes of couture are the topic of this work, which delves into the ateliers of Chanel, Valentino, Dior, Givenchy and Yves Saint Laurent. The stunning images tell the story of the skilled artisans who work meticulously hour after hour to bring the designers’ visions to life.

Don’t miss:

Luxury couture jeweller Stephen Webster is releasing his autobiographical tome Gold Struck, while Italian fashion house Bottega Veneta will launch Bottega Veneta: Art of Collaboration featuring images from their advertising portfolio dating back to 2002. The collaborations include Peter Lindbergh, Nobuyoshi Araki and Robert Longo. Both books will launch in October.

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cinema Behind the lens

Get a glimpse into the secret world of haute couture and its creators with our pick of the best couture documentaries Words: Sophie Jones-Cooper

Signé Chanel Karl Lagerfeld is undeniably one of our generation’s fashion geniuses and this five-part documentary miniseries follows the master at work, not to mention his dedicated team, as he sets about creating his FW04 couture collection. The window is opened on this usually heavily guarded maison and reveals the inner workings of how such intricate creations come to life. From Karl’s initial sketches and his persistent attention to detail to the dedication and superior craftsmanship and skills of his team of seamstresses, it is a race around the clock to get these dresses catwalk ready.

The documentary brings the viewer inside the storied world of the Christian Dior fashion house with a privileged, behind-thescenes look.

DIOR & I

The Secret World of Haute Couture

When Raf Simons was chosen as the new Artistic Director for Dior back in 2012, he had a mere eight weeks to create his first couture collection, a role that normally takes six months. This award-winning documentary, directed by French fashion film maker Frédéric Tcheng, gives a rare insight into Raf’s journey from his first day to show day and pays homage to the hidden talent of the house’s veteran seamstresses, who translate Simons’ vision into fabulous couture creations.

Have you ever wondered whom the women are that spend thousands on couture and what they actually pay for their hand-stitched bespoke creations? The Secret World of Haute Couture delves into this glitzy side of the world we know little about and interviews couture clients from around the globe to find out why they buy couture and the inner working of this secret members-only club.

Valentino: The Last Emperor We know Valentino fashion but do we know Valentino the man? Valentino: The Last Emperor offers a unique opportunity to get to know this Italian maestro as well as his lifelong partner in business and life, Giancarlo Giammetti. Filmed over two years, this stunning documentary highlights the extraordinary partnership between Valentino and Giammetti and charts his and their journey into retirement as Valentino prepares for his last haute couture show, the final act of his star-studded career.

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Viktor & Rolf FW15 Haute Couture Show

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Words: Sophie Jones-Cooper

t is one thing to question whether fashion is art, but haute couture's creative expressions and magnificent masterpieces of traditional skill and modern technique deem it an insult to dismiss the idea as being anything but. Back in the early 1800s German philosopher Hegel described the six arts in his ‘Lectures on Aesthetics’ as architecture, sculpture, painting, dance, music and poetry. In the early 1900s, cinema became the contemporary consideration as the seventh art, and now in 2015, could haute couture lay claim as the eighth?

THE EIGHTH ART?

As dresses and art became one at this season’s Haute Couture Week, we explore the juxtaposition between both avenues

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Art has long been an inspiration for fashion designers and couturiers in particular and there is a distinct cross-pollination of worlds. The late great Christian Dior, one of the most influential couturiers of the twentieth century, had a taste for art from a very young age and art, in

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Clockwise from left: Viktor & Rolf SS15; Dior FW12; Iris Van Herpen Haute Couture FW12.

