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A G U I D E TO F I N D I N G T H E H I D D E N G E M S O F VA N CO U V E R

PROJECT BRIEF + PRO CESS BO O K DESIGNED BY FIONA SAMSON


CO N T E N TS

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PROJECT BRIEF

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

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MIND MAP

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DESIGN PROPOSAL

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PROTOTYPE

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RESEARCH SUMMARY

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ONLINE SURVEY

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DESIGN OPPORTUNITY

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THE APP

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DESIGN OBJECTIVES

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USER TESTING

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DESIGN CRITERIA

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THE BRANDMARK

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AUDIENCE PROFILE

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COLOUR GUIDE

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HUMAN FACTORS

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THE MAP

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MARKET RESEARCH

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PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS

FEASIBILITY

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THE WEBSITE

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EDUCATIONAL GOALS

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THE VIDEO

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CONTACT INFORMATION

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CONCLUSION

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SCHEDULE AND DELIVERABLES

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ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

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LITERATURE REVIEW

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GANTT CHART

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3

PROCESS


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P R OJ E C T B RI E F

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1 . 0 e x ec u ti v e

summary This document summarizes the information gathered for the proposal of my undergraduate thesis project. The project focuses on promoting and supporting local independent businesses within Vancouver, inspired and generated through the involvement of both visitors and local residents. Research findings to date include various design books, tourism websites, and articles written by local residents of Vancouver. Through secondary research, I have explored issues such as the term “Responsible Tourism,� differing perspectives of locals and tourists, design strategies, and existing precedents that surround these topics. Through my investigations, I plan on representing these issues by designing a guide that consists of a printed map, a phone app, and an accommodating website that highlights both local businesses and remote locations within the city.

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Further information through primary research during the development of this project included interviewing various personas of both locals and tourists, which was accomplished through an online survey as well as a user testing phase. This allowed me to gain a better perceptive on the target audience and the effectiveness of an online presence and a printed publication as the final deliverable. The research and design of this project took place from September 2012 to April 2013 and will be displayed at the Emily Carr University Grad Show in May 2013.


2 . 0 d esi g n

propos a l The main focus for this project is to not only look at promoting Vancouver as a more friendly and approachable city, but to highlight the various places that make Vancouver so unique and lovable to its residents. The opportunities and challenges of this project was to create an incentive for locals to contribute their personal preferences into an online database, as well as attempting to create a connection between the various communities within Vancouver. I propose that in developing a campaign through various mediums that utilizes usergenerated content, I strive to create relationships and generate trust between residents and visitors through shared experiences of exploring the city. I anticipate that this campaign will not only reduce obstacles between residents within the city of Vancouver, but also improve cultural barriers.

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2 . 1 R ese a rc h

summary

The research for this project will focus mainly on local independent businesses and remote locations based on user generated content. The objective is to generate a compilation of unique places to visit and explore, that will intrigue both locals and visitors within Vancouver. Further investigation of my research can be found in Appendix A: Annotated Bibliography and Appendix B: Literature Review. As a requirement for research projects involving humans, Emily Carr University students are required to complete the TCPS: CORE Course on Research Ethics tutorial provided by ECUAD’s Research Ethics Board. My certificate of completion can be found in Appendix D: Ethics Documents and Consent Forms.

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Primary Research

Secondary Research

Primary research consisted of an initial online survey and a user testing phase that contained questions and activities relating to people’s perspectives on exploring the city of Vancouver. The primary research focused mainly on the perspectives of both local residents and tourists living within the city. Participants for this study were between the ages 19 – 35 of both male and female, of various ethnicities, professions, interests, opinions, and lifestyles.

Along with investigations on the influence of user-generated content in terms of travel decisions, I also examined the influence of the general connotations that locals and tourists have on the city of Vancouver. The initial goal was to understand why residents and outsiders feel that there is a great sense of segregation within the city. My research began with an investigation on a documentary by Melissa James and Kate Kroll titled “No Fun City,” which is a film based on the numerous limitations on local bars, pubs, and music venues in Vancouver. Since its release in 2010, several articles were written by both locals and tourists, sharing their opinions as to why they agree or disagree with the films’ proposition. This lead me to explore both positive and negative insights that locals and tourists have on the city.

Douglas Coupland’s, “City of Glass” is one example of how the author navigates the city and through his exploration he provides categories as to what makes Vancouver so unique. The third section of my research involves analyzing the term “Responsible Tourism.” This term, which is defined by the Capetown Declaration 2002 and the Kerala Declaration 2008, “is an approach, which can be used by travelers and holidaymakers, accommodation and transport providers” that “seeks to maximize positive economic, environmental, and social impacts and to minimize negative ones.” Their objective is to minimize negative impacts of global tourism by promoting economic, environmental, and social responsibility, as well as building bridges between travelers and locals through more meaningful connections that provides a deeper understanding of local culture.


2 . 2 Desi g n

O pport u nit y The opportunities and challenges of this project was to find and create an incentive for locals to share their personal preferences within an online database. By examining the success of usergenerated content, I hope to develop a campaign, in the form of an app and website that not only promotes the uniqueness of Vancouver, but also creates relationships through personal experiences of both locals and tourists. In deciding what the deliverables would be for my project, I found that I was really drawn to the idea of travel journals and the uniqueness in the recordings of ones personal experience while travelling. I also believe that having a print publication as an alternative holds a deeper sense in recording memories and makes the experience of the user or the observer more personal and visceral. Overall, I believe that the challenge for this project would be to find places, activities, and interests that will not only attract both locals and tourists to participate in but also encourage them to interact with each other throughout the city.

