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Abbey Farm

LEAP

LEA

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Abbey Farm, Blunsdon St Andrew

Design and Access Statement December 2013


Abbey Farm Design and Access Statement

Author Checked by: Approved by: Position: Date:

DPDS Consulting Group Old Bank House 5 Devizes Road Old Town Swindon SN1 4BJ Copyright The contents of this document must not be reproduced in whole or in part without the express written consent of © DPDS Consulting Group Mapping reproduced from Ordnance Survey mapping with the sanction of the Controller of H. M. Stationery Office, © Crown Copyright Reserved. DPDS Consulting Group. Licence No AL100018937

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The Abbey Farm Project Team DPDS Consulting Group Master Planning and Urban Design Planning Policies and Procedures Landscape Visual Impact Assessment Socio Economics Development Environmental Impact Assessment Co-ordination and Management Environmental Statement Writing and Production Recreation Community Consultation

Cole Easdon Consultants Transportation Assessment and Highway Design Infrastructure Assessment and Design Ground Conditions and Contamination Assessment Hydrology and Water Resources Assessment

Reading Agricultural Consultants Agricultural Assessment

Ecosulis Ecology

Cotswold Archaeology Archaeology and Cultural Heritage

Acoustic Consultants Noise/Vibration

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Contents 1.0

Introduction...................................................................... Statutory provisions.......................................................... Requirements of the Design and Access Statement......... The Proposal..................................................................... Planning policy context..................................................... National ............................................................................

2.0

3.0

Introduction 1 1 1 3 3 3

Appraisal Context.............................................................................. 6 Site Context....................................................................... 7 Character Assessment....................................................... 8 The Site............................................................................. 11 Site Description................................................................. 11 Topography and Views...................................................... 13 Flood Plain and Drainage.................................................. 14 Habitat and Vegetation..................................................... 14 Statutory Designations...................................................... 15 Archaeology...................................................................... 15 Noise................................................................................. 15 Access and Movement...................................................... 16 Highways and Access......................................................... 16 Pedestrian and Cycle Network........................................... 16 Public Transport................................................................ 16 Land use and Neighbourhood Structure........................... 17 Retail................................................................................. 17 Employment...................................................................... 17 Education.......................................................................... 17 Leisure............................................................................... 17 Open Space....................................................................... 18 Utilities.............................................................................. 18

Proposals Introduction...................................................................... Aims and Objectives......................................................... Summary Amount............................................................ Landscape and Use........................................................... Formal Open Space.......................................................... Informal Open Space........................................................ Green Corridors................................................................ Drainage........................................................................... Trees and Hedgerows........................................................ Visual Impact..................................................................... Access and Movement...................................................... Vehicular Access............................................................... Pedestrian and cycle Access............................................. Public Transport................................................................ Internal Movement.......................................................... Inclusivity.......................................................................... Layout................................................................................ Structure........................................................................... Urban Form...................................................................... Scale and Appearance....................................................... Building heights/Massing................................................. Densities........................................................................... Building Footprint Areas................................................... Housing Provision............................................................. Landmark Buildings.......................................................... Views and Vistas............................................................... Key frontages..................................................................... Character Areas................................................................ Sustainability.....................................................................

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Abbey Farm

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1.0 Introduction Document 5 Abbey Farm - Design and Access Statement

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1.0 Introduction

Requirements of DAS

1.1 This Design and Access Statement has been prepared by DPDS Consulting Group and is being submitted in support of an outline planning application (all matters reserved apart from means of access) to Swindon Borough Council for residential development on the land at Abbey Farm, Tadpole Lane, Swindon. The intention of this document is to explain the design rationale behind development and communicate how the scheme has been developed with detailed thought as to meeting all appropriate design and access considerations. The document should be read in conjunction with other documents supporting the outline planning application.

1.6 A Design and Access Statement should explain the design principles and concepts that have been applied to the particular been applied to the particular aspects of the proposed developments. The level of detail required in a Design and Access Statement is determined by statutory requirement and the scope of matters reserved in the application.

Statutory Provisions 1.2 This Design and Access Statement has prepared and submitted in accordance with the provisions of Section 42 (5) of the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004, and Article 8 of The Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (England) Order 2010 (as amended by The Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (England) (Amendment) Order 2013).

1.7 The 01/2006 Circular confirms that outline planning applications must include details on use and amount of development and any other matters for which planning permission is sought. Where reserved, at least a basic level of information on layout, scale, access is required. In addition the Circular introduces requirements for the minimum amount of information to be submitted with an outline application, although to some extent these provisions have been superseded due to the 2012 amendments to the DMPO specified in section 1.2. Each of these matters addressed by this Design and Access Statement are summarised by DPDS in table 1 with amendment by DPDS to reflect amendments to the DMPO.

1.3 In accordance with Article 4 of The Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (England) Order 2010 (DMPO) (as recently amended by Article 3 of The Town and Country Planning (Development Management Procedure) (England) (Amendment No. 3) Order 2012), where an ‘Layout’ and ‘Scale’ are reserved matters there is no longer the requirement to provide any minimum level of detail on these matters (ie. No requirement to state the approximate location of buildings, routes and open spaces and where scale is a reserved matter; the application must state the upper and lower limit for the height, width and length of each building. Accordingly any information with in this Design and Access Statement with respect to these matters is provided for illustrative purposes only, unless expressly stated otherwise.

Figure 2. View of eastern hedgerow

Figure 3. View of eastern end of site looking north-west

1.4 The Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) Circular 01/2006 provides further detailed guidance on requirements, including those specific to outline applications. Accordingly the primary purpose of this statement is to explain; “the design principles and concepts that have been applied to the proposed development and how issues relating to access to the development have been dealt with.” (Paragraph 80). 1.5 This Design and Access Statement has been prepared in accordance with this statutory guidance and “Design and Access Statements – How to write, read and use them” 2006 by the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE). Figure 1. Design and Access Statement CABE Guidance

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(CABE)

Figure 4. View of eastern end of site looking north

(DPDS)

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Design and Access Statement Requirements (summary by DPDS)

Use

Explanation of the proposed use or mix of uses of buildings, their distribution across the site, the appropriateness of the access to and between them and relationship to surrounding uses. Justification of the choice of development ‘zones’ or blocks should also be provided. For outline applications the statement should provide an explanation of how the principles of design and access will be addressed in detailed design.

Amount of Development

Details of how much development is proposed, including numbers of residential units and proposed floorspace of other uses. Where a range of upper and lower level development parameters are given this should be justified.

Indicative layout (for illustrative purposes only)

The way in which buildings, routes and open spaces are provided and their orientation. Although the DMPO no longer requires any detail of Layout to be provided for outline applications, this DAS includes an illustrative layout of the land use development ‘zones’ and an illustrative layout of how blocks of buildings may be arranged. For outline applications the statement should provide an explanation of how the principles of design and access will be addressed in detailed design.

Scale Parameters (for illustrative purposes only)

Although the DMPO no longer requires any detail to be provided for outline applications, this DAS indicates various scale parameters for illustrative purposes, with maximum and minimum details sufficient to give the 3D parameters for development.

Appearance (For illustrative purposes only)

For outline planning applications where the external appearance of buildings is reserved, the Design & Access Statement should justify the principles governing the detailed external design of buildings and landscaping.

Indicative access points

Appraising the context

Explanation of how local context has influenced the design and the proposed use. For outline applications an assessment of the site’s immediate and wider context in terms of social, physical and economic characteristics is required, including relevant planning policies and details of community involvement. Local context should be discussed in relation to the scheme as a whole, rather than specifically in relation to the individual components above.

The areas where the access points to the site will be situated to create means of access to the road along with an indicative internal layout to the main estate roads. For outline applications the principles which will be used to inform the future design of access should be included. It is important to note that the wording of 62(5) relates only to ‘access to the development’ and does not therefore extend to the internal access provisions of individual developments and buildings.

Table 1. Design and Access Statement requirement summary by DPDS

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Landscape

Principles identified for the treatment of private and public spaces in the scheme with an illustrative layout of open space. Relationship to the surrounding area and details of how the landscaping will be maintained.