particular the Impressionism movement, was a huge influence on his work. While he himself loved to paint and surrounded himself with artist friends, he knew it was not his forte, so instead, went on to design dresses. He constructed his dresses like an architect and chose his colours like a painter. Sadly, he died in 1957 and it was in fact Yves Saint Laurent who took over at the helm. The creative geniuses that thus followed continued the designer’s legacy, paying homage to Dior’s love of art. In 2011, then head designer John Galliano chose legendary fashion illustrator René Gruau as the inspiration for his SS11 collection with voluminous dresses in beautiful watercolours and calligraphic brushstrokes in embroidery bringing the artist’s work to life. Current creative director Raf Simons reproduced the abstract canvases of painter Sterling Ruby on the haute couture dresses of his FW12 collection. After gaining experience at Dior, Yves Saint Laurent went on to create his own couture house in 1962, and over the years, until he ceased his haute couture line in 2002, paid tribute to many of the great artists of our time. In 1965, Mondrian, 1966 pop art, 1970 Picasso and in 1988 the Cubism movement and Vincent van Gogh. While his title of ‘Artistic Director’ as opposed to ‘artist’ does not allow him to be ranked among the great artists of our time, in 1983 his talent was honoured with a retrospective exhibition at the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art, the first time a living fashion designer had received such an accolade.

The designers took to the catwalk, which was held in a gallery of the Palais de Tokyo and dismantled model’s dresses (art canvas’ and cloths inspired by the Dutch Golden Age paintings of the 17th century in gilded frames nonetheless) and hung them on the white wall back drop and vice versa, creating

Stephane Rolland FW15

Contemporary couturiers are also juxtaposing fashion with art. This season, Dutch designers Viktor Horsting and Rolf Snoeren of Viktor & Rolf, are certainly pioneering the belief of couture as art; with their ‘wearable art’ collection which was not only an artistic impression, but which also saw art being created from the dresses as part of the catwalk show.

EMERGEAST SUGGESTS... Online gallery EMERGEAST.com – created by art authorities Nikki Meftah and Dima Abdul Kader – shines light on the region’s hottest emerging artists. Inspired by the heaps of talent under their umbrella, here the duo offers shares intimate insights on those promising artists and bespoke advice to their young collectors!

an exhibit of contemporary art. “Art comes to life in a gallery of surreal proportions,” it said in the show notes. “A dress transforms into an artwork, back into a dress and into an artwork again. Poetry becomes reality, morphing back into fantasy.” This collection follows their SS15 offering, which was inspired by the expressive landscapes of Vincent van Gogh and saw artistic creations of huge 3D flowers and giant straw hats. Dutch art collector Han Nefkens saw these creations as works of art, so bought and donated three of them to the Museum Bojimans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam, as well as one of the pieces from their latest collection. Iris van Herpen, another Dutch couturier, also sees the correlation with fashion and art, working by the ethos of reciprocity between craftsmanship and innovation in techniques and materials. “For me fashion is an expression of art that is very close related to me and to my body,” she explains. “In all my work I try to make clear that fashion is an artistic expression, showing and wearing art, and not just as functional and devoid of content or as a commercial tool.” For her SS12 collection, inspired by nature, Iris used 3D printing to create a stunning sculptural aesthetic to her dresses. French contemporary couturier Stéphane Rolland could also be described as a sculptor with his collections inspired by his passion for architecture, sculpture and photography. His FW15 collection is a great example of such skill and inventive talent, with architecturally designed dresses, sculpted to precision and perfection. Do these creations warrant fashion as art, art as fashion? This remains a contentious issue but one worth exploring season after season.

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Which art style speaks to you? Starting your art collection may seem like a daunting task when you don’t know where to begin. Some people might shy away from the thought of purchasing their first piece due to seemingly high barriers of entry prevalent in the art industry. At EMERGEAST, we are dedicated to breaking down those barriers by demonstrating that anybody with an art appreciation can become a collector. Whether you're buying a masterpiece, a painting you stumbled upon on your last holiday or purchasing a painting due to a sentimental connection, you are collecting a piece of art. That’s it! You are officially an art collector. That wasn’t so hard, was it? The vital question anyone buying an artwork should ask himself or herself is do you love it? In this issue, have a look at which art style can set you off in the right direction for that unique collection... Calligraphy: Embrace your heritage and language through the beauty of the script. Cultural: Home is where the art is, as we like to say. Perhaps start your art collection with a sense of home right on your walls. Urban/street art: Push the envelope and support the region’s avantgarde artists taking themes and subject matter to the next level.