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2 . 3 Desi g n

O bjecti v es I believe that this project will eliminate previous negative connotations about the city and encourage a more positive lifestyle for the tourism community and residents of Vancouver. I hope that it will give an opportunity for both groups to fall in love with city of Vancouver and at the same time develop meaningful connections with each other. In acknowledging and creating awareness of the division between residents of Vancouver, I hope to generate a stronger sense of trust by allowing people to participate and contribute their positive thoughts, opinions, and experiences about the city.

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2 . 4 d esi g n

C riteri a

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2 . 4 .1

User Audience Criteria The project will appeal to a young adult audience (19 -35) who were either raised in Vancouver or are completely new to the city.

2.4.2

Structural Criteria The map will contain a collection of unique places and business, inspired by user generated content. I anticipate the app will influence the user to experience the city in a distinctive and positive way. The website will serve as a informational platform for both the map and the app.

2.4.3

Performance Criteria My project will function as a campaign that will exist through various mediums. In conjunction with experiencing the city in a more personalized way, the second objective of the project is that by simply sharing these experiences with others, it may begin to break the negative connotations of Vancouver as being a “No Fun City.�

2.4.4

Aesthetic Criteria My approach was to create a unique map of Vancouver. The printed map is in the form of a origami fortune teller that allows the user to explore the various neighbourhoods within Vancouver.

2.4.5

2.4.6

Technical Criteria The app serves a platform for users to contribute their own personal experiences of the city. The website highlights a few selected locations based on popularity of the user generated content. Marketing Criteria To effectively promote the objective of the project, I plan on using the website as a promotional platform as well as using posters implemented throughout the city that encourage users to question their knowledge and experience of places in Vancouver. I also took part in filming the locations mentioned within the project to produce a short promotional video on the use of the project to post on video sharing sites such as YouTube and Vimeo.


3 . 0 A u d ience

P rofi l e 3 .1

3.2

3.3

Introduction The target audience is young adults in Vancouver that are either new to the city or have lived in the city for a majority of their life. They have acknowledged that they are currently unhappy with their living situation in the city due to the lack of communication and interaction with other residents and are determined to make a change. Age Factors The audience demographic and user profile that I strived to market towards is for a young to mid age adult market (age 19-35) however, this unlimited access through the website also possesses the opportunity to reach to multiple demographics as well.

3.4

3.5

Gender Factors The project will equally target both males and females. 3.6

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Cultural Factors The challenge within this project was to find the factor that connects residents within Vancouver. Understanding what it is to be a “Vancouverite� will be much easier to examine, however understanding what it is to be a tourist will be more difficult especially when dealing with different cultural backgrounds. Regardless, both groups encompass the same objective; to find new and exciting ways to explore the city of Vancouver. Educational, Knowledge, and Skill Factors Local users will already encompass a general knowledge of the city, and like most tourists, would be searching for places and events that fit specifically to their personal interests. Income Levels Due to the fact that living expenses as well as tourism in Vancouver is known to be absurdly expensive, I envision users of the project to have a small disposable income and will be more attracted to affordable activities.


3.7

3.8

3.9

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Languages Spoken The project itself will be written and designed in English. I realize that by having such a wide range of ethnicities in working with tourists that it may cause some language barriers, however I would like to give tourists the opportunity to share their cultural background. Lifestyle Factors The target audience is young adults that are generally more open to sharing their thoughts, ideas, and experiences of living in the city. From a locals’ perspective, they tend to be busy in terms of work or school and feel the need to take a step back to really explore the city. From a tourists’ perspective, they are more open to trying anything that the city has to offer to fully absorb the cultural uniqueness of Vancouver. Examples of Interaction I imagine the target audience to engage with the project through promotional aspects such as the website and promotional posters. Through marketing strategies such as guerilla tactics throughout the city, I hope that the brand will become familiar to all that live within the city.

3 .1 0

Conclusion In conclusion, I hope that the project will be inviting enough to generate user content from both locals and tourists that strive to eliminate division and encourage meaningful relationships between residents in the city. By sharing their experiences, I hope that it will create new long lasting relationships and a more meaningful appreciation for the city of Vancouver.


4.0 Human

F a ctors At this phase of the project, there are no known physiological, psychological, emotional, sensory factors that might influence or constrain the design of the project. As populations age, there is going to be greater demand placed on designers to make products, environments, and information accessible. The target audience of 19 – 35, will encompass an ability to function with computers as well as smart phone apps. During the prototype and user testing phase, I worked with various participants to determine effective factors in terms of the interface and overall user experience.

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5 . 0 M a rket

R ese a rc h Being a resident of Vancouver myself, I have always noticed certain segregation within the city. I came across the documentary, “No Fun City,� earlier this year and to some extent, I agreed with the ideas that the filmmakers were implying. Having previous experience with travelling to other cities and countries, I felt that Vancouver lacked in welcoming and interacting with the people that we come into contact on a daily basis. Further investigation of market research can be found in Appendix E: Visual Exploration (Existing Precedents).