(amended to reflect DMPO 2012)

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The Proposal 1.8 • • • •

The proposed development at Abbey Farm includes: Up to 350 dwellings, including general market and affordable homes‘C3 Use Class’; Provision for a small convenience store (up to 500m2 GFA ‘A1 Use Class’ with residential accommodation above); 8.21 ha Formal and Informal Public Open Space, including 2 Local Equipped Areas for Play (LEAPs); x ha of additional open space and green infrastructure, including x ha of nature conservation/landscape enhancement area and surface water infiltration drainage basins; and Associated infrastructure, including roads, drainage and landscaping.

Planning Policy Context 1.9 A detailed précis of relevant planning policy is set out in the Planning Supporting Statement which forms part of this application. We therefore set out below only those aspects related to design considerations.

National 1.10 The National Planning Policy Framework March 2012 (NPPF) sets out the Governments commitment to good design: 1.11 The NPPF sets out the importance to be attached to the built environment. 1.12

Paragraph 57 states:

“It is important to plan positively for the achievement of high quality and inclusive design for all development, including individual buildings, public and private spaces and wider area development schemes” 1.13 58:

This recognition of good design is further elaborated at Paragraph

1.14 Planning policies and decisions should aim to ensure that developments: • • •

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Will function well and add to the overall quality of the area Establish a strong sense of place, using streetscapes and buildings to create attractive and comfortable places to live, work and visit. Optimise the potential of the site to accommodate development, create and sustain an appropriate mix of uses (including incorporation of green and other public space as part of developments) and support local facilities and transport network. Respond to local character….and reflect the identity of local

• • •

Surroundings and materials. Create safe and accessible environments Are visually attractive as a result of good architecture and appropriate landscaping.

1.15 The NPPF examines, at Section 8, the promotion of healthy communities. At Paragraph 69 it states:

take account of: •

• •

“Planning policies and decisions …should aim to achieve places which promote: • •

Opportunities for meetings between members of the community who might not otherwise come into contact with each other….. Safe and accessible developments, containing clear and legible pedestrian routes and high quality public space which encourage the active and continual use of public areas.”

1.16

At paragraph 73 it is further identified that there should be:

“Access to high quality open spaces and opportunities for sport and recreation which can make an important contribution to the health and well-being of communities”. 1.17 More detailed advice is contained in By Design – urban design in the planning system: towards better practice (DETR CABE 2000).which seeks to promote higher standards in urban design. The broad design objectives for new development set out in the guidance include the following: • • • • • • •

Character – a place with its own identity; Continuity and enclosure – a place where public and private space is clearly distinguished; Quality of public realm – a place with attractive and successful public areas; Ease of movement – a place that is easy to get to and move through; Legibility – a place which has a clear image and is easy to understand; Adaptability – a place that can change easily; and Diversity – a place with variety and choice

1.18

NPPF Chapter 12.0 sets out the policies relating to Heritage.

The desirability of sustaining and enhancing the significance of heritage assets and putting them to viable uses consistent with their conservation; The positive contribution that conservation of heritage assets can make to sustainable communities including their economic vitality; and The desirability of new development making a positive contribution to local character and distinctiveness.

1.20 NPPF Chapter 4.0 sets out measures to promote sustainable transport, stating that the transport system needs to be balanced in favour of sustainable transport modes, giving people a real choice about how they travel. Paragraph 32 sets out that: 1.21 All developments that generate significant amounts of movement should be supported by a Transport Statement or Transport Assessment. Plans and decisions should take account of whether: •

• •

The opportunities for sustainable transport modes have been taken up depending on the nature and location of the site, to reduce the need for major transport infrastructure; Safe and suitable access to the site can be achieved for all people; And improvements can be undertaken within the transport network that cost effectively limit the significant impacts of the development.

1.22 The Manual for Streets sets out principles to guide best practice in the design of residential roads. It differs significantly from previous advice in the following ways: •

• • •

Giving equal weight to the ‘place’ and ‘movement’ functions of the street and greater weight to its non-vehicle users and urban design than to vehicular access considerations; Introducing a user hierarchy with pedestrians considered first in the design process; Recommending a maximum 20mph design speed to reduce casualties and encourage social activity; Encouraging ‘walkable’ neighbourhoods through a more connected street layout.

1.5.10 Paragraph 128 requires, that “in determining applications, local planning authorities should require an applicant to describe the significance of any heritage assets affected, including any contribution made by their setting.” 1.19

Paragraph 131 states:

In determining planning applications, local planning authorities should

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Swindon Design Guide 1.23 The Swindon Design Guide is Supplementary Planning Guidance that sets out principles for building and urban design at Swindon. In addition the Design Guide outlines successful examples of urban design at Swindon to inform studies of development context.

Public consultation 1.24 A public consultation exercise was undertaken by DPDS in July 2013, which sought the views of the local residents and other stakeholders on draft proposals for the site. A number of changes were made to the application proposals as a direct result of the consultation process. A detailed description of the public consultation process is set out in the Statement of Public Consultation which forms part of this application.

Figure 5. Design Guide Swindon Cover

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Figure 6: National Planning Policy Framework Cover

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Figure 7: Manual for Streets Cover

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2.0 Appraisal 5

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2.0 Appraisal Context

KEY The Site

Site Context 2.1 Figure 8 shows the Abbey Farm site within its context. The site lies on the northern urban edge of Swindon, Wiltshire and is bounded by the A419 Blunsdon bypass to the east and by Lady Lane and Tadpole Lane to the south. The town has a population of approximately 160,000 and benefits from excellent transport links, including the M4 which passes immediately south of the town and a railway station serving the main line between London and Bristol. 2.2 The site is located in Blunsdon St Andrews, which consists of a mixture of historic development, predominantly associated with the ruined manor house at Blunsdon Abbey (now Blunsdon Abbey Park caravan site), and modern development on St Andrews Ridge and Lyall Close. The site also lies in the proximity of the villages of Broad Blunsdon and Lower Blunsdon, which are located immediately east of the A419. Other settlements close to north Swindon include the market town of Highworth located 3 miles to the north-east and Cricklade, a town of approximately 4,000 inhabitants located 3 miles to the north-west.

Figure 8: Larger Context Plan

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Site Context 2.3 Figure 9 shows the Abbey Farm site within the context of the northern edge of Swindon. In addition to the existing development there are currently two development commitments within the immediate vicinity of the site. 2.4 The Abbey Stadium application site is located immediately south east of the Abbey Farm site. The site benefits from an extant Swindon Borough Council outline planning approval for a mixed-use development comprising 450 dwellings (at a density of 37 dwellings per hectare) and 4 hectares of employment land. Reserved matters applications for the site were recently submitted. 2.5 Tadpole Farm, located west of Abbey Farm, has outline planning permission for a mixed-use urban extension accommodating 1,700 dwellings, 5 hectares of employment land and local facilities, including a local centre, primary school and public open space. The site is under the control of Crest Homes who recently began submitting reserved matters applications for the site. 2.6 The Abbey Farm development proposals have been designed to respond positively to the context of both existing and committed development in the vicinity of the site in terms of its relationship with the northern edge of Swindon.

Figure 9: Larger Context Plan

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Character Assessment 2.7 One of the core principles behind the design of the development proposals is a close response to the physical context of the site. To achieve this, a character assessment was carried out for Swindon and the other nearby settlements and is set out below.