(Clockwise from top: Untitled by Amir Ershadi; Mulatham Series I by Raed Issa;Paranoia by Salman Al Najem)

All artwork is available at www.emergeast.com

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the list

23 - 25 sep

Eid Al-Adha Where: International When: 23 – 25 September What: Translated in English as “The Festival of Sacrifice” and counted as the second of two religious holidays under the Eid banner, Eid al-Adha is one of the most important observances on the Islamic calendar. The religious aspect of the holiday celebrates the willingness of Abraham one of the most highly regarded prophets in the Muslim faith, as well as others of a monotheistic nature - to make the ultimate sacrifice to God; that being, his son. As the story goes, of course, Abraham’s son is spared and switched for the quintessential sacrificial lamb. A day of ardent prayer, remembrance, sacrifice and charity, Eid al-Adha is also a celebration of togetherness, and is often observed by practicing Muslims with family and friends gathered closely around. If you are lucky enough to be invited to a friend or family member’s celebrations, expect great food and a loving environment!

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14 - 21

1 july 31 oct

The Dave Matthews Band

Dubai International Dance Festival

Art Jameel

Where: Yas Island, Abu Dhabi, UAE When: 8 October What: It’s an eclectic and improbable fusion of blues, rock, funk and folk songwriting that has made the Dave Matthews Band one of the most popular groups of the past two decades. And come October, they’re going to be one of the hottest tickets around town as the group takes on Abu Dhabi to kick off their 2015 International Tour in Du Arena. So whether you’re part of DMB’s absolutely dedicated massive fan base or just a regular Joe looking for a night of good old music, tickets will be selling out like hot cakes so we suggest grabbing yours now! www.ticketmaster.ae

Where: Dubai, UAE When: 14 – 21 September What: Prepping for what is set to be a rhythmic storm of epic proportion, Dubai promises to have us all break out in dance this September with an armada of the world’s foremost dancers and dance troupes who will take to the stage in a myriad of fantastic shows and exciting parties all celebrating the art of movement. Haven’t dusted off those dancing shoes in a while? Don’t worry; there are a wealth of opportunities to improve your own skills with in-depth workshops and programmes perfectly catered for the twinkliest of toes. The DIDF has everything you will possibly need to beat that rhythm slowly growing inside you. www.dubaidancefestival.com

Where: GCC When: 1 July – 31 October What: Calling out to all budding and aspiring photographers across the Gulf region, it’s time to get snappy! In its sixth year, the Art Jameel Photography Award is freeing itself from all clasps, having previously only been open to residents of Saudi Arabia, and is now inviting all creative and talented photographers across the GCC, whether nationals or residents, to join. The latest iteration of the competition will revolve around the theme of “Transitions”, and encourages applicants to produce a single photograph or series of photographs that capture today’s changing society. www.ajpa.artjameel.org

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16 sep 9 jan

17 - 20 sep

14 jun 26 sep

The Hunt

Beirut Art Fair

Garden After

Where: Doha, Qatar When: 16 September– 9 January What: A purveyor of Middle Eastern art, Doha’s Museum of Islamic Art is proving to be the perfect spot to soak in some rich Islamic culture this fall with the introduction of the highly anticipated exhibition, The Hunt: Princely Pursuits in Islamic Lands. Come September, the MIA will open its doors to a beautifully curated mix of lavishly illustrated manuscripts and colourful ceramics, all depicting the act of hunting, something that was and still is an essential element in the lifestyle of rulers throughout the Islamic world. www.mia.org.qa

Where: Beirut, Lebanon When: 17 – 20 September What: An urban melting pot for the art and design scene, Lebanon’s dynamic capital will be buzzing this summer as the Middle East’s creative community descend on the city for the sixth edition of the Beirut Art Fair. This massive art centralisation will see 50 international modern and contemporary art and design galleries, from over 14 countries, share their visions in what is set to be the culutral event of the season. www.beirut-art-fair.com