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Existing Products Yelp This app operates as a social networking app that functions through user generated content. It provides online search resources for visitors based on the type of business, location, accessibility ratings, and reviews. Urbanspoon Similar to Yelp, this app also provides online search capabilities for visitors strictly based on restaurant businesses. It also provides locations, ratings, reviews, and a reservation system called RezBook. yelp

foursquare

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urbanspoon

geocache

FourSquare This app is a location-based social networking website that enables users to “check-in” at locations and events using mobile devices. Using GPS technology, users are awarded points or “badges” based on the locations that they visit. Geocache This smart phone application is “a real-world, outdoor treasure hunting game using GPSenabled devices.” Users attempt to find a hidden container or “geocache” by navigating certain areas around the city using GPS coordinates. Once the location is found, users sign a logbook and return the “geocache” to the original location. They also have the option of sharing their stories and photos online. Locations range from local parks, hiking trails, underwater, or city streets.


5.3

Benchmarks

5.4

By examining the existing apps, websites, and products available, I have been able to grasp a better understanding of effective strategies that I may use within my project. Websites such as “Local Insight” have given me a better understanding of Vancouver culture and have also inspired me to explore the places and “hidden gems” mentioned within the site. The apps that I have researched have also given me ideas as to the activities that I would like to include to encourage users to engage with the project. As of April 2012, Foursquare as reported 20 million registered users with over 3 million check-ins per day.

Stay Local Stay Local is a local website that promotes six key neighborhoods in Vancouver: The Westside, Downtown, Gastown, Chinatown, East Van, and the Drive. The site strives to promote local Vancouver attractions based on food, drink, retail, nightlife, arts, and culture. Local Insight | Things to Do in Vancouver This website contains updated articles written by local bloggers and experts on Vancouver that articulates different perspectives on things to do in Vancouver. Featured articles include “10 Ways to Fit in with Vancouver Locals,” “Romantic Vancouver,” and “20 Reasons I Love Vancouver.” Vancouver Is Awesome This website is an online community-based social website that promotes sharing positive stories of arts, culture, lifestyle, and news surrounding Vancouver. The site is designed as a blog like format however, it also gives the user the option of exploring weekly feature categories that include cheap stuff, interesting people, independent music, neighborhood pics, and so on.

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Summary Research Sources

5.5

Market Testing I began my market testing with a simple online survey of 10 questions regarding how people feel living within the city, what their personal preferences are based on particular categories, and how people have adapted to online social media.

5.6

Conclusion I believe that in promoting the city of Vancouver based on “hidden gems,” will persuade users to not only explore the city from a different perspective but also formulate a sense of pride for the people, places, and culture that makes Vancouver so distinctive. The development and success of the apps mentioned above also proves that there is an appreciation for an online presence that corresponds with a physical one. I hope that the content generated by the intended users will improve the relationships and experiences of both locals and tourists.


6 . 0 F e a sibi l it y

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6 .1

Production The production of the project will take place from September 2012 until April 2013. Factors that may influence the success of the project might include budget, time, resources, knowledge, skills, and materials.

6.2

Audience Response I strive to work with both locals and tourists that are passionate about living in Vancouver.

6.3

Research The first few months consisted of primary and secondary research. During this time, I gained a deeper understanding to the negative implications of isolation between residents of Vancouver, as well as how people navigate and explore the city.


7. 0 E d u c a tion a l

Go a l s With this project, I hope to gain a better perspective of both positive and negative behavioral patterns between locals and tourists in Vancouver. In doing so I will strive to explore the solutions that have the potential to eliminate Vancouver’s title as the “No Fun City.� During my four years at Emily Carr University, I have taken various courses such as typography, web essentials, art direction and so on that have given me the basic skills and knowledge that I can apply to this project. My experiences within these courses have enabled me to work thoroughly through various Adobe programs such as InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, and AfterEffects. I hope that with this project, I will learn to improve these skills and assets. I realize that I may lack in interaction design aspect of this project, however with in depth research and collaboration with other experienced designers in the field, I hope to gain a better understanding on interface design and web development.

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Overall, I hope to understand the significance of communication design as it fits to the needs of the cultural community within Vancouver. In terms of communication design, I hope that my exploration within issues involving the lifestyle and tourism in Vancouver will widen my knowledge of cultural sustainability. I also hope to become more adept at using software for design and production purposes and improve my written, oral, and visual presentation skills.


8.0

C ont a ct

I nfor m a tion The primary investigator of this research is myself, Fiona Samson. I am a fourth year design student at Emily Carr University of Art + Design majoring in Communication Design. I may be reached by: Email: fsamson87@gmail.com or fsamson@ecuad.ca Phone: 778-828-7837 Website: www.fionasamson.com The faculty supervisors for this project were Deborah Shackleton, Gilly Mah, and Chris Hethrington. They are the instructors of the Core Design course at ECUAD, DESN410: 2D Core Design Studio. They can be contacted by: Email: dshack@ecuad.ca gmah@ecuad.ca chethrington@ecuad.ca