Swindon 2.8 Swindon is located geographically at the point where the characteristic stone architecture of the Cotswolds to the north (Fig. 10) and west meets the red brick and clay tile style of the Wessex Downs to the south and east (Fig. 11). Swindon is, therefore, a town dependent upon a number of imported historic architectural design references rather than having a distinctive character of its own. Standing, as it does, on the edge of these two very distinctive areas, it is not surprising to see the influence of both within the town. Figure 10: Characteristic Stone Architecture of the Cotswolds

Figure 11: Wessex Downs Red Brick and Clay Tiles Style

Figure 12: Early Cottage Blocks

Figure 13: Railway Village Dwellings

Figure 14:Varied Housing Types in Swindon

Figure 15: Generic Housing Lacking Character in Swindon

2.9 The original market town stood on Swindon Hill, now Old Town (Fig. 12). With the arrival of the Great Western Railway in 1840 and their decision to create a locomotive station and repair shops close to the junction with the Cheltenham and Great Western Union Railway at Swindon came the expansion of the town to fill the gap between the old market town and the new station and engineering works to the north. Street after street of red brick terraced cottages roofed with slate brought from Wales on the railway were built. 2.10 Closer to the station and engineering works the Great Western Railway built the Railway Village (Fig. 13). The original design by Brunel was based on elevation sketches for a terrace of 9 cottages at Steventon, on the main line to the east of Swindon in Oxfordshire. The resulting group of buildings of Brunel’s Railway Village, complete with the addition of Jacobean and Elizabethan motifs to the stone built facades, created the most architecturally impressive group of railway workers’ houses built in the country at that time. The architectural style also featured taller three storey buildings on corner plots, mainly for community use or shops. 2.11 Following the establishment of the railway and related engineering works Old Town, the original Swindon market town, continued to grow and now features a variation of terraced housing, semi-detached and detached villas. Over the last century, the contemporary style and pattern of development has changed resulting in a diverse mixture of architecture and layout patterns, from inter-war to modern estates typical of this period across the country (Fig. 14). 2.12 During the last 40 years, Swindon has expanded rapidly with new housing development areas to the east, west and north. The current major expansion area is Wichelstowe, to the south of the town adjacent the M4 motorway. Some of Swindon’s suburban areas are also indicative of the rapid spread of the town consuming the local centres of surrounding villages and incorporating them and their identity into the fabric of one urban area. Though this has added to Swindon’s polycentricity, expansion has tended to adhere to standardised design practice, resulting in the emergence of areas more generic than characterised (Fig. 15).

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Character Assessment Blunsdon and Broad Blunsdon 2.13 Blunsdon contains a number of settlements, including a ribbon of predominantly residential development located on either side of the old A419. As well as this relatively isolated pocket of roadside development it comprises several quite distinct villages; Broad Blunsdon, Lower Blunsdon and Blunsdon St Andrew. 2.14 Blunsdon St Andrew can be separated into two different character areas; the Conservation Area to the west of Lady Lane and the new development to the east - St. Andrew’s Ridge. These two areas are linked by a linear area of open space that runs to the south of the residential development and separates the village from the Swindon Northern Development Area (NDA). 2.15 The Blunsdon St. Andrew Conservation Area includes St. Andrew’s Church and the former Blunsdon Abbey House (now fallen into ruin) and its grounds, as well as the adjacent new development at Lyall Close. The use of local materials and abundant vegetation in this area differentiates it from the new development to the east. Historic buildings are generally constructed of coursed stone rubble with some brick dressings and clay tile roofs. The architectural style is mixed, but references vernacular form and detail. Of note is the prominent use of stone and stone rubble walls which help to unify the character of the area. The character of the development at Lyall Close is determined by its moderately steep topography and views out across the vale to the south (ie. important views in opposite direction to Abbey Farm). Wyld Court, a recent development in close proximity to the Grange, is slightly more contained in its setting.

Figure 16: Development within Blunsdon St Andrew

Figure 17: Development within Blunsdon St Andrew

Figure 18: Development within Blunsdon St Andrew

Figure 19: Development within Broad Blunsdon

Figure 20: Development within Broad Blunsdon

Figure 21: Development within Broad Blunsdon

2.16 The development at St. Andrew’s Ridge contrasts with the character of the Conversation Area and relates much more closely to the new housing of northern Swindon. Built in the 1990s, the development is a network of through roads and cul-de-sacs branching off two main routes, Salzgitter Drive and Thornhill Drive. A pedestrian/cycle route runs through the development providing a linear connection from Lady Lane through to Thamesdown Drive. 2.17 Dwellings range in size and are up to 2.5 storeys in height. A mixture of architectural styles and materials has been used, often within the same street. There is a haphazard range of detailing from ornate porticos to string courses and brick quoins more in keeping with the local vernacular. Materials include a range of brick, render, expressed timber beams and reconstituted stone with plain and interlocking concrete tile roofing.

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Character Assessment

Character Assessment

Cricklade

Highworth

2.18 Cricklade is a small market town situated on the River Thames to the north of Swindon and Blunsdon, separated by the River Ray flood plain. The town was founded by the Saxons in the 9th century and was the location of a Saxon royal mint. Part of the town is covered by a Conservation Area and the town centre contains areas of well maintained public space and attractive architecture. New developments on the periphery of the town are characterised by typical late twentieth century detached and semi-detached dwellings laid out in culde–sac arrangements (Fig. 24 and 23). However, there have been some smaller scale developments, mainly infill schemes, that have reflected the historic character of the local architecture. Notably many of the buildings are constructed from Cotswold stone, many with slate or coursed stone roofs.

2.20 Highworth is another market town standing at the gateway to the Cotswold on a hill top to the south of the Thames valley floodplain. The architecture of the central areas strongly reflect the Cotswold influence with the majority of the building built of Cotswold stone, particularly in the conservation area. Like many other market towns in the Swindon area, the strong post war economy and growth of Swindon has also led to fairly substantial expansion of Highworth, especially to the north west and north east of the town where the character of the new development is fairly typical of the late twentieth century estate housing. As in Cricklade, there are some examples of small scale developments that have reflected the traditional character of the town, mainly close to the centre.

Figure 22: Traditional Wide and linear Street

Figure 25: Traditional Wide and linear Street

2.19 There is a strong linear street pattern in the older part of Cricklade, especially along the High Street (Fig. 22). This is a feature of a number of towns in the Swindon sub-region such as Hungerford, Marlborough, Royal Wootton Bassett and Malmesbury, often with a gentle curve associated with the main street or a progressive widening of the central space.

Figure 23: Modern New Residential Development

Figure 24: Semi-Detached Dwellings Laid out in a Cul-de-sac Arrangement Document 5 Abbey Farm - Design and Access Statement

Figure 26: Varied Architectural Detailing and

Figure 28: Sensitive/Respective Treatments to Older Architecture

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Figure 27: Highworth ‘s Centre

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The Site Site Description 2.21 Figure 29 shows the proposed Abbey Farm site. The site covers an area of approximately 23.6 hectares and is currently leased to a major farmer in the area who employs the land for arable farming.

Key The Site

2.22 The northern boundary of the site adjoins what is currently fallow countryside, with agricultural land to the west, while the eastern boundary is defined by the new Blunsdon by-pass. The southern boundary of the site is formed by Tadpole Lane and Lady Lane, which connect the B4553 (Purton/Cricklade Road) to the west with the A419 to the east, eectively forming the northern boundary of development in the Swindon urban area. 23.6 hectares

2.23 The site is largely enclosed by mature vegetation, which eectively obscures it from most aspects. The surrounding areas are largely developed, with Broad Blunsdon to the east and Blunsdon St. Andrew to the immediate south. To the south-west of the site there has been considerable new development, mostly related to the Northern Development Area, though there has been significant house building in the Blunsdon St. Andrew Conservation Area. 2.24 Figure 30 shows a summary of the site opportunities and constraints which have been identified and used to inform the design of the development proposals set out in Chapter 3. These opportunities and constraints are discussed by topic within the rest of this chapter.

Figure 29: Site Plan (1:5000)

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Key

Figure 30: Opportunities and Constraints Document 5 Abbey Farm - Design and Access Statement

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Topography and Views 2.25 Figure 31 shows the topography of the site. The site is located on the plateau of Blunsdon Hill and is bisected by a public right of way and hedgerows that run north to south. The land to the east of these hedges is relatively flat, while the land to the west slopes gently from its central high point down to the west and south-west. The slope becomes steeper towards the southern and western boundaries of the site.

Views from the Site 2.26 From locations within the site there are some attractive glimpse views through the existing foliage out and across to the countryside to the north. Through careful design and management of planting, these views could be maintained within the proposed development (eg. from proposed recreational footpaths). Views over Swindon to the south are less apparent due to the nearby residential developments and the extent of the trees and foliage along Tadpole Lane and Lady Lane.