Where: Sharjah, UAE When: 14 June – 26 September What: Far more than a gallery, the UAE’s newest experimental design hotspot 1971 is pushing boundaries, working closely with local designers, architects, schools and universities, to present a contemporary and cuttingedge mix of curated exhibitions and public programmes. One such display is Garden After, a spiritual installation and ode to the history of Islamic Garden Architecture by the multi-disciplinarian Lebanese artist, Jamal Tayara-Baroudy. www.1971design.ae

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Couture Club

The prestigious Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture is an exclusive club that welcomes fewer than two dozen members into it’s flossy inner folds. Inclusion is granted only to those possessing the highest level of skill, talent, quality and of course, a certain je ne sais quoi. For Parisian couturier Stéphane Rolland, it’s been home since 2008, when he joined the ranks of fellow members Valentino and Dior. Here, the celebrated designer, whose clients include princesses both of the royal and rock variety, tells SLT why couture is not just a craft, it's a culture. By Julia Seidl

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hen luxury lover HH Sheikha Moza bint Nasser Al Missned met Prince Charles for a stroll around the Royal Botanic Gardens in Surrey, England, she opted for a custom grey flannel embroidered dress by couturier Stéphane Rolland for the well-documented event. Known for his sculptural stylings and flare for architectural details, Stéphane is a designer the Sheikha has turned to on many an occasion, including official visits to royal dignitaries in both France (which called for a white silk crêpe gown with a hand painted ombre waistline that was created with only five days notice) and Spain, where one of Stéphane’s signature tuxedo gowns in a creamy ivory palette did the trick. Referring to his client as the Arab world’s version of Ava Gardner, the couturier is an admirer of her wholesome yet glamourous style, one he often sees in his Middle Eastern patrons. “The Arab woman has an innate sense of seduction and an intense love of fashion,” says the designer who launched his couture line in 2007. “Their aesthetic can be as extreme as it is subtle, always well thought out, from the toes to the tips of eyelashes, and that is what I like.”

“I made my first sketches for a dress when I was 4-years-old, which foreshadowed my future. As a child, I didn’t realise that fashion was a profession, I just thought it magical in and of itself." — Stéphane Rolland collection (a minimum of 35 pieces for day and Royalty aside, precious few have the means - or the occasion - to procure a piece of haute couture for their closet. A gown bearing the official label can command a five-figure price tag, upwards of a million beads and hundreds of hours of hand-embroidery, meaning inimitability and exclusivity are key to the allure of couture. The same principle can be applied to the designers behind the craft. While many create couture, only a select few can add the qualifier “haute” in front (haute couture is French for “high dressmaking”). Tightly controlled by the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture in Paris through a stringent list of rules that dictate various requirements, including the number of full-time staff per house (at least 15) to the number of pieces per

evening), it’s a designation that is legally granted by the French Ministry of Industry to just 14 houses internationally. It’s a small circle and one that Stéphane never expected to join when he first became a designer. “I made my first sketches for a dress when I was four years old, which foreshadowed my future. As a child, I didn’t realise that fashion was a profession, I just thought it magical in and of itself,” says the designer who was raised in Argentina, Paraguay and the French West Indies. “My two grandmothers and of course my mother were significant in my taste for fashion. They each had a different yet distinct style. I began

" I consider myself more an artist than a designer. I need to create all kinds of universes and products, whether it’s furniture, sculpture, photography or drawing. All challenges interest me and I don’t like to be shut in a single mode. That’s freedom."

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"I structured my collection around Art Deco architecture, gold sculptures from the 1970s and light," says the designer of his FW15 couture collection, shown here in sketches and backstage.