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Phone: 604-844-3800


9.0

sc h e d u l e &

d e l i v er a b l es Fall Semester 2012 Phase One: Design Development Research, Design Thesis Proposal, 10 x 10 Presentation Phase Two: Concept Development, Visual Exploration, Research Summary, Prototype Phase Three: Project Development, Modeling, Prototype Iterations Phase Four: Project Development, Testable Prototype, Presentations Spring Semester 2013 Phase Seven: Final Project and Prototype Due Phase Eight: Undergrad Research Symposium, Final Files Due, Degree Exhibition

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The production of this project will take place from September 2012 to April 2013. The first four phases of the fall semester have been illustrated in a Gantt Chart, which can be found in Appendix F: Gantt Chart. The final proposed design for this project consists of a printed map, a phone app, and a promotional we. It will include various activities and suggestions on how to explore the city of Vancouver, so that the user may experience the city in a more abstract way and in turn share their experiences with others to create a sense of a more sociable community.


a ppen d i x a a n n o tat e d b i b l i o g r a p h y No Fun City James, Melissa, and Kate Kroll. No Fun City. Film. This documentary explores the decline of independent live music venues in Vancouver due to proliferation of condo developments, the commercialization of large music venues, and strict city zoning and liquor regulations. Hence, the name given to Vancouver as the “No Fun City.” The film follows the trials and tribulations of small local venues that have been raided, shut down, and in some cases evicted by police officials, and as a result have resorted to playing in illegal venues, warehouses, and parking lots. Carman, Tara. “Part One: Social Isolation Has Far-reaching Effects on Us and Our Neighbours, Survey Says.” www.vancouversun.com. Web. 14 Oct. 2012. This article from the Vancouver Sun illustrates the division between local residents in Vancouver. The article describes a survey, titled “Connections and Engagement,” that was conducted by the Vancouver Foundation about how “residents feel increasingly estrange from their friends, their neighbors and their communities.” The article also articulates the negative effects of insulated neighborhoods such as increased crime rates and health effects such as high blood pressure and dementia. People who reportedly felt more alone than others also tend to have general negative views of their neighborhoods and communities.

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Moxley, Mitch. “Welcome To Vancouver: ‘No Fun City’.” Huffington Post 5 Oct. 2012. Web. 14 Oct. 2012. This article written by Mitch Moxley and featured in the Huffington Post, illustrates the authors’ perspective on why Vancouver has been titled the “No Fun City.” Similar to the documentary, Moxley also points out the many reasons as to why the city lacks in genuine entertainment such as dull nightlife, few music venues, arbitrary liquor laws, cold weather, expensive housing prices, shortage of young professionals, and few late night public transportation options. Sulyma, Jason. “Vancouver: An Imperfect But Perfectly Fun City, A Rebuttal.” Huffington Post British Columbia. 6 Nov. 2012. Web. 6 Oct. 2012. This article was written as a rebuttal to the title of “No Fun City” that Vancouver has been infamously dubbed. Although Sulyma agrees that Vancouvers cultural scene is far from perfect, there is still much to appreciate about the city other than the obvious such as the Granville Street strip. As for the debate on Vancouver as an anti-social city, Sulyma makes some interesting observations. Other than financial issues and weather restrictions, he articulates that one of the main factors as to why residents in Vancouver are so disconnected is because we are so fascinated with our digital self in social media. Sulyma also examines the problems involving transit service, liquor laws, and art funding.


Responsible Tourism “Budapest Go Local: Responsible Travel.” Web. 6 Oct. 2012. This section of the Budapest Underguide highlights the positive aspects of “Responsible Tourism,” which is defined by the Capetown Declaration 2002 and the Kerala Declaration 2008. According to the site, “Responsible Tourism is an approach, which can be used by travelers and holidaymakers, accommodation and transport providers” that “seeks to maximize positive economic, environmental, and social impacts and to minimize negative ones.” Their objective is to minimize negative impacts of global tourism by promoting economic, environmental, and social responsibility, as well as building bridges between travelers and locals through more meaningful connections that provides a deeper understanding of local culture. “Budapest Underguide | Budapest Conference,Team Building Budapest,Visit Budapest.” Web. 6 Oct. 2012. Budapest Underguide is an online travel agency located in Budapest, Hungary, that specializes in tailor made itineraries for both global and local clients. They provide people of every age, profession, gender, and class with various interests. Each walking tour and private guide is unique and tailored to the individual based on his or her interests.

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Goodwin, Harold, and Venu V. “Responsible Tourism 2008.” Kerala Declaration. Web. 6 Oct. 2012. This website highlights the Kerala Declaration on Responsible Tourism, which is a concept that focuses on local economy, well-being, local culture, and environment. They believe that interactions between tourists and local people can exist within a local level however; local communities and tourism businesses need to posses a common understanding. The site articulates that Responsible Tourism is not a product but rather a community that needs to by managed properly in order to sustain it.