Views Towards the Site 2.27 As shown in Figure 32 detailed visual analysis of the site has shown that the visual impact of development could be significantly reduced by a set-back of built development from the edge of the escarpment and by strategic tree planting on the site periphery. An initial phase of tree planting and hedgerow reinforcement has already been implemented in this location.

Figure 31: Site Topography Plan

New tree planting within site

Mature Tree cover at Upper Widhill Farm

Proposed housing at 146m AOD and indicative ridge height of 155m AOD maximum

Site Boundary hedge to be reinforced and grown-out to 3m in height

A’ 140

View Line View level at approximately 88.6 m AOD

120 100

A

80 0m

Distance from viewpoint (meters) 500 m Chapel Farm access A419 Approximately

1000 m

AOD heights (meters)

1500 m

Ground profile

87 m AOD Figure 32: Site Section and View Impact Analysis 13

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Flood Plain and Drainage 2.28 The site is located within the catchment for the River Ray, located some 2.2km west of the site. No watercourse or surface water drainage feature exists within the site boundaries or its immediate vicinity. According to the Environment Agency indicative flood map the site lies within Flood Zone 1, which has a less than 1 in 1,000 chance of river or sea flooding in any year. As such the site is at low risk of flooding from fluvial or tidal sources. 2.29 The favourable natural characteristics of the site (hilltop location and permeable geology), together with the use of SUDS (sustainable urban drainage systems) would ensure that development of the site would result in negligible residual impact on the area’s hydrology and flood risk.

Habitat and Vegetation

2.31 The most significant stretch of hedgerow is located on the southern boundary with Lady Lane. This hedgerow is less significant further west, where it becomes fragmented and visually permeable. Two hedgerows also define a narrow lane and public right of way that runs north-south across the site. 2.32 In addition to retaining important hedgerows, the site also presents the opportunity to establish new ecological corridors linking the existing settlement and features such as the woodland at Blunsdon Abbey with the countryside to the north of the site and the open space proposed as part of the Tadpole Farm development. These corridors could also integrate some of the key new green spaces provided within the development.

2.35 The sensitive design of the proposed buildings and site development to ensure that Abbey Farm can integrate positively with the Conservation Area. 2.36 The Conservation Area is analysed in Section 2.15 of this Design and Access Statement and provides a range of design cues in terms of layout, design and use of materials which could be used in the proposed development to give it character and help integrate it with its context. 2.37 There are no other statutory landscape designations within or immediately adjacent to the site.

Statutory Designations

2.30 A full ecological survey has been completed by Ecosulis. The survey has shown that the site is dominated by highly managed arable farmland creating an environment in which habitat and structural diversity is relatively low and species diversity is also low. Tree cover is limited on the site to individual trees within the hedgerows and the majority of these are not of high quality. There are, however, a number of ecologically important hedgerows within the site and along the site boundaries and these should be protected wherever possible.

2.33 The Blunsdon St. Andrew Conservation Area lies to the south-west of the site. The Conservation Area Appraisal acknowledges that there is limited potential for adverse impacts from the proposed development on the Conservation Area, as the

Figure 33: Sustainable Urban Drainage

Figure 34: Ecological Corridor

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2.34 Mitigation of the residual impacts on the current character of the Conservation Area is proposed in the form of a landscape scheme, as indicated on the submitted Landscape Concept Plan, and through

“Topography restricts views of the Conservation Area from the surrounding areas except from the south where a public footpath runs across the fields”.

Archaeology 2.38 A desk-based assessment, geophysical survey and archaeological trial trenching have all been carried out and have not identified any significant archaeological remains within the site. Heritage assets of archaeological interest were identified and classified as of no greater than ‘negligible-low’ significance. The archaeological assessment concludes that the development of the site would result in adverse effects of no greater than slight

Figure 35: St. Andrews Church December 2013 Copyright : DPDS Consulting Group

significance on archaeological resources and that the site could be developed without further archaeological mitigation being required.

Noise 2.39 Assessment of the acoustic environment at the site shows that, with the exception of narrow strips of land adjacent to the A421, Tadpole Lane and Lady Lane, the noise exposure of the site falls into either Noise Emission Category ‘A’ or ‘B’, and is therefore considered very suitable for residential use. A noise insulation scheme would be prepared to inform the detailed design of the scheme to address noise impacts on buildings and gardens that are exposed to road noise and Speedway noise, including acoustic fencing. 2.40 The use of the site for predominantly residential purposes would not be expected to result in significant residual effects on other existing noise sensitive receptors, including the Conservation Area, provided suitable mitigation is employed to ensure that construction effects are minimised.

Figure 36: A419 use of vegetation for noise buffer 14


Access and movement These include: 2.41 Figure 40 shows the existing access and movement configuration for the Abbey Farm site.

A potential pedestrian link across Lady Lane following the alignment of the footpath/cyclepath immediately east of Longfellow Close and Yeats Close.

A potential pedestrian link between the site and the north-south section of Lady Lane, which is closed to vehicular traffic and connects with the Orbital Shopping Park.

A potential pedestrian link across Tadpole Lane following the alignment of the public right of way that runs through Abbey Gardens.

Highways and Access 2.42 The site is located on the northern edge of Swindon, approximately 3.1 miles north of the town centre. It has good links to the M4 and M5 motorways via the main A419 trunk road, which defines the eastern boundary of the site and links Swindon with Gloucester. 2.43 The site is bounded to the south by Tadpole Lane and Lady Lane. To the east, this route links with the A419 overbridge junction at the A4311 Cricklade Road. To the west it links with Purton and Cricklade via the B4553. 2.44 Thamesdown Drive, a dual carriageway known locally as the Northern Orbital is located further south of the site. This route provides a link between the north-east of Swindon (and the A419) and the west of the town, bisecting the Northern Development Area. Vehicular links between Lady Lane and Thamesdown Drive are provided by Saltzgitter Drive and Oakhurst Way.

Cyclists 2.49 The site is well connected to the existing nearby amenities by a number of off-road cycle routes between Lady Lane and Thamesdown Drive. In particular the opportunity should be taken to link the proposed development directly with the footpath/cyclepath immediately east of Longfellow Close and Yeats Close, which connects to the wider cyclepath network.

Figure 37: A419 view from Abbey Farm in 2013

2.9.3 Public Transport 2.45 The site is currently accessed at a singular point along Tadpole Lane. Vehicular access into the development could potentially be provided by upgrading the existing mini-roundabout on Lady Lane. An additional roundabout at the junction of Lady Lane and Tadpole Lane could provide a second vehicular access.

2.50 The number 24 Thamesdown Transport bus service, which runs between Blunsdon, Haydon Wick, the town centre and the Great Western Hospital currently travels along Salzgitter Drive and Lady Lane (between Salzgitter Drive and the A419 Blunsdon over-bridge). As part of the proposals this service could be diverted to serve the Abbey Farm site.

2.46 The Transportation Assessment, which includes road/junction capacity analysis, confirms that the existing transport networks can serve the development of the site with minimal detrimental impact on existing networks and without the need for major new infrastructure.

Figure 38: Abbey Farm eastern footpath

Pedestrian and Cycle Network Pedestrians 2.47 There are two public rights of way within the site. The first of these is a bridleway which runs on a north-south axis between the two fields which form the site. Once past the northern site boundary, the bridleway runs in a north-east direction and connects with a pedestrian/cycle bridge across the A419 to Blunsdon. The second public right of way also connects the site with the bridge across the A419, but runs across the eastern field on a north-east axis before running parallel to the A419. 2.48 There are a number of further opportunities to ensure that the proposed development is well connected with the existing housing and amenities to the south of Lady Lane and Tadpole Lane.

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Figure 39: Cycleway south of Abbey Farm to be extended

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Key

Figure 40: Access and Movement Plan

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Land use and neighbourhood structure

Utilities

2.51 Figure 45 shows a land use and neighbourhood structure plan for the Abbey Farm site.

2.59 Overhead telecom cables currently run the length of the site on an east-west axis. These cables could be redirected or put underground as part of the development proposals.