"The signature material of this season is metallic silicone. I worked it into sculpture, mosaics and weaving but gazar and jersey are still my favourite materials."

to read books about designers at a very early age, to devour fashion magazines and to cut out photos I liked in order to analyse and understand what would later become my profession.” With encouragement from his parents, whose only condition to supporting his career choice was that he must devote himself completely, he enrolled as a student at the École de la Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne, a storied school whose graduates also include Karl Lagerfeld, Yves Saint Laurent and Issey Miyake. At the age of 20, a role in Balenciaga’s menswear department came calling, followed shortly thereafter by the coveted title of Creative Director for the historic French fashion house. “Everything started at Balenciaga, where I revealed myself and where I started to breathe because I could express myself. I discovered Cristobal Balenciaga’s archives and it was a great

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A craftsman works on a cage skirt from Stéphane's SS15 collection. Right: At his Avenue George V salon, the designer puts the finishing touches on his masterpiece.

emotional experience as well as a revelation,” says Stéphane. The great couture house of Jean-Louis Scherrer, who catered quite heavily to the tastes of Middle Eastern clients including princesses in Jordan and Saudi Arabia, took notice of Stéphane’s talent and influence on the runways and offered him the top spot in 1997. For ten years, the designer worked at perfecting his masterpieces under the Scherrer label until in 2007 at the age of 40 – and shortly before the start of the great recession - Stéphane went solo and launched his own couture house, taking almost the entire team from Jean-Louis Scherrer with him. “There is no ideal timing for opening a fashion house. I opened mine at the beginning of the financial crisis. It was a risky gamble but it’s during

this type of financial crisis that the world repositions itself and I quickly understood that luxury would have an important role to play, if it was fair and true.” It’s a wager that has certainly paid of for Stéphane. Since going solo eight years ago, he fast-tracked his way to earning the exalted haute couture label in December 2008, having received the title less than a year after launching, a feat that normally requires four years. As for his impressive client list, it isn’t just princesses of royal decree who have been sitting front row at his shows during Haute Couture Week or flocking to his Avenue George V salon in Paris for a custom creation by the legend. Pop princesses from Lady Gaga to Rihanna and Beyoncé have chosen to wrap themselves in his

unique, fairytale-invoking gowns, creating visions on the increasingly competitive red carpet. For Stéphane, understanding his clients’ needs is about more than the event or the dress. “Haute couture is a culture, a philosophy. Creating a unique work for a woman draws on psychology and sometimes even psychoanalysis. This interests me more than simply reducing haute couture to a craft. For me, the world of extreme luxury represents much more. We are at the heart of the intimacy of the self.” Nowhere is his intimate relationship with luxury more apparent than in his first boutique in Etihad Towers in Abu Dhabi, which opened in 2013. Citing a desire to pay homage to the region that has offered him so much love and success, it was a natural spot for the designer to launch his first stand-alone store. With goals of opening more stores, including other locations in the Gulf, Stéphane is embracing his success head on. “Life is made up of cycles of 1, 3, 7, and 10 years, and yet in my eighth year I feel I am starting a new cycle with new desires, and a need to create in a way which is at once more centred and more eclectic with a culmination in the tenth year. But only God knows.”

Save the best for last

Known for his jaw-dropping runway creations, including his bridal gowns, Stéphane Rolland has enlisted the help of a few famous faces to execute some very dramatic conclusions.

Fan Bingbing, FW12 The Chinese actress flexed her modeling muscles in a white wedding gown dripping in leather which required four attendants to arrange the train.

Yasmin Le Bon, SS12 Flanked by two suiters, the former model and wife of Duran

Carmen Dell’Orefice, SS13

Duran frontman Simon Le Bon walked the runway in a

Proving you’re never too old to walk down the aisle, the

110-pound silk jersey gown adorned with lacquered metal

former supermodel stole the show at age 82 in an elegant

panels.

white tuxedo and cape ensemble.

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OUTURE Welcomed into the league of haute couture, Ralph & Russo are championing the atelier arena. SLT is a front-row spectator as the British house makes waves across the world and learns how its founders Tamara Ralph and Michael Russo are playing by their own set of rules.