Local Insight Chadwick, Mike. Vancouver in Focus: The City’s Built Form. Vancouver: Granville Island Publishing, 2006. Print. This book is an artistic collection of contemporary black and white photography of Vancouver’s architecture and landmarks by author Mike Chadwick. It not only celebrates the ongoing growth of architectural development but also the city’s ability to grow within a natural scenic setting. Chadwick’s approach to the content of the book was to avoid the stereotypical photos of the city skyline, mountains, and so on but rather individual scenes and the details within them. Coupland, Douglas. City of Glass. Douglas & McIntyre, 2000. Print. This book features short essays and photographs by Coupland that illustrate his hometown of Vancouver. Each essay and the images that accompany them display a different aspect of the city. Some titles Coupland highlights include the more tourist attractions such as Grouse Mountain, Stanley Park, and Whistler, as well as the more obscure aspects of Vancouver such as Dim Sum, Trees, Grow-Ops, and The Big One. Through his descriptions of these particular areas, Coupland articulates that “people want to know what Vancouver feels like to somebody who lives here – from the inside out.” “Vancouver - Local Insight | Things to Do in Vancouver.” Web. 14 Oct. 2012. This website contains updated articles written by local bloggers and experts on Vancouver that articulates different perspectives on things to do in Vancouver. Featured articles include “10 Ways to Fit in with Vancouver Locals,” “Romantic Vancouver,” and “20 Reasons I Love Vancouver.” “Vancouver Is Awesome.” Web. 6 Oct. 2012. Vancouver is Awesome is an online community-based social website that promotes sharing positive stories of arts, culture, lifestyle, and news surrounding Vancouver. The site is designed as a blog like format however, it also gives the user the option of exploring weekly feature categories that include cheap stuff, interesting people, independent music, neighborhood pics, and so on.

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Existing Precedents Groundspeak, Inc. “Geocaching - The Official Global GPS Cache Hunt Site.” Geocaching - The Official Global GPS Cache Hunt Site. Web. 14 Oct. 2012. This smart phone application is “a real-world, outdoor treasure hunting game using GPSenabled devices.” Users attempt to find a hidden container or “geocache” by navigating certain areas around the city using GPS coordinates. Once the location is found, users sign a logbook and return the “geocache” to the original location. They also have the option of sharing their stories and photos online. Locations range from local parks, hiking trails, underwater, or city streets. “Stay Local.” Web. 6. Oct. 2012. Stay Local is a local website that promotes six key neighborhoods in Vancouver: The Westside, Downtown, Gastown, Chinatown, East Van, and the Drive. The site strives to promote local Vancouver attractions based on food, drink, retail, nightlife, arts, and culture.

Design Strategies Himpe, Tom. Advertising Next: 150 Winning Campaigns for the New Communications Age. San Chronicle Books, 2008. Print. Francisco: This book provides numerous examples of successful marketing and advertising campaigns from across the globe. Within each chapter, Tom Himpe provides insight on how to create successful campaigns such as be playful, contagious, a storyteller, sociable, collaborative, supportive, and green. Pricken, Mario. Creative Strategies: Idea Management for Marketing, Advertising, Media and Design. New York: Thames & Hudson, 2010. Print. In this book, Mario Pricken highlights the key to successful advertising and marketing through various campaigns from all over the world. Examples range from print, product, and installations.

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a ppen d i x b L i t e r at u r e r e v i e w No Fun City My interest in exploring certain negative behavioral patterns in Vancouver originated from a documentary titled “No Fun City”, which was written and filmed by former Vancouverites, Melissa James and Kate Kroll. The documentary explores the decline of independent live music venues in Vancouver due to the proliferation of condo developments, the commercialization of large music venues, and strict city zoning and liquor regulations. Hence, the name given to Vancouver as the “No Fun City.” The film follows the trials and tribulations of small local venues that had been raided by law enforcement, shut down, and in some cases evicted. As a result, some had resorted to playing in illegal venues, warehouses and even parking lots. Since the films debut in 2010, various Vancouver residents as well as visitors have written several articles regarding the issues behind the city’s lack of fun. According to an online poll titled “Is Vancouver a ‘No Fun City’,” conducted by Global BC in 2008, a majority of residents agree that Vancouver is a “boring” city. The results of the poll were as is: 70% say that “yes, it feels like other big cities have so much more going on” whereas 29% say “no, there’s plenty to do here, we’re definitely fun!”

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One article, written by Mitch Moxley for the Huffington Post, illustrates the authors’ perspective on why Vancouver has been titled the “No Fun City.” Similar to the documentary, Moxley also points out the many reasons as to why the city lacks in genuine entertainment such as the dull nightlife, lack of music venues, arbitrary liquor laws, bothersome cold weather, expensive housing prices, shortage of young professionals, and few late night public transportation options. He states, “newcomers to the city reported struggling to meet new people and make friends, a complaint I’ve heard from every person I know who has moved to No Fun City.” In comparison to the article, blogger Jason Sulyma wrote another article published in the Huffington Post titled “Vancouver: An Imperfect But Perfectly Fun City, A Rebuttal.” Sulyma suggests that Vancouver’s cultural scene is far from perfect, however there is still much to appreciate about the city other than the more commercial scenes such as the Granville Street strip. He suggests alternatives in finding the “hidden gems” of Vancouver in smart phone apps such as The Georgia Straight, Westender, or social media mediums such as Facebook and Twitter. As for the debate on Vancouver as an anti-social city,

Sulyma makes some interesting observations. Other than financial issues and weather restrictions, he articulates that one of the main factors as to why residents in Vancouver are so disconnected is because we are so fascinated with our digital self in social media. He states, “it’s cheaper to look cool on the internet than to support something in person”. In addition to the rise of social media, he also examines the problems involving transit service, liquor laws, and art funding. However, Vancouver city is still considered fairly young at barely 100 years old, therefore local culture and communities are still in its early development. In conclusion, “Vancouver isn’t perfect” but the city has the potential to fill it with various cultures and event niches.