Retail 2.52 The site lies within approximately 500m of St Andrew’s Ridge Village Centre, which incorporates a local food store, public house, estate agent, hairdresser, takeaway and an early years nursery. The centre can be easily accessed via pathways and a dedicated off-road cycle track. 2.53 The site is also well linked to the district centre for north Swindon, The Orbital Shopping Park, which is located approximately 1km to the south of the site and accessible via a section of Lady Lane that is closed to vehicular traffic. There are many retail facilities located within the shopping park, including an ASDA supermarket and restaurants.

Employment 2.54 There are a number of employment sites near to the site, including the Groundwell and Groundwell West Industrial Parks, which are located immediately west of the A419. The proposed Tadpole Farm and Abbey Stadium developments also contain significant areas of employment.

Education 2.55 There are a number of primary schools which are accessible from the site. The closest of these are Bridlewood Primary School in the nearby development of Ash Brake and Abbey Meads Community Primary School.

Figure 41: St Andrew’s Ridge Village Centre

Figure 42: The Local Drinking Establishment in St Andrew’s Ridge Village Centre

Figure 43: Green Street Treatment in Neighbouring Developments

Figure 44: Neighbouring Housing Development Lacking Character and Legibility

2.56 The nearest secondary school is Isambard Community School, approximately 800m from the site and easily accessible via Tadpole Lane.

Leisure 2.57 There are a range of leisure facilities located within close proximity of the site, including the Abbey Stadium (speedway track, greyhound racing, market and associated leisure facilities) immediately south of Lady Lane and a David Lloyd Gym immediately west of the junction between Thamesdown Drive and the A419.

Open space 2.58 Key public open space accessible to the site is located at Groundwell Bridge, Ash Break, Priory Vale and Abbey Meads. Proposed open space would be created at Abbey Stadium and Tadpole Farm. Important recreational pedestrian and cycle links are located at Lady Lane and East of Longfellow Close with the footpath network linking to the north.

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St Andrews Primary School Approved Tadpole Farm development

Approved Abbey Stadium development

Blunsdon Abbey

Red Oaks Primary School

Uplands School

St Andrew’s Ridge Local Centre

Groundwell West Industrial Park Isambard Community School

David Lloyd Gym

Strategic Green Corridor

Bridlewood Primary School

Groundwell Industrial Park

Abbey Meads Community Primary School

Abbey Meads Local Centre

North Swindon District Centre

St. Francis Primary School

Key Site boundary

Leisure

Proposed leisure

Post ofÂżces

Primary vehicular routes

Schools

Proposed schools

Public houses

Secondary vehicular routes

District and local centres

Proposed local centres

Libraries

Rural

Open space

Supermarkets

Residential

Proposed residential

Convenience stores

Employment

Proposed employment

Health facilities

Figure 45: Land use/Neighbourhood Structure

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3.0 Proposals 19

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3.0 Proposals Introduction 3.1 This chapter sets out the proposals for the development of the Abbey Farm site and explains the rationale behind them. The design of the proposals is based on the application of the core urban design principles set out in Section 1.9 in combination with a thorough understanding of the site developed through the analysis carried out in Chapter 2.

Key Residential (C3) Convenience store (A1) / residential (C3) Educational Centre (D1) and Hard Play Area Games Courts Soft Play Area

Aims and Objectives

Pitches and Habitat Local open space / Nature Conservation Area

3.2

The key aims of the proposals for the Abbey Farm site are to:

Local Equipped Area for Play (LEAP) Infiltration drainage basins / swales

Create a compact, cohesive and sustainable urban extension on the northern edge of Swindon;

Retained / proposed trees Retained / proposed hedgerows Pumping station

Provide a high quality, attractive and safe environment for future residents;

Highways Private drives Footpaths

Create an accessible and legible network of streets, which ensures that the development is well integrated with the existing settlement and its amenities;

Maintain and enhance the existing green infrastructure to promote ecological diversity and provide attractive and well integrated public open spaces;

Create a development which responds to the qualities and character of its context in terms of design and use of materials.

Summary Amount and Use 3.3 Figure 46 shows a land use masterplan for the proposed development. The application site area covers an area of 23.6 hectares and includes the following: 3.4

Figure 46: Landuse Masterplan

Up to 350 dwellings, including affordable homes;

Provision for a small convenience store;

Formal and Informal Public Open Space, including areas that could accommodate 2 full size football pitches or 1 cricket pitch;

2 Local Equipped Areas for Play (LEAPs);

Additional open space, including woodland and 4 dry balancing basins;

Two principle access points off Lady Lane and Tadpole Lane; and

Associated infrastructure, including roads, drainage and landscaping.

Document 5 Abbey Farm - Design and Access Statement

Land uses Land uses (All figures approximate) (All figures approximate)

Residential (Including secondary and tertiary routes)

Convenience Store

Education Centre: • Building • Hard Play • Games Courts • Soft Play • Pitches

Area (hectares) Area (hectares)

14.3 Hectares 35.5 Acres

0.08 Hectares 0.2 Acres

1.82 Hectares 4.5 Acres

Public Open Spaces and Nature Conservation Areas: • Landscape and Ecological Enhancement • Balancing Basins LEAPs • Pitches • Open Space

6.0 Hectares 14.8 Acres

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Landscape 3.4 Figure 47 shows the overall landscape concept for the proposed development, while Figure 48 shows the landscape strategy in more detail.

Formal Open Space Equipped Areas for Play

Informal Open Space Table 2 sets out that the proposal will provide approximately 6 hectares of open space of which will include informal public open space. A proportion of this space will provide space for areas that area identified as ‘nature conservation areas’. These areas would be planted to enhance the biodiversity and landscape quality of the site and surroundings and include a significant element of woodland planting.

3.5 The proposals include the provision of two LEAPs, both of which have been designed in accordance with Swindon Borough Council open space standards ‘Open Space and New Housing’ (2004). Their location within the scheme has been carefully considered as part of the masterplanning process.

Key Principal hedgerows reinforced and enhanced Native tree planting to strengthen containment and augment wooded character of ridge Existing and proposed green spaces Potential green links towards and from existing urban edge

3.6 The first of the two LEAPs is located on the central boulevard at the centre of the Blunsdon Rise character area (see Section 3.7.7), making it highly accessible and ensuring high levels of natural surveillance from passers-by. This LEAP will also benefit from high levels of natural surveillance provided by the adjacent properties on all four sides.

Controlled views out from elevated plateau Edge of 2 storey built development set back to limit visibility

3.7 The second of the two LEAPs is located in the western half of the site adjacent to one of the principal dedicated pedestrian footpaths running through the development. Natural surveillance will be provided by both passers-by and the adjacent housing to the south and east.

Pitches 3.8 Open space is provided within the proposals that is suitable to accommodate one full size football pitch, should the Council require the pitch. The potential pitch is located within the principal area of public open space on the northern edge of the site. The location of this space offers the following advantages: •

It is at the confluence of the two principal dedicated pedestrian routes running through the site, making it highly accessible and providing good levels of natural surveillance from passers-by;

It creates a buffer between the proposed housing and the northern edge of the site, minimising its visual impact;

It provides an attractive setting for the proposed housing to the south and benefits from the natural surveillance this will provide;

It is central to the overall development.

Figure 47: Proposed Landscape Concept

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Green Corridors

Visual Impact

3.10 In order to encourage ecological diversity and link the green infrastructure of the existing settlement through the proposed development and the farmland to the north of the site, the proposals incorporate a number of key green corridors as set out below:

3.14 The visual impact of the proposed development will be kept to a low level by setting built development a significant distance back from the edge of the escarpment and by providing strategic planting on the site’s northern periphery. An initial phase of tree planting and hedgerow reinforcement has already been implemented in this location and the proposals will enhance this by establishing a landscape enhancement zone.

Linking Abbey Gardens with the proposed landscape enhancement zone and the farmland to the north of the site via the principal area of public open space and western LEAP.