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Ralph & Russo Couture was launched just over seven years ago. Are you pleased with what you have achieved so far? MR: Yes, we are thrilled with the level of success, but above all we are grateful. Creating a new fashion house and acquiring significant brand recognition takes time. Though we have come a long way, we know that we are only at the beginning of a very exciting adventure. When you start work on a new season, how do you decide on the tone of the collection? TR: Generally speaking, the theme of the collection is a work in progress throughout the development period, meaning it evolves as the weeks pass. The tone is normally inherited from the previous season but with a new-born energy. And how has that manifested in the latest collection? TR: We unleashed a renewed interpretation of our romantic sensibility: sensual femininity and sexy sophistication.

Do you have a muse? When you design, who do you target in your mind? TR: I feel it would be restricting to design with a single woman in mind when I’m dedicated to addressing the dreams of all women. All the women I meet enrich my path in fashion. Nevertheless, a few personalities embody certain characteristics that appeal to me. I can instantly recall Mona von Bismarck and HH Sheikha Mozah. But above all, each client is a muse. And every creation you see on the catwalk is designed with a certain client in mind. What is the profile of your typical client?

MR: We take such pride in our clientele. Yet it is still hard to identify a typical profile. We dress women from all walks of life. Still, they all come together on one point: they all have strong personalities and are aware of the image they want to convey. How would you sell haute couture to a first-time client? TR: At the outset, we would nurture her patience and intrigue, as we gently depict the haute couture philosophy. It can never be hurried. Then we work at unpacking her need. I find a woman very touching as she enters, for the very first time, a ‘salon de couture’. There is often a humble expectation of magic. The enchantment and the insight that I get from this initial encounter propels me into prioritising a design that perfectly synchronises with her personality. I’ve always said that couture is a form of therapy, a philosophy and a culture. A magic! What is the greatest misconception about haute couture? MR: I have rarely heard misconceptions about haute couture. I guess a few people might consider it merely centred on extravagance. In reality it is an industry of dedicated and untiring artisan expression. It is an exclusive culture providing a discerning clientele with a bona fide value proposition that

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From atelier to backstage fittings and finally its catwalk debut, Look 20 from their FW 2015 collection is a lavender silk zibeline ballgown with silk thread work, silver Bullion and metallic biot feather hand embroidery.


reflects and celebrates the preservation of ‘savoir faire’. What is the changing role of a couturier? TR: The role of a couturier has evolved in that we need to be commercially savvy, unlike some of our predecessors during the ‘golden age’, who could afford to be strictly artists. What are the biggest challenges you foresee for haute couture? MR: I believe that haute couture’s biggest challenge today is to preserve its landmark ‘savoir faire’ and maintain the level of excellence with which it has always been synonymous. How do you go about that? MR: Artisans, especially those of the standards

Look 5 (above and right): Ivory and silver tulle cocktail dress with metallic silver thread work and silver Bullion and pearl hand embroidery.

we expect, are like gold dust. We have to find a balance between hiring very experienced people and young people that have an interest and could be trained. We invest in a lot of young graduates for the sake of keeping alive what is increasingly becoming a rare art form. We are also exploring initiatives with various fashion colleges in London, dedicating senior artisans in our atelier to provide training during weekends. Tell us about the strategy behind opening a flagship boutique at Harrods, which is unconventional for a couture house. MR: In order for it to remain relevant, couture has had to evolve and endure the present pace. Ironically, accessibility - what has always been its antithesis - is key. As it is first and foremost a lifestyle, couture needs to be in

Look 19 (above and left): Metallic gunmetal Guipure lace dress with cut-out three dimensional elements and metallic feather appliqué.

Look 38 (below and right): Black silk zibeline tailleur with oval sleeves and structured collar, wholly hand embroidered with crystals, pearls and silk thread.

Look 42 (above and left): Gold lace and thread work fishtail gown with floral Goldwork and metallic feather appliqué.