An article published in the Vancouver Sun titled “Part One: Social Isolation Has Farreaching Effects on Us and Our Neighbors,” also illustrates the division between local residents in Vancouver. The article describes a survey, titled “Connections and Engagement,” that was conducted by the Vancouver Foundation about how “residents feel increasingly estrange from their friends, their neighbors and their communities” which surprisingly beat out other underlying issues such as homelessness, drug abuse and affordability. Some troubling results from the respondents include Vancouver being one of the most difficult place to make friends, people having little interest in knowing their neighbors, lack of volunteer involvement in their communities, and an inability to live comfortably due to financial situations. The article also articulates the negative effects of isolated neighborhoods such as increased crime rates and health effects. Another study shows that loneliness can affect the immune system, which in turn makes people vulnerable to disease. According to a Sentis analysis, “people who reported feeling alone are most likely to be between the ages of 25 and 34, single, living alone in an apartment and experiencing financial strain.”

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People who reportedly felt more alone than others also tend to have general negative views of their neighborhoods and communities. In terms of the multiculturalism that Vancouver is proudly admired for, local resident Bob Cowin explains that it may be the cause of language barriers, which in turn makes it difficult to maintain relationships. Oddly enough, Clement suggests that a natural disaster, like the long awaited major earthquake on the B.C. coast, may have the potential to pull societies together.


Responsible Tourism During my initial research phase, I came across the term “Responsible Tourism” through the Budapest Underguide website, which is an online travel agency located in Budapest, Hungary, that specializes in tailor made itineraries for both global and local clients. The term “Responsible Tourism” which is defined by the Capetown Declaration 2002 and the Kerala Declaration 2008, “is an approach, which can be used by travelers and holidaymakers, accommodation and transport providers” that “seeks to maximize positive economic, environmental, and social impacts and to minimize negative ones.” Their objective is to minimize negative impacts of global tourism by promoting economic, environmental, and social responsibility, as well as building bridges between travelers and locals through more meaningful connections that provides a deeper understanding of local culture. Their definition of the “Responsible Traveler” is that they not only look for real personal experiences but they strive to be part of the destination. The value authentic, deep travel experience through local traditions, cultures, and rituals rather than those created for tourism. I found this source to be particularly helpful in trying to find solutions to Vancouver’s isolation problem.

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According to the Kerala Declaration on Responsible Tourism, which is a concept that focuses on local economy, well-being, local culture, and environment, interactions between tourists and local people can exist within a local level however, local communities and tourism businesses need to posses a common understanding. The site articulates that Responsible Tourism is not a product but rather a community that needs to by managed properly in order to sustain it. Recognizing that “tourism can be a tool to conserve and enhance local natural and cultural heritage,” the declaration also strives to minimize negative economic, environmental, and social impacts, involve local people in decisions that affect everyday life, provide enjoyable experiences for tourists through connections with local people, and provide access for physically challenged people. In all, the declaration articulates that “recognizing the experience, knowledge, and skills of communities, we can listen and learn from them” and the experiences of others. The site also provides solutions as to promote the idea of Responsible Tourism such as education, raising awareness through campaigns, and media coverage.


Local Insight A book that particularly inspired me to explore the different perspectives on exploring the city of Vancouver was Douglas Coupland’s book, “City of Glass.” This book features short essays and photographs taken by Coupland that illustrate his hometown of Vancouver. Each essay and the images that accompany them display a different aspect of the city. Some titles Coupland highlights include the more tourist attractions such as Grouse Mountain, Stanley Park, and Whistler, as well as the more obscure aspects of Vancouver such as Dim Sum, Trees, Grow-Ops, and The Big One. Through his descriptions of these particular areas, Coupland articulates, “people want to know what Vancouver feels like to somebody who lives here – from the inside out.” The book was designed to mimic an underground Japanese magazine, which also supports Couplands’ attempt to illustrate his own personal take and love for the city.

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A more visual approach to exploring Vancouver can be found in Mike Chadwick’s “Vancouver in Focus: The City’s Build Form.” This book is an artistic collection of contemporary black and white photography of Vancouver’s architecture and landmarks by author Mike Chadwick. It not only celebrates the ongoing growth of architectural development but also the city’s ability to grow within a natural scenic setting. Chadwick’s approach to the content of the book was to avoid the stereotypical photos of the city skyline, mountains, and so on but rather individual scenes that people fail to recognize and the details within them. Chadwick reflects on his experience in publishing his book and states, “assembling this collection was a learning experience and a personal journey, one which I’m happy to be able to share.”


a ppen d i x F gantt chart

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JANUARY

FEBRUARY

MARCH

APRIL

SER TESTING REFINE PROTOTYPE

USER TESTING

FINAL DESIGN ITERATIONS

EXHIBIT DESIGN

2013 SPRING SEMESTER

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PHASE ONE

PHASE FIVE

PHASE TWO

PHASE SIX

PHASE THREE

PHASE SEVEN

PHASE FOUR

PHASE EIGHT


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P R OC E SS

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m in d

m a ppin g With the initial brainstorm session in the beginning of this project, I realized that I wanted to focus on culture perspectives within the city of Vancouver. As a relatively new resident to the city, one aspect that interested me the most was the act of storytelling and sharing different experiences of living in Vancouver.