Key •

Linking the retained hedgerows along the southern edge of the site and the existing bridleway with the proposed landscape enhancement zone and farmland to the north of the site via the principal area of public open space.

GEND LEGEND

Dedicated footpaths

Dedicated footpaths Green

corridor

Green corridor

ent Landscape Landscape enhancement zoneenhancement

zone

Farmland

Key public open space

Key public open spacee

Along the western edge of the A419, providing an ecological corridor as well as a noise and visual impact buffer.

Drainage

Key private open space

hedgerows Retained / proposed pRetained p g / proposed

hedgerows

Retained trees

Retained trees Infiltration drainage basins Infiltration drainage basins

3.11 As shown in Figure 48, drainage for the proposed development will be provided through 4 dry balancing basins/ponds. The landscape treatment of the balancing basins and layout of the adjacent development will be carefully considered to ensure that the basins form integral and attractive features of well-defined informal public open spaces.

PEN

OL O

SPOR

CHES T PIT

SCHO

E

SPAC

AP

LLEEAP

3.12 In addition to the dry balancing basins/ponds, a series of swales will be provided along the southern edge of the proposed development. The swales will not only provide an important drainage function, but also create an attractive landscape feature along the interface of the site and Tadpole Lane/Lady Lane.

Trees and Hedgerows

L

LEEAAP P

3.13 As discussed in Section 2.30, habitat and species diversity on the site is relatively low. There are, however, a number of ecologically important hedgerows within the site (principally along the southern boundary) and these are retained in the proposals wherever possible. As discussed further below, the proposals also reinforce the existing planting along the northern site periphery for both ecological and visual impact reasons.

Blunsdon Abbey Gardens

Figure 48: Proposed Landscape Strategy

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Access and movement Vehicular Access 3.15 Vehicular access into the development will be provided via two points on Lady Lane/Tadpole Lane.

LEGEND

Key Extended Public Right of Way

3.16 The eastern access arrangement will involve providing a fourth arm to the existing 3-arm roundabout at Lady Lane/Salzgitter Drive. This will not only provide access into the proposed development, but will also resolve the existing issue regarding lack of deflection for drivers travelling west to east along Lady Lane. 3.17 The western access arrangement will involve the creation of a 4-arm roundabout at the existing junction of Lady Lane and Tadpole Lane. This stretch of Lady Lane/Tadpole Lane is already subject to a 30mph speed limit and the creation of a roundabout at this location will further help to reinforce the speed limit. The creation of a roundabout slightly off-line from the existing road will also help to improve visibility and highway safety.

Retained Bridleway Strong East West Deflection Extended alignment of Existing Pedestrian/Cycle Path New Footpath/Cyclepath

Improved Visibility

LEAP

Vehicular Access Points

Pedestrian and cycle access 3.18 The proposed development will be fully integrated with the existing settlement and the farmland to the north. This will be achieved by: •

Retaining the existing bridleway that bisects the site and crosses the A419 and linking it with key new pedestrian/cycle routes;

Extending the alignment of the existing footpath/cyclepath located to the east of Salzgitter Drive across Lady Lane and into the proposed development;

Providing, at the eastern access point, a footpath/cyclepath along both sides of the access road, continuing onto Salzgitter Drive where the cyclists will then continue on-road.

Providing, at the western access point, a footpath/cycleway along both sides of the access road, continuing onto the north-south aligned section of Lady Lane. This latter section of Lady Lane is ‘stopped up’ to through traffic, and is described by the Swindon Cycle Route Network Plan as ‘good for beginners. Low volumes of traffic, low speeds. Few buses or goods vehicles’.

Extending the alignment of the public right of way running adjacent to St. Andrews Church across Tadpole Lane into site and connecting it with the retained bridleway and link over the A419.

LEA

P

Figure 49: Proposed Access and Movement Strategy

Cycleway south of Abbey Farm to be extended into site

View out from Abbey Farm near Lady Lane

Tadpole Lane entrance to Wyld Court

Abbey Farm from east of A419

Figure 50: Vehicle, Pedestrain and Cycle Access 23

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Public Transport

Key

Lady Lane / Tadpole Lane ane Through routes

3.19 It has been agreed with Thamesdown Transport that the number 24 bus service, which routes between Blunsdon, Haydon Wick, the town centre and the Great Western Hospital, could be diverted to serve the proposed development.

Secondary / tertiary routes outes Private drives Mews / Courtyards Bridleways Cycle paths / footpathss Footpaths

3.20 The service currently runs along Salzgitter Drive and Lady Lane (between Salzgitter Drive and the A419 Blunsdon over-bridge). It is proposed that instead of heading east along Lady Lane or south along Salzgitter Drive, the bus will travel west along Lady Lane. The bus will then enter the site at the western roundabout, undertake a U-turn at the first internal roundabout, exit back onto Lady Lane, head east towards Salzgitter Drive and then continue along the original route. The proposed diversion could serve the nearby caravan park and other adjacent homes in the vicinity of Blunsdon Abbey. It is also proposed that bus stops be provided on Lady Lane at the eastern end of the site.

LEAP

Internal Movement Route network LEA

P

3.21 The layout of the routes has been designed to make walking and cycling as easy as possible by creating a network of connected streets. The aim of the network is to directly connect key destinations, including the LEAPs, principal open space and convenience store.

Street hierarchy 3.22 The aim of the proposed development is to establish a clear hierarchy of streets that helps to distinguish between the main routes which connect destinations and the minor routes which principally provide access. Figure 3.5 shows the route hierarchy for the proposed development. The parameters for the various levels of the hierarchy are set out below. 3.23 It is proposed that all primary, secondary and tertiary streets and mews/courtyards are offered for adoption by Swindon Borough Council. Private drives will serve a maximum of 5 dwellings from one point of access. All pedestrian/ cycleways will be a minimum of 3.5m wide and all recreational footpaths a minimum of 2m wide.

Inclusivity 3.24 The masterplan has been developed to provide an accessible ‘barrier free’ pedestrian environment for mobility impaired users. All footpaths within the site will be a minimum of 2m wide to allow for two wheelchair users to safely pass one another. Dropped kerb crossings will be provided at all minor road junctions within the site. The proposed bus stops will be designed to provide easy access for all and parking provision for mobility impaired users of the convenience store will be provided in accordance with Swindon Borough Council parking standards.

Figure 51: Route Hierarchy

Central boulevard/primary streets

Secondary streets

• • • •

• • •

Carriageway width: 6-8m Footpath widths: 2-4m Tree lined central boulevard Parking: on-street (parallel), mews/courtyard, on-plot

Carriageway width: 5.5m Footpath widths: 2m Parking: mews/courtyard, on-plot

Tertiary streets

Private driveways

• • •

• • •

Carriageway width: 4.8m Footpath widths: 2m Parking: mews/courtyard, on-plot

Carriageway width: 4.2m Footpath widths: n/a Parking: on-plot

Mews/courtyards • • •

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Carriageway width 5m+ Footpath widths: shared surface Parking: mews/courtyard

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Layout Structure

Urban form

3.25

3.30 The form of the proposed development is principally structured around a central boulevard which runs through the centre of the site on a broadly east-west axis. The boulevard is directly linked to both the eastern and western accesses into the site and also intersects with the retained bridleway. It incorporates the convenience store and is served by the proposed bus route which runs around the roundabout at its western end. The curvature at the western end of the boulevard responds to the topography of the site and is a common feature of market town high streets in the area (see paragraphs x to y above). The importance of the boulevard in terms of its position in the route hierarchy will be emphasized through the use of regular tree planting and a strong building line.

Figure 53 shows an illustrative masterplan for the proposed development at Abbey Farm.