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touch with the lives and attitudes of today’s clients, many of whom are no longer what they used to be 30 years ago. Our clients are modern women with demanding careers and schedules that don’t always allow for endless fittings. With completion usually taking several weeks, sometimes months, we had until now been unable to cater to an increasing number of clients wanting pieces available within a shorter time frame. The opening of our showroom at Harrods now gratifies such clients’ needs. Any additional openings planned? MR: In addition to Harrods, we will be launching six retail boutiques in the near future, with Malaysia and Singapore openings by end of this year. From royalty to rock stars, you’ve dressed a broad spectrum of women. Is the primary style distinction based on their personality or their role? TR: I believe the first thing that matters is the strength of their personality. This brings credibility to their role. It allows them to become leaders in their fields. Your aesthetic appeals to women in the Arab world, where you’ve become hugely popular. Do you seek Middle Eastern sensibility whilst designing? TR: The Middle East has always been a source of inspiration for me. That said, you’ll probably never see a literal or direct visual interpretation, but rather a mood, a movement or even a feeling that is reminiscent of the sprit of the Orient. Complete this: A women looks her best... TR: ...when she is in love and loved in return. Do you have a favourite fabric?

TR: I adore gazar. It adds strength to a drape. I also like the simplicity and fluidity of silk crêpe, and the lightness and fragility of organza. Do you have a favourite look from the runway?

TR: My first sketch is the one that generally sets the trend of the new season – this time n°35 was my first. This look combines all the elements of our vision about fashion, and really personifies the brand’s core values such as elegance, romance and timelessness. Would you consider undertaking grander scale design such as hotel chains? MR: We would love to and in fact that’s already in the pipeline. Every creative adventure is a new piece of work and vice versa. We spend three quarters of our lives in hotels and we appreciate feeling at home. And that’s what we would want to instill as and when that materializes.

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Ralph & Russo rule the Red Carpet (clockwise from top right): Afef Jnifen at the Walkabout Foundation's Inaugural Gala, London; Araya Alberta Hargate at Pavillon Cambon for the Ralph & Russo show; Ana Beatriz Barros at the amfAR Paris benefit dinner; Fan Bingbing at the premiere of her movie 'Lady of the Dynasty', Beijing; Hanaa Ben Abdesslem at amfAR 2015; Carolina Parsons at The Second Annual SaintTropez Gala.

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the scene AN INSIDE TOUR OF THE PARTIES, HAPPENINGS AND PULSE OF THE GULF'S BUSTLING CAPITALS. SEE WHO WAS SNAPPED OUT AND ABOUT.

And The Winner Is

At a ceremony hosted at the Manzil hotel in Downtown Dubai, Suketdhir and Taller Marmo stole the spotlight as they were awarded the menswear and womenswear winners, respectively, of the 2015/16 International Woolmark Prize India, Pakistan and the Middle East regional final.

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SCARF STORY

Doha's Fire Station, Artist in Residence hosted the much awaited scarf collaboration between UK brand, Art On Fashion and Qatari artist Noor Abuissa called ‘For the love of colour'.

A SWEET AFFAIR

Qatar's fashion savvy and VIPs got together at Lagoona Mall for Pari Gallery's special Cartier perfume launch party.

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Covets

Sole Searching

Photo Courtsey of The Victoria & Albert Musuem, London

What were you thinking when you put on your shoes this morning? Was it the sense of empowerment they would give, the practicality and comfort on offer? Or simply they just matched your outfit? The transformative power of footwear has always been mystifying, and now, is the centre of the V&A’s fashion exhibition, Shoes: Pleasure and Pain. With more than 200 pairs of historic and contemporary shoes from around the world on display, the exhibition seeks to dissect the agonizing aspect of wearing shoes as well as the euphoria and obsession they can inspire.

Wedding toe-knob paduka, silver and gold over wood, Inida / 1800s. .

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Sur la Terre Arabia 38 - Pre-Fall 2015  

Turning a new page on luxury in the GCC since 2008.

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