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37


v a nco u v er

m oo d bo a r d

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PROTOTYPE MOBILE APP, IPAD APP, OR WEBSITE?

interactive book

KAT E PO CRASS

KE RI SM ITH

• A guided travel journal encourages users to explore the easily overlooked and wonderful everyday details encountered while traveling, whether near or far away

• Smith proposes to document and observe the world around you as if you’ve never seen it before

FO U RSQ UA RE •

Enables users to “check-in” at locations and events using mobile devices

G E O C AC HE •

iphone app

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a real-world, outdoor treasure hunting game using GPS-enabled devices.


V I S I T VA N CO U V E R

ipad app

• • • • •

Take a digital Tour of the city Learn how to get to and from Vancouver Find Accommodation Choose a Restaurant Use the Calendar and Magazine to get an insider’s perspective

J O N ATH A N H A R R I S

website

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• Developed 10 x 10, We Feel Fine, Cowbird • Goal: to build a public library of human experience • Knowledge & wisdom accumulated may live on as a part of the commons, available for present and future generations • Community of storytellers • Automatically find connections between your life and others


on l ine

survey http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/S9SJ5Z7

93 RESPONDENTS

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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

What is your age? What is your gender? What do you like about Vancouver? Is there anything that you don’t like? How often do you try new things? List 5 of your favorite places in Vancouver. What type of places do you usually attend to? How do you search for new places or events? What words best describe what Vancouver means to you? Describe a significant memory or experience.


survey

res u l ts gen der

age

try som et h ing new

sometimes rarely 57%

38%

18-24

25-34

2% 55-64

1%

32%

65-74

LIKES

D I SL I K E S

1 NATURE

other

1 weather

other

2 FOOD

sushi

2 transit

low wages

3 PARKS

music shows

3 politics

high living cost

4 BEACHES

multiculturalism

4 nightlife

architecture

5 people

5 EVENTS

top p laces to v isit 1 restaurants 2 outdoor activities 3 music venues 4 pubs 5 bars

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always

68%

}

he a r d t hro u gh

d escriptiv e words

west coast laid back friendly 1 friends 2 social media 3 websites

hipster trendy food


a pp

m oo d bo a r d

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a pp site m a p

FILTER

CAMERA • • • • •

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KEYWORD PHOTO VIDEO DATE LOCATION

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Popular Everything Animals Architecture Art Cars Design Education Film Music Food & Drink Beauty Health History Holidays & Events Home Humor Fashion Outdoor Photography Products Science Nature Sports Technology Travel

PROFILE

CAMERA

CHOOSE EXISTING

• • • •

Profile Picture Stories/Photos Followers Following

FIND FRIENDS SETTINGS • Username • Language • Facebook, Twitter Settings • Terms & Privacy • Logout • Cancel


LOADING PAGE

LOGIN

HOME

EXPLORE

POST STORY PHOTO VIDEO

RECOMMENDED ITINERARY RECENT VISITS FAVORITES MAP ACTIVITIES

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REGISTER

• • • • • • •

Name Create User ID Create Password Confirm Password Email Address Register VIA Facebook, Twitter, Email Address • LOCAL OR TOURIST?


w irefr a m e

Home Label

Logout Label

TITLE

TITLE

TITLE

Label Logout

TITLE

Home Label

TITLE

TITLE

TITLE

TITLE

TITLE

TITLE

TITLE

TITLE

TITLE

TITLE

TITLE

Home Label

Logout Label

TITLE

TITLE

TITLE

HOME SCREEN VIEWING OPTIONS: SALON + MOSAIC + SCROLL MAIN ICONS: EXPLORE + CAMERA + PROFILE + MORE

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LOADING PAGE

DRAW A RANDOM SHAPE

ACTIVITIES ABSTRACT ACTIVITIES THAT INTERACT WITH USER APPLIED TO GOOGLE MAPS (SPECIFICALLY VANCOUVER)

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NOW FOLLOW IT


PROTOTYPE

USER TESTING My initial prototype was for an iPad app and was developed as an interactive PDF. I tested the prototype on 10 different people. What I got from the user testing is that the app may work better as a phone app rather than an iPad. I also realized that I didn’t want the app as the main feature for my project due to technical constraints and skill, however the user feedback definitely gave me some insight on further development for other components of the project including colour palette, branding, and featured locations based on user suggestions.

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Interactive PDFScreenshots of Activities

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Lo g o

I nspir a tion

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(the name)

w on d er l u st An obsession with traveling. Not necessarily long distances. someone who travels without ceasing, usually from town to town in order to find adventure and excitement. waonderlust stems from a desire to escape routine and responsibility. However, during the user testing phase I realized that the name wasn’t appropriate for the concept of the project.

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(the name)

l ost & fo u n d A repository in a public place, as in a school or theater, where found items are kept for reclaiming by their owners. Lost and found are things which someone has lost and which someone else has found.