3.26 The overall layout of the proposed development is largely determined by the landscape concept discussed in Section 3.5. 3.27 The principal area of public open space is positioned on the northern periphery of the site. This location is central to the overall development and at the confluence of key routes, but also significantly reduces the visual impact of the proposed housing by establishing a landscape buer along the northern site boundary. Essentially the layout consolidates the existing settlement of Swindon by pushing built development to the south of the site and using public open space to create a transition between this urban area and the open countryside to the north. 3.28 The two proposed LEAPs are also important structuring elements of the layout. The eastern LEAP forms the focus of the Blunsdon Rise character area (see Section 3.39 on character areas), providing a formal area of open space at the eastern end of the central boulevard. The western LEAP forms the focus of the Meadow View and Abbey Green character areas, and is located on the main pedestrian route between Tadpole Lane and the retained Bridleway. The character of this space will be less formal, reflecting its more peripheral location. 3.29 The location of the convenience store has also been given careful consideration in the layout of the proposed development. Its location at the intersection of the main boulevard and the principal north-south route makes it highly accessible and provides a node, and possible landmark, at the centre of the proposed development.

3.31 The layout of the proposed development is based on the perimeter block. This urban structure ensures a clear distinction between public and private space and allows high levels of natural surveillance over the public realm. It also allows for the creation of legible and permeable street networks, which in turn encourages the use of sustainable modes of travel and creates street activity. In determining the layout of the perimeter blocks within the proposed development particular consideration has been given to responding to the topography of the site and optimising solar gain. 3.32 The layout of buildings within the perimeter blocks has been carefully considered to reflect the nature of the character areas discussed further in Section 3.39 Essentially the masterplan provides more regular, formal layouts along the central boulevard and to the south and east of the site, closest to the recent and proposed development along Lady Lane. Looser, more organic layouts have been provided to the north and west of the proposed development to reflect the transition to public open space and the countryside, and to respect the character of the Blunsdon St. Andrew Conservation Area.

Figure 52: South west view of Abbey Farm from central compress 25

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Key Indicative dwellings Convenience store Local open space / Nature Conservation Area Primary school and play area Primary school play area, pitches and habitat Local Equipped Area for Play (LEAP) Infiltration drainage basins / swales Retained / proposed trees Retained / proposed hedgerows Pumping station compound Highways Private drives/mews/courtyards Public Rights of Way / bridleways Formal / adoptable footpaths Recreational footpaths

LEAP

LEA

P

Figure 53: Illustrative masterplan Document 5 Abbey Farm - Design and Access Statement

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Scale and appearance

Building Footprint Areas

Building Heights/Massing 3.37 3.33 Figure 57 shows the distribution of building heights across the proposed development. Building heights along the northern and western edges of the development will be a maximum of 2 storeys in order to minimise its visual impact and to respect the character of the Blunsdon St. Andrew Conservation Area. The remainder of the development will be a maximum of 2.5 storeys, with the exception of the following strategic locations in which some 3 storey buildings will be used to enhance levels of legibility: • At the two main gateways into the development;

Assumed dwelling footprint areas are set out in Table 4 below.

Character area

Approximate total m2 (Excluding garages)

Blunsdon Rise

9,877 m2

Meadow View

11,592 m2

Abbey Green

17,744 m2

• At either end of the central boulevard; Figure 54: Example of housing south of Abbey Farm

• At the intersection of the central boulevard and eastern access road. Table 4: Building footprint areas for each character area

3.34

Assumed building ridge heights are set out in Table 3 below.

Number of storeys

Assumed ridge height

Housing provision Market Housing

2

9.0 m

2.5

10.5 m

3

3.38 The proposed development will provide up to 350 dwellings, which will include both market and affordable housing. The anticipated market housing mix is broken down in Table 5 below.

No. of bedrooms

Type

Percentage

1

Houses

4

2

Houses

61

3

Houses

134

4

Houses

106

5

Houses

12.0 m

Table 3: Building Heights

Figure 55: Public Open Space, Blunsdon, St Andrew

Densities 3.35 One of the main aims of the proposed development is to create a clear transition in character from the existing urban settlement immediately south of the site to the open countryside to the north and west. 3.36 As discussed in Section 3.26, to reflect this transition the development proposals provide more formal layouts along the central boulevard and to the south and east of the site and looser, more organic layouts to the north and west. The densities provided by the development will broadly reflect this arrangement, ranging from a maximum of 30 dwellings per hectare at the eastern end of the site, to a minimum of 15 dwellings per hectare at the western end of the site.

?

23

Table 5: Housing Provision Figure 56: View out from Abbey Farm near Lady Lane 27

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Key

Figure 57: Building Heights Document 5 Abbey Farm - Design and Access Statement

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Landmark buildings

Views and vistas

Key frontages

3.39 Landmark buildings, distinguishable through either a step up in height or through the application of a bespoke design, will be provided within the proposed development to enhance levels of legibility and add variation. As shown in Figure 58, key landmark buildings will be provided in the following locations:

3.40 As shown in Figure 58, the following key views and vistas have been established within the proposed development in order to enhance the distinctiveness, quality and legibility of the public realm:

3.41 As shown in Figure 60, a strong building frontage will be provided along the central boulevard and the main streets connecting it with Tadpole Lane and Lady Lane. This should help enhance the legibility of the development by reinforcing the position of the central boulevard at the top of the street hierarchy.

Views north across the principal public open space, including glimpses to the countryside beyond;

Vistas along the central boulevard, including termination with landmark buildings at either end; and

• The convenience store.

Glimpse views south across Swindon from development on the south western edge of the site.

Figure 58: Typical use of Landmark Buildings

Figure 59: Typical use of 2.5 Storey Buildings

• Adjacent to the two main gateways into the development; • At either end of the central boulevard; and

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Figure 60: Typical key frontages treatment Document 5 Abbey Farm - Design and Access Statement


Landmark buildings Landmark buildings Nodes Nodes

Gateways Gateways Key views Key views Strong building frontage

Strong building frontage

REA

OL A

SCHO T SPOR

HES PITC

EAPP LELA

LE

LEA AP P

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Residential Character Areas 3.42 The appearance and character of the proposed residential development has been carefully considered to ensure that it responds closely to its context, yet forms a distinct identity of its own.

Key Abbey Green character area

3.43 Within the overall development, three distinct character areas have been identified: Blunsdon Rise; Meadow View; and Abbey Green. The three character areas are shown in Figure 62 and have been identified based on their existing landscape character/setting and the findings of the local character assessment set out in Chapter 1. The exact articulation of each character area will be fixed at detailed design stage, but this section aims to provide an indication of the kind of form, design and use of materials that should be used. The aim is to create three character areas that exhibit their own distinct character, yet combine to form a clear and cohesive identity for the development as a whole.

LEAP

LEA

P

Figure 62: Residential Character Areas

Abbey Green

Meadow View

Blunsdon Rise

Figure 63: Snapshot of residential housing in Character Areas 31

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Abbey Green Figure 66: Indicative Building, Architectural Features and Treatments for Abbey Green

Formal / adoptable footpaths

• •

• •

• • • •

Topography: Steeply sloping down to the south-west. Landscape/views: Strong sense of enclosure and rural character created by the planting along the northern perimeter and retained hedgerows along the southern and western perimeters. Key features: The LEAP forms a focal point. Urban form: Loose layouts to reflect the proximity of the countryside to the north and west, and Blunsdon St. Andrew Conservation Area to the south. Parking: On-plot. Building type: Detached. Building design features: Stone and brick quoin blocks to corners, doors and windows. Bay windows and porches. Boundary treatments: Hedges and low stone rubble wall boundaries.

Recreational footpaths

LEA

P

Predominant Materials • • •

Stone Brick Clay and slate tiles

Figure 64: Abbey Green Location Plan Figure 65: Indicative materials palette for Abbey Green

Terca Wienerberger Weald Red Brick

Stanton Moor Buff Sandstone

Guiting Gold Tumbled Limestone

Cotswold Cream Tumbled Limestone

Weathered Village Plain Tile

Goxhill Light Red Plain Tile

Welsh Natural Slate

Alpina Natural Slate

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Meadow View • • • •

• • • •

Figure 69: Indicative Building, Architectural Features and Treatments for Meadow View

Topography: Gently sloping down to the south-west. Landscape/views: Blocks are orientated to take advantage of the views over the public open space and open countryside to the north. Key features: Principal area of public open space to the north. Urban form: Formal layout along the central boulevard. Looser arrangements along the northern edge reflecting the transition from urban to rural. Parking: On-street; on-plot. Building type: Principally semi-detached and detached, with larger detached dwellings along the periphery of the public open space. Building design features: Bay and first floor window projections, porches, Juliet balconies. Boundary treatments: Low brick and stone rubble wall boundaries.