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typography exploration


logo exploration

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The

B r a n d m a rk brandmark:

sample:

FACETS NF KNOCKOUT JUNIOR BANTAMWT brandmark:

BASE NINE NORMAL ONE

KNOCKOUT JUNIOR BANTAMWT 58

sample:


t y pe

p a l ette

SECONDARY PALETTE:

TUNGSTEN MEDIUM

GOTHAM BOOK

CAECILLIA 55 ROMAN

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WELCOME

TO THE CITY OF VANCOUVER Bordered by the Coast Mountain Range and the Pacific Ocean, Vancouver is recognized as one of the world’s most livable cities with one of the smallest carbon footprints of any major city in North America.


co l o u r g u i d e I created a colour palette that was inspired by user feedback. I asked participants what colours they felt best described the city of Vancouver. A majority of the responses described Vancouver as a very young, lush, and earthy environment.

EXPLORATION primary

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secondary

C: 21 M: 78 Y: 73 K: 8

R: 185 G: 88 B: 71

C: 26 M: 7 Y: 64 K: 0

R: 185 G: 88 B: 71

C: 51 M: 61 Y: 67 K: 42

R: 91 G: 71 B: 60

C: 8 M: 17 Y: 20 K: 0

R: 230 G: 207 B: 193

C: 55 M: 86 Y: 6 K: 0

R: 124 G:182 B: 125

C: 12 M: 25 Y: 55 K: 0

R: 223 G: 188 B: 130

C: 56 M: 6 Y: 4 K: 0

R: 109 G: 187 B: 181

C: 23 M: 63 Y: 79 K: 8

R: 183 G: 108 B: 69


FINAL PALETTE

primary

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secondary

C: 92 M: 51 Y: 52 K: 29

R: 1 G: 84 B: 92

C: 0 R: 0 M: 0 G: 0 Y: 0 B: 0 K: 100

C: 57 M: 6 Y: 31 K: 0

R: 108 G: 187 B: 181

C: 41 R: 144 M: 42 G: 122 Y: 100 B: 0 K: 14

C: 1 M: 25 Y: 34 K: 0

R: 247 G:197 B: 164

C: 29 M: 26 Y: 25 K: 0

R: 183 G: 177 B: 177


map

m oo d bo a r d

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63


v a nco u v er

nei g h bo u r h oo d s

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map

print v ersion ILLUSTRATED MAP (FIRST ITERATION)

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ILLUSTRATED MAP (SECOND ITERATION)

L

f

VOLUME ONE - SPRING 2013 ISSUE Lost and Found is a guide to finding the local, hidden gems of the city of Vancouver. To promote the significance of localism, the guide highlights a compilation of independent businesses and noteworthy locations inspired and generated by local insight.

BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE LOCALS OF THE

EAT

DNR

DRINK

ART & CULTURE

MUSIC

SHOP ( YOU’RE WELCOME ) VISIT WWW.LOSTANDFOUNDVAN.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION

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PAPER PROTOTYPES Inspired by Chinese Fortune Tellers This prototype encourages the user to interact with the map in a more playful way. It also allows them to choose the places they would like to visit based on certain preferences such as budget, weather, energy level, etc.

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DIGITAL PROTOTYPES The paper prototypes definitely helped with figuring out not only the dimensions but also how the content would be laid out. I tried different colour palettes as well as photographs that corresponded with the locations featured on the map.

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FINAL ITERATION This iteration is based on the 8 different neighbourhoods of Vancouver and the unique locations that reside in them. The user can choose places to visit based on the location. These locations are also marked on the illustrated map and are colour coordinated based on categories such as food, drink, art and culture, and DNR (Diamonds in the Rough), which are more underground places rather than businesses.

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map

on l ine v ersion Generated through MapBox (application) FIRST ITERATIONS I wanted to try different approach to the colour palette for the online map.

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FINAL ITERATION This map will serve as a feature on the promotional website that highlights the places featured on the printed map. I went with a more neutral colour palette so that the markers wouldn’t blend in with the map. LINK: http://tiles.mapbox.com/fsamson87/map/map-fa1hnaz6

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P ro m otion a l

b a nners

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pro m otion a l

postc a r d s

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w ebsite

m oo d bo a r d

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Website First Iterations

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Second Iterations The website will serve as a platform for the campaign and will contain basic information on what the project stands for. I wanted the site to be visually stimulating rather than text heavy. The map would be the main feature of the site where the user is able to filter the specified locations either as images or locations on the map. Like the printed fortune teller map, filtering options are primarily based on neighbourhoods and then narrowed down by specific categories. Due to time constraints and lack of coding skills, this site will remain a prototype rather than a live site.

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P ro m otion a l

Vi d eo For the promotional website I plan on showcasing for the grad show, I wanted to create a short promotional video that will show clips of the different neighbourhoods within Vancouver. I also wanted to provide clues as to how the neighbourhoods differ from each other and the different aspects that make them so exclusive.

(ROUGH CUT VERSION 1 - CLICK TO PLAY)

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STORYBOARD

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C onc l u sion Overall, this project has given me the opportunity to explore the city through the eyes of different perspectives and in turn I have gained a new appreciation for the city. Although the platform of this project is fictional at this stage, I hope that the content of the project will encourage both locals and visitors to share their opinions and experiences within the city and in turn encourage them to seek and support independent businesses and remote places that make Vancouver the young, exciting city that it is today. In the future, I would like to carry on with this project as a blog with my own reviews that will focus more on art, culture, and music within the city.

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THE SHOW 2013 EMILY CARR UNIVERSITY OF ART + DESIGN

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Lost and Found