Predominant Materials LEA

• • • •

P

Brick Render Timber Clay and slate tiles

Figure 67: Meadow View Location Plan Figure 68: Indicative materials palette for Blunsdon Rise

Belcrest Red Bricks

Burgundy Blend Red Bricks

Terca Wienerberger Weald Red Brick

Cotswold Cream Tumbled Limestone

Mini Stonewold Grey Slate

Cambrian Heather Slate

Clay Arcadia Reclaimed PanTile

Guiting Gold Tumbled Limestone

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Blunsdon Rise • •

• •

• • • •

Figure 72: Indicative Building, Architectural Features and Treatments for Meadow View

Topography: On the plateau of Blunsdon Hill. Landscape/views: Strong sense of enclosure from the surrounding hedges, with glimpsed views out over the open countryside to the north. Key features: Formal public open space/LEAP forms the focal point. Also contains the convenience store. Urban form: Formal layout reflects the importance of the central boulevard as well as the proximity of the A419 and the recent development across Lady Lane. Parking: On-street; mews/courtyard; on-plot. Building type: Terraced; semi-detached; detached. Building design features: Bay and first floor window projections, porches, balconies. Boundary treatments: Brick and metal railing boundaries.

LEAP

Predominant Materials • • • • •

Brick Render Timber Steel Clay and slate tiles Figure 70: Meadow View Location Plan

Figure 71: Indicative materials palette for Blunsdon Rise

Belcrest Red Bricks

Burgundy Blend Red Bricks

Guiting Gold Tumbled Limestone

Cotswold Cream Tumbled Limestone

Mini Stonewold Grey Slate

Cambrian Heather Slate

Clay Arcadia Reclaimed PanTile

Clay Neo Natural Red Pantile

Document 5 Abbey Farm - Design and Access Statement

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Abbey High Street • • • • • • • • • • •

• •

• • • •

Central location within the site. Key Nodal point within the site where both numerous pedestrian and vehicle movement lines intersect. Provides variety in terms of landuses housing both a primary school and convenience store alongside residential. Creates an inviting and safe public realm through the adoption of various shared space principles; narrow vehicle lanes encouraging slower vehicle speeds and giving more space to the pedestrian and cyclist. level surface treatment to provide high mobility for cyclists and vulnerable road users and signify a new environment for road users. edge friction with street furniture and planting further reducing vehicle speeds. wider raised table to cater to the desire line established by the bridleway. Stop and stay spaces for pedestrians in front of both the primary school and convenience store facilitating a variety of activities. Aesthetic streetscape through high quality materials. Landscape/views: key structures such as the primary school and convenience stores will be distinctive landmark strictures to strengthen legibility. Key features: variety of uses and high quality public realm. Urban form: Formal layout along the central boulevard to create and maintain appropriate enclosure through tree planting and appropriate heights. Parking: On-street; on-plot. Building type: Principally terraced along the street. Building design features: Distinctive elevations, porches, juliet balconies. Boundary treatments: vegetation to boundary between dwellings and public realm to help provide a buffer maintaining privacy for groundfloor units.

Figure 73: Indicative Public Realm Treatments for Abbey High Street (Source: CABE, John Lord)

Figure 74: Indicative materials palette for Abbey High Street

Predominant Materials • • • • • •

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Brick Render Timber Clay and slate tiles Steel Glass

Noxer Concrete Sliver Grey Block

Terca Wienerberger Weald Red Brick

Winchester Open Top Litter Bin

Pallas Concrete Light Granite Block

Pallas Concrete Anthracite Basalt Block

Sineu Graff Bench

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Document 5 Abbey Farm - Design and Access Statement


Sustainability 3.44 Climate change mitigation and the principle of sustainability have been guiding principles in the evolution of the masterplan for Abbey Farm. The design of urban extensions should incorporate measures to reduce energy consumption, encourage sustainable means of travel, and provide the opportunity for adaptation over time. 3.45 These principles have been accounted for in the design of the proposed development in the following ways: •

• • • • •

• • • • • •

Orientation of block structure and buildings to take full advantage of solar heat gain and natural ventilation. Photovoltaic roof panels can be fitted to a number of dwellings thereby reducing electricity demands; Design of dwellings to satisfy the Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH) levels specified in government standards, including as a minimum at least 30% of dwellings being CSH Level 3 compliant; Small scale renewable/low carbon energy sources such as the provision of photo-voltaic arrays and heat pumps will be provided for a proportion of suitable dwellings, in order to address the requirements of the relevant CSH standards, and will be specified as part of the detailed application specification; Design of the proposed retail unit to satisfy the energy efficiency requirements of the BREEAM ‘Very Good’ standard; Provision of an accessible and permeable movement network, reducing dependence on the car by encouraging people to walk or cycle; Provision of high quality recreational open space network, incorporating play provision, to foster active, healthy lifestyles; Extension of the local bus service into the site, reducing car dependence; Provision of green corridors across the site to protect and enhance ecological diversity, including the provision of about Xha of forest planting; Provision of Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS) to reduce the risk of flooding, including the additional capacity to ensure adaptability to the impacts of climate change; Provision of a mix of dwelling types and tenures to encourage a mixed community in the area; Design of a number of dwellings to accommodate the opportunity for working from home, reducing the need to travel; Provision of low flush cisterns and other fittings to minimise the use of water; Design of at least 2% of dwellings to be wheelchair accessible, in accordance with Local Plan policy; Design of 5% of dwellings that target compliance with appropriate ‘Lifetime Homes’ adaptability standards; Provision of recycling facilities in all homes. Washing lines and composting bins are to be provided for homes with gardens.

Document 5 Abbey Farm - Design and Access Statement

Figure 75: Example of a sustainable urban drainage system

Figure 76: Example of photovoltaic roof panels

Figure 77: Example of a water butt

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Primary School 3.46 Part of the schemes application includes a proposal for a 2 form entry primary school to be located at the centre of the site. The location is highly permeable being situated at a strong nodal point where primary and secondary routes for both motorists and pedestrians intersect. The location also provides good access to local amenities being in close proximity to the local convenience store and public open space. 3.47 The design for the primary school set out adheres to guidance established in Building Bulletin 99 and Building Bulletin 77.

Design Parameters: • • •

• • • • • • • • • • •

Architectural treatment and design that helps promote a landmark structure. Building heights that do not exceed the heights of adjacent units. Elevations and form that positivity contribute towards the wider street scene and adhere to the proposed character and materials used throughout the scheme. Footprint that responds to the surrounding context and assists in defining the public realm. Layout that does not severely impact the functionality of the site in relation to legibility and permeability. Layout that respects and responds to the bridleway running though the centre of the site. Sufficient space for pitches and games courts that meet Department of Education Standards. Sufficient space for both informal and social play areas that meet Department of Education Standards. layout of outdoor spaces that ensure minimal noise pollution to neighbouring properties, Provision of a boundary fence to secure the property from trespassers. Sensitive treatments to boundaries where required. Access to cycle storage facilities for both students and staff. Sufficient parking provision that meets Swindon Borough Council Parking Standards. Separate secure parking provision for both staff and visitors.

Figure 78: Enclosed hard landscaped play area with natural survailance (Source: CABE)

Figure 79: Waiting space infront of school for parents waitng for thier children (Source: CABE)

Figure 80: Strong iconic school entrance with informal shelter (Source: CABE)

Figure 81: Sensative materials and elevations in relation to green context (Source: CABE)

Figure 82: Enclosed hard landscaped play area with natural survailance (Source: CABE) 37

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Document 5 Abbey Farm - Design and Access Statement

Abbey farm design & access statement (16 12 13)  
Abbey farm design & access statement (16 12 13)  
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